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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – January 2021

Welcome to January 2021 edition of IXth Volume of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

The year 2021 opened on a very unusual note for Blog World of Hindi Film Music with a post Hans Akela: A song that stood tall amid the ruins on SoY. Rahul Bhagwanrao Muli presents the songs that are only the surviving link to the memory of the film. The song is then “Hans Akela“ which is still floating freely, liberated from the mortal debris of the film.

And of course, a post on 26th January – Republic Day: Reading between the lyrics of five patriotic Hindi film songs – The better and more enduring ones of this gnre, however, make room for other sentiments – celebration with caution, pride tinged with anxiety, a love for the country that is firm but not blind.

We now move on to other tributes and memories:

Boss of Bombay Talkies: How Devika Rani fought innuendo and personal tragedy to get back on her feetKishwar Desai presents Edited excerpts from a biography – The Longest Kiss: The Life and Times of Devika Rani, Westland Books – of the movie star and pioneering studio owner.

Mahendra Kapoor: The playback singer who did not need a sound systemAjay Mankotia – January 9, 2021 was the 86th birth anniversary of the singer who owned the bastion of patriotic and religious songs in Bollywood

Sajjad Husain, the ‘Unsung’ MaestroRajan NS – Sajjad Husain was a priceless asset to Hindi film music but could not get the recognition that was his due, despite his prodigious talent.

The Masters: Naushad Ali – After a few forays into working as an instrumentalist in films, Naushad got his first big break when music director Khemchand Prakash took him on as an assistant. It was 1940 before he got his first film as an independent composer – Prem Nagar, for which, Naushad says, he did a lot of research on the folk music of Kutch. Soon, other films followed, but it was with Rattan (1944) that Naushad first tasted success.

The Unlucky Genius N Datta: His songs for ‘other’ singers is a rounding-off article after Hans Jakhar ‘s articles on N Datta’s principal singers, Asha Bhosle and Rafi

The Masters: C Ramchandra – Ramchandra Narhar Chitalkar was born on January 12th 1918 and died on January 5th 1982. His debut in Hindi films, as an independent music director was in Jeevan (1942), on the strength of his bond with Master Bhagwan. While the film only did average business, the music was appreciated, and Ramchandra had his foot in the door in the Hindi film industry as well. Bhagwan and he would collaborate professionally on a further 15 films.

Rafi sings for Chitragupt – Part 1 is the solo songs whereas part II is his duets.

How Guru Dutt became the reluctant hero of his masterpiece ‘Pyaasa’Excerpted with permission from Guru Dutt – An Unfinished Story, Yasser Usman, Simon & Schuster India.

Shailendra Sharma @ Golden Era of Bollywood has posted following memorial tribute posts:

Ae Nargis e Mastana – Remembering Sadhana on her 5th anniversary on 25th December.

My favourite ‘Rafi-Suman Kalyanpur’ duets is a tribute to Suman Kalyanpur on her 84th birthday. Here is one duet that I have picked up as my choice, and the other one is at then end of this episode –

Zara Thehro Ji Abdul Gafaar – Satta Bazaar (1959) – Kalyanji Anandji – Hasrat Jaipuri

January 2021 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs takes up Jaidev: Brilliant, But Underrated, Composer:  1972-1973 that covers Jaidev’s music in films Bhavna, Maan Jaaiye (both in 1972) and Prem Parbat (1973). We have covered, the years –

  • In 2018, we listened to his songs from the most successful films phase of 1955 to 1963.
  • In 2019, we listened to his more remembered songs from his less remembered films for 1964 to 1970, and
  • in 2020, we listened to highly appreciated songs from the films that did not succeed in 1971

in the form of our commemorative annual series in the month of Jaidev’s death anniversary month.

We will now take up the articles on other subjects:

Film Songs Based on Classical Ragas (14) – The Melodious Trio: Bageshri, Rageshri and Malgunji – Subodh Agrawal – All three ragas are very sweet and pleasant – ideal for shringar rasa. Malgunji is perhaps the sweetest, while Rageshri has a touch of gravity.

Songs of Music (!) explores different facets of music or where music plays a very important role in the song and / or the movie. For example – Manbhaavan Sangeet Suhavan (Chandramukhi, 1960 – Manna Dey – S.N.Tripathi – Bharat Vyas) , a song based on Raag Basant Bahar, is a perfect tribute to music. It refers to the various gods and goddesses who espouse the cause of music,

Heroine introduces herself! follows up on Hero introduces himself!

In the Micro View of Songs of 1945  we have carried forward the micro view of solo songs of Female singers  – now in the form of Naseem (Banu) | Naseem Akhtar | Munnavar Sultana, Other female singers – Part I and Part II and the Summing up post on Female Solo songs – My TOP female solo songs. We, then, commenced the Micro View of the Duets for the year 1945 with Duets (+) of Golden Era (Male +) Singers.

In continuation to our tradition of ending the post with a few songs of Mohammad Rafi, each one of which basically has a link with the topics discussed in the present post.

