Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – October 2014

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Welcome to October 2014 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

Having traversed the topics of Non-Compliance and subsequent CAPA in our earlier editions, we now take a look at the next logical step in the chain – Continual Improvement.

Be it a student or a practitioner of Quality Management, the subject is certainly not new. Hence, we will endeavour to present here the articles that shed some new perspective on the subject.

What is CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT?Improvement that occurs in spurts that reoccur

CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT WITHIN THE QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS sets the tone for the subject.

Continual improvement

Continual improvement should focus on enablers such as leadership, communication, resources, organisation architecture, people and processes – in other words, everything in the organisation, in all functions at all levels… Departmental improvements may merely move the constraints or problem somewhere else in the process chain.

Improvement is not about using a set of tools and techniques. Improvement is not going through the motions of organising improvement teams and training people. Improvement is a result, so it can only be claimed after there has been a beneficial change in an organisation’s performance.

Why Continuous Improvement May Need To Be DiscontinuedRon Askenas

As innovation thinker Vijay Govindarajan says, “The more you hardwire a company on total quality management, [the more] it is going to hurt breakthrough innovation. The mindset that is needed, the capabilities that are needed, the metrics that are needed, the whole culture that is needed for discontinuous innovation, are fundamentally different.”

It’s time to nuance our approach in the following ways:

Customize how and where continuous improvement is applied. One size of continuous improvement doesn’t fit all parts of the organization.

Question whether processes should be improved, eliminated, or disrupted. Too many continuous improvement projects focus so much on gaining efficiencies that they don’t challenge the basic assumptions of what’s being done.

Assess the impact on company culture.

When Your Past Success Becomes An ObstacleKarol Kinsey Goman

One of the greatest challenges for a leader who wants his or her team to thrive in changing times is to identify those practices and attitudes that need to be eliminated in order to more quickly adopt new behaviors. Here are five key questions that you should ask your team members to consider:

1. What do we do best? (What skills, abilities, and attitudes are we most proud of?)

2. Which of these current skills, abilities, and attitudes will continue to make us successful in the future?

3. What do we need to unlearn? (Which skills are becoming obsolete? What practices — attitudes, behaviors, work routines, etc. — that worked for us in the past may be a detriment in the future?)

4. How does our competence stop us from doing things differently? (Where are the “comfort zones” we’re most reluctant to leave?)

5. What new skills do we need to learn to stay valuable to the organization?

You Are Either Getting Better Or You Are Getting Worse — Here’s How To Get Better – Paul B Brown

You have to keep getting better…Everyone acknowledges that–in theory.  In practice it tends to fall apart, ironically, when things are good…. Waiting until have to change is never good…. Far better is trying to improve slightly every single day.

The subject of Continual Improvement cannot be done enough justice if we address it in only one post in our Blog Carnival. So, we will continue in next two Carnival editions…..

We turn to our regular sections now:

Bill Troy, ASQ CEO opens up the debate on Charting A Strategy For Quality–And Beyond

“The purpose of strategy, after all, is to answer this question: How do you get from where you are to where you want to be?  What is your path?  How are you going to get there, what steps do you need to take, and in what order?

“I’d like to offer five key questions about strategy that you may find useful as you work on your own strategic planning.

  1. What are your key facts and assumptions?
  2. What is your theory of victory?
  3. Can you actually accomplish each aspect of your strategy?
  4. Is your organization doing things that sit outside your strategy?
  5. Have you left enough planning time to test your strategy?

“One caveat: Determine how much time you have to spend on strategy and act accordingly. We all must get things done, so we must not fall to “paralysis by analysis.” We can only admire the problem for so long. A good rule of thumb many of us learned in the military is the one-third, two-thirds rule”, i.e. leave two-thirds of the time to others for absorbing, implementing and improving upon the strategy.

Julia McIntosh, ASQ communications , in her ‘September Roundup: What’s the Best Approach to Strategy?’ presents views expressed by ASQ Bloggers on the subject.

And then move over to ASQ TV Episode s:

Quality Improves Government

Around the world, government agencies are using quality tools and implementing quality methods to make noticeable and sustainable improvements. This episode of ASQ TV looks at two positive stories, addressing the importance of quality in government. Manu Vora interview Milwaukee Public Health Lab

Related additional video:

               Manu Vora and V.K. Agnihotri advocate quality in government by discussing quality’s role in the government of India now and for the future.

