Super Economies: The Settings of an International Plot: Shall or Shall Not?

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Super Economies

America, India, China and The Future of World
By Raghav Bahl
ISIN: 978-06-7008-812-6 ǁ Publishers: Random House ǁ Price: Rs. 699/-

In the first part, we looked at the preamble that Raghav Bahl builds for his case for India’s potential case in the coveted SuperEconomy club. In this second part, we look at the Raghav Bahl’s separate chapter-wise exploration of the past events of the international stage, wherein the involvement US, China and India, translated into the future case of ‘Shall it or shall it not ?’ for India’s Super Economy status.

Super economies 2In “From Falling Towers to Falling Tickers”, Bahl sees “The Dawn of Super Economy Era”. The events of 9/11uninteionally created the new opportunities for the developing nations, hastened the levelling of global playing field, ushering in new geopolitical order, whose contours would be boldly sharpened by the collapse of Lehman Brothers seven years later. The three most important words of the decade following 9/11 turned out to be not ‘war on terror’ but ‘made in China’ – be it supply of cheap goods or pouring in of Chinese savings into US Dollar….It was no accident that ubiquitous term now used to describe the first wave of globalization – BRIC(S)- was coined in aftermath of 9/11. The customised model of these countries, based essentially on free-market capitalization, allowed India and China to heal quickly from the wounds of 2008 financial meltdown.

Raring to Go” focuses on “A Growing Concert of Democracies” in the face of newly assertive China’s experiment to strengthening its grip over trade and diplomacy. Rare Earths became the symbol. By the turn of 20th century, China was supplying over 90% of world’s rare earth metals, even though its own resources were of the order of third of the global reserves. The true extent of China’s stranglehold on rare earth became alarmingly clear after a show-down with Japan in September, 2010. Even as it denied any official embargo, the shipments of rare earths to Japan drastically dwindled. China’s efforts to improve order and price leverage unintentionally driven the revival of global rare-earth production in the US and allied democracies. The united economic power of the democratic world proved to be an antidote to China’s combativeness.

Neutral No More” portrays the developments in Burma during the end-of-20th-century-beginning-of-21st-century. During the course of mid-20th century, Burma’s relation kept swinging between India and China. However nullifying the results of 1990 elections, the Military Junta sought to isolate Burma back towards democratic reforms by way of series of trade and economic sanctions. That gave China a right window to enlarge influence in the resource-rich land. However, by mid-1990s, India’s leadership began to adopt a ‘strategic realistic policy’, which favoured the limited engagement with Burma’s military rulers. Burmese military leadership’s wariness of Chinese-backed Maoist insurgency in the hills went on to aggravate over a period of time. So the Junta started diversifying its support system. India went on balancing its relationship with autocratic regime on one hand and the pro-democracy movement on the other hand. By 2011, the Junta was disbanded and was replaced by nominally civilian government. The new government hardly lost any time in unchaining Chinese shackles over its economy. Burma was now deftly playing the same multi-alignment game, mastered by the countries such as Kazakhstan in trying to escape the Soviet-Russian sphere of bear-hug influence. With most recent win Aung San Suu Kyi’s NLD the sense of transformation is now palpable.

The Burmese Story reinforces the efficacy of rare-earth showdown coordination of the democratic nations to counteract Chinese adventurism. India’s new strategic ties with countries, as varied as Japan, Australia, Singapore, Indonesia, South Korea, Vietnam, erstwhile Soviet-bloc countries as well as its neighbours continues to gain its strong impetus against the mighty dragon under PM Narendra Modi’s present central government too.

A Region at Sea” maps, primarily, South China and, secondarily, the Indian Ocean, as the main theatres of rivalry for the 21st century Super Economies. The fact that 80% China’s oil imports travels through the crowded Strait of Malacca across South China Sea partly underscores the strategic importance of the erstwhile historic events. China appears keen to expand its presence not only in South and East China Seas but also in Indian Ocean, where it has ‘helped’ in ramping up the ports in Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Pakistan.

China’s increasing marine power has spurred small littoral states like Vietnam, Singapore and Malaysia to bolster their naval capabilities. Though, albeit tentatively. India keeps backing their tiffs with China.

China’s actions in South China Sea have tested the alignments of 21st century in much the same way its approach to Burma and rare-earth metals did. Deterring China in the South China Sea has proven far more challenging for Team Democracy than solving rare-earth crisis or winning over Burma. For one thing, many Chinese harbour an unshakable conviction that their sovereign claims are legitimate. At the same time, it also believes that US has absolutely no legitimate claim to the region, and is merely using its power to egg on China’s rival claimants….Fortunately, China is not eager enough incite actual military conflict in Asia’s waters.

In the age of Super Economies, the most promising bulwark against Chinese creep comes not from US but from the rapidly strengthening bond between Japan and India. Outwardly, Asia’s two largest democracies have little in common, but their cultural and religious connections stretch back to centuries.

To be sure, India and Japan have gone out of their way to reassure China their goal is not containment. As their bond solidified, the language of Indo-Japanese partnership grew less circumspect….To hedge its bets, China has explored broad new west-oriented foreign policy.

The fact remains that the today’s world powers don’t need to choose between being rival or allies; they can be both, or neither. Managing such bifurcated relationship requires a revolutionary kind of teamwork, careful coordination of policy, purpose and rhetoric among the like-minded countries.

Aligned With India, But Allied With Pakistan” is ‘The Great American Paradox’. The 9/11 incidents linked Osama Bin Laden’s liquidation, US presence in Afghanistan and similar incidents led to sinking of Pakistani public opinion of America to the lowest. Correspondingly, Americans too did not think much better of Pakistanis…The imploding US-Pakistan alliance heartened – or less surprised – India. The cross border sponsoring of extremist terrorism seems to have accelerated the convergence of US-India strategic interests. For America, the old adage – India can be friend, but not ally and Pakistan can be an ally but not a friend – was seen to be turned upside down. Pakistan was behaving neither like a friend nor like an ally and India was suddenly exhibiting signs of becoming both.