Sambhal Sambhal Kar Jaiyo O Banjare.. Dilhi Door Hai – Saajan (1947) – with Lalita Deulkar, Gereta Roy – C Ramchandra – Ram Murti Chaturvedi

Tum Ho Jaao Hamare, Hum Ho Jaaye Tumhare – Roop Lekha (1949) – with Surinder Kaur – Sajjad Hussain – Khumar Barabankvi

Chhin Ke Pher Li Aankhein Jaan Gaye Ham Jaan Gaye – Chandani Raat (1949) – with Shamsahd Begum –  Naushad Ali – Shakel Badayuni

Ghata Mein Chhup Kar….Jo Dil Ki Baat Hai..Nazar Tak AAyee Jaati Hai – Baaz (1953) – with Geeta dutt – O P Nayyar – Majrooh Sultanpuri

Sambahl Ke Baitho Jhara, ChhaoN Mein BaharoN Ki,,,,Chand Hai Taare Bhi Aur Ye Tanhai Bhi – Roop Lekha (1962) – with Suman Kalyanpur – Nashad – Farooq Qaiser

I look forward to your inputs to enrich the contents of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Disclaimer: This monthly series of posts is my best-effort-based compilation of posts on Hindi film songs that I normally visit regularly. As I record my sincere thanks to all the original creators of these posts, any other posts that I have nor covered herein shows my lack of awareness of existence of such posts and is by no means any disrespect to their work. The copyrights to the posts, images and video clips remain the properties of the original creators.

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I Liked Music from films

“The Micro View of the Songs of 1948 @ SoY – MY Top Music Director(s)

Having gone through the exercise of micro-reviewing the songs  for the six years – in this case from 1955 backwards to the present 1948 – I have observed that the task of choosing MY TOP of Music director every year has become more tough as year goes down. That is mainly because older I go into the timeline, less I was found conversant with either the film itself or the context in which the song was played (situational context vs.song composition relevance) or even the popularity /approval of the film’s song as a whole from listeners  / critics respectively.

So, I kept on devising some or other tests to come up with rational judgement to moderate my inherent biases.

The first of such test is the logo picture posted by SoY at the very opening of the overview post, which invariably places six films in the frame. For the present case, ‘Best songs of 1948: And the winners are?’, Naushad has two films – Mela and Anokhi Ada whereas Anil Biswas (Anokha Pyar), C Ramchandra (Nadiya Ke Paar), Ram Ganguli (Aag) and Ghulam Hiader (Shaheed) have one film each.

I then run through posts relating to Male Solos, Female Solos and Duets to make amental note of music directors whose songs continues to strike chord even now. I observe that Naushad’s songs in Anokhi Ada and Mela or Anil Biswas’s songs in Anokha Pyar, Gajre and Veena, those of C Ramchandra in Nadiya Ke Paar and Khidk’ or those of Husnlal-Bhagatram in Pyar Ki Jeet or certainly Ghulam Haider in Shaheed, to a great extent Ram Ganguly in Aag or Khemchand Prakash in Ziddi standout for the everlasting songs. For the year, Ghulam Mohammad in Grihasthi and Pugree, or Shyam Sundar in Actress have also pitched in well.

Then I have out the songs that appeared in the respective category of MY Top listings. The number of songs composed by differenet music directors appears as given herebelow:

Music Director Male Solos Female solos Duets Total SoY

Total

Hansraj Behl 1 1
Husnlal Bhagatram 1 2 3 3
Naushad 1 1 2 4 10
Ram Ganguly 1 1 1 3 2
Anil Biswas 1 3 1 5 1
S D Burman 1 1 1 3 1
Khemchand Prakash 1 1 1 3 2
Ghulam Haider 1 1 2 3
Avinash Vyas 1 1
C Ramchandra 1 1 2 3
Snehal Bhatkar 1 1 1

If we place the results of the Total in the descending order, then Anil Biswas comes at the top, followed by Naushad and then Husnlal Bhagatram, S D Burman, Khemchand Prakasha and Ram Ganguly share the next spot, followed by Ghulam Haider and C Ramchandra.

Apart from the simple quantitative perspective, one of the most noteworthy feature of Ghulam Haider’s songs in Shaheed and those of C Ramchandra in Nadiya Ke Paar is that they have used relatively not very popular singers like Surinder Kaur or Lalita Deulkar for a very popular heroin Kamini Kaushal. And yet the songs did attain very high acceptance- both the by the critics as well as by the listing public in general.

SoY, @ Best songs of 1948: Final Wrap Up 4, also adopted a smilar matric for quantifying the process of evaluating the share of different music directors in the Top lsting of songs under different categories. The last column in the foregoing table reflects the Total score. Based on this evaluation The Songs of Yore Award for the Best Music Director of 1948 has been conferred on Naushad.

How would have you analyzed the Songs of 1948?

I am sure you will certainly join me to take up a similar detailed Micro View when SoY takes up 1947 next in this Best songs of year series.

P.S.

