Welcome to February 2015 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We have chosen to visit Institute for Healthcare Improvement, envisioning “Improving Health and Healthcare Worldwide”. We would especially focus on Resources thereat, which offers tools, change ideas, measures to guide improvement, IHI white papers, audio and video, improvement stories, and more.

clip_image002IHI uses the Model for Improvement as the framework to guide improvement work. The Model for Improvement,* developed by Associates in Process Improvement, is a simple, yet powerful tool for accelerating improvement. This model is not meant to replace change models that organizations may already be using, but rather to accelerate improvement.

We also get to learn about the fundamentals of the Model for Improvement and testing changes on a small scale using Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles.

We will also have a look at some of the videos here:

Dr. Mike Evans Video: An Illustrated Look at Quality Improvement in Health Care

In the video, Evans starts with a simple question: Why should you care about quality improvement? He presents a brief history of QI (including a “Mount Rushmore” of improvers), then touches on system design, the Model for Improvement, and the familiar challenge, “What can you do by next Tuesday?” — all in less than nine minutes!

Deming’s System of Profound Knowledge (Part 1) and (Part 2)

Robert Lloyd, the Director of Performance Improvement at IHI, uses his trusty whiteboard to dissect the science of improvement. In short videos, he breaks down everything from Deming’s System of Profound Knowledge, to the PDSA cycle, to run charts.

The Model for Improvement (Part 1) and (Part 2)

The Model for Improvement was developed by Associates in Process Improvement.

In the second part, we have NDCBlogger from among the Influential Voices Blogroll Alumni.

This is the blog of Deborah Mackin, the author of The Team-Building Tool Kit series and founder of New Directions Consulting. She has a background in quality manufacturing and production, as well as organizational excellence

We have selected two of the articles from the blog so as to open a peep-in window to the blog:

A Manufacturing Floor Operator’s Experience with High Performance Teams and What It’s Meant To HimMatthew Harrington

While looking for this video on YT, we happily land upon:

Why Change When Things Have Been Successful in the Past?

“We are not making a change to a Team concept because we are doing something wrong. In fact, our success is due to the great work we have done to this point. We are a leader in the field. We want to maintain that leadership and to do so we need to move forward with how we do business.”

We turn to our regular sections now:

Bill Troy, ASQ CEO picks up the thread for the round of discussion, “Why Should Quality “Go Global”?, from the visits paid to the HQ by ASQ’s representatives from global offices in India, Mexico, and China, and partner organization in Brazil, Quali.

Paul O’Neill, a quality thought leader, 2013 Juran Medalist, and  former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, chairman and CEO of Alcoa from 1987 to 1999, where he retired as chairman at the end of 2000, is now immersed in taking the principles of quality and using them to fix the enormous problems the U.S. faces in healthcare.  As an acknowledged expert in healthcare economics, he uses the same quality principles he espoused and enforced at Alcoa to help healthcare executives and providers cut waste and increase effectiveness and safety.

The key take-aways from the discussions have been presented @ Finding Inspiration form Quality Leaders.

First, when he went to Alcoa, he surprised everyone by what he made his top priority.  It was not increasing shareholder value, capturing market share, or increasing profits.  It was worker safety.  Because, as Secretary O’Neill explains, your people are the most precious asset you have.  When they are injured, you don’t have just an interruption in the work, you have real human suffering.  No profit is worth that.

The second take away that resonates, as much as the first, is simply to treat everyone with dignity and respect.

The third point sounds simple, but its implications are unforgiving and pervasive.  It is that your aim must be to be the best in the world at everything you do.  This is a radical departure from what most of us think of as improvement. It does not say be better than last year or be better than the guy down the street.  It says you must drive to be the best in the world and he meant exactly that.   This, in more details , means to figure out theoretical perfection, measure yourself against that standard, and then figure out how to get there.  You then start systematically eliminating everything that is keeping you from attaining that theoretical level of perfection, keep measuring, and don’t stop until you get there.  (My) guess is that’s where even a leader as good as Paul O’Neill will lose a lot of potential followers. If you really mean it, this part is very, very tough.  But, as Secretary O’Neill told me, it is also a lot of fun! ……….. We indeed intend to find out.

Julia McIntosh, ASQ communications , in her January Roundup: Quality Inspirations notes that – A quality role model could be anyone from a guru to a mentor to a person who is not “in quality” at all, but still embodies quality principles- Family, Professional Mentors or Icons and Beyond. The round up sums feedback from a cross-section of ASQ Influential Voices bloggers.

And then move over to ASQ TV Episodes: New To Quality – discover seven quality tools and Quality Body of Knowledge ®

Our ASQ’s Influential Voice for the month is – Manu Vora

clip_image002[129]ASQ Fellow Manu Vora is chairman and president of Business Excellence, Inc. He is an expert in organizational excellence and the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. He blogs at Thoughts on Quality, wherein he puts across his views, thoughts and experiences in relation to the monthly topic for discussion @ASQ Influential Voice forum..

We have picked up one article – A Clear Vision – to illustrate the content on the blog.

The Oxford Dictionaries defines vision as “The ability to think about or plan the future with imagination or wisdom”. Why do organizations need vision? The vision provides a purpose, direction, and focus to take an organization to a next height. It is essentially a dream of the future. …the vision statement should be memorable, short, and uplifting (not several paragraphs put together by outside consultants which become ‘Words on the Wall (WOW)’). ‘ … The article supplements this with few excellent examples of Vision statements from the US Baldrige Performance Excellence Award winners in various domains.

Here is a bonus read from ASQ: Top 8 Books Every Quality Professional Should Read

  1. The Quality Toolbox, Second Edition, by Nancy R. Tague
  2. Juran’s Quality Handbook, Sixth Edition, by Joseph M. Juran and Joseph A. De Feo
  3. Root Cause Analysis: The Core of Problem Solving and Corrective Action by Duke Okes
  4. Making Change Work by Brien Palmer
  5. The Essential Deming, edited by Joyce Nilsson Orsini PhD
  6. Organizational Culture and Leadership by Edgar H. Schein
  7. Economic Control of Quality of Manufactured Product by Walter A. Shewhart
  8. Practical Engineering, Process, and Reliability Statistics by Mark Allen Durivage

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our Improvement journey ………….