Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – March 2017

Welcome to March, 2017 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

This is the month when the North India in particular celebrate the fun and frlickings of aolourful Holi . We have picked up these  topical posts to commence our present episode:

We will now take up the posts on the anniversaries or eulogies:

“Phir Wohi Dil Laya Hoon” – Joy MukerjeeThe failure of “Humsaya” and the inability to release “Love in Bombay” resulted in Joy Mukerjee losing his stardom as soon as the 70’s dawned. To repay his debts, Joy was forced to act in B- and C- grade movies like “Ehsan”, “Puraskar”, “Mujrim”, “Aag aur Daag”, “Kahin Aar Kahin Par”. This ended up denting his reputation further. Joy’s sorrow and inner anguish reflected in his face and the sadness that had crept on his face was palpable….As a hero, Joy Mukerjee appeared only in 32 films.

Sai Paranjype’s ‘Katha’ is a fabulous fable about the most charming chawl in the worldBubla Basu – The renowned filmmaker’s 79th birthday is the perfect excuse to revisit one of her loveliest films, starring Naseeruddin Shah, Farooque Shaikh and Deepti Naval.

For Sahir Ludhianvi, the best kind of love was unrequitedNirupama Dutt – On the celebrated Urdu poet’s 96th birth anniversary, a reminder of his contradictory attitudes towards women and relationships.

The eyes have it in ‘Achcha Ji Main Haari’ from ‘Kalapani’Rudradeep Bhattacharjee – The song from Raj Khosla’s ‘Kalapani’ works on playful looks and sighs.

The Vanraj Bhatia interview: ‘My music was unique then and is perhaps unique even now’Greg Booth – The acclaimed 90-year-old composer looks back on the music he made and looks ahead to the opera he hopes to finish someday. Let us listen to: Sanvariya Dekh Zara from Shyam Benegal’s Sardari Begum (1996).

Films that are 50: A mad scientist, a vampire and willing victims in cross-border hit ‘Zinda Laash’Karan Bali  – The baggy adaptation of the Dracula legend proved to be a neat box office fit in Pakistan in 1967.

The March 2017 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs was dedicated to S N Tripathi: Unremembered music director of remembered songs.

Here are posts on other subjects as well:

WHEN BOLLYWOOD ACTRESSES DECIDED TO MASQUERADE AS ‘MEN’!Sharada Iyer is a mirror image of her article Bollywood’s Drag-Queen Acts, wherein she has been able to muster of 18 films where the actresses have donned the man’s role.

Unko Yeh Shikayat Hai Ke Hum Kuch Nahin Kehte – When Silence Speaks Volumes – There are some songs that rise high above the regular and become proverbial. Such is the everlasting magic of this exquisite ghazal from Adalat (1958) which says volumes more than simple words could ever convey. Anand Desai and Antara Nanda Mondal explore the finer nuances of this quietly introspective ghazal, written by Rajinder Krishan, composed by Madan Mohan and sung by Lata Mangeshkar, which connects with the listener at a personal level.

Another Mujra in a Different Kitchen –is post about performances by people who are not necessarily stars and have not had huge studios invested in them, who are happy simply to practice and exhibit an art that they love. It may also be lot of fun to see people doing classical Indian or Bollywood dances in very ordinary surroundings, in front of objects as incongruous as, say, modern kitchen appliances.

Noor Jehan in Incomplete Film Tara (1949) – If completed and released on time, Tara might have become Noor Jehan’s first film in Pakistan. However, with the continuous string of flop Urdu films during the formative period of Pakistani Film Industry, someone advised Shaukat Hussain Rizvi/Noor Jehan to produce and direct a film in Punjabi instead of Urdu. Chanway, a Punjabi film released in 1951 became Noor Jehan’s first released film in Pakistan and a very successful one.

Guest Post: Rajinder Singh Bedi – My Uncle as I remember him in which Nischint Bhatnagar‘Nishi’, who is Mr Bedi’s niece (his younger brother’s daughter)  a heart-warming little insight into the man Rajinder Singh Bedi was.

In Film songs in classical ragas (11) – The evocative duo: Mand and Shivranjani.Subodh Agarwal carries forward his monumental contribution of presenting Hindi Films based on a particular classical Raag along with the basics of the Raag  that laypersons would understand and relish.

Best songs of 1948: And the winners are? Apart for the very meticulous Film Historians, it is the crowd-funding efforts of netizens that have made the Vintage Era of Hindi Films so much accessible to us. “Best songs of year” has become a most dependable platform to bring all these works on one page in a structured way.

This curtain raiser has provided so much fodder, that absorbing so much itself will take some before we I commence my micro-review journey for the year.

As the curtain on 1948’s songs has gone up, I have picked up Mohammad Rafi’s most known song on Gandhiji  to end the present episode:

Suno suno ae duniyawalo Bapu ki ye amar kahani (NFS) -lyrics Rajendra Krishna, music Husnlal-Bhagatram

I trust you will always feel free to proffer your suggestions for making this series of posts more lively and informative….

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – March, 2017

Welcome to March, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We will commence our episode with an article on Quality, in general, in our daily life.

Trends That Are Affecting the Future of Quality Management by Debra Kraft – From a total quality management standpoint, trends include broader adoption of quality management principles across industries and an increasing importance placed on sustainability.,, Quality management concepts should apply to everything every business does.

Let us now pick up a different topic in this category of sustainability – The tragedy of the commons (TOTC).

The tragedy of the commons is an economic theory of a situation within a shared-resource system where individual users acting independently according to their own self-interest behave contrary to the common good of all users by depleting that resource through their collective action.