Soft Skills-Leadership and Management

It’s one thing to know the ins and outs of your industry and profession. But you can’t be an effective leader and drive change in your field without soft skills. This episode of ASQ TV describes what soft skills are and how mastering them will help you get ahead in your day-to-day relationships and, ultimately, your career.

Rosemarie Christopher’s Career Corner columns

Related additional video:

According to author and speaker Simon T. Bailey, it’s important for leaders to also think big-picture to truly drive change. In this segment, hear how leaders should consider the story they’re telling, how they can sustain their leadership and what quality leaders can do to take initiative in their organizations. View Bailey’s 2014 World Conference on Quality and Improvement keynote speech, available on demand

To motivate employees and develop high-performing work relationships, leaders must understand that all people have certain needs that must be met in the workplace. In this segment, learn about the desires of each person to help you connect with people for meaningful work relationships and long-term productivity.

Our ASQ’s Influential Voice for the month is – John Priebe

clip_image001John Priebe is vice president of business quality for NBCUniversal and a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt with experience in process improvement, innovation, and quality control. He blogs at JohnPriebe.com with a headline tag as Innovation | Quality | Leadership.

A majority of the posts relate to discussions on the topics at ASQ Influential Voices, with quite few of the topics interspersed I between. Here is one such post: The Emergent Culture: Be the Change You Wish to See.. The article draws up a parallel with a natural biological phenomenon known as ‘emergent behaviour, in a flock of birds. Of course, in case of human beings, it is a long road, but the journey can well be begun by “be the change you wish to see in the world”.

We do not have a fresh insight this month in so far as Curious Cat Management Improvement Carnival category is concerned.

However , in such an event, we do pick up an interesting article posted recently. We pick up Take Advantage of the Strengths Each Person Brings to Work for our present edition.

clip_image002Managers should be setting up the organization to take maximum advantage of the strengths of the people in the organization while minimizing the impact of weaknesses.

This needs a ‘refusing to fail’ attitude so as to ‘create a system that works and builds on the skills, ability and desire to do great work that your employees bring to work.’

W. Edwards Deming: “the aim of leadership is not merely to find and record failures of men, but to remove the causes of failure: to help people to do a better job with less effort.”

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey to continual improvement…………….

Wishing Very Happy Diwali festivities to all………

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music–September 2014

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Welcome to September, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

The entire August 2014 edition of our blog carnival was dedicated to the memories of Mohammad Rafi. As result, we had not been able to visit any of the other published post in that episode. We will make good those inadvertent omissions in the present episode.

We begin out tour of our regular blogs:

Hemant Kumar’s songs by SD Burman

Besides his own compositions, Hemant Kumar freely sang under other composers. SD Burman was one of the most important for him, making him the voice of Dev Anand – one of the big three – in many films. Continuing the series on SD Burman for various singers, SoY presents songs for Hemant Kumar as a tribute to the latter on his 25th death anniversary.(b. 16 June 1920; d. 26 September 1989).

Best Songs of 1951: Wrap Up 2

This is the part Two of the Wrap Up round on Best songs of 1951: And the winners are? . Part 1 has addressed wide ranging discussions on Male Playback Singers for the Year 1951. The ‘other’ female playback singers bring immense variety and several of them had their landmark songs in the year. As a result, this year SoY has taken up a separate post for ‘other’ (than Lata Mangeshakar) Female Playback Singers. .

Aao bachcho tumhein dikhayen jhanki….ki

Jagriti (1954), has a more or less mirror image on the other side as Bedari. Actor Ratan Kumar (Nazir Rizvi) was the common link, where he played the same role of a differently-abled nice boy, who reforms the wayward boy

Multiple Version Songs (18): Hindi-Telugu exchange [Guest article by Arunkumar Deshmukh]

His first guest article in the series on Multiple Version Songs was on Hindi-Marathi, naturally.  Arunji surprised everyone by an equally erudite article on Hindi – Kannada versions. The Hindi- Telugu exchange is equally rich and interesting.

Ten of my favourite ‘male pianist’ songs’ is a veritable collection of songs picturised on men sitting at pianos, a worthy sequel to women pianists .

That also gives us cause to recall an archived article – My favorite piano-songs, from the 50s and 60s that have at least one character “playing” the piano throughout the song. Even as some songs would get repeated in these three articles, the presentations offer a varied fare that whets our appetite of different perspectives.

August being the month of festivals, it was high time a post on Festival Songs that would collate songs relating to various festivals was eagerly awaited.

My Favourites: Letters in Verse resurrects the now forgotten art and passion of writing letters.

