Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – July 2014

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Welcome to July, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

For the period of the current edition of the Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music, we have birth anniversaries of two music directors whose work apparently spans two ends of the spectrum of Golden Period.

We take up the first chronological end – Anil Biswas.

Remembering Anil Biswas, The SingerA tribute on Anil Biswas’s Birth Centenary (b. 7 July 1914; d. 31 May 2003)

“Songs of Yore heralded 2014 as the Year of Anil Biswas with Inaugural post by his daughter, Shikha Biswas Vohra – Anil Biswas: The Maestro and My Father. We have since had three more posts dedicated to him with his songs for Suraiya, Talat Mahmood, and his sister, Parul Ghosh…… Therefore, in our tribute to the Bhishm Pitamah in his Centenary Year, it is important to remember him as a singer too.”

The Maker of Mukesh: Anil Biswas’s opening paints a very vivid picture of the role of Anil Biswas – a Guru (of those days), in general, and the extent to which he would take pains for his passion – the music. While continuing the Centenary Tributes to Anil Biswas, SoY pays a very special tribute to Mukesh as well on his 91st birth anniversary (on 22nd July).

The Masters: Sajjad Hussain quite vividly portrays the nuances of Sajjad’s music. “According to his son, the principled musician had no regrets or bitterness. He had lived life on his own terms, and had been admired as a musician par excellence by his contemporaries. History deals with him kindly as well, recognising the talent that preferred to remain unused but would never compromise. The body of work that he left behind has delighted music connoisseurs for generations, and it will continue to do so for as long as there are people who listen to Hindi film music from the golden age.”

Bulo C Rani – Phoolon Se Hum Shikhenge , Fariyad Na Karana, Ro Lena presents a bouquet of songs by one of the highly meritorious music directors of the Golden Period who could never hit the commercial success. The article is in Gujarati, but that should not come in the way of enjoying the melodies presented therein.

Atul’s Bollywood Song A Day– With Full Lyrics has crossed a great milestones of publishing 10,000 songs. To commemorate the event, several regular guest writers have contributed a post on this occasion. Visiting these posts is a subject by itself, which we would take up separately.

Forgotten Melodies (Part 2) – Sweet Melodies From My Father’s Films.

“When I did my previous post I was more or less sure about the songs that I would select for this post. I decided then that my next post would be a selection of songs that have struck a chord in my heart and songs that I have just liked because of the sweet melody and of course the lyrics.” The first part of the article – Forgotten Melodies (Part 1) – My Favourite Dance Sequences From My Father’s Films – has appeared in June 2014 episode of our Blog Carnival.

Kamal Hai?! Bindiya Songs has five songs but all of them relate to period beyond the extended end of our time scale. But Anu Warrier (Conversations over Chai) has added Khanke Kangnaa Bindiya Hanse , Lata Mangeshkar – S D Burman – Dr Vidya [1962] among others in her comment.

Makeover of the filmi doormats lists of five filmi doormats – Jameela in Chaudavi Ka Chand (1961)[ Badle, badle mere sarkar nazar aate hai]; Simran in Dilwale Dulahaniya Le Jaayendge (1995); Anjali in Kuchch Kuchch Hota Hai (1998); Lalita in Parineeta (1953 ) and (2005) and Chandramukhi in Devdaas (1935 ), (1955 ) and (2002).

Music, fantasy and colour in V Shantaram’s Navrang narrates ‘over-the-top explosions of colour and classical music in Hindi-film history’.

A Song For The Day is “a personal favorite” in as much as “the song stands for a sense of energy that accompanies longing and loneliness and infuses ephemeral pathos which depending on one’s mood may well turn out to be lasting.” The song neing discussed here is: Jab Chali Thandi Hawa, Jab Uthi Kaali Ghata, Mujhko Aye Jaan-e-Wafa Tum Yaad Aaye – Do Badan (1966) – Asha Bhosle – Ravi.

Kyunki Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq ‘discovers’ the quawaali by Mubarak Ali Khan – Na Tu But Kade Ke Talab. Nusrat Ali Hateh Khan has also rendered this quawalli in his very unique style. And now let us listen what we have always loved to listen – Na To Carvaan Ki Talaash Hai

SoY has also commenced Best songs of 1951: Wrap Up 1 – The article goes on to sum up contributions by the readers and then presents – Songs of Yore Award for the best Male Playback Singer of 1951 goes to Talat Mahmood, and the best song is Meri yaad mein tum na aansoo bahana. Mukesh is given Jury’s Special Honour.

To end the current edition we will take up 75th Birthday (26th June) tribute articles –

However, I would like to recall his first two films only:

The Second one ….Bhoot Bangala (1965 )

And the First.. Chhote Nawab (1961)

And you guessed it right… these songs are also our tribute to Mohammed Rafi as well…..

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – June 2014

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Welcome to June, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We begin our carnival with visits to our regular blogs:

Suraiya’s songs by SD Burman

“Since SD Burman made his debut late, his songs for Suraiya are much less compared to, say, Naushad’s, but as was his wont, he had a talent to create something for every singer, which would easily rank among his/her landmark songs, even if we just count Man more hua matwala and Nain deewane, Suraiya’s songs by SD Burman have a place among her greatest songs.”

Songs of Yore completes four years – With a tribute to Juthika Roy

Juthika Roy“Born in 1920, she sang her first song on the radio at the age of 7, which was a Rabindra Sangeet, Aar dekhona, andhaare aamaay dekhate daao. Her first HMV record was of two Bengali songs, which was followed by two Meera bhajans in Hindi in 1935-36. She became synonymous with Meera bhajans and achieved enormous popularity during the 40s through 50s. Kamal Dasgupta composed most of her songs, with whom she also sang a number of duets, including some naats and qawwalis.”

Shri Arunkumar Deshamukh has also guest-written an article on Juthika Roy – Mandir ho har kadam pe pooja ho subah shaam@ atul’s bollywood song a day- with full lyrics. The song presented here is a duet of Juthika Roy with Kamal Dasgupta.

Whilst on the subject of Juthika Roy, let us also enjoy Juthika Roy’s interview on Vividh Bharati, on 25th February 2009 @ Anmol Fankar.

The incredible brother-sister in music: Anil Biswas’s songs for Parul Ghosh

“Her swan song in films was in Aandolan (1951) – Vande Mataramwith Manna Dey and Sudha Malhotra, composed by Pannalal Ghosh. She sang about 100 songs in all in 25 films. She died on August 13, 1977 after prolonged illness in Bombay. The song list (not exhaustive) at Cineplot shows that she sang for most of the top composers of the time, but her most famous songs are by his brother.”

Ten of my favourite Sunil Dutt songs is the collection of solo songs Sunil Dutt sings on the screen. The list does not contains only song from a given film.

Twin Songsare true back-to-back songs, songs that segue into each other with no dialogues or scenes in between. The compilation presents 14 sets of such songs in one go, which one can be listen here too.

Forgotten Melodies (Part 1) – My Favourite Dance Sequences From My Father’s Filmscaptures some of more favoured dance sequences from films in which Tarun Bose has played a role.

Lively songs from Naushad“is devoted to the multitude of lively songs that Naushad composed through the 1940s, 50s and 60s.Lively here does not “mean only songs that celebrate joy or abandon”. It also includes “songs that have a (relatively) lively and attractive pace when compared to slow, brooding songs. Some of his lively songs may actually be sad situations. But the songs may be lively with a relatively fast tempo or with lyrics, expressions or situations that appear cheerful!.” For an uninterrupted listening, do use this playlist.