With Osama Bin Laden dead and Afghanistan’s future uncertain, what was left of US-Pakistan partnership quietly unravelled…One of the tensest issues between them was nukes – or rather, the security of nuclear armament in the hands of Pakistan. As the only Muslim-majority country in the world with a successful nuclear weapons programme, Pakistan would be the first stop for Islamic radicals looking for nuclear option. Pakistan’s continuing ability to secure nuclear arms remains suspect in US eyes.. As Pakistan’s behaviour grew increasingly defiant and irrational, the US found itself looking more and more to India. While preparing for departure from Afghanistan, India seemed more in place to occupy the US space. So far, India’s assistance to Afghanistan has been entirely economic and humanitarian…The continued instability in Afghanistan seems to raise the risk of India – Pakistan (probably nuclear, this time) war. The best option to try to reduce Pakistan’s India-obsession is to increase the cross-border trade and transit between the two countries. Another option is for India to rise above squabbling and push for progress on the Kashmir issue, fostering the dialogue while reducing it military presence and addressing humanitarian abuses…But the best hope may yet come from another giant presence lurking on the border – China. China has remained on the side-lines for most of the Afghan conflict; however it has started adopting a more active role once the present theatre starts to wind down. China also continues to exert subtle pressure on Pakistan t crack down harder on terrorism if its wants their economic relationships to grow.

Afghan region could end up being the first great theatre of Super Economic collaboration among US, China and India. Unlike in South China Sea or the Indian Ocean, where they play a competitive game of brinkmanship, their strategic interests align in seeing an orderly, growing AfPak as their best chance for curbing terrorism and advancing peace and prosperity in the region, and beyond.

We will continue with Raghav Bahl’s detailed background analyses in the next part – Super Economies: America and India – Heritage Link, Democratic States – Positives Enough for Convergence !? on 21st February, 2016………………….

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – January, 2016

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Welcome to January, 2016 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We will begin our present issue with a tributes that were originally published in December, 2015. However, ours being a curative post, we will need to take such topical posts into our stride as a natural hazard for such curative exercises.

Week starting on 20th December is A Very Significant Week for Birth and Death Anniversaries. This post, though, has decided to include numbers that are less likely to appear on people’s greatest hits list – Nalini Jaywant (20 December), Vasant Desai (22 December), Noor Jehan (23 December), Mohammad Rafi (24 December), Naushad (25 December).

Naushad’s Priceless Moment: ‘Anmol Ghadi’ (1946) – Anmol Ghadi is the only link that connects up three greats. Naushad, Rafi and Noorjehan are also linked in an incredibly eerie way –Noorjehan’s death anniversary falls on December 23 (2000), Rafi was born on 24 December (1924) and Naushad’s birth anniversary falls on December 25 (1919).

Bimal Roy: The Eastern Mystic Who Made FilmsVijay Kumar explores the deeper existential layers of thoughts, views, emotions and relationships in Bimal Roy’s iconic films.. At the point of his death, he was working on two projects: Mahabharat and Maha Kumbh. In his death, the country missed out, on celluloid, what would have been the most authentic deconstruction and interpretation of the greatest epic, namely Mahabharat, and an understanding and exposition of the largest human congregation on the face of Earth, namely Maha Kumbh..

Bimal Roy’s Madhumati – Untold Stories from Behind the Scenes By Sathya SaranRinki Roy BhattachBimal Roy’s Madhumati – Untold Stories from Behind the Scenesaya, BimBack cover of the book with a comment from Amitabh Bachchanal Roy’s daughter has written this book as almost an offering to her father’s memory. Not party to any more of the actual work on Madhumati, Rinki’s book is an account of her search for stories about the film to know how it was made and the elements that went into making it one of the masterpieces of Indian cinema.

In his comment, MN Sardana has hoped that the book may throw light on the non-inclusion of two songs, recorded for Madhumati. First is Tan Jale Man Jalta Rahe ,sung by Dwijen Mukherjee & chorus and the second being Kancha Le Kanchi Lai Lajo Rut Matwali, Naye Paise Ko Leke Aaya Hai Naya Saal sung by Ghulam Mohammad , Asha Bhonsle, Sabita Banerjee & Chorus.

Last Month, Sadhana drew curtains to her life. She was well remembered in the offerings of rich Sadhna in 'Abana'obituaries. One of the most telling obit came in from (I think that was from) Sanjay Leela Bhanshali – she was queen of mellow drama and not the melodrama.

Sadhana was learning acting in “Filmalay acting school” and she got an opportunity to debut as heroine in “Love in Simla”. Sadhana had earlier played the second lead in a Sindhi film “Abana” that had released in 1958. Sheila Ramani played the lead in this Sindhi film.

Going back in time with Sadhana – “I want my fans to remember me as the Sadhana of Love In Simla, Mere Mehboob, Woh Kaun Thi and Arzoo.” – first published on Rediff.com in December 2012.

Abhi Na Jao Chhodkar… notes that it ought to be most appropriate to remember ‘one of my favourite actresses’ is to remember her ‘- frozen on screen, in all her beauty and grace, for all time’.  We have picked up one of the less heard song –Ab aur na kuch bhi yaad raha – Prem Patra (1962) – Lata Mangeshkar – Salil Choudhary – Rajinder Krishan

My contribution to such songs is Aaye Re Din Sawan Ke – Gaban (1966) – Lata Mangeshakar – Shanker Jaikishan.

Peeyush Sharma in his tribute – Adieu Sadhana – recollects some of the most enchanting, lilting, melodious, memorable songs that are associated intrinsically with the gorgeous style icon Sadhana.

In Tribute: Sadhana (1941-2015) Madulika Liddle looks back to “The schemer? The victim? The innocent soul? The glamour girl? The girl next door? Each of those. And more” roles of Sadhana. We have picked up Meri nazrein haseen hai ki tum ho haseen (Ek Musafir Ek Haseena, 1962, Asha Bhosle, O P Nayyar ) from My Favourite Songs of Sadhana

In Sadhana: What movies! What songs!, Dinesh Raheja remembers Sadhana’s memorable movies and songs.

Subir Sen passed away in Kolkata on December 29(,2015) at a private hospital. In one of the very fitting tributes, Aah Dil Mein Hai Nayan Mein Neer Hai, skapur01 recollects that ‘in all, he sang for less than 25 (plus one unreleased) Hindi films, and the number of songs is less than 30. He also composed music for a Hindi film that apparently was released only in England, in 1970 or thereabout. The film had songs sung by Mohammed Rafi, Geeta Dutt, Asha Bhosle, besides himself. Presently, the post has presented a very rare solo song, composed by S N Tripathi, from an unreleased film, ‘Rani Chandrawati’ from the 1960s’ – Aah Dil Mein Hai Nayan Mein Neer Hai .