Tragedy of the Commons  – This animated series of short videos acts as a video glossary to define specific scientific terms or concepts in a fun, easy to understand way.  –

Part 1

Part 2

The Tragedy of the Commons  – In this video, we take a look at common goods. Common resources are nonexcludable but rival. For instance, no one can be excluded from fishing for tuna, but they are rival — for every tuna caught, there is one less for everyone else. Nonexcludable but rival resources often lead to what we call a “tragedy of the commons.” In the case of tuna, this means the collapse of the fishing stock. Under a tragedy of the commons, a resource is often overused and under-maintained. Why does this happen? And how can we solve this problem? Like we’ve done so many times throughout this course, let’s take a look at the incentives at play. We also discuss Nobel Prize Winner Elinor Ostrom’s contributions to this topic.

A common thread throughout Garrett James Hardin‘s work is an interest in bioethics. Trained as an ecologist and microbiologist and a Professor of Human Ecology at the University of California for more than thirty years, he is best known for his 1968 essay, The Tragedy of the Commons. Garrett Hardin’s writings enable us to responsibly assess our surroundings to optimize the quality of life for present and future generations.

In an interview, on the Tragedy of the Commons, Garrett Hardin states that “What I meant by writing The Tragedy of the Commons is to call people’s attention to the fact that the problem of dividing the resources has to be done in a way that fits in with human nature. We shouldn’t expect too much of it.”

Victor M. Ponce has presented a critical analysis of  Hardin’s classic piece “The Tragedy of the Commons,”. He states that “ a commons is a natural resource shared by many individuals. In this context, “shared” means that each individual does not have a claim to any part of the resource, but rather, to the use of a portion of it for his/her own benefit. The tragedy is that, in the absence of regulation, each individual will have a tendency to exploit the commons to his/her own advantage, typically without limit. Under this state of affairs, the commons is depleted and eventually ruined…. Societies that want to remain sustainable have no choice but to regulate the use of the commons. Regulation is the price to pay for sustainability; it is the least undesirable strategy, since an unregulated commons eventually marches itself toward tragedy.

Here is the test of our understanding of commons’ theory with a multiple-choice question.

Assume that there are several people on a boat in a lake or ocean. All of a sudden, one of them goes crazy, pulls out a drill and starts drilling a hole in the hull. The rest have three choices:

  1. Watch the drilling and examine how fast the driller makes a hole in the hull,
  2. Grab a lifejacket and jump out of the boat, because it is obvious that the boat is going to sink eventually, or
  3. Stop the culprit and throw the drill overboard to avoid the repetition of such an unfortunate incident.

If the answer is A, you do not know that the boat is actually a commons, so you fail the test. If your answer is B, you know that the boat is a commons, but you do not know that it is “your” commons, so you fail too. If your answer is C, you know that the boat is a commons and you are ready to defend its integrity, because your security and comfort (to say nothing about your life!) depends on it. I think most people would agree that the most sensible answer is C.

In conclusion, the rights of the individual are seen to end where the rights of the commons start; conversely, the rights of the commons end with the rights of the individual. Thus, an appropriate balance between these two rights is the only sustainable course to take if we are to avoid a repetition of “The Tragedy of the Commons.”

To sum up our present discussion on the subject of TOTC, I have picked up three leads that present the topic in the current day perspective of environmental sustainability.

Strengthening Sustainability in Urban Communities. Exchanging Transatlantic Best Practices articulates the good vision for a “world-class” sustaining city

Tragedy of the Commons – a true story from Bangalore  – Dell employees fix a HUGE UGLY dump right outside Bagmane Tech Park, Bangalore!

We will now turn to our regular sections:

I have picked up the question relating to key deliverables and processes of a quality Manager  under ISO 9001:2015. The answer states that with the adage of Risk Based Thinking to the new standard, the Quality manager and the QA department would be responsible for the deliverables of their department and its processes. They would also be responsible for discerning any risks to the company’s goals and objectives.

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy has presented March Roundup with a question – How can we prevent quality professionals from being perceived as a “thing of the past”? What adaptations need to occur in the quality industry as a whole and on the individual level to revitalize the industry and attract  the next generation of quality professionals?- and a round of discussion thereon.

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episode:

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of February,2017:

Solving Problems Effectively: Resolving root cause is as fundamental as ABC – Rooting out the reasons for internal and/or external failures is fundamental to customer satisfaction, cost of quality improvement, and even a matter of survival in the marketplace. The classic approach to root cause analysis of a problem is to ask why? (or why not?) a number of times. It is important to know how deep is ‘deep enough’ before probing deeper.….The focus of the investigation needs to be on the quality system. How did the system allow the problem to occur in the first place? Where is the weakness in the system? The goal is developing more system-based improvements as opposed to finding someone to blame.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs: March, 2017

S N Tripathi: Unremembered music director of remembered songs

There would hardly be anyone who may need reminding these songs:

But, perhaps it may need some recalling that these songs were by composed by S N (Shree Nath) Tripathi . That is because, ironically even as the songs are remembered, the films have faded out of memories. So, s-n-tripathiperhaps the name of S N Tripathi -14 March 1913 | 28 March 1988 – who has composed music for almost 250 films, he also acted in some 200 films, directed 39 films and even written screenplays for around 37 films. The destiny in its own weird wisdom chose to keep S N Tripathi in the fringe orbits of the Hindi Film Music world.

He joined the film world as a violinist in 1936. He then was appointed assistant to Sarswati Devi. The first song that he sang was Ae Re Daiya Lachak Lachak Chalo (Jeevan Naiya, 1936) for Ashok Kumar on the screen. This, incidentally, was the maiden film of Ashok Kumar too. S N Tripathi’s maiden film as a music director was Chandan(1936). The film, unfortunately, was released in 1941 only.

Nanha Sa Dil Deti Hoon – Chandan(1941) -Rajkumari, SN Tripathi  – Lyrics: Pt. Indra Chandra

For our present episode we will explore some of the S N Tripathi’s songs up to 1950.

The first film that is said to have given recognition to S N Tripathi was Panghat (1943).

