Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – March, 2017

Welcome to March, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We will commence our episode with an article on Quality, in general, in our daily life.

Trends That Are Affecting the Future of Quality Management by Debra Kraft – From a total quality management standpoint, trends include broader adoption of quality management principles across industries and an increasing importance placed on sustainability.,, Quality management concepts should apply to everything every business does.

Let us now pick up a different topic in this category of sustainability – The tragedy of the commons (TOTC).

The tragedy of the commons is an economic theory of a situation within a shared-resource system where individual users acting independently according to their own self-interest behave contrary to the common good of all users by depleting that resource through their collective action.

Tragedy of the Commons  – This animated series of short videos acts as a video glossary to define specific scientific terms or concepts in a fun, easy to understand way.  –

Part 1

Part 2

The Tragedy of the Commons  – In this video, we take a look at common goods. Common resources are nonexcludable but rival. For instance, no one can be excluded from fishing for tuna, but they are rival — for every tuna caught, there is one less for everyone else. Nonexcludable but rival resources often lead to what we call a “tragedy of the commons.” In the case of tuna, this means the collapse of the fishing stock. Under a tragedy of the commons, a resource is often overused and under-maintained. Why does this happen? And how can we solve this problem? Like we’ve done so many times throughout this course, let’s take a look at the incentives at play. We also discuss Nobel Prize Winner Elinor Ostrom’s contributions to this topic.

A common thread throughout Garrett James Hardin‘s work is an interest in bioethics. Trained as an ecologist and microbiologist and a Professor of Human Ecology at the University of California for more than thirty years, he is best known for his 1968 essay, The Tragedy of the Commons. Garrett Hardin’s writings enable us to responsibly assess our surroundings to optimize the quality of life for present and future generations.

In an interview, on the Tragedy of the Commons, Garrett Hardin states that “What I meant by writing The Tragedy of the Commons is to call people’s attention to the fact that the problem of dividing the resources has to be done in a way that fits in with human nature. We shouldn’t expect too much of it.”

Victor M. Ponce has presented a critical analysis of  Hardin’s classic piece “The Tragedy of the Commons,”. He states that “ a commons is a natural resource shared by many individuals. In this context, “shared” means that each individual does not have a claim to any part of the resource, but rather, to the use of a portion of it for his/her own benefit. The tragedy is that, in the absence of regulation, each individual will have a tendency to exploit the commons to his/her own advantage, typically without limit. Under this state of affairs, the commons is depleted and eventually ruined…. Societies that want to remain sustainable have no choice but to regulate the use of the commons. Regulation is the price to pay for sustainability; it is the least undesirable strategy, since an unregulated commons eventually marches itself toward tragedy.

Here is the test of our understanding of commons’ theory with a multiple-choice question.

Assume that there are several people on a boat in a lake or ocean. All of a sudden, one of them goes crazy, pulls out a drill and starts drilling a hole in the hull. The rest have three choices:

  1. Watch the drilling and examine how fast the driller makes a hole in the hull,
  2. Grab a lifejacket and jump out of the boat, because it is obvious that the boat is going to sink eventually, or
  3. Stop the culprit and throw the drill overboard to avoid the repetition of such an unfortunate incident.

If the answer is A, you do not know that the boat is actually a commons, so you fail the test. If your answer is B, you know that the boat is a commons, but you do not know that it is “your” commons, so you fail too. If your answer is C, you know that the boat is a commons and you are ready to defend its integrity, because your security and comfort (to say nothing about your life!) depends on it. I think most people would agree that the most sensible answer is C.

In conclusion, the rights of the individual are seen to end where the rights of the commons start; conversely, the rights of the commons end with the rights of the individual. Thus, an appropriate balance between these two rights is the only sustainable course to take if we are to avoid a repetition of “The Tragedy of the Commons.”

To sum up our present discussion on the subject of TOTC, I have picked up three leads that present the topic in the current day perspective of environmental sustainability.

Strengthening Sustainability in Urban Communities. Exchanging Transatlantic Best Practices articulates the good vision for a “world-class” sustaining city

Tragedy of the Commons – a true story from Bangalore  – Dell employees fix a HUGE UGLY dump right outside Bagmane Tech Park, Bangalore!