We also recall an earlier post form Songs of Yore – Subir Sen: The involuntary Hemant Kumar clone.

We have picked up a couple of less heard songs from, Best songs of the most unloved singer Mahendra Kapoor, a tribute to Mahendra Kapoor on his what would have been 82nd birth anniversary (9 January 1934 – 27 December 2008)

The interview in Beete Hue Din contains some interesting information about the Metro-Murphy Competition and Mahendra Kapoor’s career.

In Ye duniya rahe na rahe kyaa pataa, Sadanand Kamath fondly recollects some of the events in the life of O P Nayyar on his 90th birthday on 16th January, 2016. ….. One of his box office hit films – ‘Phagun’ (1958) had 11 songs. When Ustad Ameer Khan asked him as to why he had composed almost all the songs in Raag Piloo, O P Nayyar told him that he did not have the knowledge of classical raagas. It was just a coincidence that his compositions matched with Raag Piloo. In the later years, Ustad Ameer Khan told him that in “akeli hoon main piyaa aa” from ‘Sambandh’ (1969), he had used about 16 different raagas…….The blogpost also further recounts a few examples of songs where he had nicely blended the playing of the musical instruments with that of the mood of the songs.

Posts that remember Suchitra Sen : Forever Suchitra Sen – A Silhouette tribute – By Amitava NagThis article has been edited from Uttam Kumar and ‘Mrs Sen’: The Magical and Hypnotic Uttam-Suchitra Years ǁ Rahe Na Rahe Hum: ‘Mahanayika’ Suchitra Sen’s Aura Lingers On… ǁ Romance In Cinema – Uttam Kumar And Suchitra Sen – A Case Study

“Phir Wohi Dil Laya Hoon” – Joy Mukerjee – As a hero, Joy Mukerjee appeared only in 32 films. In his last two outings – “Kahaani Phoolwati ki” and “Insaf Main Karoonga”, Joy took up the role of the villain.

Joy Mukherjee, in second lead, and Helen, in a rare break away from her ‘cabaret dancer’ roles, in Hum Hindustani (1960)

Joy Mukherjee, in second lead, and Helen, in a rare break away from her ‘cabaret dancer’ roles, in Hum Hindustani (1960)

In a tribute to Raj Kapoor, we have picked up a rare photograph of the sons with the father, from Rediff archives:

Shashi Kapoor, Raj Kapoor, Prithviraj Kapoor, Shammi Kapoor. Photograph: Rediff Archives

Shashi Kapoor, Raj Kapoor, Prithviraj Kapoor, Shammi Kapoor. Photograph: Rediff Archives

We now move over to other regular posts.

26 Rare Photos of Madhubala to Remind You Why She Was Such a Goddess – Vandita Kapoor has presented photos from a 1951 shoot for Life magazine by photographer James Burke may just help her keep this title forever. By turns sultry and sweet, serious and childlike, enigmatic and completely accessible — in these photos  Madhubala is thoroughly magnificent.

Madhubala - a 1951 shoot for LIFE by photographer James Burke - 2Madhubala - a 1951 shoot for LIFE by photographer James Burke -1Madhubala - a 1951 shoot for LIFE by photographer James Burke - 3

Helen Remixed 3 presents a nice mix of rare Helen videos and upgrades in 1080p High Definition.

Shammi Kapoor’s connection with the ‘Silsila’ hit ‘Neela Aasman So Gaya’ – The 1960s star had composed the song, which he gifted to Amitabh Bachchan for Yash Chopra’s ‘Silsila.’

My Favourites: ‘What’s Life?’ Songs seeks some of the ‘answers’ to that deepest of existential angst.

My Favourites: Songs of Hope and Encouragement

“This new day is too dear,
with its hopes and invitations,
to waste a moment on the yesterdays.”

पन्छी : An aviary of Songs is a Bird-watch guest article by Shalan Lal in Songs of Yore.

Bollywood’s love affair with Horse – From the list of songs chosen in the guest article by D P Rangan, we have picked up one less heard song –Humkadam humsafar humnasheen humzuban by Manna Dey, Mahendra Kapur and Usha Khanna –Nishan (1965), lyrics Javed Anwar, music Usha Khanna

The Three Mumtazes in Basant (1942) – Pramila with Mumtaz Ali in Balam Dhire Bol Koi ǁ Mumtaz Ali with Mumtaz Shanti in Gori Mose Ganga ǁ   Mumtaz Shanti lip singing Parul Ghosh’s playback voice in Mere Chhote Se Man Mein. ǁ The third Mumtaz, a.k.a. Madhubala, when this toddler grows up, sings Tumko Mubarak Ho.

A dubbed film and a song : In Prema Lekhalu 1953 A. M. Rajah, in the telugu version, starts the duet. In the Hindi version, (Aah, 1953) Lata Mangeshkar starts the song Aja Re Ab Mera Dil Pukara. The Tamil version is similar to the Telugu one, both sung by A.M.Rajah and Jikki.

Music in the house: Can you hear Noor Jehan? – by Devyani Onial – On the crowded shelves of this small room at the New Gramophone House in Chandni Chowk, perhaps the only vinyl record shop in Delhi, fading record sleeves hold gems from the past. Anuj Rajpal has an enviable stock of around 2,00,000 EP and LP vinyls and 78-RPM shellac recods.

Balaji Vittal and Anirudha Bhattacharjee are Keeping Score : Was the Sixties the defining sound of Hindi film music? – for which the foundation was collectively laid by the likes of Naushad, C Ramchandra, Shanker Jaikishan, S D Burman, Salil Chaudhary.

Matinee idols – Between 2003 and 2005 – photographer Shahid Datawala received a grant from Sarai for a project on cinema and cinema-going culture in Delhi. Thus began his journey to several of the city’s decrepit single-screen theatres. –

Before the silence: Rhythm House a haven for music lovers – by Paroma Mukherjee – In the fast-changing lives of Mumbaikars, Rhythm House stood as a haven for music lovers looking to discover new genres and seek out some solitude. With its closure, the city will lose not just an institution, but also a way of life.

In our, by now a ritual, closure we revisit the recent tributes to Mohammad Rafi:

I look forward to receive your inputs for further enriching the contents of the posts…..

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – January 2016

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Welcome to January 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

In the previous episode of our blog carnival, we have taken up an overview of the changes in the just published Revision of ISO 9001 (:2015). From the present episode, every month we will take up each key change individually for a closer look.

We first take up the most fundamental underlying concept – Process Approach..