Panghat Ke Ghaayalon Ka Panght Hi Thikana – Panghat (1943) – S N Tripathi – Lyrics: Pt. Indra Chandra

Here is the song that itself should have settled any and all debates about S N Tripathi’s versatility. He has acted, sung and composed this very light ‘bath-room’ song, and done so with great flare and even greater finesse.

Aayi Baloonwaali Aayi Re – Aadhaar (1945) – Geeta Dutt and S N Tripathi – Lyrics: M A Razi

Geeta Dutt was just 14 when she sang this song.

Aise Na Hamein Chhedo, Aise Na Satao, Kuchch Sun Lo Hamari – Ramayani (1945)  –  Rajkumari, Pahari Sanyal –

HFGK has not specified the singers. From the star cast of the film we can deduce that Rajkumari ought to have playedback for Nargis. The film was a social drama. Listening Rajkumari in a very light romantic song is great pleasure.

Laaj Bhare… In Nainan MeinAdhik Sudha Bharo Na.. – Uttara Abhimanyu (1946) – Ashok Kumar – Lyrics:  Roopdas, Saraswati Kumar Deepak (?)

Ashok Kumar association with S N Tripathi seems to bond very strongly. It is said that it was SN Tripathi who trained the novice voices of Ashok Kumar and Devika Rani for the song “Mein Ban Ki Chidiya Ban Ke Ban Ban Doloon Re for ‘Achhoot Kanyaa’ in 1936 under the baton of Saraswati Devi. The present song can also be considered as unique. HFGK records that this song is a pure playback by Ashok Kumar, possibly for Shahu Modak on the screen,.

Sola Singaar Main Sajaaungi.. Piya Ko Rijhaaungi – Panihari (1946) – Shanta Apte – Lyrics: Pt. Indra, Rammurty, Brajendra Gaud (?)

The poster of the film loudly proclaims: “Here she is ! New Shanta in a gay romance!” This song perhaps aptly translates the intention…..

Beet Chali Barkha Rut Site, Sudh Na Mili Tumhaari – Shree Ram Bhakta Hanuman (1948) – Mukesh – Lyrics: B D Mishra

We now seem to see an inadvertent, but unfortunate type-casting of S N Tripathi into mythological films. So was the hero who sings the song on the screen – Trilok Kapoor, who incidentally is the younger brother of Prithviraj Kapoor. Additionally, S N Tripathi also got cast into roles of Hanumaan as well!

Aao Sakhi Mangal Gao Ki Subh Din Aaye Re – Veer Ghatotkach (1949) – Saroj, Shanti Sharma – Lyrics: Ramesh Joshi

Here is playful song, filmed on a very young Meena Kumari.

Ashok Kumar or Meena Kumari did not get typed into mythological B class films, but S N Tripathi did !

Ek Naya Sanasaar Sajao, Aaj Khushi Ka Din Aaya – Veer Ghatotkach (1949)- Rohini Roy, Yahwant Bhatt and Chorus – Lyrics: Moti B. A.

Arun Kumar Deshmukh has narrated some of the history of one the singers – Yashwant Bhatt – of the song in this post.

1950 film Saudamini was a social film. The songs of the film were quite melodious and ought to have caught the attention of the fans at that time.But, perhaps not enough to turn the tide away from the mythology as afar as S N Tripathi was concerned.

Kaali Koyal Bole Matwali Koyal Bole Re – Saudamini (1950) – Mohan Tara Talpade – Lyrics: Anjum Pilibhiti

S N Tripathi has tried every possible trick to infuse variety into his songs in a social-theme film by selecting different playback singers.

Kaali Kaali Badli Chaayi Saawan Ki Ritu Aayi – Saudamini (1950) – Geeta Roy (Dutt)

Geeta Roy is at her usual vintage mellifluous self..

Kaali Ghata Hat Gayi Neel Gagan Mein Nikala Chand Hai – Saudamini (1950) – Chitragupt –

As the adequate information is not available, one may not be able to definitively state whether Chitragupt was assisting S N Tripathi for this film or not. In any case, however, the fact that S N Tripathi has experimented with Chitragupt’s voice speaks for his spirit of experimentation.

Dukh Dard Bhare Dil Ka Kahe Kisko Fasana – Saudamini (1950) – Uma Devi

For a sad song S N Tripathi has so effectively used voice of Uma Devi.

Jawani Chaand Salona Chamake Aur Choop Jaye – Saudamini (1950) – Mohammad Rafi, Zoharabai Ambalewali and chorus

Rafi commences first antara with a different beat than that of Mukhada before Zohra switches to the original tempo at the end of the anatara.

Surya Dev Dinesh Hey Mam Baar Baar Pranaam Ho -Shree Ganesh Mahima (1950)

Records do not amply state whether the song is also sang by S N Tripathi himself, which he certainly acts on the screen. The song is a rare prayer addressed to Surya, The Sun god.

We will end our present episode with the song that has the credit of being the first ever duet of Mohammad Rafi and Geeta Dutt, a wonderfully crafted song using chorus:

Jai Hind Yeh Hind Ki Kahniyan – Manasarovar (1946) – Lyrics: Saraswatikumar Deepak

We will continue our search for Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

Business Sutra |1.2 | Purpose of a Corporation

business-sutra-1Business Sutra |1| Corporations

In the opening part of the first episode of his TV serial, Business Sutra, Devdutt Pattanaik dwelt upon the subject of the Indian way of doing the business.

In our present post, we will have a detailed look at the second of the three parts of this episode.

Business Sutra |1.2 | Purpose of a Corporation

500 corporations control about seventy percent of world trade and each year approximately 3 million new limited liability companies are registered. The way these corporations are managed can therefore affect the potential for either positive or negative change, depending on the chosen stewardship. The biggest question we face goes to the very core of business: What is the purpose of these corporations?

However, the subject has ever remained any simple either in tone or in its content. Depending on the context, the related discussions have remained as much exhaustive as hotly debated.

