Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – January 2015

Welcome to January 2015 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

For the year 2015, we would strive to follow a different pattern than that for the last year.

In the first part, we will put up articles related to Improvement – in its any shade of grey. The second part will take up the blog of any one of the Influential Voices Blogroll Alumni members and will explore that blog in some more depth. The third part will be our regular columns of Article from the blog of Bill Troy, ASQ CEO and the related monthly round up, a look up at an ASQ TV Episode and the continuing series on ASQ’s Influential Voice .

We begin our present episode with articles related to Improvement. Since we have taken up to follow this subject for the whole year, we will take up 3 to 5 articles that come up in the first cut of the search every month. This may certainly mean that what we take up each month, may not the last word, nor it may the exhaustive treatise.

Let’s be honest. How many times have you achieved all of your yearly goals?

The problem is not with goals. Goals provide focus, create momentum and help us stay on track.

The problem is with the goal setting process itself – choosing the right goals and setting up the right support for them.

1. Start with your current goals. Keep your previous goals in mind to create a sense of flow.

2. Connect your goals to a larger purpose that shows why they are important, and helps answer the question “What’s next” once they are achieved.

3. Goal setting is not always a logical process. Sometimes it can make a difference to just hold the intention of something you really want to do, even if you don’t have any idea of how you will achieve it.

4. Write your goals down and put them somewhere visible.

5. Don’t keep your goals a secret.

6. Set up processes and practices that support your goals.

The 90-day Performance Improvement Cycle

In contrast to the annual cycle, the 90-day performance improvement cycle is simply about focusing on and elevating just one performance priority over a 3-month period…. 90 days is a much more tangible timeframe than a year; we can feel its length almost viscerally and can see its end in our mind’s timeline…. It matters far less that we reach our targets each 90 days than we make steady and learned progress…. It’s through action that the world changes, not through thinking and planning.

The Hardest Part of Lean is to See the Waste William A. Levinson, principal, Levinson Productivity Systems – like poor quality, waste effort is built into the job where it is then taken for granted…

The Performance Improvement Blog is about Increasing learning and effectiveness of leaders and managers in organizations. As a way of review of the year 2014, the blog owner, Stephen J Gill has selected five blog posts that seem to have had the most interest for readers. Here are the links of these posts:

Eight Leader Habits of a Learning Culture

The World is Fast…And Learning Must Be Faster

Cultural Barriers to Organizational Learning

Why Your Organization Needs a Learning Culture

Learning to Learn Collectively

International Society for Performance Improvement ® – ISPI – and its members use evidence-based performance improvement research and practices to effect sustainable, measurable results, and add value to stakeholders in the private, public, and social sectors. Founded in 1962, ISPI is the leading international association dedicated to improving productivity and competence in the workplace. ISPI represents performance improvement professionals throughout the United States, Canada, and 44 other countries.

In the second part, we have Complexified’s Blog from among the Influential Voices Blogroll Alumni. The blog has a good deal of refreshing contents. We have selected two of the articles from the blog so as to open a peep-in window to the blog:

“Works better; costs less.”  A catchy phrase, a good slogan. When it comes to the work of government, regardless of political orientation, everyone agrees they want government to work as well as possible.

No matter what method is used, in or out of government, the successful improvement organizations have some things in common:

1)Focus on the Process, not the People.  Deming and others taught that 80-90% of the problems with the output or outcomes of a process of work, are the result of a lousy process, NOT the fault of the people.

2) Everyone has to acquire deep knowledge of the current process in order to make meaningful change.

3) Decisions need to made based on data and facts, not people’s opinions.

4) Differences of opinion need to be fully considered in open, and resolved through respectful dialogue.

5) Failure is an opportunity to learn.  All results provide information to help drive future improvements.

6) It’s not enough to just make it “better, faster, cheaper.”  Aim also at creating “more smiling faces” among your employees, customers, and suppliers.  You’ll be glad you did.