We will now turn to our regular sections:

I have picked up the question relating to key deliverables and processes of a quality Manager  under ISO 9001:2015. The answer states that with the adage of Risk Based Thinking to the new standard, the Quality manager and the QA department would be responsible for the deliverables of their department and its processes. They would also be responsible for discerning any risks to the company’s goals and objectives.

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy has presented March Roundup with a question – How can we prevent quality professionals from being perceived as a “thing of the past”? What adaptations need to occur in the quality industry as a whole and on the individual level to revitalize the industry and attract  the next generation of quality professionals?- and a round of discussion thereon.

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episode:

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of February,2017:

Solving Problems Effectively: Resolving root cause is as fundamental as ABC – Rooting out the reasons for internal and/or external failures is fundamental to customer satisfaction, cost of quality improvement, and even a matter of survival in the marketplace. The classic approach to root cause analysis of a problem is to ask why? (or why not?) a number of times. It is important to know how deep is ‘deep enough’ before probing deeper.….The focus of the investigation needs to be on the quality system. How did the system allow the problem to occur in the first place? Where is the weakness in the system? The goal is developing more system-based improvements as opposed to finding someone to blame.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – March 2016

 

Welcome to March, 2016 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Sahir Ludhianvi -  The People's Poet  - Akshay ManwaniOn the poet’s 95th birth anniversary, Akshay Manwani  has narrated an account of Sahir Ludhyanavi’s  seditious youth in ‘I have lit fires with songs of rebellion’: Memories of Sahir Ludhianvi’s college years…..

Read full interview of Akshay Manwani on his book Sahir Ludhianvi: The People’s Poet :-Harper Collins Publishers India, ISBN 978-93-5029-733-9, Rs 399, 320 pages

Madhulika Liddle also has penned Book Review: Akshay Manwani’s ‘Sahir Ludhianvi: The People’s Poet’

Antara Nanda Mondal , in her tribute to Sahir Ludhyanvi,  Jinhe Naaz Hai Hind Par Voh Kahaan Hain: Songs of Sahir notes that his first among the four songs he wrote for ‘Aazadi Ki Raah Par (1949) –  B S Nanji, Music : G D Kapoor –  was – Badal Rahi Hai Zindagi.

More to read on Sahir Ludhianvi:

Best duets of the not-so-unloved Mahendra Kapoor – Mahendra Kapoor would always be remembered not only for his duets with Lata Mangeshakar or for Ravi or O P Nayyar duets with Asha Bhosle, but also for duets, composed by relatively lesser known music directors, with several other  contemporary singers.  Of the songs remembered here, we have picked up:

‘Chalte Chalte Yunhi Koi Mil Gaya Thha’: The Music of Ghulam Mohammad is a special tribute to Ghulam Mohammad by Peeyush Sharma on his 48th death anniversary. Even though Ghulam Mohammad started giving music in films since early forties, his noteworthy compositions got their due from 1948 onwards. His music bore the fragrance of Rajasthan’s soil and touched new heights in Hindi film music. The article does full justice to Ghulam Mohammad’s work, beyond his all popular Shama or Mirza Ghalib or Pakeezah music.We would pick up a couple songs that find mention here, but do not have a video link:

Tonga in the Tinsel WorldGuest article by DP RanganHe recently debuted as a guest author with his piece on Bollywood’s love affair with horses. Here are  some of the songs that may  not be remembered well now:

  • Ek Nazar Ek AdaRaat Ke Rahi (1959) – Mohammad Rafi – Bipin Bapul – Vishwamitra Adil
  • Matwale Saajna – Faulad (1963) – Asha Bhosle- G S Kohli – Anjaan

Hum Ko Bhula Diya To Kya – Sudhir Kapoor remembers ‘Do Music Directors direct the music?’, an article that had appeared about 72 years ago in June 1943 issue of FILMINDIA magazine…..The sum and substance of the article is that the music directors, in most cases, have no control over what is to be sung, how it is to be sung, who is to sing and where the song is to be fitted in the screenplay….. The song which I am presenting is one of those songs which remind me of the tune of a popular song. The song is “Humko Bhula Diya To Kya, Yaad Meri Bhulaao To Jaanun” from the film ‘Chanda Ki Chandni’ (1948). Geeta Dutt sings the song on the words penned by DN Madhok. The song is composed by Gyan Dutt……This song reminds  of a popular KL Saigal song “Jeene Ke Dhang Sikhaaye Jaa” from the film ‘Parwaana’ (1947) (Music: Khurshid Anwar). Incidentally, this song was also written by DN Madhok.