The most discussed and debated view – The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits -is attributed to Milton Friedman. The core of of Milton Friedman was: There is one and only one social responsibility of business – to use its resources and engage in activities designed to increase its profits so long as it stays within the rules of the game, which is to say, engages in open and free competition without deception or fraud.

One of the strongest rejoinder, and by now a fairly widely accepted view, is that of Peter Drucker. In his book The Practice of Management, Peter Drucker declares -“The purpose of a company is to create a customer” and “a business….is defined by the want the customer satisfies when he or she buys a product or a service. To satisfy the customer is the mission and purpose of every business.”

purpose-of-business-peter-drucker

The views expressed by our own Gandhiji also echo a similar sentiment.

purpose-of-business-mahatma-gandhi

Let us look at several other points of views so as to gather a wider perspective of the discussion:

In The meaning of Bill Gates has been discussed Bill Gates interpretation of the direction that Microsoft should take up on the basis of what was his understanding the then purpose of the organization.  As with many great innovations, Bill Gates’s vision has come to seem so obvious that it is hard to imagine the world any other way. Yet, early on, he grasped two things that were far from obvious at the time, and he grasped them more clearly and pursued them more fiercely than his rivals did at Commodore, MITS or even Apple.

The first was that computing could be a high-volume, low-margin business. Until Microsoft came along, the big money was in maintaining a select family of very grand mainframes. Gates realised that falling hardware costs, combined with the negligible expense of making extra copies of standard software, would turn the computer business on its head. Personal computers could be “on every desk and in every home”. Profit would come from selling a lot of them cheaply, not servicing a few at a great price. And the company that won a large market share at the start would prevail later on.

Gates also realized that making hardware and writing software could be stronger as separate businesses. Even as firms like Apple clung on to both the computer operating system and the hardware—just as mainframe companies had—Microsoft and Intel, which designed the PC’s microprocessors, blew computing’s business model apart. Hardware and software companies innovated in an ecosystem that the Wintel duopoly tightly controlled and—in spite of the bugs and crashes—used to reap vast economies of scale and profits. When mighty IBM unwittingly granted Microsoft the right to sell its PC operating system to other hardware firms, it did not see that it was creating legions of rivals for itself. Bill Gates did.

Noel Tichy and Ram Charan have unraveled Jack Welsh’s the then interpretation of GE’s purpose and the consequent direction GE ought to chart in Speed, Simplicity, Self-confidence: an interview with Jack Welsh: In 1981, Welch declared that the company would focus its operations on three “strategic circles”—core manufacturing units such as lighting and locomotives, technology-intensive businesses, and services—and that each of its businesses would rank first or second in its global market.

GE’s strategic redirection had essentially taken shape by the end of 1986. By then, Welch has embarked on a more imposing challenge: building a revitalized “human engine” to animate GE’s formidable “business engine.”

His program had two central objectives. First, he championed a company-wide drive to identify and eliminate unproductive work in order to energize GE’s employees. Second, and perhaps of even greater significance, Welch lead a transformation of attitudes at GE—struggling, in his words, to release “emotional energy” at all levels of the organization and encourage creativity and feelings of ownership and self-worth. His ultimate goal was to create an enterprise that can tap the benefits of global scale and diversity without the stifling costs of bureaucratic controls and hierarchical authority and without a managerial focus on personal power and self-perpetuation. This requires a transformation not only of systems and procedures, but also of people themselves.

In an HBR article, Ben W Heineman, Jr. presents Steve Jobs and the Purpose of the Corporation : His deep commitment was to make innovative, robust and beautiful products that delighted customers. There can also be no question that Jobs was not focused on shareholders or taking short-cuts or short-term actions to maximize shareholder value.

In a TED Talk, Profit is not always the point, Harish Manwani while presenting the Unilever Sustainable Living Plan, which said, “Our purpose is to make sustainable living commonplace, and we are going to change the lives of one billion people over 2020”, traces his own career of how this was and is being done.

In a paper published in 2011 – The Purpose of the Corporation in Business and Law School Curricula – Darrell West examines law and business school curricula to determine which perspectives are taught in professional education, and student perceptions about business schools based on surveys at leading business programs over the past decade. The paper concludes that having broader conceptions of corporate purpose is necessary to effectively address the ways in which corporations impact life in contemporary society.

Firms of Endearment: How World-Class Companies Profit from Passion and Purpose: Rajendra S. Sisodia, David B. Wolfe, Jagdish N. Sheth, Pearson Education, February 2014, Second Edition : Today’s greatest companies are fueled by passion and purpose, not cash. They earn large profits by helping all their stakeholders thrive: customers, investors, employees, partners, communities, and society. These rare, authentic firms of endearment act in powerfully positive ways that stakeholders recognize, value, admire, and even love. They make the world better by the way they do business-and the world responds. They had created radically new rules:

  • Build a high-performance business on love (It can be done. We’ll prove it.)
  • Help people find the self-actualization they’re so desperately seeking
  • Join capitalism’s radical social transformation—or fall by the wayside
  • Don’t just talk about creating a happy, productive workplace: DO IT!
  • Honor the unspoken emotional contract you share with your stakeholders
  • Create partner relationships that really are mutually beneficial
  • Build a company that communities welcome enthusiastically
  • Help all your stakeholders win, including your investors

Chris MacDonald proposes that it really is foolish to think that the purpose of a corporation is to make money. But that’s only because it’s foolish to think that corporations have purposes at all. That is, it’s foolish to think of a large, multifaceted organization as having a single, unitary “purpose” in the universe, rather than thinking of it as serving many purposes for many interested parties. Arguing over what a corporation is “really for” — building shareholder value? making products to make people happy? Providing jobs? etc. — is a fool’s errand. He poses a question: How you should behave yourself in the course of your job, in pursuit of your goals? This is a question of ethics. And that question is much more enlightening than some grand question about purposes.