That’s the main part of it.  One more item is needed, in the private sector, but especially in government.

7) Maintain the commitment to continuous process improvement.  Leaders must support the work, making time and resources available to meet, act, and learn.

If these points, or a similar list, were drawn up as a Charter to Improve Government, would you support it?  Would you encourage your government organizations to sign the charter, and commit to continuous improvement?

We turn to our regular sections now:

Bill Troy, ASQ CEO is trying something a little different for the monthly topic for discussion – ‘Is Quality Ambitious Enough?’. The article presents Brooks Carder’s poser – whether ASQ’s mission: To increase the use and impact of quality in response to the diverse needs of the world, is ambitious enough, particularly when quality is responsible for many of the things that make life better.

Julia McIntosh, ASQ communications , in her ‘’December Roundup: What Does Ambition Look Like in Quality?’ notes that – “Not surprisingly, this became a somewhat contentious topic among the group.

And then move over to ASQ TV Episodes: The Lighter Side of Quality–Stop Saying That, Please

This is an ASQ TV dramatization, wherein Quality professionals tell us through social media what they wish their co-workers would stop saying

Our ASQ’s Influential Voice for the month is – Jennifer Stepniowski

clip_image002Jennifer Stepniowski is the person that’s passionate about what they do. She is the nerd that shows up to the quality conference wearing a “Got Quality?” shirt. She is Communications Director at Pro QC International and an adjunct instructor at Hillsborough Community College. For Pro QC, her primary responsibilities included supplier development, process design and implementation, and training of on-site resources.  In her current position as Communications Director, she develops and executes the organization’s marketing strategy.  She enjoys market research, promotion, representation at trade events. She blogs @ Quality Time.

We have picked up the article, My Family Is SMART! New Year’s Resolution Success, from the blog. Incidentally, it fits with the theme of the present edition.

“Despite using the SMART template for success…we just failed on follow-through.  we failed before we even got started…we needed something visual to represent what we wanted to accomplish…I thought about linking the success of a potted plant with our goals…As time passes, the plant (and the habits we hope to change) will simply flourish as long as we are aware of them, appreciate them and give them the attention they need to thrive….Is it SMART? I like to think so, but time will tell.”

Articles Written:

Quality Progress (ASQ Print Publication) § Blog Boom (7/14) § Quality in the 1st Person – Be the Change (12/13)

Pro QC Newsletter (Editor and Content Developer)

§ A Systematic Issue Management Process – Manufacturing Quality Application § Classifying Quality Defects: Is it Major, Minor or Critical § Determining the Costs of Quality § ISO 26000: Introducing the New Social Responsibility Guideline § Marketing Quality: The Big Picture § Quality Tools for Successful New Year’s Resolutions § Understanding the Inspection Process

MasterControl

§ Four Common Quality Misconceptions § Grid Analysis for Simplified Supplier Selection § Quality Inspiration

Pro QC Blog (Editor and Content Development)

§ http://blog.proqc.com

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our the Improvement journey ………….

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Author: ASHOK M VAISHNAV

In July 2011, I opted to retire from my active career as a practicing management professional. In the 38 years that I pursued this career, I had opportunity to work in diverse capacities, in small-to-medium-to-large engineering companies. Whether I was setting up Greenfield projects or Brownfield projects, nurturing the new start-ups or accelerating the stabilized unit to a next phase growth, I had many more occasions to take the paths uncharted. The life then was so challenging! One of the biggest casualty in that phase was my disregards towards my hobbies - Be with The Family, Enjoy Music form Films of 1940s to mid-1970s period, write on whatever I liked to read, pursue amateur photography and indulge in solving the chess problems. So I commenced my Second Innings to focus on this area of my life as the primary occupation. At the end of four years, I am now quite a regular blogger. I have been able to build a few very strong pen-relationships. I maintain contact with 38-years of my First Innings as freelance trainer and process facilitator. And yet, The woods are lovely, dark and deep. But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep.

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