Pradeep Kumar Songs from 1960 to 1963 – This is a follow on post to Some good Pradeep Kumar songs from the films released in 50s.Here are some of these:

“Dil Ko Lakh Sambhala Ji” – Shakila is a very vivid retrospective of Shakila a.k.a. Badshah Jehan.  Her songs are at SHAKILA HITS.

In Ten of my favourite “Man Sings and Woman Dances’ songs the singing man is not to dance along but physically must remain present in the picturization. That has ruled out  Tu Hai Mera Prem Devata or Jaa tose nahin boloon Kanhaiyya or Jhanan-jhanan baaje bichhua

Five Excellent Dances with Krishna Kumar – Krishna was in a dancing team with his brother Surya Kumar during the Vintage era, and they both also trained other dancers and worked as choreographers. Unfortunately, Krishna Kumar’s career came to an abrupt end sometime before the completion of the film Awara (1951), when he was murdered.

The Fascinating Tale of  So Many Anarkalis – The first screen adaptation was produced in the silent era. Two films were released in 1928, Loves of a Mughal Prince (Seeta Devi)and Anarkali (Sulochana). She appeared in two more Anarkali  films.  One was a 1935 talkie version of earlier silent one and in the second one , a 1953 version, She was Jodhabai and Bina Rai was Anarkali in this film. In 1955 telugu version, Anjali Devi plays Anarkali. The film was dubbed in Tamil as well. The 1958 version form Pakistan had Noor Jehan plyaing Anarkali.  ‘Jaltey Hain Arman. Perhaps best among all is K Asif’s 1960 version, Mughal-e-Azam . Apart from movies, the Salim-Anarkali saga has inspired theatrical performances, portions of song sequences and spoofs, including the Tamil film Illara Jyothi (1954), Chashme Buddoor (1981), Chameli Ki Shaadi (1986), Maan Gaye Mughal-e-Azam (2008) and most recently, Ready (2011). The affair between the prince and the courtesan may have been doomed, but their romance lives on.

How Chand Usmani Got Film Chance?  –  In this interview, Chand Usmani states that her favorite (Indian) stars are Nargis and Geetabali and Geeta Roy(Dutt) is not only her favorite playback singer, but a friend as well.

More Geeta Dutt  has remembered :

Raj Kapoor and Nargis on the sets of Aah(1953)

aah-sets-April 1953
Enter a caption

Raj Kapoor, and Director Raja Nawathe (seated on chair near window), together with other workers of the R.K. Unit, look on keenly while Nargis does a rehearsal for a sequence in Aah.

Shammi Kapoor’s Biography Makes for a Fascinating Read, is a review by Anirudha Bhattacharjee & Balaji Vittal, engineers by education and IT consultants by profession  ……overall, the book is a fascinating page-turner that can be consumed in one sitting. And unlike watching a Shammi Kapoor super hit which is a one-time watch masala film, it’s a book dense enough to be re-read, multiple times. And it has some lovely photographs too…

We end our present episode with an interesting post on Mohammad Rafi –

Mohammed Rafi - God’s Own Voice.pngRafi vs Talat vs Mukesh vs Kishore: the big rivalries of the Hindi film music world is excerpted (with permission from) Mohammed Rafi: God’s Own Voice by Dhirendra Jain and Raju Korti, (Niyogy Books_. For us, now, who played what games, and why, is certainly of no interest. It is those songs that have been mentioned that interest us, solely and wholly.

Nilay Majumadar, quite passionately states ‘that the most important effect of Rafi on me was it changed my way of listening to music. As the years passed, I understood the words more, their meaning, their correct pronunciation all became increasingly important. Above all poetry of the songs became significant….

I look forward to receive your inputs for further enriching the contents of the posts…..

Inadvertent, but potentially a VERY harmful use of KYC documents

In ordinary course we keep issuing and submitting our KYC documents (identity and residential proofs.. such as PAN card, electricity bill etc.) to various people, For housing or car or other loans, bank accounts, or even for buying new sim card.

At almost all these places they ask for self-certification on these documents. We immediately sign those documents and hand over.

Just imagine your self-certified copies are likely to freely available in the hands of the persons for illegal usages. These documents can be used by him for EVERYTHING!