The Purpose of the Corporation project has released a video animation to review the purpose of the corporation and the myths of the shareholder value maximisation model. A backgrounder is also available online offering further information and data studies.

The Project launched a global roundtable series on corporate governance that brought together experts from business, academia, regulators and civil society to discuss the future of big business. Events were held in London (September 2015), New York (June 2015), Zurich (October 2015) and Breukelen (The Netherlands – February 2016). Paris (April 2016), Oslo (August 2016). The results of the global roundtable series were presented at a high-level conference in September 2016.

The report is available here: http://www.purposeofcorporation.org/corporate-governance-for-a-changing-world_report.pdf

In his talk, Start With Why, Simon Sinek, consultant and author, explain the emergency for companies and organizations to wonder “why”: why, fundamentally, did they build up themselves, why do they exist and which are the values in which they believe? Each company owns a combination of three strategic components: why they exist (“Why”), how they to business (“How”) and what are its products and services (“What”). The specificity of this mix, if the company succeeds in expressing it, becomes its strength. Companies that understood this approach of leadership are more innovative and more long-lasting than the others.

How to Identify Your Team or Organization’s Purpose – Jesse Lyn Stoner seeks replies to these three questions

  1. What business are you really in? Who are your customers and what do they really need from you? Knowing “what business you’re really in” informs strategic decisions.
  2. What is the real value you offer? How do people benefit from what you offer? How does your service or product benefit society at large?  A significant and valuable purpose inspires commitment and provides meaning to daily activities.
  3. What is the end-result that you offer? Focusing on the end-result you create is engaging and energizing.

The Power of Purpose for Innovation and Transformation – Cheryl J Grise and Vallerie Keller – Successful companies embed purpose at the heart of their strategy. But how do you identify and articulate a company’s purpose? And, having done so, how do you translate it into successful innovation and strategic transformation? This article provides important insight into purpose-led transformation and how it can help build a better working world.

Thus far, we have had representative samples of what the West has to say on the subject of the purpose of the corporation.

Let us now look at what Devdutt Pattanaik has to say in Segment 2: Purpose of a Corporation.

The purpose of the organization can be represented in the form of concept of happiness or LSD.

Here are the key points from his present discourse:

In India the belief is also wealth and not the only wealth. The core question that most of us are faced with in our daily existence is that what is the purpose of a corporation? What is the motivation that should ideally drive a corporation?

Typically it should not be profitability because profitability is also equal to a certain efficient way of running a certain distribution of wealth. The profits can only come if you produce goods and products that consumers wanted, in the best most efficient manner.  Is the profitability the generosity, is it ambition, is it agreed.

lsdThe motivation of corporation is to create happiness. In India currency is of three types and it was represented using the three goddesses – one goddess who is sort of famous for sitting on a lotus everywhere in India, holding an pot overflowing with wealth. Another goddess is famous because she holds a veena in one hand and scriptures in the other hand.  She is he goddess of knowledge. There is a third goddess. She has a trident in her hand.  The first one is called Lakshmi[L], second one is Saraswati [S] and the third one is Durga[D].

One represents material wealth, the second represents the intellectual wealth and the third one is emotional wealth. These are the three things that human beings transact each other.  This also represents material needs, intellectual needs and the emotional needs of a human being. The organizations have to work at all three levels,

The question is of striking a balance somewhere along the line.

If you closely look at the balanced scored, it is about LSD.

“The number of people who are really motivated by money is very small,” Drucker once remarked. “Most people need to feel that they are here for a purpose, and unless an organization can connect to this need to leave something behind that makes this a better world, or at least a different one, it won’t be successful over time.”

Follow Drucker’s lead and change work from being transactional to transformative. Productivity will go up, and so will joy at work. We may call that positive business.

We will take up discussion of Short-term or long-term thinking (professionalism or family business), as presented in the Segment 3 of the first episode of Devdutt Pattanaik’s TV serial Business Sutra in our next episode.

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – February, 2017

Welcome to February, 2017 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

This is the month when the world celebrated Valentine Day. We have picked up these  topical posts to commence our present episode:

Bachapan Ki Yaad Dheere Dheere Pyaar Ban Gayi – Shaheed (1948) – Lalita Deulkar – Ghulam Haider – Qamar Jalalabadi

We will now take up the posts on the anniversaries or eulogies:

The three distinct phases of OP Nayyar’s career –  Ravindra Kelkar pans three distinct musical styles, each corresponding to three time periods of O P Nayyar’s career.  Here are three illustrations, each for a respective phase:

Taare Chandani – Baaz (1953) – Geeta Roy (Dutt) – Majrooh Sultanpuri

Man More Ga Jhoom Ke – Mangu (1954) – Asha Bhosle – Majrooh Sultanpuri

Humdum Mere Khel Na Jano – Phir Wohi Dil Laya Hoon (1963) – Mohammad Rafi, Asha Bhosle – Majrooh Sultanpuri

Remembering Madhubala, Bollywood’s Very Own Marilyn Monroe – Khalid Mohamed- republished to mark Madhubala’s birth anniversary Madhubala’s end-years were spent in deflecting an illness which had a deadline. At one point, doctors had declared that Madhubala wouldn’t last beyond a period of two years. ..Despite that, she attempted to complete the last shooting spell required for Chalak co-featuring Raj Kapoor. Lore has it that since filmmakers had stopped approaching her to act, she threw caution to the wind, and steered towards film direction. Neither this project titled Farz Aur Ishq, nor Chalak, could get to the finishing line.

Cuckoo Did Get A Mention Here On Her Birthday This Year… – Even as there is no specific post on Cuckoo,  a new comment to the old post Discussion, Info and Great Pics Related to the Earliest Appearances of Cuckoo makes up for the loss.