We now turn to the archives of the other blogs and articles:

4 June was the birthday of Nutan. We recall Nutan’s Biography, and supplement it with Lady Nutan, wherein very interesting aspects of her life have been presented. The article has sourced a good deal of material from Cineplot.

Jaikishan – The Eternal Prince of Hindi Film Music is an exclusive interview with Bhairavi Jaikishan, daughter of famed Jaikishan of Shanker Jaikishan duo. – “Listen to the soulful Rafi number ‘Yaad Na Jaaye Beete Dinonki” from Dil Ek Mandir. And listen to the Spanish ‘original’ Besame Mucho and one is left awestruck! The feel is similar but to the Indian ear – it is the pathos of the SJ-Rafi rendition which touches the heart! This was a typical Jaikishan characteristic.”

Evolution of the Hindi film song (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5 and Part 6) traces the way Hindi Film Sings evolved. Presented here are some excerpts:

“We saw the late 30s and early 40s responsible for the entry of singers such as GM Durrani, Arun Kumar, Parul Ghosh, Zohra Ambala, Amirbai Karnataki, Rajkumari, Shamshad Begum and Suraiya. Now a newer generation of singers followed them. Among the male singers, Shankar Rao Vyas introduced Manna Dey with Ram Rajya in 1943, Naushad introduced Mohd. Rafi to Hindi films with Pehle Aap in 1944 and Anil Biswas introduced Mukesh in Pehli Nazar in 1945. Of these perhaps the most important talent was undoubtedly Mohd. Rafi.

“While Rafi, Mukesh and Kishore Kumar went on to rule the Hindi Film Industries from the 1950s, there were other male playback singers whose contribution could not be denied – Manna Dey, Talat Mehmood and Hemant Kumar….. Meanwhile the 1940s had also thrown up some of the best female talent in playback singing – Meena Kapoor, Asha Bhosle, Geeta Dutt and of course the one and only Lata Mangeshkar…”

And now, we move over to our regular Mohammad Rafi-related video clips and articles:

Mohammed Rafi – VOA Tribute – Rare interview and his own selection of songs -

The special program is a joint production of the staffers of VOA Urdu Service and the VOA English division. This is based on a rare interview of the legendary Bollywood singer, Mohammad Rafi, recorded during one of his visits to London in 1977 by Subhash Vohra of VOA English, who was then working for the BBC Hindi Service. This program, devoted to the memories of Rafi, also includes his own selection of songs.
You can also listen to very intimate observations of the famed Bollywood personality, Ameen Sayani, who is still adored in South Asia for his masterly music presentation over several decades.

My Abba - A MemoirYasmin Khalid Rafi, daughter-in-law of Mohammed Rafi published her book- Mohammed Rafi – My Abba, A Memoire. In a review of the book on “Outlook”, With A Song on His Lips, Sathya Saran has this to state – “Few sang as Rafi sang, few touched so many as he did. A mellow, melancholy memoir recalls a master we don’t know.”

We have chosen to remain brief and focused in this episode. How would you to react to this style?

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – May 2014

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Welcome to May 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

This month many of our regular blogs that we visit seem to have turned on to film reviews. Well, that provides us a good opportunity to test wider oceans.

Husnlal-Bhagatram – The ‘First’ Composer Duo – pens the narrative of the origin and rise of Husnlal – Bhagatram…. The duo is fond of fast pace, actualized mainly through dholak and employment of atonal drums such as matka or idiophones such as ghunghroo, etc.” …Another aspect of their composing style .. is that “they make a musical statement which consists of successive song-lines with a descending and repetitive tonal contours”, which “appears to resolve the melody into completeness and it seems easier to remember” and “very few notes are used in those lines”. …..

One style feature that makes many of Husnlal-Bhagatram’s fast-paced songs catchy and instantly likeable is their tendency to punctuate the melody lines with very short and catchy orchestral phrases as a trigger for repetition of words or line, or by inserting short pauses at the end of a mukhda or antara before the rhythm moves forward. There are many examples to illustrate this point but… here are two songs that .. can be easily identified as Husnlal-Bhagatram creations.

The first example is Suraiya’s popular ‘tere nainon ne chori kiya’ from ‘Pyar Ki Jeet (1948). The pause after ‘tere nainon ne’ is filled with a brief flute piece that becomes such an integral part of the tune that if you try humming the tune, that flute piece would instantly play in your mind. …………The other example is Lata’s ‘tum dil ko tod doge’ from ‘Farmaaish’ (1953). The prelude itself is enough for one to identify it as their creation, but look at the rest of the composition. The first line is broken right at the middle and filled with a music piece, then at the end of the line comes another music piece before the line is repeated in exactly the same manner. In the antaras, a similar approach is followed, although the musical punctuation is used at the end of each line and a lovely pause is introduced at the end of the cross-line.”

We have A lovely Mohammed Rafi – Suraiya duet from Sanam (1951), composed by Husnlal Bhagatram, Mohammed Rafi singing for Dev Anand and Suraiya singing for herself.

KHURSHEED BANO … Barso re .. Tansen.. A Forgotten songKursheed and Suraiya were the two singing actresses of Mumbai Film-world who have shared the honours with the renowned singer K.L. Saigal. This talented and famous actress/singer of the thirties and the forty’s, Khurshid Bano rested in peace on 18th April 2001 in Karachi, at the age of 87 years and thus an era of talent in terms of acting/singing in the film industry finally came to an end.

In Melody Makers of Yesteryears (Unforgettable melodies) – part 1, usha manohartakes up “Chitragupt, Sardar Mallik and Narayan Dutta who were not often approached by any of the top movie makers like Bimal Roy, Nasir Hussain, Guru Dutt , Raj Kapoor or Mehboob Khan, but nonetheless they did make an impact, and once in a while did get a chance to work with some top film makers. Whenever they composed music for any film, they came out with some of the most melodious and meaningful compositions .

In Part 2she takes up Dattaram, G S Kohli and Sapan Jagamohan.

In Part 3, Ajit Merchant, Iqbal Quereshi and Bipin Babul have been covered in details.

Fascinating True Story Of A Lata Mangeshkar Song Born in A Los Angeles Music Shop narrates a very interesting story of a song which later in the same year (1958) Salil Chwdury composed – a classical Bengali song in Raag Khamaj (Carnatic-Hari Kambhoji) using the lovely Sur Bahar Sitar, David Bernard (of that LA music shop) gifted him in Los Angeles.. Sitar is the only musical instrument that is predominantly heard in the orchestration of this entire private song.. Perhaps this is also the only song in the Indian music history today wherein only Sitar is heard throughout a song..This Bengali song, is “..Naa jeo naa rajani ekhono baki..aaro kichhu dite baki.. bole raatjaaga pakhi..” was sung by the legendary Lata Mangeshkar..and its Hindi version “O Sajana barkhaa bahaar aayee..Ras ki phuhaar laayi.. Akhiyon mein pyar laayi..” (Parakh-1959).

Funny Hindi Songs – 20 Best Old Hindi Comedy Songs – “The other day I was watching the weekend show on Times Now which featured some of the best old Hindi comedy songs of yesteryear. Thus was the birth of this hub. They showed around 9 -11 songs as for the time constraint which every program on TV has. Here on the net, we don’t have any such time constraint, so I went ahead to compile a list of best 20 funny Hindi songs…..All these songs are excellently written and in one form or the other will give you a happy feeling. If the lyrics don’t evoke the laughing gases in you then do watch the video and shake a leg with it.”

We take a pause here in our charting of new waters.