August 27 is the death anniversary of Mukesh. ‘Made for each other: Mukesh and Kalyanji-Anandji’ pays tribute to Mukesh, by exploring one of the very special associations he had had with some of the leading music directors of his era.

Coincidentally we also have an exclusive post – Kalyanji-Anandji, the immortal duo detailing their notable films, songs, achievements and key recognitions that highlight their versatile talent. The post also discusses their distinctive composing style and more importantly, highlight their personal nature and why they are immortal.

We now stray beyond our oft-tracked path and take a look at occasional marvels that one lands up in such journeys:

First Ghalib ghazal to be used in a film was ‘Aah ko chahiye ek umr asar hone tak’ was the first Mirza Ghalib ghazal to be used in a movie (Masoom – 1941).

Whilst on Cutting The Chai, we also join the (still continuing) celebration of 100 years of Indian Cinema @ 100 Years of Indian Cinema: India Post’s 50 commemorative stamps.

This is also a diamond jubilee year of 1964 film Dosti, which is rightly commemorated @ Dukh To Apana Saathi Hai – Sushil Kumar.

And as coincidences would have, we landed upon The spirituality in Hindi Film songs, which also talks about immortal songs, of this 1964 movie, Dosti’, penned by inimitable Majrooh Sultanpuri and sung in the angelic voice of Mohammed Rafi”.

We have been a given an excellent lead for very unusual wealth of information in terms of several articles @ Scroll.in . Here is one example - A reminder for the Scots: India has a thriving bagpipe tradition too – Folk troupes in the country’s Garhwal region, especially those that play for weddings, often include a bagpiper. – by Mridula Chari.

Similarly Suresh Chandvankar, the Honorary Secretary of Society of Indian Record Collectors and the Editor of The Record News, the annual journal of the Society has contributed Marathi and English articles on the 78 rpm era to various periodicals, newspapers and websites. We take up one of the several articles for this edition, and will take up at least one article in each our subsequent editions.

Mimicry and comic songs from the dawn of the recording era in India – European recording companies scoured India looking for interesting sounds and songs, between 1902 to 1908.

We have a very interesting fare from our friend Bhagwan Thavrani :

In our regular ending of the carnival, we have “3-G: Great Lyrics, Grand Music and Golden Voice in Indian Cinema by Sri Biman Baruah , information shared by Sri Binu Nair, Founder, Rafi Foundation, Mumbai listing Mohammed Rafi solos written by Hasrat Jaipuri and filmed on different Actors:

Year Film Song Music Actor
1961 Jab Pyar Kisi Se Hota Hai Teri Zulfon Se Judaee Tu Nahin Mangi Thi Shankar Jaikishan Dev Anand
1962 Asli Naqli Chheda Mera Dil Ne Tarana Tere Pyar Ka Shankar Jaikishan Dev Anand
1963 Tere Ghar Ke Samne Dil Ka Bhanwar Kare Pukar, Pyar Ke Raag Suno Re S.D. Burman Dev Anand
1968 Duniya Falsafa Pyar Ka Tum Kya Jano, Tumne Kabhi Pyar Na Kiya Shankar Jaikishan Dev Anand
1964 Aayee Milan Ki Bela Tum Kamsin Ho, Nadaan Ho Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1965 Arzoo Aye Phoolon Ki Raani Baharoon Ki Malka Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1966 Suraj Chehere Pe Giri Zulfen Kehdo Tu Utha Do Main Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1968 Jhuk Gaya Aasman Kaun Hai Jo Sapnon Mein Aaya Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1961 Junglee Ehsaan Tera Hoga Mujh Par Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1962 Professor Aye Gul Badan Aye Gulbadan Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1964 Rajkumar Is Rang Badalti Duniya Mein Insaan Ki Niyaat Thik Nahin Hai Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1969 Tumse Accha Kaun Hai Janam Janam Ke Saath Nibhane Ko Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1966 Gaban Ehshan Mere Dil Pe Tuhmare Hain Dostoon, Yeh Dil Tuhmare Pyar Ka Shankar Jaikishan Sunil Dutt
1970 Bhai-Bhai Mere Mehbbob Tere Dam Se Bahar Aaye Shankar Jaikishan Sunil Dutt
1965 Gumnaam Ek Ladki Hai Jisne Jina Muskil Kar Diya Shankar Jaikishan Manoj Kumar
1964 Ziddi Teri Surat Se Nahin Milti Kisi Ki Surat S. D. Burman Joy Mukherjee
1966 Love In Tokyo Aaja Re Aa Jara Lehrake Aa Jara Shankar Jaikishan Joy Mukherjee
1964 April Fool Meri Mohabbat Paak Mohabbat Aur Jahan Ki Shankar Jaikishan Biswajeet
1972 Shararat Dil Ne Pyar Kiya Hai Ek Bewafa Se Ganesh Biswajeet
1968 Mere Huzoor Rukh Se Zara Naqab Utha Do Mere Huzoor Shankar Jaikishan Jeetendra
1969 Pyar Hi Pyar Main Kahin Kavi Na Ban Jaoon Shankar Jaikishan Dharmendra
1973 Naina Hum Ko Tu Jaan Se Pyaari Shankar Jaikishan Shashi  Kapoor