It’s really serious and it’s been seen that in most of the terrorist activities, KYC documents are sourced from the SIM card sellers.

Hence, please inculcate a habit of writing the purpose of submitting the self-certified KYC Document(s), to whom the document is handed over and the date so that those documents cannot be used again.

 

—- Shared for the public benefit.

Life – Stages – what it looks like !! ??

Couple of days I read a Google+ posting titled  Stages of Life., with an eye-catching, revealing and thought-provoking image:

Stages of Life

Obviously, the first thing my mind recalled was product life cycle:

Prodcut Life Cycle

And that led to a search of similar images on internet.

Here are some that I found quite interesting:

life-stages-cartoon

Stages of Life -2

The Four Stages of LifeWheels of Life

Carnival of Quality Management and Articles Blog Festival – April 2013

Welcome to April 2013 edition of Carnival of Quality Management and Articles Blog Festival.

I have only three broad divisions of the articles for this month’s edition of the Blog Festival:

One relating to core Quality area, and another relating to areas that leads to a better organization, better life over a period of time, and the other one relating Change Management.

Articles relating to the Core Quality Function

Four Ways to Measure the Effectiveness of Your Root Cause Analysis Process
Root Cause Analysis is all about improving your bottom line in safety, environmental compliance and profitability. This paper explores measuring the effectiveness of Root Cause Analysis as a business process intended to produce business results. The author provides examples of the primary KPIs that will help you keep your finger firmly on the pulse of your RCA process.

Five Ways to Boost Quality in Manufacturing Operations – John Mills, executive vice president of business development, Rideau Recognition Solutions

  1. Reward success
  2. Measure team performance
  3. Avoid abstract
  4. Study peers and success stories
  5. Process over product

Manufacturing is a precise business that tolerates errors poorly, as Boeing appears to be finding out right now. Strike a balance on your line. Reward teams that find ways to creatively boost output without sacrificing safety. Reserve penalties for only the most serious errors.

And be mindful of history. Every production line experiences trouble from time to time, but recurring mistakes are inexcusable.

And quite useful and interesting articles, from Bizmanuals:

How to Create A Policy & Procedures Manual

Among the tools prescribed to help create the manual, Business Process Map is the heart of the manual creation. And in a related article, Top 10 Policy Procedure Templates, for which the requests keep pouring in, can be browsed.

Management by Procedures is how McDonalds or other successful franchises manage their business.  You start by defining your process using a process map to build visual communication and understanding.  Next, write down what needs to get done, by whom, and when.  Then deploy and practice the procedure.  Perfect the procedure until you have a consistent process just like a franchise would need to roll this out to hundreds of others.

What Process Approach Questions are Used for a Process Audit?
Process auditing is focused on determining process effectiveness and the ability to achieve planned results.

Ask The Experts takes up  a detailed reply to a question relating to Clause 7.6 of ISO 9001-2008 in Measurement System Analysis.

SIPOC – Supplier, Input, Process, Output, Customer – is an interesting method to look at the critical-to=quality requirements of the process. The question on SIPOC relates to healthcare industry, and is thus very useful for quality professionals from other industries to understand the concept.

And omnibus round ups by borawski– of the series of articles under a subject for the month:

Roundup–Quality In Unexpected Places –  for March 2013

Roundup–Risk and Failure in Quality and Science for February 2013

And here is an omnibus collection of the articles that do have a bearing on the quality of life that you live – at the organization, at personal or social levels –

Learn To Prioritize Effectively

To prioritize effectively, it is important to think about what activities, tasks, responsibilities, etc. are most important to you and deserve your time. So how do you decide what is “important?” I use a simple criterion to define what is important and where I spend my time. I define things I can do as good, better, and best.

In a speech given by Dallin H. Oaks speaks about how to prioritize effectively and make correct choices. He spoke about the difference between good, better, and best choices.

Do you have a “Go-To” Top10?

All of us have situations which are problematic. They can range from minor irritations and something irksome, to outright emergencies. We all need a ‘Go-To” Top 10. These will be your top 10 top professional connections to whom you can turn in a crisis or even with a problem or a question.