We have two posts on Waheeda Raheman’s birthday –

  • Waheeda Rehman – The Woman of Substance On-Screen – In Pyaasa, Mujhe Jeene Do, The Guide, Teesri Kasam and Kaagaz Ke Phool – Waheeda’s best four movies to the author’s mind – Waheeda played the women who traded their charms for sustenance.” Vijay Kumar revisits these films from the perspective of the towering women characters in them played by Waheeda Rehman.
  • In Praise of Waheeda Rehman who had quite a few songs that are songs that are paeans to her beauty, praising her charm and her loveliness, while some of the others are sheer romance, in verse.

Hua jab se dil mein tera guzar, Mujhe chain hai na qaraar hai (Zara sun haseena-e-nazneenKaun Apna Kaun Paraya (1963) – Mohammed Rafi – Ravi – Shakeel Badayuni

Remembering Faiz Ahmed Faiz Through His Aching Words – Almas Khateeb – here’s looking at some of this subtle and sophisticated poet’s works, that’ll stay with us for years to come: Faiz Ahmed Faiz and His Beguiling Poetry.

The February 2017 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs was dedicated to ‘Some of the Talat Mahmood Duets receding from the memory’.

Here are posts on other subjects as well:

the-corsican-brothersram-aur-shyam

Films that are 50: A Dilip Kumar double treat in ‘Ram Aur Shyam’  – Nirupama Kotru – The thespian proves that comedy is as easy as tragedy in the 1967 hit comedy, which was a remake of  the popular Telugu film Ramudu Bheemudu, which in turn was loosely based on Alexander Dumas’s The Corsican Brothers.

Los Angeles, 1975. Lata Mangeshkar takes the stage. Deafening applauseMohan DeoraRachana ShahOn Stage With Lata is a different kind of memoir: it is a short history of Mangeshkhar’s concerts in the United States of America, Canada, the Caribbean and the Fiji Islands between 1975 and 1998.

Audio master: ‘Kismet’ laid the foundation of the Hindi film song as we know itRudradeep Bhattacharjee – In the 1943 blockbuster, the essential elements and conventions of the movie tune were codified, including the mukhda-antara form. Musicologist Jayson Beaster-Jones notes, “Both the film and the music of ‘Kismet’ exemplify a point just before a critical moment of transition for Indian filmmaking.”

Hope for Mumbai’s single screen cinemas after New Excelsior gets a shiny makeover – Subhash Ghai’s cinema chain has renovated and relaunched the iconic Mumbai theatre with new amenities and fewer seats.

Flowers bloom in Bollywood – D P Rangan has presented a colorful spread of Hindi film songs on flowers.

My favourites: Ten answers to the ‘Kaun Aaya’ question is in response to songs on Kaun Aaya, such as:

Chaakuwaala chhuriwaala… aaya main mastaana (Al-Hilal, 1957)

Mehfil mein jo aaye tum (Vallah Kya Baat Hai, 1962)

Ghoomke aaya hoon main… Baajewaala Patialewaala (Basant, 1960)

The Adivasi Chain Dances (Santali and Dhimsa)Circle dance, or chain dance, is a style of dance done in a circle or semicircle to musical accompaniment, such as rhythm instruments and singing. Circle dancing is probably the oldest known dance formation and was part of community life from when people first started to dance.

We end today’s episode with a prayer composed also by Mohammad Rafi

Hazrat Adam Ka Wakeya

I trust you will always feel free to proffer your suggestions for making this series of posts more lively and informative….

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – February, 2017

Welcome to February, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We will commence our episode with a few articles on Quality in our daily life.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

I have picked up the question Using the 10:1 ratio rule and the 4:1 ratio rule from the section Ask The Experts, ASQ, for our current episode. The question deals with the field of confidence in the results of calibration employed in the metrological and statistical practices recommended for Measurement and Monitoring Equipment.

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy has presented Chris Moustakas ‘s guest article – Quality Management, Continuous Improvement, and Their Relation to the Golden Circle. Chris Quotes: “ In his famous Ted talk, Simon Sinek argues that if you look at the world through the simple concentric layers of why-how-what (the Golden Circle), and push yourself as close as possible to the center circle, “why,” you position yourself to be more of a visionary than a doer. “What” we do to accomplish a goal is tactical, bland, and uninspiring. “How” we set ourselves up to accomplish that goal is strategic and implies direction. “Why” we do what we do is the million-dollar question, and where true inspiration originates.”

The subject of Golden Circle is so engrossing that I plan to devote the rest of our present episode to a few more articles on the topic.

First things first. Let us look at Executive Summary: The Golden Circle with Simon Sinek  by: Andy Partridge. When most organisations or people think, act or communicate they do so from the outside in, from WHAT to WHY. And for good reason – they go from the tangible to the intangible. We say WHAT we do, we sometimes say HOW we do it, but rarely say WHY we do WHAT we do….But not the inspired leaders and companies. Every single one of them, regardless of their size or industry thinks, acts and communicates from the inside out.

simon-sinek-quote-hire-people-for-money

How Would Simon Sinek Use The Golden Circle Rules to Explain Account-Based Marketing? – Sangram Vajre proposes a similar model for B2B Marketing:

b2b-golden-circle-model

Intrapreneurship starts with a WHY – This is part of the series of posts talking about Ecosystem Design – We fancy a good revolution where there is not difference between a customer and a worker. The employees believe in our Why and because of this choose to work in the company, and the customer believes in our Why and choose to buy in our stores. One of our goals is to find customer who believe what we believe and work together so that we can all succeed.