This is certainly not an exhaustive list. We will try to make good the misses in due course of time.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – September 2014

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Welcome to September 2014 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

Our topic for the blog carnival edition of August 2014 was Corrective and Preventive Action [CAPA]. Among other things one very vital element in designing, planning and implementing CAPA is Root Cause Analysis.

For our present edition we will delve deeper into this subject.

We begin our search with what Wikipedia has to say:

A root cause is an initiating cause of a causal chain which leads to an outcome or effect of interest.

In plain English a “root cause” is a “cause” (harmful factor) that is “root” (deep, basic, fundamental, underlying or the like).

The term root cause has been used in professional journals as early as 1905.

Ivan Fantin (2014) describes the root cause as the result of the drill down analysis required to discover which is the process that is failing, defining it as “MIN Process” (meaning a process that is Missing, Incomplete or Not followed .

Mark Paradies looks at various elements of the Definition of a Root Cause @ Root Cause Analysis Blog

The most basic cause (or causes)
that can reasonably be identified
that management has control to fix and,
when fixed, will prevent
(or significantly reduce the likelihood of)
the problem’s recurrence.

The salient aspects that emerge from this definition are:

First, when one finds a root cause, one has found something that management can fix that will prevent the problem’s recurrence. This is a key because it keeps one looking until a fixable solution can be found.

Second, the definition targets problems that are within management’s grasp to fix.

Third, the definition helps answer the always troubling question of how much investigative effort is enough.

Fourth, the definition implies that a problem may have more than one root cause.

Moreover, a root cause has these identifying characteristics:

1. It is clearly a major cause of the problem symptoms.

2. It has no productive deeper cause. The word “productive” allows you to stop asking why at some appropriate point in root cause analysis. Otherwise you may find yourself digging to the other side of the planet.

3. It can be resolved. Sometimes it’s useful to include unchangeable root causes in your model for greater understanding. These have only the first two characteristics.

4. Its resolution will not create bigger problems. Side effects must be considered.

5. There is no better root cause. All alternatives have been considered.

Root cause analysis is an approach for identifying the underlying causes of why an incident occurred so that the most effective solutions can be identified and implemented.  It’s typically used when something goes badly, but can also be used when something goes well.  Within an organization, problem solving, incident investigation and root cause analysis are all fundamentally connected by three basic questions:  What’s the problem? Why did it happen? and What will be done to prevent it?

ASQ considers Root cause analysis as a collective term that describes a wide range of approaches, tools, and techniques used to uncover causes of problems.

ASQ Fellow Jim Rooney walks through the basics of root cause analysis:

Part 1:   A Conceptual Overview

Part 2:  Practical Application

What is Root Cause Analysis?’ covers ‘The origin of root cause analysis; Understanding root cause analysis; and The Future: Inductive, Intuitive, and Automated RCA’

“DevOps teams often spend far too much time treating recurring symptoms without penetrating to the deeper roots of software and IT issues, making the extra effort to solve problems at their source.  But as every doctor knows, plenty of time and money can actually be saved by figuring out exactly why problematic symptoms appear in the first place.  Approaching problems with an eye to unearthing such basic casual factors is called root cause analysis, and, as in the case of the smart doctor, it can greatly aid your efforts as a system administrator, developer, or QA professional to prevent a lot of unnecessary suffering.”

The site also offers Further Resources

Root Cause Analysis – Tracing a Problem to its Origins notes that “you can use many tools to support your Root Cause Analysis process. Cause and Effect Diagrams and 5 Whys are integral to the process itself, while FMEA and Kaizen help minimize the need for Root Cause Analysis in the future.”

Root Cause Analysis (RCA) investigation :

Every day a million people are treated safely and successfully in the NHS.

However, when incidents do happen, it is important that lessons are learned  to prevent the same incident occurring elsewhere. Root Cause Analysis investigation is a well recognised way of doing this.