Five Ways To Turn Your Crisis Into A Comebackby Tim Milburn –

  1. Recognize what got you headed in the wrong direction in the first place. [else, you may be doomed to repeat those things, again and again.]
  2.  Ask yourself: Why?
  3.  Set your sights on a goal, a target.
  4. Do something every day.
  5. Find joy in the process

The Not Knowing Path of Being an Entrepreneur – By Leo Babauta

Lots of people… try to control the outcomes. Unfortunately, the ability to control outcomes is an illusion.

Here’s How to Walk The Not Knowing Path:

  1. Admit you don’t know
  2. Watch for (the source of) anxiety
  3. Tell yourself you’ll be OK
  4. Consider worst-case scenarios
  5. Know your principles
  6. Act on your principles, not on (your) goals or plans
  7. Breathe and  smile.

The Fundamental Problem in ManagementTimothy Kastelle

The fundamental problem in management is that the world is uncertain, and people hate dealing with uncertainty…The problem with requiring certainty is that when you do, you fail to act.. All of the bad aspects of bureaucracy come from trying to build systems that provide certainty in a world that is by its very nature uncertain…The more businesses I work in and talk with, the more convinced I become that the single most important management skill to develop is a tolerance for ambiguity.

Dr. Deming’s Joy at Work, Happiness & the High Performance Organization – Key factors that lead to a happy life also have direct implications for creating a happy and productive workplace. – Lawrence M. Miller, www.ManagementMeditations.com

  1. Build great teams! Be sure that every employee serves on a well-functioning team with knowledge of its purpose and its performance. Encourage celebration of winning team goals and setting records.
  2. Build internal social networks. Build social networks around common interests and competencies. These become learning networks that provide both the joy of social relationships but also the joy of learning.
  3. Be sure to practice respect for people and recognize that the world’s greatest experts are those who are on-the-spot, with their hands on the work. This builds their self-esteem and encourages learning.
  4. Institute a process of gaining flexibility through multi-skilled, cross trained employees who can optimize the effectiveness of their teams.
  5. Stop wasting money where it doesn’t pay off and spend it where it does. Pay employees for gaining skills and achieving performance. Value high performance by paying for it.
  6. Know and promote the worthy purpose of your organization. Ennoble your employees by connecting them to a spirit of service. This is the essence of leadership.
  7. Hire optimists and not pessimists. Generate hope and optimism by clearly stating where we are going and why it will be great when we get there. Generate creative dissatisfaction in yourself and your employees.

Five Questions CEOs Should Ask about their Supply Chain

Minimizing supply-chain-disruptions requires taking a best-in-class approach from the highest levels of the company – Brian Nolf and Gerhard Plenert, Wipro Consulting Services

1. Is quality built into your supply chain, or do inspection and correction occur after the fact?

2. Is supply chain management a strategic senior level position in your organization or is it a part of an operations activity?

3. Is the movement of information and money as critical in your supply chain as the movement of materials? In other words, does it take longer to create paperwork and process payments than it takes to deliver the goods?

4. Do you have a built-in change management process that constantly reviews the elements of your supply chain and looks for opportunities to improve quality and operational efficiency—or do your systems, policies and procedures block improvement?

5. Does your supply chain minimize the amount of touches and the touch time in supply chain transactions, so as to reduce the number of potential failure points?

The issues surrounding these five questions revolve around culture; capability, flexibility, capacity and technology; systems and processes; repeatability and reliability; and collaboration.

Understanding Quality: Duty Towards Self – Tanmay Vora
“The place to improve the world is first in one’s own heart and head and hands, and then work outward from there.” – Robert M. Pirzig

THE 10/10/10 RULE FOR TOUGH DECISIONS – BY: CHIP HEATH AND DAN HEATH
It’s good to sleep on it when there are tough choices to make, but you also need a strategy once you wake up–which is why you should employ the 10/10/10 rule.
To use 10/10/10, we think about our decisions on three different time frames:

  • How will we feel about it 10 minutes from now?
  • How about 10 months from now?
  • How about 10 years from now?

WHY THE FUTURE OF INNOVATION IS IN IDEAS, NOT PRODUCTS – BY: KAIHAN KRIPPENDORFF
As we kicked off the 18-hour flight home, I devoured a series of articles in theSingapore Times featuring the winners of the “Singapore Business Awards”: a doctor, an insurance CEO, an advertising exec, and a coffee product seller. Each started careers with little and now leads huge, fast-growing, disruptive businesses.

Dissect the reasons they give for their success and you will see a series of what I call “fourth options”: strategic choices that your customers love and that your competitors won’t copy.