The Golden Circle of Innovation” – Though not focusing on the why, how and what, Crossan and Apaydin have generated an overview of all relevant theories on innovation, resulting in a framework for innovation, as depicted below….They mention two ‘dimensions of innovation’, both focusing on innovation itself and they mention several ‘determinants of innovation’, focusing on the way that innovation is accelerated and managed within organizations.

framework-for-innovation

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episode:

  • Using Quality Tools at Work and Home – Yvonne Howze describes how she successfully uses quality tools in her professional and personal life, often with amusing consequences.
  • SR Offers Opportunities for Quality Professionals – “Sustainability is the goal,” says Andrea Hoffmeier in this ASQTV interview. Hoffmeier, explains how quality professionals can play a role in helping their organizations and clients reach the goal of sustainability through social responsibility. She also discusses how DMAIC can be adapted for the SR audiences.
  • Sherlock Holmes and the Case of Quality Methods – Matthew Barsalou, Statistical Problem Resolution Master Black Belt at BorgWarner Turbo Systems Engineering GmbH, discusses Sherlock Holmes, hypotheses, and root cause.
  • Becoming—and Remaining—An Engaged Company – Alyce Nelson, Executive Coach & Quality Principal, FAS. Inc., discusses how to keep staff engaged and how to keep from derailing organizational engagement.

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of January,2017:

Quality at the Source : QATS can produce dramatic quality improvements: Jim's GemsIn its purest form QATS defines that quality output is not only measured at the end of the production line but at every step of the manufacturing process and being the responsibility of each individual who contributes to the production of on-time delivery of a product or service…There are simple techniques for QATS to work effectively:

  • No-fault forward
  • Standardized work
  • Prepare the most important resource
  • Self-checks
  • Successive checks
  • Mistake-proof

Get In Sync : How do you reach the highest level of willingness, the level at which you boldly step forward? Bottom line, make sure you’re in sync by doing what really matters…to you.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs: February, 2017

Some of the Talat Mahmood Duets receding from the memory

talat_other_singersAll the singing greats at the start of their careers – Talat Mahmood, Mohd Rafi, Kishore Kumar,  Mukesh, Geeta Dutt, GM Durrani, Meena Kapoor, Kamal Barot, Mubarak Begum and others

In the month of his birth anniversary (24-2-1924) as I sat down to list out Talat Mahmood’s duets that seemed to have receded from the memory, I had not expected to find enough numbers to make a full-fledged article. Nonetheless I had pre-set the conditions that not more than one song will be taken up per pairing partner and the music director. However whatever filters you set up, you can always find enough pearls from the very rich sea of duets of Talat Mahmood.  So here is my pick –

Mujhko  Apna Banaya Kisne Tune Sajania  Tune – Sampatti (1949) – Talat Mahmood,  Suprova Sarkar – Timir Burman  – Pandit Bhushan

For quite romantic banter between the two loved ones, the rhythm of the song may appear faster. But that does not impede understanding the feeling and enjoying the song.

Poochh Rahe Ve Yaar Ki Bibi Kaisi Ho – Shaadi Ki Raat(1950) -Talat Mahmood, G M Durrani, Surinder Kaur – Pt. Govindram – Sarshaar Sailani

We have a typical pre-marriage ceremony folk song from Punjab. Talat Mahmood seems to be enjoying the (musical) company of his partners.

Taqdeer Hansi Ansoo  Nikale, Ik Thes Lagi Dil Toot Gaya – Pagle (1950)  – Talat Mahmood , Rajkumari  – Snehal Bhatkar – Kabil  Amritsari

Here is a duet in which one singer is a just-settled newcomer and the other is a vintage era veteran.

Jawani Ke Zamane Mein Jo Dil Na Lagayega Pichche Pachchatayega – Madhubala (1950) -Talat Mahmood, Shamshad Begum – Lachhiram Tomar – Rajinder Krishna

Talat Mahmood easily matches the light mood of Shamshad Begum.

Tum Kaun Ho Rajkumari Ye Chanda Sa Mukhda Idhar To Karo – Rajput (1951) – Talat Mahmood, Madhubala Zaveri – Hansraj Behl –  Bharat Vyas

Technically, this is the debut film of Madhubala Zaveri. This seems to be the song of ‘swayamvar’.

Manna Dey joins Talat Mahmood and Madhubala Zaveri in this song.

Jao Jao Jao Aagayaa Bulawa Jung Ka

Damdi Damdi Paisa Paisa Jod Jod Mar Jaate Hain – Hamari Shaan (1951)  – Talat Mahmood, Kishore Kumar – Chitragupta – (?)

Talat Mahmood joins Kishore Kumar in a very unique combination. We also hear a very distinct third voice too, which may be that of Chitragupta, however this is just a guess.

Kahin Preet Se Bhara Koi Geet Gaa Raha – Paatal Bhairavi (1952) – Geeta Dutt, Talat Mahmood –  Ghantshala – Pt. Indra Chandra

This film is a remake of the Telugu film, so we see a very young NTR lip singing Talat Mamood’s playback. Geeta Dutt sings for Malathi. (Venkataeshwara Rao)Ghantshala was a highly respected music director of Telugu films.

Pyar Bhi Aata Hai Kabhi Gussa Bhi Aata Hai – Goonj (1952) – Asha Bhonsle, Talat Mahmood – Sardul Kwatra..

The song so vividly captures the small talk between the loved on matters of minor disagreements.

Chalo Chale Chalen Jamuna Ke Paar – Usha Kiran (1952) – Talat Mahmood,  Zohrabai Ambalewali, Uma Devi, Swaroop Lata – Hanuman PrasadAnjum Pilibhiti

Since we have only the audio clip, it is difficult to imagine who would be the three female actors for this song. The song certainly appears to be a group of friends singing together on some occasion, where the sole male actor sings “Aao Kar Le Karar  {Let us make an agreement)’ in response to the proposal of the female singers.

Chanda Tale Mushkurayen Jawaniya….Hothon Pe Aa Gayi Dil Ki Kahaniyan – Chandi Rani (1953) – Talat Mahmood , P Bhanumathi – C R Subrmanian, M Vishwanathan – Vishwamitra Adil

This film was made in Telugu, Tamil and Hindi. NTR is the hero and P Banumathi is the heroin. The additional noteworthy point for this film is that P Bahnumathi was also the director and (one of the) producer.