Investigations identify how and why patient safety incidents happen. Analysis is used to identify areas for change and to develop recommendations which deliver safer care for our patients.

RCA investigation resources:

Tools to help with the investigations process:

§ Getting started

§ Gathering and mapping information

§ Identifying care and service delivery problems

§ Analysing to identify contributory factors and root causes

§ Generating solutions

§ Log, audit and learn from investigation reports

Templates to record and share investigation findings:

§ Investigation report writing templates

§ Action plan templates

§ Other useful templates

Guidance : Background information and ‘how to’ guides

eToolkit : A framework for NHS investigations

We also have

Root Cause Analysis for Beginners”

Root Cause Analysis – McCombs School of Business

Finally, Root Cause Analysis of the Failure of Root Cause Analysis is not recommending to abandon root cause analysis and Five Whys, but exhorts to realize that no technique should be automatically applied in every situation.

Before we stop for day, a satirical insight is indeed called for:

May 01, 1994

Dilbert May 01, 1994

November 02, 1994

clip_image002[176]

October 29, 2007

Dilbert October 29, 2007

 

November 04, 2008

clip_image002

We turn to our regular sections now:

In “The Future of Quality: Evolutionary or Revolutionary?, ’ Bill Troy, ASQ CEO has set the stage for a lively debate in the days ahead and looks forward to reporting what he would see and hear from the quality professionals, whom he exhorts by “who hold the keys to our future in your hands”.

Julia McIntosh, ASQ communications reports in Blogger Round Up for August 2014, What’s The Future of Quality?, that the Influencing Voice blogging community is well distributed in for “Evolutionary” and for “Revolutionary, with fairly representative share of “Both / And” as well as “Other” views. The article ends up with a defining statement from Michael Noble : “…that ultimately change will not be driven just from within the professional community because the real driver of change comes from public demand on one issue or another.”

And then move over to ASQ TV Episode : Creating a Safer Food Supply explore how food safety standards and schemes ensure the safety of our food supply

· Examine the difference between ISO 9001 and ISO 22000

· Apples to Oranges?

Related videos :

  • Conversation With a Food Safety Consultant
  • A deeper look at HACCP and ISO 22000
  • The Lighter Side: A Chef’s Unique Approach to Standards

We have one more video this month: The Culture Craze :“Think your organization has a quality culture because employees faithfully use approaches and methods to improve processes? Think again. In this episode of ASQ TV, we learn the distinction between culture and compliance, and we review key culture findings from a global study by Forbes Insights and ASQ. We also look at ways to “millennialize” your workplace.

Our ASQ’s Influential Voice for the month is Nicole Radziwill

clip_image001Nicole Radziwill is an assistant professor in the Department of Integrated Science and Technology at James Madison University. She writes about research in the quality field, quality consciousness, and innovation. 100% of the proceeds from her consulting support the Burning Mind Project. She also enjoys references to quality in fiction & drama. Her blog is Quality and Innovation, exploring quality, productivity & innovation in socio-technical systems.

Here are some of the recent posts on the blog:

We do not have a fresh insight this month in so far as Curious Cat Management Improvement Carnival category is concerned.

However , in such an event, we do pick up an interesting article posted recently. We pick up Peter Drucker Discussing The Work of Juran, Deming and Himself for our present edition.

“All 3 of us knew quality doesn’t cost, and accounting was a snare and a delusion because it hides the cost of not doing… cost accounting doesn’t measure these things.”

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey …………….

Bizarre old Indian ads

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Old advertisements are a window to another world, at once familiar and strange. The copy might sound as if it has been plucked out of a contemporary sales pitch or the product could be one of those undying ones that refuse to fall out of fashion.

And then there are ads that were bizarre in their own times and have not been improved by the passing of years. Here is a selection of advertisements you would never see today from Cutting the Chai, a blog run by Delhi-based journalist Soumyadip Choudhary since 2005.

1410088993-760_Old-ads---tiger

Please read more in the article  “Bizarre old Indian ads: Gandhi’s hair oil, a government invitation to hunt tigers and more” @ Scroll.in

Garfield Sobers became the first cricketer to smash 6-sixes in an over, on this day -19680903

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music–August 2014–Part II

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Welcome to Part II of August, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We had broken down the present edition in the two parts to make the posts reasonably presentable.

In the first part of the article, we have has a d detailed look at arrange of sols under a range of music directors across the entire spectrum of Mohammad Rafi’s active career as well his duets with S D Burman.