Sickle Songs? Has listed three songs:

Aai Sawan Rut Ai – Mela (9148) – Mukesh, Shamshad Begum – Naushad

Naache Re Dharati Ke PyaareHeera Moti (1959) – Lata Mangeshkar, Hemant Kumar – Salil Chudhary [This is the only song composed by Salil Chaudhary, all others were composed by Roshan)

Aaj Meri Man Men Sakhi – Aan (1952) – Lata Mangeshkar and Chorus – Naushad

Does anyone have any more of the songs to add on to this subject?

Multiple Version Songs (16): Rabindra Sangeet and Pankaj Mullickis a very tribute to Gurudev Rabindranath Thakur (7 May 1861 – 7 August 1941) and Pankaj Mullick (10 May 1905 – 19 February 1978) by guest author N Venkataraman.

SoY has also released one more of Multiple Version Songs post — Multiple Versions Songs (17): Haunting Melodies in Different Moods And Settings — guest written by yours truly.

We have a very interesting two part article by Shrikant Guatam, in his regular weekly (Gujarati) column “RangRaag” in ‘Madhuvan’   supplement of Janmabhoomi Pravasi. The article has listed Exceptional Partnerships – that of a music director and a lyricist – in the world of Hindi Film Music and have provided songs such partnerships have germinated. Since recording each of the song in the article here would entail copying the whole article, I have listed here the Partnership and the film(s) in which they have collaborated:

Hemant Kumar Sahir Ludhianvi Girl Friend 1960
Majrooh Sultanpuri Ek Hi Rasta 1956
Gulzar Khamoshi 1969
S D Burman Gulzar Bandini 1963
[just one song – Mora Gora Ang Lai Le – Lata Mangeshkar; beginning the long innings that Gulzar played donning lyricist cap, among several others]
Madan Mohan Gulzar Mausam 1975
Sahir Ludhianvi Railway Platform 1955
Ghazal 1964
(jointly with Jai Dev) Laila Majnu 1976
Majrooh Sultanpuri Aakhari Dao 1958
Naushad Majrooh Sultanpuri Shajahan 1946
Andaz 1949
Saathi 1968
Roshan Neeraj Nai Umar Ki Nai Fasl 1965
Laxmikant Pyarelal Hasrat Jaipuri Chhaila Babu 1967
Kalyanji Anandji Sahir Ludhianvi Nanha Farishta 1969
Gulzar Purnima 1965
Majrooh Sultanpuri Ishara 1964
Hasrat Jaipuri Ghar Ghar Ki Kahani 1970

Both parts of the article, in Gujarati, can be read here and here.

This spurred me to re-look at an article on Shailendra’s filmography. Shailendra’s is a classic 80-20 Pareto Principle case – his great bulk of the work is with Shaker Jaikishan, followed by work with S D Burman and Salil Chaudhary and to fair extent with Roshan. Interestingly he has an equally impressive list of ‘exceptional partnerships’. Here are these gems:

Basant Prakash Badnaam 1952
Sapan Jagmohan Begana 1963
Ninu Majumdar Bhai Saaheb 1954
Robin Banerjee Massom 1960
Shailesh Mukherjee Savera 1958
Shivram Narayan Naya Kadam 1958
Chitragupta Kal Hamara Hai 1959
R D Burman Chhote Nawab 1961
Manohar Chingari 1955
Sudhir Kar Kaanch Ki Gudiya 1961
Shardul Kwatra Piple Saheb 1954
Tees Maar Khaan 1955
Kalyanji Anandji Satta Bazar 1959
Kishore Kumar Door Gagan Ki Chhaon Men 1964
Hum Do Daku 1967
Door Ka Raahi 1971
Anil Biswas Sautela Bhai 1962
Chhoti Chhoti Baaten 1965
C. Ramchandra Chhatrapati Shivaji 1952
Anarkali 1953
Ravi Dilli Ka Thug 1958
Jawani Ki Hawa 1959
Nai Raahen 1959
Mukul Roy Shailab 1956
Detective 1958
Pandit Ravi Shankar Anuradha 1960

Our friend Bhagwan Thavrani remembers: Tum Na Aaye Sanam Shama Jalti Rahi – Bhootnath (1963) – Vedpal – Lata mangeshkar – wherein he especially takes note of “Meri Awaz Ko Jaane Kyaa Ho Gaya, Main Baharon Men Gaati Rahi Jogiya.

We now take up regular take on Mohammad Rafi :

  • Mohammad Rafi- A short film on his life and songs – Part 1, Part 2 , Part 3 of film on the songs and life of legendary singer Mohammad Rafi, with inputs of Vinod Viplav, who has written his first biography-Meri Awaz Suno. This short film was produced and aired by CNBC News and Entertainment TV Channel.
  • Meri Awaaz Suno – Part 1 – Memories of Madan Mohan through his timeless melodies sung by Mohammad Rafi – Features introduction by Madanji, new nostalgic comments by Madanji and tributes by Mala Sinha, Khayyam and Jagjit Singh. It also features snippets of songs from Aakhari Dao (1958), Ghazal (1964), Suhagan (1964), Sharabi (1964), Haqueequat (1964) and Mera Saaya (1966).

Meri Awaaz Suno – Part 2 – Memories of Madan Mohan through his timeless melodies sung by Mohammad Rafi – Features tributes by Lataji, Pt. Shivkumar Sharma, Jaidev, Majrooh Sultanpuri and Jatin-Lalit. It also features snippets of songs from Aap Ki Parchhaiyan (1964), Dulhan Ek Raat Ki (1966), Heer Ranjha (1970), Naunihal (1967), Chirag (1969), Hanste Zakhm (1973), Laila Majnu (1976) and Tere Bagair (2009).

Each of our episodes is able to scratch the surface of all the great work done by a vast number of fans, lovers and knowledgeable people on the web, i.e. leaving out even a greater amount of documentation done on the print media. Let us salute these great work and join in bring up more and more of such work in our reach…….

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – April 2014

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Welcome to April 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Welcome, spring!with a few songs for the spring.

Forgotten Composers Unforgettable Melodies (9): Lachhiram -A very awkward and unfamiliar name, and not among the mainstream composers, it is so great a coincidence that even as this Blog Carnival’s March 2014 edition was on net, SoY had published this post. Lachchiram Tomar appears to have given music for around 20 films, but even in these hyper-active internet days, one does not find pre-1950 songs on internet!

Arunkumar Deshmukh, in his comment @ 13states: Aye Dil Machal Machal Ke Yoon, Rota Hai Zaar Zaar Kya “ solo of Lata from film Main Suhagan Hoon is the ONLY song of Lata, Lachhiram ever composed. He was the ‘one film-one song’ composer of Lata.” This aspect was also strongly mentioned in Shri Ashok Dave’s post on Main Suhagan Hoon, wherein it is categorically stated that Lachhiram had rather a strong preference for Asha Bhosle. Obviously, the reasons for such a pattern are not evidenced.

We have one more post relating to Forgotten composers – Celebrating the Uncelebrated: Ten of my favourite songs by lesser-known composers.

Most satisfying aspect of the subject of ‘Forgotten’ Creators of “Unforgettable” Melodies is that there are still fairly large number of knowledgeable persons who keep on with their active contributions of these ‘geniuses’ on internet and do a great service of creating an unforgettable documentation of this vital aspect of Indian Cinema.

The haunting music of Hemant Kumar– i.e. haunting songs that for some reason remain etched in your mind and you keep humming or visualizing the song often. Or, when a song conveys deep emotions that are unforgettable or which leave an impact even when you are not listening to the song. Enjoy 22 of these songs on the player here.

Lata Mangeshkar Sings for Laxmikant Pyarelal -Part 1talks about Lata – LP collaboration in 60s andPart 2talks about period from 1970 till 1996.