The present version of the standard now “promotes the adoption of a process approach when developing, implementing and improving the effectiveness of a quality management system, to enhance customer satisfaction by meeting customer requirements. {Ref: Introduction – Clause 0.3.1} The process approach involves the systematic definition and management of processes, and their interactions, so as to achieve the intended results in accordance with the quality policy and strategic direction of the organization. Management of the processes and the system as a whole can be achieved using the PDCA cycle (see 0.3.2) with an overall focus on risk-based thinking (see 0.3.3) aimed at taking advantage of opportunities and preventing undesirable results.

Schematic representation of the elements of a single process

Schematic representation of the elements of a single process

The ISO Technical Committee 176 has published a paper The PROCESS APPROACH in ISO 9001: 2015 (ISO/TC 176/SC 2/N1289) and a detailed presentation on the PROCESS APPROACH in ISO 9001:2015

ISO’s Process Approach also lucidly presents concepts like Process Approach, Process Definition, Process Examples, Inputs and Outputs – outputs could include not only services, software, hardware, and processed materials, but also decisions, directions, instructions, plans, policies, proposals, solutions, expectations, regulations, requirements, recommendations, complaints, comments, measurements, and reports. Clearly, an output could be almost anything – Process interactions, Process-based QMS.

Three Ways ISO 9001:2015 Will Encourage a Process ApproachDan Nelson

Instead of being suited to ISO 9001, a QMS is supposed to be suited to the unique operations of an organization. A process approach demands that an organization’s real, operational; core processes are developed in accordance with the “plan” phase of the plan-do-check-act cycle (PDCA). These are the processes needed for a QMS.

Second, also in the ‘Introduction, sub-clause 0.3 -Process approach’, the standard explains that the process approach is based on the PDCA cycle, mentioning W. Edwards Deming by name.

Finally, in ISO 9001:2008 sub-clause 4.1—General Requirements, contain requirements seemingly adequate to verify whether a process approach has been applied.

Process Approach

QMS is made up of a network of value-adding processes, like Customer Oriented Processes (COPs), Support Oriented Processes (SOPs), Management Oriented Processes (MOPs), Quality Managed Processes (QOPs), Outsourced Processes (OPs) that link, combine and interact with one another to collectively provide product or service. These processes are inter-dependent and can be defined by complex interactions. In order to plan and implement QMS using the ‘Process Approach’, one must:

  • Identify the processes needed for the QMS.
  • Determine their sequence and interaction (show the sequence and interaction of COP’s). There are many ways to document this, e.g., a high level flowchart or a process map.
  • Determine the application of QMS processes throughout the organization (show how MOP’s; SOP’s and QMP’s are applied to each COP and to each other). There are many ways of documenting this. A popular way is through graphical representation, e.g. process maps.
  • Determine (plan) the criteria, methods, information, controls and resources needed for each QMS process.
  • Identify the internal/external customer-required output.
  • Describe the process activity that produces the output.
  • Identify the resources needed for the process activity.
  • Identify the inputs for the process – information, materials, supplies, etc.
  • Define the process methods, procedures, forms etc., that may be needed to produce the output.
  • Define the controls to prevent or eliminate risk of errors, omissions, or nonconformities in process activity. controls may come from the IS standards; customer; regulatory and your own organizational requirements
  • Interaction with sources that provide the inputs (internal process or external supplier), uses the output (internal process or external customer), or provide the resources (internal support process) to perform the process activity.
  • Implement QMS according to the plan.
  • Monitor, measure and improve each QMS process and its interaction with other processes. Performance indicators to monitor and measure process performance may come from the IS standard, customer, regulatory and organization’s own requirements. Performance indicators may relate to the process output as well as the process activity.
  • Performance indicators for process output must focus on meeting customer and regulatory requirements. Performance indicators for process activity should focus on measuring process effectiveness and efficiency.

PROCESS MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS IN ISO 9001 (2015) – Lennart Brandt -By application of the definition of “process”, the number of processes concerned by the requirements in ISO/CD 9001 could be considered to be at least about 275.

ISO 9001:2015 – The Process Approach Approacheth – focuses on the new standard’s “process approach” requirements, how it differs from the current version, and the many problems companies and auditors will have interpreting it.

ISO 9001 series, Part 3: The Process Approach in ISO 9001:2015Ben Saxton, Business Development Manager and Alastair Atcheson, Digital Marketing Executive @ Qualsys – Auditors should be looking at the effectiveness of processes over exact compliance to procedure. This is in line with PDCA, which forms a basis for the process approach to begin with. A process approach is the best way to manage a QMS, not just in terms of the audit process, but as a business strategy in general. Auditors and organisations alike should remember that the process approach is being emphasised because fundamentally, it makes sense.

The Joy of ProcessSusannah Clarke says a process approach can inspire innovation and creativity – In Morecambe & Wise Make Breakfast, watch the brilliant example of how a process approach inspires innovation and creativity:

We will now turn to our regular sections:

Future of Quality - Report - 2015Since 1996, ASQ has published seven issues of the Future of Quality Report. The latest edition explores 11 topic areas—already impacting consumers, businesses, and society—that will have a profound effect on the future of quality. These thought-provoking, personal, and detailed essays are written by distinguished experts from around the world. The “2015 ASQ Future of Quality Report: Quality Throughout” challenges, enlightens, and sparks action. ASQ CEO, Bill Troy ASQ’s Influential Voice in Top 11 Insights From ASQ’s Future of Quality Study has compiled the “key” insights from each of the 11 essays in the Future of Quality research.

We now watch the latest ASQ TV episodes:

Strategic Thinking – Business Skills – In this ASQ® TV episode, the concept of strategic thinking is examined. Learn how strategic thinking varies in theory and practice and be introduced to the analytic hierarchy process—a method that breaks down decision making into a series of comparisons. Watch now:

Strategy and Leadership: In this episode, learn a four-step method for setting organization-wide strategy that fosters employee engagement and empowerment, and get ideas for structuring your organization and communicating strategy … to employees to help achieve success. Read: Peter Merrill’s QP article on self-managed teams.

Making Strategy Visual – It is essential your staff connect goals, metrics and projects to get them engaged in the organization’s strategy. Hear how North Bay Regional Health Center in Ontario achieves this important goal by making strategy visual to employees and customers.

We would add Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems as our regular feature from this month.

Thought PowerJim's Gems: Choose to think the best about yourself, your world, and those people who are there to support you.