We now move on…….

We take up one more post which looks at Mohammad Rafi’s solo songs, from the archives of Dusted off, for a detailed listing of the song..

Rafi in Ten Moods showcases the breathtaking versatility of this man and his voice in these ten songs.

Cynical: Yeh duniya agar mil bhi jaaye Pyaasa
Devotional: Man tarpat Hari darshan ko aaj Baiju Bawra
Exuberant: Duniya paagal hai ya phir main deewaana Shagird
Patriotic: Yeh desh hai veer jawaanon ka Naya Daur
Romantic: Deewaana hua baadal Kashmir ki Kali
Comic: Jangal mein mor naacha Madhumati
Melancholic: Dekhi zamaane ki yaari Kaagaz ke Phool
Seductive: Aaja re aa zara aa Love in Tokyo
Philosophical:  Man re tu kaahe na dheer dhare Chitralekha
Empathetic: Tukde hain mere dil ke Mere Sanam

Part I spurred Rafi in Ten Moods – Part II, which also needs to be tied up here:

Philosophical: Aaj puraani raahon se, Aadmi
Gloomy/Sad: Aye mere dost aye mere humdum, Meherbaan
Devotional: Insaaf ka mandir hai, Amar
Lovesick: Aanchal mein sajaa lena kaliyaan, Phir Wohi Dil Laya Hoon
Classical: Madhuban mein radhika naache re, Kohinoor
Heroic/Royal: Hoshiyaar! jaanewaale zara hoshiyaar, Raj Kumar
Praise/Taareef: Salaam aap ki meethi Boyfriend
Adoring: Yeh teri saadgi yeh tera baankpan, Shabnam
Patriotic: Jahaan daal daal par, Sikander-E-Azam
Romantic: Door reh kar na karo baat, Amaanat

We now again turn back to Mohammad Rafi in duets with female as well male singers in The Legends: Mohammed Rafi – Part 2. Each of the song is supplemented by a second choice as well, to which we have added choices by the readers.

With Lata Mangesgkar
Aansoo Husnlal Bhagatram Sun meri saajna re 1953
Maya Salil Chuadhary Tasveer teri dil mein 1961
Piya Milan Ki Aas S N Tripathi Tune Chhal Kiya
Dil Tera Diwana Shanker Jaikishn Mujhe kitna pyar hai tumse 1962
With Asha Bhosle
Banarasi Thug Iqbal Quereshi Aaj mausam ki masti 1962
Phir Wohi Dil Laya Hoon O P Nayyar Nazneen bada rangeen hai 1963
Chah Cha Cha Iqbal Quereshi Ek chameli ke mandve tale 1964
Kashmir Ki Kali O P Nayyar Deewana Hua Badal
Tu Hi Meri Zindagi Rono Mukherji Jidhar bhi main dekhun 1965
With Geeta Dutt
Aar Paar O P Nayyar Arre na na na na na na tauba tauba 1954
Mr. & Mrs. 55 O P Nayyar Udhar tum haseen ho 1955
Bade Sarkar O P Nayyar Jahan Jahan Khayal 1957
12 O’clock O P Nayyar Dekh idhar ae haseena 1958
With Noorjehan
Jugnu Feroz Nizami Yahan badla wafa ka 1947
With Shamshad Begum
Chandani Raat Naushad Chheen ke dil kyun pher li aankhen 1949
Kaise baje dil ka sitar
Sindbad The Sailor Chitragupt Adaa se jhoomte huye 1952
Sawan Hansraj Behl Bheega bheega pyar ka sama 1959
Rail Ka Dibba Ghulam Mohammad La de mohe balma aasmani 1953
Aag Ram Ganguly Solah baras ki bhayee umariya 1948
Wih Suraiya
Dastan Naushad Ta ra ri a ra ri 1950
Shama Parwana Ghulam Mohammad Beqarar sa koi 1954
With Suman Kalyanpur
Black Cat N Dutta Nashe Mein Hum 1959
Shagoon Khayyam Parbaton ke pedon par 1964
Jee Chahta Hai Kalyanji Anandji Ae jaan-e-tamanna
Bheegi Raat Roshan Aise ta no dekho 1965
Mohabbat Isko Kahete Hain Khayyam Thaheriye hosh mein
Brahmchari Shanker Jaikishan Aaj kal tere mere pyar ke charche 1968
With Sudha Malhotra
Detective Mukul Roy Aankhon pe bharosa mat kar 1958
With Lalita Deolkar
Saajan C Ramchandra Humko tumhara hi Aashara 1947
With Aarti Mukherjee
Boy Friend Shanker Jaikishan Aigo Aigo yeh kya ho gaya 1961
With Usha Khanna
Daku Mangal Sinh Usha Khanna Sone ke tere 1966
With Talat Mahmood
Sushila C Arjun Gham ki andheri raat mein  1966
With Kishore Kumar
Akalmand O P Nayyar Do Akalmand do fikarmand 1966
Chupke Chupke S D Burman Sa re ga ma 1975
With Manna Dey
Parvarish Dattaram Mama o mama 1958
Sachai Shanker Jaikishan Ae Dost Maine Duniya Part I 1969
Part II
Part III
With Mukesh
Do Jasoos Ravindra Jain Do jasoos kare mehsoos 1975
With Chitalkar
Sagai C Ramchandra Haseenon ki gaadi mein 1951
With S D Batish
Chand Ki Duniya S D Batish Hoke rocket pe sawaar 1959