Found: Vyjayanthimala’s Other Bharatanatyam Dance in Chittor Rani Padmini (1963, Tamil)! – Cinema Nritya Gharana had presenteda beautiful Bharatanatyam dance of Vyjayanthimala’s in the 1963 Tamil film Chittor Rani Padmini in the first post on V.S. Muthuswami Pillai, but lamented that the second dance at the end of the movie she was said to have performed for the king could not be located . [This article was covered in August 2013 edition of this Blog Carnival.] Well! The dance has now been located, at the rich treasure house of Kandasamy Sekkarakudi Subbiah Pillai’s YouTube channel, and it is fantastic!

There are two dances that feature performers who are not yet identified (but definitely would like to know more about) and there is one song for which the identity of some of the singers seems to be a subject of hot debate. So, for the first post devoted to Khazanchi (there will probably be more here), let’s delve into these… Some Mystery Singers and Dancers in Khazanchi (1941).

The Mystery of the Missing Songs- a list of the songs (I knew were) filmed and deleted for one reason or the other.

Ten of my favourite ‘classic poem’ songs’ lists ten songs that are, in whole or part, written by classic poets.

My Favourites: Ghoda-Gaadi Songs -Here are these songs, “in the memory of an animal-drawn vehicle that gave us some wonderful melodies. But with some caveats.

  • The songs can encompass any sort of horse-drawn vehicle – carriages, phaetons, Victorias, carts.
  • The whole song had to be picturised on the vehicle. (That took care of two of my favourite songs, Ye kya kar dala tune from Howrah Bridge and Sun bairi balam from Bawre Nain.)
  • It had to include the hero and  the heroine, even if only one of them were singing. (I originally titled this post Ghoda, Ghodi and Ghoda-Gaadi.) That deleted two other songs from my list: Chhoti si ye zindagani re from Aah, and Jhoome re neela ambar jhoomefrom Ek Gaaon ki Kahani.”

And as can be expected, there is at least one more of aTen of my favourite ghoda-gaadi songs “from pre-70s films that I’ve seen. Other than that, my requisites for the selected songs were:
1. That the person singing (on screen, that is) remains in the ghoda-gaadi through at least 80% of the song (which is whyAe dil hai mushkildoesn’t feature in this list).
2. Horse-drawn vehicles of all types qualify: tongas, Victorias, phaetons, even chariots. Horseback is out.
3. And, no two songs from the same film are allowed.”

SoY continues the great series on S D Burman and his songs with the leading playback singers, on the first death anniversary of Shamshad Begum with East meets West: Shamshad Begum’s songs by SD Burman.

We have some excellent material on one of most known ‘back-room’ face of Hindi Film Music – Manohari Singh.

In The Reed ManManohari Singh talks about his life and experiences, his colleagues and what it was like in the halcyon days of the Hindi film music world. [The post is penned byAshwin Panemangalore, who is primarily an electrical engineer, put in a long stint at L & T’s group of companies in software and instrumentation. After retiring in 2008 he is indulging in his passion for jazz.]

Manohari Singh – The Charming Pied Piper- Music lovers, both connoisseurs and common listeners, throng to listen to the mere sound of his instrument playing……Be it the Saxophone, Western (Key) Flute, the Clarinet or the Mandolin, there is a magical charm in the way he plays those instruments. There is unanimous agreement about the man’s extra special expressions, amazing breath control and inimitable tone of instrument playing.

Memories of Manohari Singh (1931 – 2010)is an anthological video clip capturing Manohari Singh’s work.

We also have two excellent posts presenting some important facets of legacies of two of the great (background) singers of Hindi Film Music world.

Lata Dinanath Mangeshkar Gramophone Record Museum : A National Heritage Made by Shri Suman Chaurasiya has more than 28000 records., of which records of Lata Mangeshkar’ s song number over 6000.

@ Beete Hue Din, Shishir Krishna Sharma’s article‘Tere Pyar Ka Aasra Chahta Hoon’ – Mahendra Kapoorremembers Mahendra Kapoor’s debut song,a duet ‘Kisi Ke Zulm Ki Tasweer Hai Mazdoor Ki Basti’ with Dhan Indorewala from the 1953 release movie ‘Madmast’. [ An interesting trivia – Music Director of this film – Madmast- V. Balsara and Dhan Indorewala went to marry later on.] Another song which Mahendra Kapoor sang for this movie was a qawwali with S.D.Batish, ‘Unhe Dekhein To Wo Munh Pher…Hamey Ankhein Dikhaate Hain’. …..

We also have some additional inputs by Shishir Krishna Sharma @ Mahendra Kapoor’s First Film Song He sang his first solo, “Kisko Daani Kahen … Tere Dar Ki Bhikmangi Hai Daata Duniya Saari” for Snehal Bhatkar’s Diwali Ki Raat in 1956.

The next song which he had sung was a Heer for the punjabi movie, Heer which had music by Anil Biswas. In addition to the above songs, He is also known to have recorded the following before participating in the competition:-

1. A few lines for the song “Ek Taraf Joru Ne Hai Nikaala” for composer Bulo C Rani in the movie Madhur Milan(1955). This song had been sung by Mohd Rafi, Geeta Dutt and A.R. Ojha and penned by Raja Mehdi Ali Khan.

2. A duet with Sabita Banerjee for composer Shanmukh Babu, “Oh Bedardi Jaane Ke Na kar Bahaane” for the movie Lalkaar(1956).

We eulogise passing away of V K Murthy, one of the most outstanding cinematographer, and Nanda, the beautiful and versatile actress of the Golden Era of Hindi Films.

The Masters : V K Murthy- Venkatrama Pandit Krishnamurthy’s journey to becoming VK Murthy, the eminent technician who was known as ‘Guru Dutt’s eyes’ is the stuff films are made of – a rags to riches story that began in the erstwhile princely state of Mysore in 1923.

Iconic beam shot by V K Murthy  for Waqt Ne Kiya Kya Haseen Sitam
No post on VK Murthy can be complete without the story behind the fantastic beamshot, for the song Waqt ne kiya,even though it’s been repeated in every tribute that has ever been written about the director, the film, or now, the cinematographer.

Here are a few of the video clips on V K Murthy:

Ten of my favourite Nanda songs“to celebrate Nanda’s life and career—and to wish her farewell—a selection of ten of her songs that I particularly like. These are all from pre-70s films that I’ve seen, and in each song, Nanda’s character does some—if not all—of the singing…… RIP, Nanda. You will be missed. Your sunny smiles and laughing eyes, your dignity, your ability to make your characters so believable—all will be remembered.”

Here are some more tributes to Nanda from You Tube:

During the period for the present edition, our friend Bhagwan Thavrani has remembered Pyar Ki Dastan Tum Suno To Kahen – Lata Mangeshkar (Music Director: Hemant Kumar) from Farar (1965). That reminded me to look for Dil-E-Nadaan Ko Sambhalun To from the same film, which shows Lata Mangeshkar as singer in the credits, but is believed to have been rendered by Suman Kalyanpur. In any case, Hemant Kuamr was at his melodious self, in the film. Here are the rest of the songs from the film:

Songs of Yore has presented Best songs of 1951: And the winners are?- After reviewing the best songs of 1955 and 1953, which were gap years in the Filmfare Awards (Baiju Bawra,1952 was the first film to get the Filmfare Awards for the best music, but in the later years no films of 1953 and 1955 won these awards, SoY now comes to the pre-Filmfare era with 1951. 1951 seems to have more than 110 films and 1000 songs. Without any doubt, all discussions are going to be as live as any discussions on SoY or the previous 1955 and 1953 posts have been.