Here is the Telugu version of the song

Tu Ud Ja Panchhi Bawaare  Ja Dess Begane Jaa –  Aag Ka Dariya (1953) –  Talat Mahmood, Sulochana Kadam – Vinod  – Aziz Kashmiri

The song is set to a rather difficult rhythm, but still retained the melody.

Ek Dil… Do Hain Talabgaar Badi Mushkil Hai, Kashmakasha Mein Hai Mera Pyar Badi Mushkil Hai  – Darwaza (1954) – Talat Mahmood, Suman Kalyanpur – Shaukat Dehlvi ‘Nashad’ – Khumar Barabankvi

This is debut duet that Suman Kalyanpur recorded for Hindi films, when she was Suman Hemmady, a budding artist from AIR stable. In an interview, this is what she said about this song: “I was thrilled to sing with a singer, who was blessed with the best of aesthetics and melody. Talat Mehmood gave a divine effect to the song with his silk voice and I tried my best to match him. He was very pleased with my rendering..”

Aankhen Bhari Hui Hai Aur Dil Bhara Hua Hai – Majboori (1954) – Talat Mahmood, Meena Kapoor Robin Chatterjee – D  N Madhok

The song is set in soft tone in consonance with the words of the song. That has given full expression to Talat Mahmood’s velvety voice. Meena Kapoor matches every note.

Tera Bachpan Ek Kahani – Sangam (1954) – Talat Mahmood, Mubarak Begum – Ram Ganguli –S H Bihari

This is second of the three films that were named Sangam. This song definitely shows that Ram Ganguli was very much beyond Aag (1948).

Door Hote Nahin Jo Dil Mein Raha Karte Hai – Waris (1954) – Talat Mahood, Suraiya – Anil Biswas – Majrooh Sultanpuri

 Talat Mahmood – Suriya’s duet – Dil-e-Naadan Tujhe – from Mirza Ghalib or Raahi Matwale from this film itself have attained so high popularity that some of the other duets, like the present one, have been overshadowed.

Thandi Hawaon Mein Taaron Ki Chhaon  Mein Aaj Balam Mora Dole Jiya  – Bahu (1955) – Geeta Dutt, Talat Mahmood – Hemant Kumar – S H Bihari

In so far as I am concerned, the song has not at all receded from the memory. But A very unique combination of Hemant Kumar, Geeta Dutt and Talat Mahmood ought to yield such a sweet result!

Nazar Aa Nigahon Se Chhup Jane Wale – Piya (Unreleased film of 1950s) – Talat Mahmood, Nirmala – S Banerjee – Majnoon Lucknowi

The lady singer is none other than famous singer Nirmala Devi. The younger generation would like to know her as mother of 90’s dashing actor Govinda.

Main Padh Rahi Hoon Tumko, Mery Kitab Tum ho – Captain India (1960) -Talat Mahmood, Sudha Malhotra – Hemant Kedar – Rajaram Saki

Quite an out-of-box way of explain the fact that both the loved ones are trying to understand each other by really trying to read each other.

Jay Jay Bharat Desh – Matlabi Duniya (1961) – Talat Mahmood, Ameerbai Karnatki, Chorus – Shushant Banerjee – Jayanti Joshi

We have made one exception to our original filter because this is the only duet of  Talat Mahmood and Amirbai Karnataki together.

Tum Pe Quarban Dil…Shukria Aap Ke Pyar Ka – Sakhi Lutera (1969)  – Talat Mahmood, Usha Balsaver – B N Bali – Aziz Ghazi

The female singer and the music director are quite unknown names. The song is set to a brisk dance tune.

Mohabbat Ki Kahaniyan Sunane Lagi Hai Jawaniyan – Talat Mahmood, Lata Mangeshkar – Woh Din Yaad Karo (1971) – Laxmikant Pyarela – Anand Bakshi

Except Talat Mahmood and Lata Mangeshkar singing in a duet, we have quite a rare set of combinations in this song. If Laxmikant Pyarelal using voice of Talat Mahmood and that too at almost the fag end of his career, for Sanjay Kumar on the screen is not enough of such rare combinations, Sanjay Khan and Nada pairing as lead actors gets added to.  The song is quite different from LP signature compositions, except the orchestration of the second interlude. Of course, all other male songs of the film are in Mohammad Rafi’s voice.

Here is the full song, in audio format-

We will end our present Talat Mahmood episode with two instances of his Mohammad Rafi associations –

Ek Nazar Mein Dil Le Jaaye..Surat Ho To Aisi Ho – Baarish (1957) – Talat Mahmood, Mohammad Rafi, Franciz Vaz, Chitalkar – C Ramchandra – Rajendra Krishna

Today, this song would have been the cause of nation-wide agitations by the feminists – not one but four, clearly rogue-looking youths of the locality, serially, teasing the girl who has come to fill up her pots at the public tap.

love-and-god

The famous recording of K.Asif’s magnum opus “LOVE AND GOD”, in which Naushad got the top 7 playback singers of the film Industry to agree to sing as a chorus for one song  – TALAT MAHMOOD, MOHD. RAFI, MANNA DEY, HEMANT KUMAR, SUMAN KALYANPUR, KHAN MASTANA, and BALBIR photographed during the rehearsals of the recording! (www.talatmahmood.net)

Rahega Jahan Mein Tera Naam  – Love & God (1986) – Mohammad Rafi, Talat Mahmood, Manna Dey & Balbir –  Naushad Ali – Khumar Barabankvi

The film had got mired in several glitches and took a very long time in making. By the time film got released, two of its heroes, Guru Dutt and then his replacement, Sanjeev Kumar and K Asif, the director, had passed away.

These songs represent only a one of the many shades of Talat Mahmood’s duets. So, when we get the next opportunity, we will look at other shades of Talat duets.

We will continue our search for Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.