Dealing with Challenges:  Learning to overcome our challenges is what builds character and resilience.

Embrace efforts: Decide to embrace and enjoy the effort, and you’ll reap wonderful benefits from it.

20 Most Popular Posts on the Curious Cat Management Blog in 2015

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Super Economies: A New Century, A New Power Dynamics

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Super Economies

America, India, China and The Future of World

By Raghav Bahl

ISIN: 978-06-7008-812-6 ǁ Publishers: Random House ǁ Price: Rs. 699/-

Super economies 1Our times are characterized not by estranged superpowers building formidable arsenals, but by engaged societies building a robust global economy. Emerging countries are redefining the geo-economical (and geopolitical) dynamic in the new world order; a soaring GDP and a booming population are the new indicators of a nation’s strength.

The 21st century will be led by a handful Super Economies – large, prosperous counties with a fairly high growth rate, ranking among the world’s top trade partners, commanding 15 to 20 % of global GDP; having nuclear arms but using economic leadership to effect significant changes.

A New Century, A New Power Dynamics

The WWII rearranged geopolitical landscape to produce the Age of Superpowers. From ‘50s through end of ‘80s was the period of great Cold War conflict between the Soviet block and US and its allies. Even as the political conflict pivoted around ideological – communism vs. democracy or capitalism – eyeball-to-eyeball real ground realities were played through nuclear arms race. Only when Berlin Wall fell in 1989 did the Cold War end, and with it the bipolar Superpower era. For quite some time, USA ruled supreme.

Between 9/11 attack and subprime meltdown of 2008, America’s place as numero uno power of the old world was deeply shaken. BRIC(S) economies had started to emerge as alternative power centre in the beginning of 21st century. If the 20th century power rested mainly on in the hands of bureaucrats, country’s military was its main instrument of influence. This is now replaced by power of the marketplace in which economic prowess emerged more influential than the military strength in driving the global agenda. What Superpowers achieved with missiles and warships, The Super Economies seek to achieve with economic leadership, organising multilateral trade dialogues, setting the terms of inter-country engagement and using tough negotiations to establish everything from exchange rates to climate policy.

The Super Economy recognises the superior value of ‘soft power’ – what Joseph Nye defined as the ability to get what you want through attraction rather than coercion or payments[1] – and is adept at deploying its economic and cultural assets to win influence.

Even after the major disasters of 9/11 and 2008 financial meltdown, USA has recovered economical as emotional Super Economy leadership role. Even as large part of old economic activities or low-end activities of current times remaining off-shore, US has carved out its prowess in high-tech fields like nanotechnology and digital manufacturing, advanced software(s), composite materials or 3-D printing to name a few. Crumbling big-city infrastructure has spawned creative public-private partnerships to undertake the repairs and reconstruction. Otherwise erstwhile advanced economies of Europe or Japan are beset with varying degree of structural constraints.

Of all the emerging economies, China has earned the spurs of Super Economy. Its Purchasing Power Parity adjusted GDP has surpassed that of USA, for the first time in 40 years. The recent surfacing of some major issues and too rapid economic growth has given birth to a hot new debate on the US-China race outcome. Most of the Western economists firmly bet for American supremacy in the foreseeable future. However it should be noted that they do not manifest confidence, in equal measure, in pushing aside the long term Chinese dominance of world affairs.

While the Europe dominated the 20th century, the Indian Ocean is clearly accepted to occupy the centre of attention, in military and economic terms. For the first time in 500 years, the bulk of global resides in Asia.

That puts India in the right place at the right time. Raghav Behl bets strongly in India taking over as Super Economy in wake of decisive mandate in favour in wake of decisive mandate in favour of the present Narendra Modi led BJP/NDA government. This is in spite of India being critically hobbled by among other things political extremism, corruption and expanding rich-poor divide. [2] China’s rise an economic superpower has unintentionally helped India and USA into a closer strategic alignment.

Raghav Behl goes on to trace India’s potential journey to Super Economy status through several happenings and factors, each one being presented as a separate chapter, which we will take up on 2nd February, 2016,  in the next part of this article.

[1] Joseph Nye on Soft Power

[2] Will India become a Superpower? – Ramchandra Guha

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – December 2015

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Welcome to December, 2015 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We will begin our present issue with a post that could well have been included in our last episode –

Four Aces and A Queen – Geeta Dutt’s songs with 4 ace music directors that may be missed because of the dominance of SD Burman, Hemant Kumar, OP Nayyar in her list of hit songs. On the birth anniversary of Geeta Dutt, the Queen of Bhaav Gayaki, Parag Sankla explores her lesser heard gems from the repertoire of four music directors Hansraj Behl, Chitragupt, Bulo C Rani and Avinash Vyas.

And since we are on that very site, we certainly get more to read on Geeta Dutt:

Geeta Dutt’s list of her best songs in 1957 – For some reason, may be because C.H. Atma sang it first (?), she did not include Preetam Aan Milo

Raj Kapoor – Musically – Raj Kapoor with different instrument in each of the song is remembered here. We have picked up the less heard song from the ones presented here.

Remembering Raj Kapoor- The Showman And His 7 Iconic Heroines – Nargis, Nimmi, Simi Garewal, Zeenat Aman, Dimple Kapadia, Mandakini, Padmini Kolhapure – on his 91st birthday.

C Ramchandra as Chitalkar – continuing the series on the Year of Naushad (with C Ramchandra in tandem), SoY presents the songs of CR as a singer. C Ramchandra has also sung for other music directors, such as Mir Saheb (Lal Haveli, 1944), Anil Biswas (Jwar Bhata, 1944; Veena, 1948), Husnlal-Bhagatram (Apni Chhaya, 1950), Hemant Kumar (Samrat, 1954; Lagan, 1955), Roshan (Baraati, 1954), Usha Khanna (Faisla, 1965), Laxmikant-Pyarelal (Chhaila, 1967. We have picked up some of the less heard songs:

Naushad’s gems before ‘Rattan’ (1944) – a very fine researched article that brings up the (real) vintage Naushad – Before Rattan, Naushad did over a dozen films, having over 120 songs…. The Internet (YouTube) has brought to us a large number of his early songs….. a large number of his early songs are of outstanding quality. One for one, these songs are no less melodious and enjoyable than Rattan’s.

Upperstall has presented profiles of Saeed Jaffrey by Shoma A Chatterji; Shyam Benegal by Karan Bali and Dharmendra also by Karan Bali.