One of the most iconic song from the year 1951 is Thandi Hawayein Laharati Aayen – Naujawan – Lata Mangeshkar, S D Burman. In Thandi Hawayein Legacy – Charles Bayer crooned “C’est la vie” in Algiers(1938) without even realizing what a big chain of inspirations he had set for the next generation of Indian music makers.

Old Is Gold has presented two part interview with Ghalib Khan , son of famous Hindi Film lyricist Asad Bhopali. Thefirst part of the interviewends with an outstanding song from Film Afasana (1951)’s Kismat Bigdi Duniya Badli – Mukesh (Husnalal Bhagatram).

Thesecond part of the interviewtakes us to our usual section on Mohammad Rafi with Miss Bombay (1949) song – Zindagi Bhar Gham Judaai Ka Hamen Tadpaayega First Version and Second Version (Hansraj Behl) and “Ek Naari Do Roop” song Dil Ka Soona Saaz Tarana Dhoondhega(Ganesh).

Here are three posts on Mohammad Rafi for the present edition of this Blog Carnival:

I am sure you will enjoy the present edition of our Blog Carnival and look forward to additions / inputs to enrich it further…….

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – March 2014

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Welcome to March 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

For the period under review, we have two excellent compilations w.r.t. Talat Mahamood birth anniversary on 24th February, 2014, from none other than Songs Of Yore.

  • The first of the articles – The Mentor and the Protégé: Talat Mahmood songs by Anil Biswas – commemorates Talat Mahamood’s 90th birth day. While Anil Biswas was not the most prolific  with Talat Mahmood as compared to C Ramchandra, Ghulam Mohammad and Madan Mohan, he remains the most important composer for him, so much so that you mention Talat Mahmood and Anil Biswas comes to mind.
  • The article that follows on SoY, is also about an equally rare combination of Talat Mahmmod’s Hindi Songs career – with S D Burman : Talat Mahmood’s songs by SD Burman. Talat Mahmood had only about 15 songs with S D Burman, a fraction of the songs SDB has with Mohammad Rafi and Kishore Kumar. But his impact was way beyond his numbers, and SD Burman created several immortal songs with him, as he did with Mukesh with about the same number of songs, as can be seen in this article and comments thereto.

These two articles lead us to search for a retrospective on similar articles on Talat Mahmood. Surprisingly, during the searches, one comes up either to vanilla Talat Mahamood songs catalogues or vanilla playlists, but not very incisive analyses that looks at Talat Mahmood’s career with different music directors at different phases / periods of the Golden Era of the Hindi Film Music.

The first one is a post written 4 years before, on Talat Mahmood’s 86th birthday – Ten of my favourite Talat Mahmood songs.

The second one is a review of Nakli Nawab(1962), in terms of an observation that films’s music Director, Babul, has used three playback singers for the hero – Manoj Kumar – in the film.

Talat Mahmood, in a duet with Asha Bhosle – Mast Aankhen Hai Ke Paimaane

Mukesh in Phoolon Se Rangeen Zameen Hai

And two of Mohammad Rafi classics – Tum Poochhati Ho Ishq Bhala Hai Nahin and Chheda Jo Dil Ka Fasana

Well, now that we have jumped over to Mohammad Rafi track, let us continue our present journey on that track and fathom what we have in store this month in so far as Mohammad Rafi is concerned.

Jabberwock returns to an infrequent series about old song sequences (some earlier entries Aashirwad, “Rail Gaadi” and the vitality of the well-done song sequence; the pleasures of “Saaf Karo Insaaf Karo and Cold water for Devdas – song sequences in Biwi aur Makaan) with thoughts on “Tere Mere Sapne” from Guide , in the article “Tere Mere Sapne”, a visual treat.

“Hindi cinema has a long history of the song sequence as a declaration of love or commitment, but rarely has it been done as well as it is here. This sequence lasts more than four minutes, but it is made up of only three shots, which increase progressively in length – in other words, there are only two cuts in the whole scene. While the song in itself is one of the loveliest we have ever had, the visualisation shows Vijay Anand’s talent for using the long, unbroken take to add dramatic intensity and continuity to a given situation.”

Shri Ashok Dave has presented one more of a rare combination of Mohammad Rafi with a music director who did not get due that his talent deserved – Lachhiram (Tamar) , through songs of Main Suhagan Hoon (1964) :

Two duets with Asha Bosle

Interestingly in such a Mohammad Rafi dominated film we have a Talat Mahmood solo – Ye Kis Manzil Pe Le Aayee Meri Badkismati Mujhko.

And of course, the film has a very pleasant Lata Mangeshkar number – Aye Dil Machal Machal Ke Yoon, Rota Hai Zaar Zaar Kya.

From now on, we will also document here songs that our friend, Bhagwan Thavraniforwards via his emails or SMSes. This month we have:

  • Chandrama Ja Unse Keh Do – Bharat Milap – Lata Mangeshkar, Mahender Kapoor
  •  Tumhi Ne Dil Mera – Air Mail (1960) – Mohammad Rafi, Suman Kalyanpur – Music Director – Sardul Quatra.
  •  Interestingly here too, we have a Mohammad Rafi solo Jo Aaj Tak Hua Na – Gule Bakawali 1963 – Music Director – Hansraj Behl, as well as a Talat Mahmood solo JIYUNGA JAB TALAK- CHINGARI(1955) – Music Director Manohar

We now go back to our regular track of playlists featuring Hindi Films songs with a focused subject.

  • My Favourites: Songs in Disguise –“would have only disguised heroes, not heroines (who could be disguised or not, if they were part of the duets), and b) the hero had to be singing, not just remain a spectator. And, oh, just for me, because I like making things difficult for myself – only one song per hero.”
  • Ten of my favourite wind songs – “There have been songs addressed to the wind, songs about the wind. Here are ten of my favourites, in no particular order. The only restrictions I’ve imposed on myself are: (a) As always, the song should be from a film I’ve seen, from before the 1970s And (b) the song should have a word synonymous with wind (hawa, saba, pawan, etc) in the first line of the song.”
  • SoY had done a very interesting article Suman Kalyanpur outshines Lata Mangeshkar on October 4, 2010. The purpose of recalling this article is one of the recent comments by Rakesh Srivastava as well as discussions linked to that comment. These discussions provide us a wealth of Suman Kalayanpur songs. The comment by AM has meticulously listed Suman Kalyanpur’s songs composed by Shanker Jaikishan.
  • In Magic of Raj Kapoor and Shanker Jaikishen, rsbaab has presented an interesting analysis, certainly predominant in RK-SJ films, but nonetheless went on become hallmark of SJ’s style elsewhere too. SJ’s extensive use of preludes, blend of harmony + tempo in the orchestration, descending notes of mukhda line in the higher notes and gradually make each line of the mukhda end on a lower note , very heart tugging lyrics, use of rich and full-bodied tone instrumentsand appealing (folk) dances .
  • Bollyviewer @ Old Is Gold has now moved to a new address – Masala Punch. We take that opportunity to visit an earlier post My favorite piano-songs, where in at least one character is actually playing the piano.

March is the month of Holi- which is not only the festival of colours by also of spoofs- somewhat alike what West does on 1st of April.

SoY has taken the opportunity to sprinkle a dash of A ‘serious’ review of Sangam (1964) in its Golden Jubilee Year and seriously analyses how ‘Raj Kapoor overturns Bollywood triangle to convey profound social messages’.

Dances on Footpath has added two wonderful images to celebrate the spirit of Holi.

Holi 1Holi 2

We sign off the current edition of the blog carnival while Dusted Off explores some known advantages of blogging before diving deep into The funny side of blogging.