We will also take a brief look at some more articles for the archives of several other blogs. Each of the article does merit a very detailed look in :

We do agree that what we have covered is hardly a drop from the ocean of facts, fictions and reviews written about Mohammed Rafi, during and after his lifetime.

That is the beauty of Rafi saga- after you have said everything you wanted to say, there is still so much left to say…….

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music–August 2014–Part I

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Welcome to Part I of August, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

31st July is the anniversary of Mohammed Rafi. So, we will devote this entire edition exclusively to what is published on the occasion.

For the present edition have three articles form that two of our regular blogs and one for the archives of another of our regular blog which have full length articles to commemorate the day. Each of these articles, and the discussions thereon, have been so rich in the selection of the songs that we will move away from our regular pattern of briefly visiting the content of the post, collate the songs form the post and the discussions and list of each of the song individually. However, for the other articles, we would follow our usual practice.

Our first call is The Legends: Mohammed Rafi.

The post has narrated each of the song in the descending order of the year in which the film was released. Therefore, we have added up and arranged the listing of the songs referred to in the discussion in similar fashion.

Year: 1947
C Ramchandra Saajan Humko tumhara hi Aashara
Year: 1949
Naushad Dulari Suhani raat dhal chuki
Year: 1954
Ghulam Mohammed Mirza Ghalib Hai bas ke har ek
Husnlal Bhagatram Shama Parwana Tu ne mera yaar
Year: 1956
Shankar-Jaikishen Basant Bahar Duniya na bhaye mohe
O P Nayyar Chhoomantar Garib Janke Humko Na Tum
Year: 1957
Hansraj Behl Changez Khan Mohabbat zinda rehti hai
O P Nayyar Tum Sa Nahin Dekha Jawaniyan yeh mast mast bin piye
O P Nayyar Naya Daur Aana Hai To Aa
Dattaram Ab Dilli Door Nahin Chun Chun Karti Aayi Chidiyan
Year: 1958
Salil Choudhary Madhumati Toote hue khwabon ne
S D Burman Kala Pani Ham bekhudi mein tum ko
Year 1959
Usha Khanna Dil Deke Dekho Hum aur tum aur ye sama
Year: 1960
S N Tripathi Lal Quila Lagta nahin hai dil mera ujde dayaar mein
Ravi Chaudhavi Ka Chand Ye Lucknow Ki Sar Zameen
S D Burman Bombai Ka Babu Saathi na koi manzil
Iqbal Quereshi Bindiya Main Apne Aap Se Gabhar Gaya Hun
Year: 1961
Khayyam Shola Aur Shabnam Jaane kya doondhte rehti hain
Naushad Ganga Jamuna Nain lad jai hein
N Datta Kala Samundar Meri Tasveer lekar kya karoge…
Salil Chaudhary Maya Koi Sone ke Dil wala
Year: 1962
Roshan Vallah Kya Baat Hai Gham-e-Hasti se beghana hota
S D Burman Baat Ek Raat Ki Akela hoon main
Year: 1963
S D Burman Tere Ghar Ke Samne Tu kahan ye bata
Pt. Ravi Shankar Godaan Pipra ke patwa
Laxmikant Pyarelal Parasmani Roshan tumhi se duniya
N Dutta Gyrah Hazar Ladkiyan Dil ki tamanna thi (solo)
Dil Ki Tamanna thi…. (with Asha Bhosle)
Year: 1964
Roshan Chitralekha Man re tu kahe na dheer dhare
Kalyanji Anandji Ishaara Dil beqaraar sa hai
Iqbal Qureshi Cha Cha Cha Woh Hum Na Thi Woh Tum Na Thi
Madan Mohan Haqueequat Mein ye Soch kar uske dar se utha tha
C Arjun Punar Milan Paas baitho tabiyat behal jayegi,
Madan Mohan Sharabi Kabhi na Kabhi Kahin na kahin
Jaidev Hum Dono Main zindagi ka saath nibhata chala
S D Burman Ziddi Jaanu Kya Mera Dil
Year: 1965
Ravi Kaajal Choo lene do nazuk hothon ko
Chitragupt Akashdeep Mujhe dard-e-dil ka pata na tha
O P Nayyar Mere Sanam Pukarta chala hoon main
Shanker Jaikishan Raj Hath Aaye Bahar Ban Ke
G S Kohli Adventures of Robinhood Maana Mere Haseen Sanam
Year: 1966
Madan Mohan Dulhan Ek Raat Ki Ek haseen shaam ko
O P Nayyar Baharen Phit Bhji Aayegi Aap ke haseen rukh pe
R D Burman Teesri Manzil Deewana mujhsa nahin
Usha Khanna Shabanam Maine Rakha Hei Mohabbat
Chitragupt Oonche Log Jaag dil-e-diwana
Year: 1967
Laxmikant Pyarelal Chhaila Babu Tere pyar ne mujhe gham diya
R D Burman Bahaon Ke Sapne Jamaane ne maare jawaan kaise
Year: 1968
Laxmikant Pyarelal Mere Hamdam Mere Dost Hui sham unka khaya aa gaya
Roshan Anokhi Raat Mile na phool to katon se dosti karli
Year: 1977
Khayyam Shanker Hussain Kahin ek masum nazuk si ladki