We also have a couple of more pieces to celebrate Dharmendra’s birthday:

Just be yourself: Dharmendra in Guddi, and other reflections on his 80th birthday.

[A related piece here: the Amitabh cameos. And an earlier post about Dharmendra is here]

Happy Birthday Dharmendra and Sharmila Tagore! Here are our favourite films featuring the pair – Anupama (1966), Devar (1966), Satyakam (1969), Yakeen (1969), Mere Humdam Mere Dost (1968), Chupke Chupke (1975), Ek Mahal Ho Sapno Ka (1975), Sunny (1984). Devdas (1976), a Gulzar venture did not go beyond mahurat.

“Thoda Sa Dil Laga Ke Dekh” – Shammi Aunty (nee Nargis Rabadi) passionately looks back on her long career . We see her playing sitar in Ye Hawa Ye Raat Ye Chandani (Talat Mahmood – Sangdil -1952 – Sajjad Hussain). In our December, 2015 episode of Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs we had listened Thoda sa muskara ke dekh apana bana ke to dekh (Musafirkhana (1955) – with Shamshad Begum – O P Nayyar).

We now move over to other regular posts.

Bengal’s Music and Its Influence in Hindi Film MusicAntara Nanda Mondal and Peeyush Sharma take us on to a journey of discovering and enjoying gold nuggets of Bengal’s music strewn in Hindi film songs – a presentation made at the Romancing the Song Meet in India Habitat Centre, New Delhi, November 14, 2015.

Bengal’s Music and Its Influence in Hindi Film Music

In our last episode we had first time landed upon a couple of posts on the Silhouette, the magazine section of Learning & Creativity. It is time to catch up with some of the several interesting posts:

We have three posts by Arun Kumar Deshmukh on Atul’s Song A Day, which also throw quite an insight into the topic that is intrinsically related to the song under discussion. Even as we will listen to the songs mentioned in these posts in our next issue of Fading Memories.. Unforgettable songs (10th January, 2016), here is the brief take on each of the posts:

Tu mera copyright main teri copyright Mohammad Rafi has given playback to Kishore Kumar more number of times than others.

S No. Movie Song Co-singer Music Director
1. Miss Mala (1954) Chori chori aana naa* Asha Bhosle Chitragupta
2. Bhagam Bhag (1956) Chale ho kahan Asha Bhosle O P Nayyar
3. Bhaagam Bhaag (1956) Hamen koi gham hai Asha Bhosle O P Nayyar
4. Raagini (1958) Man mora Bawra O P Nayyar
5. Shararat (1959) Ajab hai dastan teri aye zindagi (happy and sad versions ) Shanker Jaikishan
6. Sharaarat (1959) Tu mera copyright Lata Mangeshkar Shanker Jaikishan
7. Baaghi Shahzada (1964) Main is masoom chehre ko Suman Kalyanpur Babul
8. Pyar Diwana (1972) Apni aadat hai Lala Asar Sattar

Incidentally, the other singers who gave playback to Kishore Kumar are Manna Dey ( 3 times), S D Batish (1), Amanat Ali (1) and Asha Bhosle (once in film Baap Re Baap-1955).

[*The video clip shows some other actor singing this song.]

Samaa ye pyaar ka bahaar ke ye mele traces the most creative period – years 1955-60 – of SJ. The author attributes the loss melody in the din of popularity in post-1960 period to the growing differences between the partners.

Aa jaa aa jaa aa jaa nadiyaa kinaare Author Ganesh Anantharaman, in his book “Bollywood melodies”Bollywood Melodies says, “Perhaps success came too early to them from the very first film, depriving them to develop a bond which comes after struggling together for success.” Over and above the support of RK, quality lyricists and singers, the strong arrangers like Sebastian D’Souza played a major role in SJ’s great success. The post has quite succinctly presented a full range of ranking arrangers of that time.

Incidentally, I have been also able to locate a very interesting clip, on the subject of ‘Conviction and Leadership: Insights from the World of Bollywood Music’, in which Ganesh Anantharaman presents his ‘evolving thoughts on what can be learnt from the world of Bollywood music about conviction and leadership.

Three versions of a songMan Mor Machaye Shor – Ladki (1953) – Lata Mangeshkar and Geeta Dutt . The Hindi version sounds a bit different from the Tamil (by T.S. Bhagavati and M.S. Rajeshwari) and Telugu (by T.S.Bhagawati and P.Suseela) versions.

Scroll.in continues to provide a variety of posts:

Bollywood raags: Hindustani classical vocalists who made film music – Featuring Bade Ghulam Ali Khan, Amir Khan, DV Paluskar and other legends – Aneesh Pradhan :

Incidentally, I watched Ankahee (1985) a few days back. The film has a Tulsidas bhajan, composed by Jaidev, rendered by Pandit Bhimsen JoshiRaghuvir Tumko Meri Laaj

HMV studios: In Kolkata, the home of India’s melodious past struggles for relevance

Some say it was Satyajit Ray’s favourite place. Now, the dappled HMV studio complex wears a mostly deserted look. – Chandrima Pal  · Fading tune – Next year, Mumbai will lose a significant piece of its musical history when Rhythm House at Kala Ghoda shuts down for good. Some 1,652 km or more away, in the dusty neighborhood of Dum Dum north of Kolkata, another icon of the country’s musical legacy awaits the inevitable. [I was a regular visitor to Mumbai’s Rhythm House from 1974 till 1979. I had also occasion to visit Rhythm House sometime in 2009, when I was in that area in a case relating to a customs case. I had purchased a couple of film CDs then.]

Music and the monument: Songs inspired by the Taj Mahal – The seventh wonder of the world has always fired up the imagination – Nate Rabe  · sunday sounds :

The Carnatic vocalist who sings Urdu blues – Hariharan has invented a whole new genre in ghazal singing – Manish Gaekwad – Hariharan’s singing career began with a ghazal. Jaidev signed him to sing for the movie Gaman (1978). Hariharan sang Ajeeb Sanehaa Mujh Par Guzar Gaya Yaro, written by poet Shahryar. Hariharan later came to create a new genre within the ghazal called Urdu Blues. He incorporated elements of jazz and blues music in the song Yeh Aaine Se (Kaash, 2000). Guitars and drums play on a slow beat alongside the sitar and sarangi moving into a noir space.

