Welcome to March 2015 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

For the month, I chose to search articles for “Improving the manufacturing performance”. As can be expected, the available choice was so simply far too much to handle in one episode of our blog carnival. So, I have selected some of the representative articles:

5 Ways to Boost Your Line’s Performance — Right Now … John Mills

1. Reward trainers. First, model the behaviour you want. Then, train your floor managers to implement best practices quickly.

2. Reward small failures. Productivity is a process so treat it like one. Allow staff to team up and try small experiments for boosting output, setting aside rewards for both victories and failures knowing that anything that moves the floor closer to achieving permanent gains is a win.

3. Reward efficiency. Don’t obsess over output at the expense of everything else. Structure rewards that allow employees to “bank” and use time saved via productivity enhancements as vacation or sick time.

4. Reward partnerships. More isn’t always better when it comes to developing and refining a manufacturing process, but there will always be appropriate moments to bring in outside experts.

5. Reward outcomes. Finally, remember the endgame. Identify tangible, measurable goals before embarking on any productivity-boosting campaign. Assign leaders to implement the plan and then get prepared to reward achievements.

Keys to Improving Manufacturing Efficiency

In this paper, Apriso shows how to achieve enterprise-wide supply chain visibility, manufacturing synchronization, and control over efficiency through an integrated solution that directly addresses manufacturing competence.

A Diagnostic Tree for Improving Production Line Performance – Wallace J. Hopp • Seyed M. R. Iravani • Biying Shou

Improving performance of production systems is a critical but often unstructured activity. To help managers convert ad hoc or trial & error improvement efforts into efficient and systematic reviews, we develop a diagnostic tree which decomposes a performance improvement objective into successively more concrete sub-objectives and finally into potential improvement strategies. Based on principles from the Operations Management literature, this tree is structured to enable a non-specialist to better understand the links between corrective actions and performance. It also provides an important foundation for a principles-based knowledge management system that couples the decision tree with a search engine for locating relevant documents within an intranet.

Proven Principles for Improving Manufacturing Performance – Paul Dennis, Tom Knight

Plant managers can obtain major improvements in manufacturing performance by rising above the jargon and implementing two proven guiding principles that have stood the test of time : benchmarking and elimination of waste, particularly redusction in inventory and long cycle-times. The performance improvements should maintain profit margin and provide competitive advantage. Managers should also make a diagnosis first, before prescribing the appropriate improvement technique.

How big data can improve manufacturing by Eric Auschitzky, Markus Hammer, and Agesan Rajagopaul

(Wherever a huge amount of data is being generated[ even when not on all of them on digital media]) Manufacturers (by) taking advantage of advanced analytics can reduce process flaws, saving time and money

Jeff Dorman: Improving Performance

Jeff Dorman examines the roles of leaders, managers and employees, as well as team functionality as crucial elements for organizational success..

Designing performance measures – a structured approach – Andy Neely, Huw Richards, John Mills, Ken Platts and Mike Bourne

(A well-researched article. If one starts hitting the Tables, then you get a very good feel of what can be more relevant to one’s given situation.)

Improving Analysis of Key Performance Measures at Four Middle-Sized Manufacturing Companies – Moving Focus from What Has Happened to What to Do – Marcus Danielsson & Johan Holgard

The purpose of this thesis can be formulated in three research questions: How did the companies change their attitudes and behaviour as a result of understanding variation? How should a method to understand variation be implemented?, What aspects are important to consider when undertaking an implementation process?

28 Manufacturing Metrics that Actually Matter (The Ones We Rely On) Mark Davidson

The MESA (Manufacturing Enterprise Solutions Association) organization has sponsored research over the past years to help the manufacturing marketplace identify the most important metrics, and help decision makers understand metrics improvements and their relationships to metrics programs and the use of software solutions. As part of the most recent metrics survey, 28 manufacturing metrics were identified as being the most utilized by discrete, process, and hybrid/batch manufacturers.

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

Measurement is the first step in improvement. But while measuring is the process of quantification, its effect is to stimulate positive action……Performance measures can be grouped into two basic types: those that relate to results (outputs or outcomes such as competitiveness or financial performance) and those that focus on the determinants of the results (inputs such as quality, flexibility, resource utilization, and innovation). This suggests that performance measurement frameworks can be built around the concepts of results and determinants.

Performance Factory – a new approach of performance assessment for the Factory of the Future

A new measurement and assessment framework, called Performance Factory (PerFact) and its current implementation state, is presented in this work. In addition, the Virtual Factory Framework Project (VFF) is presented. VFF is in line with the concept of the Factory of the Future and envisions the development of a Virtual Factory in order to support and improve the real factory. This in turn allows and promotes the application of PerFact by selectively assessing the real performance or the performance of planning scenarios.

In the second part, we have Innovate on Purpose from among the Influential Voices Blogroll Alumni. Here are the previous posts on this blog:

We turn to our regular sections now:

Bill Troy, ASQ CEO has presented the first of the three part blog series ‘A Leader’s Roadmap to a Culture of Quality: Building on Forbes Insights-ASQ Leadership Research’. Roy Lawton – author of the book Creating a Customer-Centered Culture: Leadership in Quality, Innovation and Speedproposes to provide the missing and necessary specifics for successful action. Part One in this blog series spells out how to successfully address point #1 – All employees must apply the four key elements of any strategy for building a quality culture.  (Page 8: Boeing’s Ken Shead).

Julia McIntosh, ASQ communications , in her ‘February Roundup: Is Quality “Global”?’ notes what ASQ’s bloggers had to say – “quality going global”—should it and does it?  If so, how is quality knowledge best shared worldwide?

And then move over to ASQ TV Episodes: A New Look at Risk Management – Learn about the role of risk in the ISO 9001: 2015 revision, assess the root causes of risk via a fishbone diagram, discover a risk management formula, and learn how the toy company LEGO successfully manages risk.

Our ASQ’s Influential Voice for the month is – Anshuman Tiwari

anshuma-tiwariAnshuman Tiwari is a quality expert with experience as an industrial engineer, quality consultant, and program manager in industries ranging from textiles to financial services. Based in Bengaluru, India, he blogs at Quality—The Unfair Advantage, wherein he includes reviews, articles, views, news, jobs, etc. on quality.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our Improvement journey ………….