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – February 2014

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Welcome to February 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We commence the present edition with three consecutive posts on Mukesh @ Conversations Over Chai

  • The Legends: Mukeshpresents author’s favourite Mukesh solos that he sang for many others (than Raj Kapoor), and successfully, at that.

These articles also prod us to take a retrospective look at article son Mukesh on the blogs tha we regularly visit on these pages:

  • @ Songs of Yore:

My favourite happy songs of Mukesh – songs that differ from Mukesh stereotyped image of THE singer of sad songs.

Mukesh’s best happy duets – “ a peppy song becomes peppier in a duet, especially if the male singer is one whose natural instinct favours soulful, slow emotional songs” as can be heard in these Mukesh duets.

Mukesh and his romance with ‘Dil’  – There was something special about Mukesh and ‘dil’, not only his romantic heart but his romancing the heart- dil songs of incredible beauty.

Songs of Yore continues to blaze the 2014 trail with:

Door Papiha Bola: Suraiya by Anil Biswas – presents Suaraiya’s songs under the baton of Anil Bisaws, reaffirming an  otherwise what is considered as an underrated bond of the two legends, in comparison to Suraiya’s  songs under other music directors like Naushad, Hushnalal Bhagatram , Ghulam Mohammad  or Anil Biswas’s songs with other playback singers like  Lata Mangeshkar, Meena Kapoor.

Songs of Atariya – With a tribute to Begum Akhtar in her Centenary Year – watch atariya in these settings to realize the intrinsic beauty in the lore associated with this word.

We also take a retrospective tour to some other articles on Suraiya:

  • Nivedita Ramakrishnan wrote One day I discovered Suraiya – when Suraiya passed away, for India Abroad, March 12, 2004. The article was reproduced @ Cinema Corridor on the occasion of her ninth death anniversary.
  • Anmol Fankar’s Suraiya on LP Records also brings the days of chronicler of this carnival where vinyl records used to be his major source of access to the songs of Golden Era of HFM. These records still continue to reminisce those moments when we used to listen these records from his erstwhile painstakingly built collection.

Dances on Footpath presents third Cuckoo’s birthday post – Happy Birthday, Cuckoo Moray!. The one was an equally substantial post in 2011, and the second was a small one, with her song from Mirza Sahiban, posted in 2013.

Conversations Over Chai presents  “One of my favourite actresses of the period, as much for beauty and screen presence as for her acting skills, here are my pick of what I think are her [Ten]  best roles” in The Divas: Sadhana.

The article on the Suraiya – Anil Biswas combination @ Songs of Yore has an interesting participant in the discussions – Lavnaya Shah, daughter of  a noted HFM lyricist and poet  Pandit Narendra Sharma. She also has written Daughter remembers: ‘ Jyoti ~ Kalash’ – the daughter’s tribute to the poem (and one of the most iconic songs)  Jyoti Kalash Chhalake . The discussions also provides us link to an abridged version of Life and Career of Pandit Narendra Sharma.

Valentine’s Day has given us two posts – both seem to be grudging contributions to the spirit of romance.

Dusted Off has presented Songs of romantic love – in ten moods –  “with a twist: not necessarily a serenade to a loved one, and not necessarily two lovers billing and cooing to each other. Instead, romantic love in its different forms and shapes and tones and hues. All of these songs are about romantic love (not maternal/fraternal/patriotic/devotional or other forms of the sentiment), and they’re all from pre-70s films that I’ve seen. And they’re each in a distinct mood that shows some aspect of romantic love.”

Conversations over Chai has presented “some beautiful songs that make you feel that romance is still alive, that if ‘love’ exists, this is how it should be/feel like, songs that make you feel all mushy for a while” in My Favourites : Love Songs.

For this edition’s Mohammad Rafi articles we have:

Till we meet again next month…. I look forward to your inputs for enriching the carnival…

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – January 2014

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Welcome to January 2014edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We have had great opening of 2014, in so far as domain of our interest goes. First Day, First Show was a brilliant article on Songs of Yore – Anil Biswas: The Maestro and My Father– by none other than the daughter – Shikha Biswas Vohra. The article, as can be expected, is rich with intimate details and emotional touch to quite known songs. 2014 is also centenary year of birth of Anil Biswas. So the article would certainly be taken as a curtain raiser to several other articles that we will have opportunity to cherish @ SoY

Here are some more of the (recent) articles on Anil Biswas:

For the readers who belong – either by age or by developed hobby – to the period to which the Golden Era of HFM music is related to, Anil Biswas or K C Dey may not sound very unfamiliar to the ears. However, KC Dey: The divine singer with inner vision provides a fairly varied treat to the singer’s repertoire  , in terms of his songs form films, his non-film bhajans and his naat.
SoY has continued to regale the opening of 2014 in presenting Subodh Agrawal’s Film songs based on classical ragas (7) – In the royal presence of Darbari. The article is 7th in the in the series on the film songs based on classical ragas.

“Dedicated to everyone who either remembers their own travels through those confusing, conflicting, rebellious, bitter-sweet, happy-sad times, and to those who are in, or about to step into that twilight world between the carefree days of childhood and sedate ‘responsible’ adulthood, here are ….songs that probably express what you may have felt, are feeling, or will feel some day…”  inMy Favourites: Songs of Innocence.

2014 has also continued the bell tolling onto the luminaries of the Golden Era. Suchitra Sen drew the final curtain to her secluded personal life, after having blazed quite a trail on Bengali Cinema skies.

Dusted Off’s other articles for the period under review:

Incidentally, this article seems to have triggered the inspiration for Dead As A Dodo (Hopefully!) – about tropes I wish would vanish, tropes that have vanished, and should stay vanished, beginning with one of the most egregious.

We also take a look at One day I discovered Suraiya, an article published in January 2013 @ The Cinema Corridor.

BhooliBisriSunahariYaadein has vividly presented VividhBharati – An indispensable part of my life. I am sure all of us would agree no less!

Our visit to Vividh Bharati.org supplements our memories through a documentary एकवृत्तचित्र :सुरोंकासुनहरासफ़र– विविधभारती.

As Always, we turn to Mohammad Rafi:

Dr.SouvikChatterji -Magic combination of Guru Dutt and Mohammad Rafi

The uniqueness of Guru Dutt’s relationship with Rafi lies in the fact that whether the composer was OP Nayyar or Shankar Jaikishan or SD Burman or Ravi, the music composed for whom had philosophical thoughts embedded in them and Rafi gave expression to the mesmerizing lyrics of evergreen tunes which had become immortal over a period of time.

B.Koshy  -Profoundness of Rafi Sahab’s tonal pattern cannot be measured by human competences– has presented a quite a detailed analysis and comparison of the tonal pattern of  leading male singers of that period.

As can be expected, Santhanakrishnan Srinivasan is all praise for Rafiji’s Voice Range. He has presented a number of songs, across a wide range of music directors in this article, in support of his fervent views.

We also have an interview of Sudha Malhotra – AISE THEY RAFI SAHAB ALL ROUNDER, recorded especially on 33rd Death Anniversary of Rafi Sahab.

I look forward to your ever encouraging response, as well as inputs to enrich the content…….

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – December 2013

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Welcome to December 2013 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

This month’s Anniversary section has lead article from the current period of a blog and then is further supported by some excellent articles/ clips form the past archives.

Songs of Yore presents some of her well-known and not so well-known songs while felicitating 77th birth anniversary of Sudha Malhotra in a well-researched article Sudha Malhotra: The last of the niche singers of the Golden Era.

For a more detailed look at ghazals of Sudha Malhotra, a visit to SongsPK.co is called for.

IMIRZA777 has remembered birthday of Geeta Dutt @ Happy Birthday Geeta Dutt.. 23 November 1930.

8th of December was birthday of Sharmila Tagore as well Dharmendra. Shrikant Guatam, in his regular (Gujarati) column   “Rang Raag” in Janmabhoomi Pravasi’s  Sunday supplement “Madhuvan”  of 8th December 2013 has aptly caught one more coincidence – the pair has done EIGHT films together . These are – Devar, Anupama, Satyakam, Yakeen, Ek Mahal Ho Sapno Ka, Mere Humdum Mer Dost, Chupke Chupke, Sunny.

Conversations Over Chai presents favourite Hindi films roles of Shramila Tagore in The Divas: Shamila Tagore.

On the second death anniversary of Dev Anand, Conversations over Chai “discovered a wealth of songs where Dev Anand was either drunk or pretend drunk, or at least holding a glass… to raise a metaphorical toast to an actor and a gentleman …to list some beautiful songs that he lip-synched on screen in Intoxicating Dev Anand.

Conversations over Chai then goes on pay a very unique tribute to Raj Kapoor on his 89th birthday – quite an interesting and thought-provoking quiz in The Only Showman.

We also pick up Portrait of the Director: Raj Kapoor   from YT channel DoordarshanNational  and a highly personalised interview, LIVING LEGND RAJ KAPOOR,  by SimiGarewalOfficial, wherein Raj Kapoor talks about his emotional evolution… his regrets.. his loves.. his music .. his films and his philosophies…… with a treat of haunting scenes and songs from his films.

14th December was also 47th anniversary of Shailendra’s passing away. Pravin Thakkar has penned the multi-faceted portrait of Shailendra in his article published in his (Gujarati) column Rajatpat Na Rang in Kutchhmitra’s Sunday supplement Madhuvan of 8th December 2013.

We supplement several clips form YT archives regarding Shailendra – A Compilation of Title songs – listing 21 title songs penned by Shailendra by शैलेंद्र के गीत | Songs of Shailendra; A Small Tribute to Shailendra by crazyoldsongs and NDTV.com’s Remembering lyricist Shailendra over and above  Chauthi Kasam (Part I, Part II and Part III) by ABP News, which we have covered in the October 2013 edition of this blog carnival.

Dances on the Footpath has posted Nalini Jaywant Songs in Nastik (1954), with English Subtitles, in honor of Nalini on her third death anniversary.

We now move over to visiting articles covering a varied interests from different blogs / websites.

Asha Bhonsle needs no introduction, but how many of us know about Asha Posle ? Ceratinly not many. However Atul’s Song A Day, in the article Aankh ke paani aankh mein rah has presented Asha Posle’s this song from 1947 film Pagdandi.

Our good friend, Shakeel Akhtar, in his article pakeezah and dupatta laments about several crafts that have been obliterated over the tides of modernism. Some of the trades so vividly narrated in the song Inhi Logon Le Leena Dupaataa Mera have triggered this article. Incidentally, we had earlier reblogged a similar content from TIME’s Lightbox  @ Disappearing Trades: Portraits of India’s Obsolete Professions – LightBox.

Dusted Off has presented “famous songs, but lip-synched by not so famous artists in Ten of my favourite ‘Who’s that lip-synching?’ songs.

Songs of Yore has brought out KC Dey’s songs in ‘Devdas’ (1935). These songs are:

Arunkumar Deshmukh has come up with one more of an extensive and well-researched treatise on a very novel topic – confusions of similar names in Hindi Film Industry @ Anmol Fanakaar in the article ‘same name confusions – part 1, part 2 and part 3’.

N Venkatraman has picked up the thread of Hindi – Tamil versions songs in Multiple Version Songs (15): In the ‘Realm of Remakes @ Song of Yore – Multiple version songs.

We also have an interesting variety of the presentation of the content – Cineplot article Tanuja talks about her top ten Hindi Films, as the title suggests has Tanuja’s own views on her top ten films.

Songs of Yore has ended a long vigil of its followers in announcing the Best songs of 1953: Final Wrap Up 4.  The survey article together with Wrap Up 1 on the best male playback singer, Wrap Up 2 on the best female playback singer and Wrap Up 3 on the best duets and the present final Wrap Up together represent probably the most unique and comprehensive discussion of the entire music of a particular year.

Nahm has presented Preet banaake toone jeena sikhaaya@ Atul’s Song A Day. The clip was 12 minutes long, and it had all 5 stanza’s in it by Mukesh on Raj Kapoor, with intermittent dialogues and a small portion or rather a stanza of the song by Suman Kalyanpur on Waheeda Rehman.

Our each episode has several intersting pieces on Mohammad Rafi. In the case of ‘Teesri Kasam’, there is no sign of Rafi here, still Shankar – Jaikishan as many as four singers for Waheeda Rehman. Tables had turned and how, for Lata Mangeshkar by 1966 vis-à-vis Shankar-Jaikishan can be judged from this.

And as  contrast look at Raj Hath (1956), wherein  Dusted Off has singled out one of the great Mohammad Rafi gem -“one song in particular is beautiful and very well-known – Aaye bahaar banke lubhaakar chale gaye   – in a very detailed review.

Nasir’s Eclectic Blog  is mainly a Tribute to the Legendary Indian Playback Singer, Mohammed Rafi, containing categories dedicated to Rafi’s Romantic Songs Transliterated/TranslatedRafi’s Sad Songs Transliterated/Translated, Rafi’s Philosophical Songs,  Rafi’s Filmy Devotional SongsPeppy Songs of Mohammed Rafi ,  Articles on Mohammed Rafi Sahaab.

Our friend Bhagwan Thavrani brings back Mohammad Rafi’s Toofan Mein Pyaar Kahan song,  Itni Badi Duniya Jahan Itna Bada Mela , composed by  Chitragupta.

Biman Baruah remembers a highly fruitful relationship with three generations of Roshans – Mohammed Rafi with legacy of composer RoshanRoshan(lal Nagrath) , Rakesh Roshan (for films directed under his banner) or Rajesh Roshan (for songsa composed under his baton) and Hrithik Roshan (in terms of his Mohammad Rafi songs with Hrithik as child artist).

You are right! This last phase was our section on Mohammad Rafi. We will continue our listings on Mohammad Rafi in our future episodes as well.

We conclude our series of Carnivals of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music for the year 2013 with this episode.

Wishing you all a very a very exciting journey to the world of Golden Era of Hindi Film Music in 2014 as well…………………

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – November 2013

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Welcome to November 2013 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

The last bastion of male playback singers of the Golden Era of Hindi Film Music, Manna Dey, finally chose to give the fight with his failing health take over. As can be expected there was a universal feeling of loss among the fans of Film Music.

We record here some of the wide array of tributes that have poured  in:

The articles /video clips, to fair extent, present the breadth, width and depth of od Manna Dey’s songs.હિંદી ફિલ્મ સંગીતના સુવર્ણયુગના એક એક અધ્યાયનો અંત..

And now we will take a look at articles, from newspapers /channels, that present a collage of his personality.

And one of the rarest cover songs (which I heard for the first time when searching for Manna Dey for his rare pieces) is my tribute to The Great Singer – Yeh Kooche Yeh Neelaam Ghar Dil Kashi Ke   - Pyaasa - SD Burman.

How can we have a November edition of a blog carnival on Hindi Films songs without any post on the Festival of India – Diwali. Dances on Footpath presents us  Ai Duniya Bata … Ghar Ghar Men Diwali Hai, Mere Ghar Men Andhera – Film Kismet (1943) – Amirbai Karnataki –  Anil Biswas – in My Favorite Diwali Song of All Time.