We would conclude our Blog Carnival 2015 with a post that was originally published on 31st July, 2015, but I landed up only this month. So welcome an opportune coincidence!

Mohammed Rafi: For The Record By Gajendra Nand Khanna – During my of vinyl records purchasing years in mid 70s, I had collected a fairly large collection of Mohammad Rafi’s LP records. At least so I believed till I came across this post. This collector’s collection documented here is simply mind-blowing. In one of the responses to the article, Antara very aptly comments that this article has become a reference point for many. (What) an eclectic collection of Rafi’s versatility!!!

As we continue our pursuit of the golden period of Hindi Film Music …….

Wishing you all a most fruitfully joyous and happy 2016….

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – December 2015

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Welcome to December, 2015 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

In the current episode of our blog carnival, we will take an overview of the changes that ISO 9001:2015 – Just published! has brought in over its previous version (: 2008).

ISO TC/176/SC2 (Public Information) Home Page has provided a host of the basic inputs relating to core of the changes in the new version @ Revision of ISO 9001 :

  • A presentation on the ISO 9001 revision (here)
  • Transition Planning Guidance for ISO 9001:2015 (here)
  • ISO 9001:2008 and ISO/DIS 9001 Correlation matrices (here)
  • ISO 9001:2015 Revision Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) (here)
  • Implementation Guidance for ISO 9001:2015 (here)

Seven Quality Management Principles

The table below compares the 8 Quality Management Principles with recently revised seven Quality Management Principles (QMPs).

8 Quality Management Principles

7 QMPs

Principle 1: Customer focus QMP 1: Customer Focus
Principle 2: Leadership QMP 2: Leadership
Principle 3: Involvement of people QMP 3: Engagement and Competence of People
Principle 4: Process approach QMP 4: Process Approach
Principle 5: System approach to management
Principle 6: Continual improvement QMP 5: Improvement
Principle 7: Factual approach to decision making QMP 6: Informed Decision Making
Principle 8: Mutually beneficial supplier relationships QMP 7: Relationship Management

ISO 9001:2015 – What are the main changes?

1/The standard is rewritten according to the HLS (High Level Structure)

2/ Risk management becomes a foundation of the standard

ISO 9001_2015-progressive changes

3/ Leadership

4/ A standard purposely open to the service industry

5/ No more quality manual?!

6/ Importance given to the context surrounding the certified organization and to its stakeholders

7/ Knowledge is a resource like any other

Significant Changes in ISO 9001 Revision 2015:

  1. The term “product” has been replaced by “goods and services”.
  2.  Two new clauses related to the context of the organization:

4.1 Understanding the organization and its context
4.2 Understanding the needs and expectations of interested parties.

  1. The requirement to use the process approach has been more explicit by adding a new clause.

4.4.2 Process approach

  1. The standard does not include a specific clause for “Preventive Actions“.
  2. The terms “document” and “records” have been replaced with the term “documented information”.
  3. Control of external provision of goods and services address all forms of external provisions.
  4. The term “continual improvement” has been replaced with “improvement”.

Infographic: ISO 9001:2015 vs. 2008 revision – What has changed?’ presents all the basic information visually.

What are the main differences between ISO 9001:2008 and ISO 9001:2015?’ not only tabulates the 10 clauses of the revised standard in comparison to the previous version, but also has visually presented the arrangement of clauses 4 through 10 according to PDCA cycle:

ISO 9001_2015 clauses in terms of PDCA cycle

As a result of the new arrangement in ten clauses, ISO 9001:2015 now has the same unambiguous structure as all standardized management systems, known as a ‘High Level Structure’ (HLS).

ISO 9001_2015 HLS

There is more emphasis in ISO 9001:2015 on measuring and properly assessing the input and output of processes.

ISO 9001_2015 on measuring and properly assessing the input and output of processes

Here are some more specific presentations on the subject:

What Changes Will ISO 9001 : 2015 Bring ? – A Bureau Veritas presentation

Key changes and transition – DNV GL

DNV GL guidance document aims to gives a basic overview of the changes to ISO 9001:2015

We will also take a look at some of the video clips on the subject:

All you need to know about ISO 9001:2015

ISO 9001:2015 Revision Training Webinar

ISO 9001:2015 Part 1: Prepare for Impending Changes in ISO 9001:2015

ISO 9001:2015: Part 2: New QMS Structure Overview for ISO 9001:2015

ISO 9001: 2015 (Part 3): Risk-based Thinking Goes from Implicit to Explicit

Risky Business: Surviving ISO 9001:2015 :- Part 1 of 3 discusses the troubled development process leading to ISO 9001:2015 and the pressures put on ISO TC 176 to rush the standard, rather than focus on ensuring the quality of the content.

Risky Business: Surviving ISO 9001:2015 :- Part 2 of 3 – discusses the good and bad aspects of the new requirements, including a scathing look at “risk based thinking.”

Risky Business: Surviving ISO 9001:2015 :- Part 3 of 3 presents “survival strategies” for leveraging the weaknesses of ISO 9001:2015 to your advantage, and how to tailor your QMS for maximum effect. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7JiK5y3iLk

NQA ISO 9001:2015 Transition Webinar (8th Sept 2015)

We will now turn to our regular sections:

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy ASQ’s Influential Voice in its post ISO 9001:2015 is now available! has furnished the supporting products such as training programs, case studies, and articles.

We have presented here ASQ TV episodes on the current subject, as available currently:

Transitioning to ISO 9001:2015 : Transitioning to a new standard can be a daunting task but there have been several revisions before, meaning there is plenty of advice on how to do it. View the head of delegation for U.S. Technical … Advisory Group to ISO Technical Committee 176 (TAG 176), Lorri Hunt’s full interview HERE.

Implementing ISO 9001:2015 : Standards expert John DiMaria explains risk is embedded in many areas of ISO 9001:2015. Access ASQ’s ISO 9001 resources, including the standard, articles, books, training and information on the upcoming … conference at the links below

We will also continue to take a detailed look at the changes in ISO 9001 in the separate series of respective articles as well as in the ensuing episodes of 2016.

I wish warm greetings for the festivities of the season and highly fruitful New Year ………

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey into 2016 by charting some new initiatives in our presentation style and content …………

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – November 2015

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Welcome to November, 2015 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We will begin our present issue with a post that is so very topical.

My Favourites: Songs of Cool Breezes ushers in the early signs of winter in our part of the world. We will also enjoy the feel of the early chill by way of some of the rare songs from this excellent list:

And now we turn our sails to the tributes.