Income points to what it takes to introduce a “fourth option.” First, you introduce a new concept or distinction (e.g., “honest insurance”). This new term is a language tool that helps people reshape how you do things. It is not a new product, but something else–a concept or narrative or category. Second, this new concept starts changing behavior (people change their KPIs, shift their processes). Third, this new set of behaviors allows you to do something different and new (e.g., pay out where others won’t). Finally, competitors want to copy you but decide that to do so require too much behavioral change to be worth it.

Jesse Lyn Stoner  culls out these The 6 Benchmarks of High Performance Teams
1)       Alignment: Alignment around a shared vision.
2)      Team Effectiveness: Effective team processes.>
3)      Empowerment: Power to do what is necessary.
4)      Passion: Energy, enthusiasm, and confidence.
5)      Commitment: Deep commitment to the team and to each other.
6)      Results: Sustained outstanding results.
We also have three articles relating to Change Management:

The first one dates back to April 2004 on ‘strategy + business’: – 10 Principles of Change Management – Tools and techniques to help companies transform quickly. – By John Jones, DeAnne Aguirre, and Matthew Calderone

We have a current related article, too:

The Discipline of Managing Disruption – To Harvard professor Clayton Christensen, coauthor of How Will You Measure Your Life?, a primary task of leadership is asking questions that anticipate great challenges. –  by Art Kleiner
Clayton Christensen’s most recent book, How Will You Measure Your Life? (coauthored with James Allworth and Karen Dillon, HarperBusiness, 2012), links the discipline of managing disruption to the kind of long-term thinking that is necessary if one is to step past today’s pressures and build a strong personal and professional legacy.

The Agility Factorby Thomas Williams, Christopher G. Worley, and Edward E. Lawler III

When the measure of performance is profitability, a few large companies in every industry consistently outperform their peers over extended periods. And they maintain this performance edge even in the face of significant business change in their competitive environments. The one factor they seem to have in common is agility. They adapt to business change more quickly and reliably than their competitors; they have found a way to turn as quickly as speedboats when necessary.

To round up the present edition we will take a look at Management Carnivals lined up by John Hunter

Management Improvement Blog Carnival #188

Management Improvement Blog Carnival #189

Management Improvement Blog Carnival #190

Management Improvement Blog Carnival #191

I keenly await your feedback, as well as inputs for making the this carnival more varied and informative.

The Best of LIFE: 37 Years in Pictures | LIFE.com

“Over several decades spanning the heart of the 20th century, one American magazine ― called, plainly and boldly, LIFE ― published an astonishing number of the most memorable photographs ever made. Driven by the certainty that the art of photojournalism could tell stories and move people in ways that traditional reporting simply could not, LIFE pursued a grand vision, articulated by TIME Magazine’s co-founder, Henry Luce, that not only acknowledged the primacy of the picture, but enshrined it.

“To see life,” Luce wrote in a now-famous 1936 mission statement, delineating both his new venture’s workmanlike method and its lofty aims. “To see the world; to eyewitness great events … to see strange things … to see and be amazed.

…… however momentous the event, however legendary, notorious, or simply of-the-moment the person, LIFE was there.

Today, the breathtaking pictures they took live here: LIFE’s new, redesigned home on TIME.com. Resurrected through trailblazing photo essays, lighthearted features, and previously unpublished photographs of the century’s leading figures and most pivotal, meaningful moments, Henry Luce’s vision (to see life, to eyewitness great events, to see and be amazed) remains as relevant and thrilling today as it was 75 years ago. This gallery ― featuring one magnificent image a year from 1936, when the magazine premiered, to 1972, when LIFE ceased publishing as a weekly ― serves as an introduction to, and a celebration of, the treasures of a storied archive: a tightly focused glimpse into the jaw-dropping breadth and excellence of a landmark publication’s iconic photography.”

Read more: http://life.time.com/history/the-best-of-life-37-years-in-pictures/#ixzz287Bul4NC

No doubt, the entire photostory is a Collecor’s Delght, however I have selected some of these great picture shere:

1939_Aerial view of a DC-4 passenger plane

With this photograph of Marilyn Monroe singing to John F Kennedy, we take a look at some of the rare photographs of John F Kennedy in this photo-essay:

We end with with a very pleasing NATURE shot: