Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music–September 2014

Welcome to September, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

The entire August 2014 edition of our blog carnival was dedicated to the memories of Mohammad Rafi. As result, we had not been able to visit any of the other published post in that episode. We will make good those inadvertent omissions in the present episode.

We begin out tour of our regular blogs:

Hemant Kumar’s songs by SD Burman

Besides his own compositions, Hemant Kumar freely sang under other composers. SD Burman was one of the most important for him, making him the voice of Dev Anand – one of the big three – in many films. Continuing the series on SD Burman for various singers, SoY presents songs for Hemant Kumar as a tribute to the latter on his 25th death anniversary.(b. 16 June 1920; d. 26 September 1989).

Best Songs of 1951: Wrap Up 2

This is the part Two of the Wrap Up round on Best songs of 1951: And the winners are? . Part 1 has addressed wide ranging discussions on Male Playback Singers for the Year 1951. The ‘other’ female playback singers bring immense variety and several of them had their landmark songs in the year. As a result, this year SoY has taken up a separate post for ‘other’ (than Lata Mangeshakar) Female Playback Singers. .

Aao bachcho tumhein dikhayen jhanki….ki

Jagriti (1954), has a more or less mirror image on the other side as Bedari. Actor Ratan Kumar (Nazir Rizvi) was the common link, where he played the same role of a differently-abled nice boy, who reforms the wayward boy

Multiple Version Songs (18): Hindi-Telugu exchange [Guest article by Arunkumar Deshmukh]

His first guest article in the series on Multiple Version Songs was on Hindi-Marathi, naturally.  Arunji surprised everyone by an equally erudite article on Hindi – Kannada versions. The Hindi- Telugu exchange is equally rich and interesting.

Ten of my favourite ‘male pianist’ songs’ is a veritable collection of songs picturised on men sitting at pianos, a worthy sequel to women pianists .

That also gives us cause to recall an archived article – My favorite piano-songs, from the 50s and 60s that have at least one character “playing” the piano throughout the song. Even as some songs would get repeated in these three articles, the presentations offer a varied fare that whets our appetite of different perspectives.

August being the month of festivals, it was high time a post on Festival Songs that would collate songs relating to various festivals was eagerly awaited.

My Favourites: Letters in Verse resurrects the now forgotten art and passion of writing letters.

August 27 is the death anniversary of Mukesh. ‘Made for each other: Mukesh and Kalyanji-Anandji’ pays tribute to Mukesh, by exploring one of the very special associations he had had with some of the leading music directors of his era.

Coincidentally we also have an exclusive post – Kalyanji-Anandji, the immortal duo detailing their notable films, songs, achievements and key recognitions that highlight their versatile talent. The post also discusses their distinctive composing style and more importantly, highlight their personal nature and why they are immortal.

We now stray beyond our oft-tracked path and take a look at occasional marvels that one lands up in such journeys:

First Ghalib ghazal to be used in a film was ‘Aah ko chahiye ek umr asar hone tak’ was the first Mirza Ghalib ghazal to be used in a movie (Masoom – 1941).

Whilst on Cutting The Chai, we also join the (still continuing) celebration of 100 years of Indian Cinema @ 100 Years of Indian Cinema: India Post’s 50 commemorative stamps.

This is also a diamond jubilee year of 1964 film Dosti, which is rightly commemorated @ Dukh To Apana Saathi Hai – Sushil Kumar.

And as coincidences would have, we landed upon The spirituality in Hindi Film songs, which also talks about immortal songs, of this 1964 movie, Dosti’, penned by inimitable Majrooh Sultanpuri and sung in the angelic voice of Mohammed Rafi”.

We have been a given an excellent lead for very unusual wealth of information in terms of several articles @ Scroll.in . Here is one example A reminder for the Scots: India has a thriving bagpipe tradition too – Folk troupes in the country’s Garhwal region, especially those that play for weddings, often include a bagpiper. – by Mridula Chari.

Similarly Suresh Chandvankar, the Honorary Secretary of Society of Indian Record Collectors and the Editor of The Record News, the annual journal of the Society has contributed Marathi and English articles on the 78 rpm era to various periodicals, newspapers and websites. We take up one of the several articles for this edition, and will take up at least one article in each our subsequent editions.

Mimicry and comic songs from the dawn of the recording era in India – European recording companies scoured India looking for interesting sounds and songs, between 1902 to 1908.

We have a very interesting fare from our friend Bhagwan Thavrani :

In our regular ending of the carnival, we have “3-G: Great Lyrics, Grand Music and Golden Voice in Indian Cinema by Sri Biman Baruah , information shared by Sri Binu Nair, Founder, Rafi Foundation, Mumbai listing Mohammed Rafi solos written by Hasrat Jaipuri and filmed on different Actors:

Year Film Song Music Actor
1961 Jab Pyar Kisi Se Hota Hai Teri Zulfon Se Judaee Tu Nahin Mangi Thi Shankar Jaikishan Dev Anand
1962 Asli Naqli Chheda Mera Dil Ne Tarana Tere Pyar Ka Shankar Jaikishan Dev Anand
1963 Tere Ghar Ke Samne Dil Ka Bhanwar Kare Pukar, Pyar Ke Raag Suno Re S.D. Burman Dev Anand
1968 Duniya Falsafa Pyar Ka Tum Kya Jano, Tumne Kabhi Pyar Na Kiya Shankar Jaikishan Dev Anand
1964 Aayee Milan Ki Bela Tum Kamsin Ho, Nadaan Ho Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1965 Arzoo Aye Phoolon Ki Raani Baharoon Ki Malka Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1966 Suraj Chehere Pe Giri Zulfen Kehdo Tu Utha Do Main Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1968 Jhuk Gaya Aasman Kaun Hai Jo Sapnon Mein Aaya Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1961 Junglee Ehsaan Tera Hoga Mujh Par Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1962 Professor Aye Gul Badan Aye Gulbadan Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1964 Rajkumar Is Rang Badalti Duniya Mein Insaan Ki Niyaat Thik Nahin Hai Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1969 Tumse Accha Kaun Hai Janam Janam Ke Saath Nibhane Ko Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1966 Gaban Ehshan Mere Dil Pe Tuhmare Hain Dostoon, Yeh Dil Tuhmare Pyar Ka Shankar Jaikishan Sunil Dutt
1970 Bhai-Bhai Mere Mehbbob Tere Dam Se Bahar Aaye Shankar Jaikishan Sunil Dutt
1965 Gumnaam Ek Ladki Hai Jisne Jina Muskil Kar Diya Shankar Jaikishan Manoj Kumar
1964 Ziddi Teri Surat Se Nahin Milti Kisi Ki Surat S. D. Burman Joy Mukherjee
1966 Love In Tokyo Aaja Re Aa Jara Lehrake Aa Jara Shankar Jaikishan Joy Mukherjee
1964 April Fool Meri Mohabbat Paak Mohabbat Aur Jahan Ki Shankar Jaikishan Biswajeet
1972 Shararat Dil Ne Pyar Kiya Hai Ek Bewafa Se Ganesh Biswajeet
1968 Mere Huzoor Rukh Se Zara Naqab Utha Do Mere Huzoor Shankar Jaikishan Jeetendra
1969 Pyar Hi Pyar Main Kahin Kavi Na Ban Jaoon Shankar Jaikishan Dharmendra
1973 Naina Hum Ko Tu Jaan Se Pyaari Shankar Jaikishan Shashi  Kapoor

This is certainly not an exhaustive list. We will try to make good the misses in due course of time.

Advertisements

Author: ASHOK M VAISHNAV

In July 2011, I opted to retire from my active career as a practicing management professional. In the 38 years that I pursued this career, I had opportunity to work in diverse capacities, in small-to-medium-to-large engineering companies. Whether I was setting up Greenfield projects or Brownfield projects, nurturing the new start-ups or accelerating the stabilized unit to a next phase growth, I had many more occasions to take the paths uncharted. The life then was so challenging! One of the biggest casualty in that phase was my disregards towards my hobbies - Be with The Family, Enjoy Music form Films of 1940s to mid-1970s period, write on whatever I liked to read, pursue amateur photography and indulge in solving the chess problems. So I commenced my Second Innings to focus on this area of my life as the primary occupation. At the end of four years, I am now quite a regular blogger. I have been able to build a few very strong pen-relationships. I maintain contact with 38-years of my First Innings as freelance trainer and process facilitator. And yet, The woods are lovely, dark and deep. But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep.

2 thoughts on “Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music–September 2014”

  1. Ashokji,
    I look forward to this compilation because you manage to locate and put in one place some amazing things that are scattered around on the Internet, but which we could never find on our own. I especially liked the research about Sudhir-Sushil Kumar of Dosti. Other interesting information was about LP consciously composing in MM style on Lata Mangeshkar’s request. Meri zindagi ke chiraag ko was so true to Madan Mohan style. We have been discussing on SoY how some songs appear to be in a different singer’s voice or composed in a different music director’s style. We have seen many songs by MM in OPN style. While on this, did you ever think that LP’s Hui sham unka khayal aa gaya seems to be in Roshan’s style?

    Ghalib’s first song in films? The person who mentions Masoom (1941) does not seem to have basic information. Nukta cheen hai gham-e-dil sung by KL Saigla in Yahudi Ki Ladki (1933) is very well known. This should be the very first use of Ghalib in films, though you would have seen I am very wary of making any absolute claims. Since talkies started in 1931, and most of our earliest films are not available, this must be the first known/available use of Ghalib in films.

    AK

    1. Thanks for “attempting” to put the records straight in so far as use of Ghalib’s ghazal first time in Hindi Films. I do agree that records are quite nebulous in that period. Hence any absolute claim may be futile. In nay case, we may refer the matter to more knowledgeable people, not to prove or diprove a particulat narration, but to bring in more (academic) awareness on the subject. In any case, the discussion, on its own too, may inherently should be quite interesting one.
      I am not very good at music to recognize the similarities of a song with the other one when both seem to be been differentiated on some or other ‘creative’ parameter. But, now that you mention, I distinctly see strains of Roashan. Since Pyarelal Sharma had had occasions to work with many of music directors of (so called) generation earlier than them, such, inadvertent or otherwise, influences do seem inevitable. These may be accepted as well, as the resulting outcome has been able to do fair justice to the original.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s