HMSinghNovember is also month of birth of Har Mandir Singh ‘Humraz’ – the compiler of Hindi Film Geet Kosh, a unique, encyclopaedic, reference compendium of Hindi Film Songs, from 1931. Biren Kothari had paid rich tribute to him when Har Mandir Sa’ab turned 60 @ હરમંદિરસીંઘ ‘હમરાઝ’: ફિલ્મી ગીતગંગાનું ગીતકોશમાં અવતરણ કરનાર ભગીરથ. I could also find one more post on Har Mandir Singh @ Hindi film Geet Kosh. And the latest is again a Biren Kothari article commemorating the 62nd birthday @ ફિલ્મશતાબ્દિએ આપણને મળેલી અનોખી ભેટ – a gift to the centenary of Films. This gift is in the form of a compilation: ‘SILENT & HINDI TALKIE FILMS INDEX’ (1913-2012)

Whilst on the subject compilations of Hindi Film Songs, let us record our sincerest appreciation of yeomen’s work done by:

There are a legion of blogs and sites, including unimaginably varied postings of video clips on YT, who have been carrying on with the great task of immortalizing Films songs by bringing them on internet.

We pay our deepest appreciation to all these foot soldiers.

We now turn to our regulars:

Evergreen Indian film music concludes the well-detailed and discussed three-part article -Top 3 Composers of Golden Era . The article has a medley of 18 songs that includes folk songs, classical tunes, western feel, Ghazals, Qawwalis, Bidaai and of course romantic songs .   The three parts of the article are:

We have not been able to cover Kalayanji Anandji till now.

In Top hits of Kalyanji Anandji, magical duets, the 8 tracks player plays songs randomly from this mix of 25 songs.  The earlier posts have  covered various facets – their affinity to Mukesh, their mastery of string instruments, songs with Lata Mangeshkar and exceptional use of chorus as a natural extension of the song and adding a sense of rhythm and tempo.

Songs of Yore has done two excellent posts at the ‘end’ of a great series on S D Burman: SD Burman’s Bengali songs and their Hindi versions – which, interestingly intersects with its series on Multiple version songs – and The ultimate SD Burman: His pure Bengali songs –  songs that easily can seen as ‘soul of his music’.

The post on SDB’s Bengali songs also provides us references to two more posts on SBD: His Non-film songs and Harveypam’s post on his film songs.

Before we end this edition, we have interesting articles on Mohammad Rafi.

Dr. Souvik Chatterji   – Looking back at Jaikishan and remembering his bond with Mohammad Rafi – has emphatically submitted that had Jaikishan not passed away  in 1971, Rafi’s dominance in bollywood music not suffered at all.
Bollyviewer @ Old Is Gold  has line up a Rafi song for each letter of the alphabet*, in  The A-Z of Mohammed Rafi.  Just to make things more interesting, the author decided to restrict to his duets or group performances from B/W films.
As can be expected, YT has several channels designed for compiling songs of Mohammad Rafi from the perspective segmenting the songs from differing aspects.  We will document such channels here, beginning with Great Rafi AND Rafi Duets.

*Aphabetical memeing also provides us back references to:

It seems that some of our regular blogs had devoted the period under review to Film Review more. That gave us a quick opportunity to take at some of the blogs who are not as prolific as some of the regular blogs.

Well, that has made the current edition quite content-heavy. Isn’t it……?

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – August 2013

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Welcome to August 2013 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

It seems we have a rich fare on dances in this edition.

Dances on Footpath’ remembers month of August for the Independence that India earned on 15t August, 1947 by Ten Favorite Songs and/or Dances from The Year 1947.

‘Dances on Footpath’ also has Five Favorite Dances to the Voice of Rajkumari this month, mostly solos, a couple of great duets, half mujras, half street or theater performances, some on familiar visual terrain and some extremely unusual-looking… but all really good dance sequences from the 1940s or early ’50s, featuring the sweet, unmistakable voice of Rajkumari.

In Vyjayanthimala’s Devadasi Dance in Piya Milan (Choreographed by V.S. Muthuswami Pillai)Minai’s Cinema Nritya Gharana has assembled a vivid analysis and comparison of Devdasi choreography, in the dance song Aaja Kahun Kana   as, different from Bharatnatyam, in Chittoor Rani Padminini dance song by leveraging the Vyjayntimala, the performer and  the choreographer- the hereditary nattuvanar V.S. Muthuswami Pillai, as the common links.

A visit to not-so-regularly-updated blog, ‘A Blog Of My Favourite Vintage Bollywood Stuff’ presents us with Some of my favourite song-dance combinations of the vintage era.

Madhulika Liddle continues to come up with quite interesting themes @ ‘Dusted Off’. We have Ten of my favourite “I am -” songs this month – where the singer introduces himself/herself by name. The “comments” to this post also further enriches the theme.

Dusted Off’’s review of Love in Bombay(2013), – “or 1971, if you go by the year the film was made, not the year the film was released. Or 1974, which was when the censor certificate dates from”, but finally released, in 2013, by sons of Joy Mukherjee after his death – needs a special mention here for the 1971-period songs of Shanker Jaikishan, who had so stunningly teamed up with Joy Mukherjee in “Love in Tokyo” : Maazaa naav ahe Ganpat Rao, Na main boli na woh bola, Saiyyaan saiyyaan,  and Rani Nacho

Shilpi Bose’s ‘Tarun Bose and The World of Cinema’  – Oonche Log (1965)– is an excellent, narrative of the film,  particularly from the point of view of Tarun Bose’s character in the film. Incidentally, “Oonche Log” also takes me back to the days of my first year of college year at Vallabh Vidyanagar (Anand, Gujarat) in 1965-66. We used to hire cycles at ½ a rupee, and make a trip to near-by Anand for a Saturday night show to see the film released on that Friday. We had gone to see Oonche Log for “on-the-screen-histrionic-duel” between Ashok Kumar and Raaj Kumar, but came back highly impressed by the dual bonus of Tarun Bose’s performance and Chitragupt’s music in the film.  Here are those songs to complete that recall:  Jaag Dil-e-Deewana (Mohammad Rafi), Aaja Re Mere Pyaar Ke Raahi Raah Sanvarun Badi Der Se (Mahendra Kapoor and Lata Mangeshkar), Haayere Tere Chanchal Nainwa (Lata Mangeshkar), Kaisi Tune Rit Rachi Bhagwan (Manna Dey and Asha Bhosle).

In Coolone160’s Sadhana- an elegant and timeless actress, we have a playlist that presents the multi-faceted theatrical personality of Sadhana.

We have had opportunity to visit a couple of more blogs this month.

We pick up SAMAY O DHEERE CHALO (Rudali – Asha Bhosle – Bhupen Hazarika – Gulzar) from Mukhtar   Sheikh’s My Vision of the Songs as a first sample. We can look forward to regular visits this blog.

Visit to ‘A Blog Of My Favourite Vintage Bollywood Stuff’ also benefited us by way of these gems: A lovely Mohammed Rafi – Suraiya duet from Sanam (1951) and My favourite Rafi songs.

Songs of Yore has kindly hosted the guest article – Forgotten Composers Unforgettable Melodies (8): Avinash Vyas  – by yours truly, in memory of Avinash Vyas’s anniversary on 20th August.

While presenting Best songs of 1953: Wrap Up 1, AKji has commenced wrapping up the discussions on the different categories for The Best Songs of 1953 @ Songs of Yore. We would take a detailed look at the entire process of review collectively, when we will have all the articles in this series available @ SoY.

I do await your keen observations on the Hindi Film Songs of the Golden Era…….and continue the search for more varied content……till we met again next month……

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