Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – July 2013

Welcome to July 2013 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Incidentally, we have several pairs of articles on each of the subject in this edition.

“Luck very rarely smiled on Madan Mohan in terms of hit films. He always composed great music for “B” type movies which did not do well at the box-office. The music was always heavenly. Three such examples are Anpadh (1962), Jahanara (1964) and Sharabi (1965). A great composer who deserved lot more than the single National Award he won for the composition of Dastak’s song.  14th of July was the anniversary of Madan Mohan.”# Shri Shrikant Guatam, in his regular weekly column in Janmabhoomi Pravasi’s “Madhuvan” supplement, has presented “successful songs of Madan Mohan in unsuccessful films”. Among the films he has chosen for this article, we pick up “Dulhan Ek Raat Ki”, which has been reviewed by Shri Ashok Dave @ his blog-post. (Both articles are in Gujarati.)

The outstanding Madan Mohan “Dulhan Ek Raat Ki” (1966) gems which went on to become (and are) popular with critics and fans are:

Ek Haseen Shaam Ko Dil Mera Kho Gaya – Mohammad Rafi

Maine Rang Li Aaj Chunariyaan Tere Rang MenLata Mangeshkar

Aapne Apana Banaya Meharbani Aapki– Mahendra Kapoor, Lata Mangeshkar

And Madan Mohan vintage song – Sapno Men Mere Tum Aao To So Jaaun – Lata Mangeshkar

And here are songs where Madan Mohan continued to dare with experimentation while blending his distinct style:

Kai Din Se Hai Bekal, Ai Dil Ki Lagan Ab Le Chal – Lata Mangeshkar

Hamaar Kaha Maano, O  Rajaji – Asha Bhosle, Usha Mangeshkar

Kabhi Ay Haqueekat-e- Muntazir, Nazar Aa Libase – A Quawali – Lata Mangeshkar and Chorus

Zindagi Hai Dulhan Ek Raat Ki – Bhupinder

Ghayal Hiraniya Van Men – Bhupinder

Kisi Ka Kuchh Kho Gaya Hai, Jiski Shay Hai Woh Aake – Mohammad Rafi

And, a bonus find, thanks to YT, Paiyaan Padungi – Lata Mangeshkar

#Old Classic Hindi Songs has songs of Madan Mohan on this special page.

Geeta Dutt Anniversary also falls in [20th]  July. “Songs of Yore” paid a tribute by way of Geeta Dutt’s best songs by SD Burman. The article has a link to the list of Geeta Dutt’s (around) 70 + solos, composed by S D Burman @ The Legendary Nightingale.. Geeta Dutt . To this Old Classic Hindi Songs has gone on to add several songs of Geeta (Roy) Dutt that were previously posted, again under a separate heading, towards the bottom part of the separate page.

In  a rare tribute to Kanan Devi, to “Dances on Footpath”’s Seven Beautiful Songs with Kanan Devi, Who Lived April 22, 1916 to July 17, 1992. We have a rich supplement of previously posted songs of Kanan Devi, by Old Classic Hindi Songs, grouped under a separate heading, listed towards the bottom of the separate page below Madan Mohan’s songs. Click here for Kanan Devi’s songs.

Pran - The Legend…And Pran” (Kishan Sikand), The Villain of Hindi Screen, and an equally transformed ‘character actor’ in his second innings, agreed to call “The End”. “Dusted Off” vividly narrates Pran Saheb’s multi-faceted commanding presence on the screen in Pran: In Memoriam . We choose to remember his Dil KI Umange Hai Jawan from Munimji. In a pairing tribute, “Filmi Geek”’s Thank you, Pran saheb, and value-adding discussion thereat, also present Pran Saheb’s songs, one of which narrates  a “song from “’Rahu Ketu’ (1978) , picturized on PremNath and Pran. They are singing to each other, and it is a qawwali. –Main hoon tera Prem and Main hoon tera Pran, probably one of a kind song in the Indian Film history, wherein two characters sing using their own professional a.k.a. real name.”

We take the opportunity to recall Shrikant Gautam’s article in his regular column in ‘Madhuvan’ supplement of Janmabhoomi Pravasi on the occasion of  Pran Saheb being decorated with (a highly belated) Dada Saheb Phalke award.[Blog Carnival’s  April 2013 Edition].

Dances on The Footpath’ presents seven of Anil Biswas songs in Happy Birthday, Anil Biswas!, to which we have a paired brief sketch of Anil Biswas along with this video clip by  IMIRZA777.

An now we move on to a pair of articles on [or is it “in”?] 1953 – Songs of Yore, continuing the trend initiated last year – with the songs of the year 1955, has mesmerizingly thrown the gauntlet to pick up Best songs of 1953: And the winners are?. The post has generated one of the highest numbers of discussion “comments”, wherein SoY readers have expressed views on quite a wide horizon of their choices. To which Dances on The Footpath presents us an intertwined comparison of films ‘New Delhi (1956) with ‘Dupatta’ (A 1952 Pakistani film) with reference to the character enacted by Sandhya in V. Shantaram’s film Teen Batti Char Rasta (1953), in a 2009 post. The song that epitomizes the discussion is: Akhiyan hai yeh roop ki pyasi – Lata Mangeshkar, music direction by Shivram Krishna.

Teen Batti Char Rasta has a very unique multilingual song, rendered by different singers to the music composed by different music directors. Among the languages represented therein, we would, obviously, choose, the Gujarati piece @  – 4.00, rendered by Asha Bhosle for which Avinash Vyas composed the music. Here is the ‘original’ song Chaanu Re Chhapanu Kain Thay Nahin ( You can to do dream secretly)  – also rendered by Asha Bhosle on Avinash Vyas’s composition.

And how can we have month of an active monsoon without posts of monsoon songs? Dusted Off has penned Ten Memorable Rain Scenes. We have a pairing post by ‘Let Us Talk Bollywood’- Baarish (1957) no rain, but drenched in beauty and fun.
We have paired posts, too – Sunahari Raaten’s Baarish (1957) and Sharmi Ghosh Dastidar’s Raw appeal (Baarish). These three reviews collectively present us songs from the film: Yeh muh aur daal masoor ki; Dane dane pe likha hai;     Zulf hai;    Kehte hai pyaar jisko ;sad version Kehte hai pyaar jisko;  Phir wohi chaand;  Hum toh jaani pyaar karega and Mr. John ya Baba Khan ya lala Roshanadan.

We have two quite unique posts, emanating from Dusted Off’s post mentioned here above – Bollywood Food Club’s Johnnie Walker in Bollywood   and Apni East India Company’s Bolly Chandeliers. The former presents Johnnie Walker bottle and the latter one presents Chandeliers in our Hindi Films.

We have some excellent posts on Mohammad Rafi this month.

Vijay Bavdekar, Nagpur has painstakingly recalled Rafi’s Ever Remembered Songs Composed By Less Remembered Music Directors.

Ashok Dave, in his review (in Gujarati) of Baiju Bawra (1952) presents raagmala, in which  Mohammad Rafi is in his elements, which has following classical music pieces:

(1) Raag Lalit: Piyu Piyu Re Karat Hai Papiha, Ab Kaho Kaise Raakhun Jiya….

(2) Raag Gaud Malhar: RoomZoom Badariya Barase, Un bin Mora Jiya Tarase

(3) Raag Puriya Dhanashri:  Ajab Tori Prabhu Aan Baan Dekhi, Baag Men Ban Me Neelgagan Men, Dekhat Hun Teri Shan.

(4) Raag Bageshri: Hay Ri Ai Kaise Main Ghar Aaun Mitwa, Tumre Jiyara Baat Chalat Mose Roke Daro Thagawa

Rajiv Nair presents Relationship between Mohammed Rafi saab and Mahendra Kapoor. The post has refrences to – Mahendra Kapoor’s award – winning song @ the Metro Murphy All-India singing competition (1957): Ilaihi koi tamanna nahin,  “composed by Rafi saab for the competition” and  the song Mohammad Rafi called up to share with Mahendra Kapoor :“Tum Jo Mil Gaye Ho (Hanste Zakhm, 1973) by composer Madan Mohan. Dad cried and so did Rafi saab, such was the melody and the mood.”

I am quite sure listening to each of the songs that present edition of this Blog Carnival is as much sheer joy, as it was to me in listening and compiling here!

Did I miss any major blog post or an article here? Do let me know, so as to widen the reach of this Blog Carnival.

Author: ASHOK M VAISHNAV

In July 2011, I opted to retire from my active career as a practicing management professional. In the 38 years that I pursued this career, I had opportunity to work in diverse capacities, in small-to-medium-to-large engineering companies. Whether I was setting up Greenfield projects or Brownfield projects, nurturing the new start-ups or accelerating the stabilized unit to a next phase growth, I had many more occasions to take the paths uncharted. The life then was so challenging! One of the biggest casualty in that phase was my disregards towards my hobbies - Be with The Family, Enjoy Music form Films of 1940s to mid-1970s period, write on whatever I liked to read, pursue amateur photography and indulge in solving the chess problems. So I commenced my Second Innings to focus on this area of my life as the primary occupation. At the end of four years, I am now quite a regular blogger. I have been able to build a few very strong pen-relationships. I maintain contact with 38-years of my First Innings as freelance trainer and process facilitator. And yet, The woods are lovely, dark and deep. But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep.

6 thoughts on “Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – July 2013”

    1. AKji,
      It is really a great boost to know that use of my leisure also does become some help to friends like you.
      I am thinking of doing an annual post by inviting all the bloggers featured on these pages to do a write up of around 100/200 words on the post from amongst the ones published in the current year.
      The collective feedback can be taken up for publishing on this forum in the first month of the next year.
      Do you think this idea may be an additional burden on the already crowded time of the bloggers?

    1. Dear Kunal Mehta,
      I am very happy to know that you did find the contents of the posts on Hindi Films songs of the Golden Era interesting enough.
      I keenly look forward to more of your visits and valued inputs.

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