And then we take up Rafi’s duets by SD Burman.

The total MF duets of Md.Rafi for S D Burman would be 39. Here is the break-up.

Pre 1957 – Lata Mangeshkar 1, Geeta Dutt 4, Total: 5
1957-67 – Lata Mangeshkar 6, Geeta Dutt 5, Asha Bhosle 17, Kamala Sista 1, Total 29
After 1967 – Lata Mangeshkar 4, Asha Bhosle 1, Total 5

In all, with Lata Mangeshkar 11, Geeta Dutt 9, Asha Bhosle 18, Kamala Sista 1, Total 39
One duet with Shamsad Begum for the unreleased film Sazaa not included.

We have rearranged the songs in the post as well as the songs in the discussions and grouped them with the accompanying female playback singer.

 

With Geeta Dutt
Naujawan 1951 Panghat pe dekho aayi milan ki bela
Zara Jhoom Le
Jeevan Jyoti 1953 Lag gayi akhiyan tumse mori
Pyasa 1957 Hum aapki ankhon mein is dil ko basa lein to
Kaala Baazar 1960 Rimjhim ke taraane le ke aayi barsaat
Ek Ke Baad Ek Batao kya karungi
Manzil Chupke se mile pyaase do dil
Miyan Bibi Razi Tune Le Liya Hai
With Asha Bhosle
Nau Do Gyarah 1957 Aaja panchchi akela hai
Kala Pani 1958 Achchaji Main haari chalo maan jao
Insaan Jaag Utha 1959 Chand sa mukhada kyon sharamaya
Bombai Ka Babu 1960 Deewana Mastana Hua Dil
Manzil Dil to hai deewana na
Baat Ek Raat Ki Jo hai deewane pyar ke
Sheeshe ka ho ya paththar ka dil
Kaise Kahoon 1964 Kisi ki muhabbat mein
Dr. Vidya Yoon hans hans ken a dekho
With Lata Mangeshkar
Ek Nazar 1951 Mujhe preet nagariya hai
Tere Ghar Ke Samne 1963 Dekho rootha na karo
Dr. Vidya 1964 Main kal phir miloongi
Jwel Thief 1967 Dil Pukare Aare Aare
Talash 1969 Palkon ke peechche se tumne kya
Ishq Par Zor Nahin 1970 Ye dil deewana hai
With Kamla Sista
Miya Bibi Raazi 1964 Paani hota doob jaati
With Suman Kalyanpur and S D Batish
Kaise Kahoon 1964 Manmohan man mein ho tumhi

We have two more articles which also deserve a similar full scale drill-down. However, in order to maintain the normal length of a post, we have taken up those two articles in the immediately following part -2 of this post.

Before we close, we would record some of the archived posts for this part of the article:

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