My Favourites: Salilda’s Malayalam Songs – on his 92nd birthday. ‘It may encourage folks to look up and listen to unknown gems’.

“Dekh Lo Ishq Ka Martaba Dekh Lo” – B.S.Thapa – B.S.Thapa ji who completed 92 on last 3 July may not be active in films now but his contribution to the Cinema as a teacher and a director can’t be denied with.

P.Susheela just turned 80A tribute with a list of some of her songs. Some of her Hindi films songs are here.

Please Go To My Post From Last Year to Celebrate the Birthday of the Great Sitara Devi – At this time last year, the author had posted ‘seven of her film scenes. Unfortunately, it is impossible to find an additional seven comparable clips on YouTube, especially if one tries to look for scenes from other films’. Here is one of her famous Kathak dance sequence – Thumak Chalat Ramchand.

S D Burman also gets a special mention on 40th Anniversary – on 31st October. Here are some notable tributes.

Ten best songs (solos) composed by SD Burman – The earlier saturation coverage has provided a good building block to choose one song per singer to pay the tribute to the master in this post.

Tere Mere Sapne Ab Ek Rang Hain – Eternal Melodies of SD Burman-Rafi By Peeyush Sharma – Had it not been the occasion of S D Burman’s anniversary, this post could have done full justice in this blog carnival’s special space of posts on Mohammad Rafi.

The Incomparable Music Of S D Burman Transcends Generations

My Favourites: Children’s Songs celebrates Jawaharlal Nehru’s 125h birthday on 14th November. These are not necessarily patriotic songs, but songs picturized on children, and are the ones that are sung by the children on the screen.

Some of the less heard songs:

We move over to other regular posts.

Watch 100 Years of Indian Cinema Come Alive in 200 Seconds of Sand ArtTanaya Singh pays due credit to Rahul Arya, a well-known sand artist for this 200-second action packed journey.

Posts on Scroll.in –

Do Chetan Anand’s best-known films stand the test of time?

Back to Boral: Looking for Satyajit Ray in the town in which he shot ‘Pather Panchali’

The brilliance of Salim-Javed lies not just in what they said, but how they said it

When Javed told Salim, ‘I was thinking that maybe we should work separately’Diptakirti Chaudhuri  · A new book speculates on why Salim Khan and Javed Akhtar split after a writing partnership that created some of the most iconic Hindi movies of the 1970s.

Saxy Desi: Check out the sounds of the saxophone in South AsiaNate Rabe  – this most romantic of jazz instruments, often purringly referred to as the sexaphone, was invented in 1841 in the lowlands of a somewhat more prosaic Belgium by Adolphe Sax to create a sound that floated somewhere between the silken tone of the clarinet and the brash flare of the trumpet :

The Braz Gonsalves 7 – Raga Rock | Joe Gomes – O Saathi Re | Unknown – Spinboldak Saxophony | Rudresh Mahantappa – Abhogi | Sahib Shihab – Om Mani Padme Om

Hai kya kya jalwa bhara hua Ghanshyaam tumhaari aankhon meinAtul, while discussing the HFM related statistics pertaining to 1932, noted that only nine songs from movies of 1932 are available. Six of these songs are already covered in the blog. Here is the seventh song of 1932 to appear in the blog : Hai kya kya jalwa bhara hua Aankh Ka Taara (1932) – Jahanara Kajjan – Motilal Naik

My Favourites: Teasing Songs are the songs, only about situations where the heroine (or in one case, the hero) is already in love with the hero, and her friends (/his friend) – as friends will – tease her about it.

Songs of Sensuality – Inspired by Conversations Over Chai’s great post on the same topic, here’s list of classic Hindi and Bengali songs that explore sensuality, physical affection, and longing.

Top Ten Songs Sung by Actors Themselves (or by Singers Appearing Onscreen) – Guest Post by Abhik Majumdar – ‘songs actually sung by (not merely lip-synched by) actors. Not singer-cum-actors, but people who were known only for their acting. First off, only one track per artiste. Secondly, there’s no point including songs by people known equally for their singing and acting. So no Kishore Kumar, no Suraiya, no Rajkumar (the Kannada actor), no Talat Mehmood even. Thirdly, the singing must conform to certain minimum standards of excellence. (A certain Mr Bachchhan stands excluded on this count.) Fourthly, in the early days of talkies when playback singing was unknown actors, even the most atrociously off-key ones, were compelled to sing their own songs. Since such examples are a penny a dozen, no point adding them …..’

Ten of my favourite ‘Aaja’ songs i.e. Hindi film songs that begin with the word “Aaja” The post has all the songs that would immediately reverberate in our mind when we read the title. Here are some of the less heard songs, picked up from the discussions by the readers:

Sapnon ke gaaon mein taaron ki chhaaon mein – K Satish Shenoy remembers that this song used to be played invariably in the same session on Radio Ceylon with another song ‘Kahan le chale ho,…’ from Durgesh Nandini.

In photos: Bollywood cinema is life and life is a movie – Photojournalist Fawzan Husain captures the making of Hindi movies as well as their impact on the world beyond the sets.

A tailor in Kamatipura in Mumbai works under the watchful eye of Hindi cinema’s leading ladies from the black-and-white era

A tailor in Kamatipura in Mumbai works under the watchful eye of Hindi cinema’s leading ladies from the black-and-white era

Best songs of 1950: Wrap Up 4 which is about the best duets of 1950 in continuation of the Overview post, Wrap Up 1 (best male solos), Wrap Up 2 (best ‘other’ female solos) and Wrap Up 3 (best songs of Lata Mangeshkar).

Best songs of 1950: Final Wrap Up 5 lives up to the expectations of distillation post on a subject that always had a wide range of discussions.

We have moved the songs remembered by our friends to a separate, full-fledged post w.e.f. this month. These posts will be titled as “Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs” and would be published on second Sunday every month.

We would therefore revert to posts on Mohammad Rafi to end each of the episode of our blog carnival.

Jaao Mere Siva Tum Kahan Jaaoge – Remembering Rafi through Rahul Dev Songs By Peeyush Sharma

Here are some not so known songs:

Ten Songs of Mohd. Rafi We Could Not Include in ‘Gaata Rahe Mera Dil’ – By Balaji VittalWe can read the excerpts of The book co-authored by Aniridha Bhattacharjee, published by Harper.

We continue our pursuit of the golden period of Hindi Film Music ……

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