All the posts that have appeared on this subject can now be accessed form one file @ The Songs of 1948 @SoY

Categories
Music from films The Books I read

More Than Bollywood: Studies in Indian Popular Music

–Guest Article by  Tadatmya Vaishnav#

More Than Bollywood - Studies in Popular MusicI recently had opportunity to read through most of the book titled “More than Bollywood: Studies in Indian Popular Music “. It is a collection of essays on popular, film and non-film, Indian music. The book is edited by musicologists Gregory D. Booth and Bradley Shope. The essays are in a scholarly style and were meant to be a formal study of Indian film music as well as certain non-film music genres, such as pop, rap and rock.

‘More than Bollywood’ includes many of the leading scholars currently working on Indian popular music and culture. The volume offers a wide perspective on contemporary and historical popular music in India, and confronts the inescapable importance of the Indian film song; but it also offers the largest collection to date of research on “non-film” popular music in India. It can be treated as one of the most comprehensive single volume on a subject that is of growing interest to scholars and students in music, ethnomusicology, film studies, popular music studies, and South Asian studies. It is intended to stand on its own as a work of scholarship, but it is also simultaneously intended as a fundamental resource for courses on popular music and music in India.

All the chapters were not, in fact, interesting, as far as I am concerned. So, I take up the three chapters that I did find interesting.

Chapter 1 – A Moment of Historical Conjuncture in Mumbai

In this chapter, Gregory Booth presents an interesting case of how the Hindi film song, as we knew it until 1990 or so, was shaped substantially in the five year period of 1948-52, immediately after Independence. He treats the 1931 – 1947 period as a period of aesthetic and professional transition. Among major changes, he identifies growing sophistication in cinematography of song sequences and a change in the sound of the female voice in film songs. During this period, the film song also got to occupy the role of the most important form of popular song. He has taken a set of three representative music directors – Naushad Ali, Shanker Jaikishan and C Ramchandra- and two arrangers – Antonio Vaz and Sebastian D’Souza and only one full-time playback singer (Lata!) as having played a major complementary role in shaping the Hindi film song. Collectively, they effected sophistication of film song orchestration, explicit engagement with classical Indian and foreign popular music and redefinition of the sound of female playback singing, among others. Destiny seemed to have chosen them as ‘right person in the right place at right time.’

The musical and professional patterns that were established during 1948 and 1952 remained almost unchanged till at least until 1970. For a further 20 years, the rise of a new generation of musicians took over major roles. The shift in the basic structural composition of the film music is seen by examining the proportion of composers who composed more than one film in a year. Only a few, generally two or three, music directors dominated the year in terms of those soundtracks that were ‘most heard’. By 1952, the percentage of music directors with multiple releases had increased to 62%. For the next ten years this figure hovered around 50%, declining back to 30% in in 1967. The corresponding figure for 1932-1947 was seen in the range of 60%. Of the 60 highest net grossing films during 1947 to 1957, 32 % were during 1948-1952. Of these, Naushad, SJ and C Ramchandra had 68% share.

The rise of an oligarchy in the world of playback singers was also equally pronounced. Among male singers it was Mohammad Rafi who ruled the roost before Kishore Kumar took over in 1969. Nevertheless, the number of important male singers was greater as compared to that of female singers. In the case of female singers, the shift was far more dramatic and extreme. 1952 was the year that virtually brought an end to the richly textured and individually timbred voices of the earlier era. Lata Mangeshkar, Asha Bhosle and Geeta Dutt collectively recorded slightly over one-third of the songs recorded in 1951. With the fading away of Geeta Dutt, by end of 1950s, Lata Mangeshkar and Asha Bhosle shared between them more than one-third of all songs. Having given a quantitative background, the author has taken up the examination of more interactive musical, aesthetic and industrial practices in this chapter.

One may disagree, as I did, with some of the conclusions – that it was Naushad who “tightened” the concept of a ‘film song’, as distinct from ‘singing in the film’, by way instrumental interludes, tempo, orchestral size, recording techniques and professionalization of the singers. Or, that the style of the male voice in Hindi film songs followed mainly from Saigal’s style while the style of the female voice changed radically with Lata (I agree only with the latter part).

The statistics quoted at various places are useful and some of the points do note important conclusions. The last point about the technology that enabled separation of on-screen voice and playback voice and the emergence of the playback singer as a distinct role, is well-made and pivotal to Hindi film music.

Chapter 2 : Global Masala – Digital Identities and Aesthetic Trajectories in Post-Liberalization Indian Film Music is written by Natalie Sarrazin.

It is a very well-written account of how globalization, as well as new technologies, has influenced the creation of popular music, mainly film music, in India since the 1990s.

The author goes into a very detailed, second-by-second, analysis of the prelude music of the title song of Roja, in order to show how digital recording techniques can marry the audio to the video much more effectively than in the past.

Another good section is the one titled “Aesthetic Decisions”. It shows how the role of the music director has changed and how the sound engineer may be the most influential person behind the final finished song. This change may be revolutionary, but like many revolutions, the outcome may not be anything to be proud of. The author seems to take this major change in her stride, perhaps because she is a Westerner and does not have emotional ties to old music.

In her concluding remarks, the author notes that ‘Hindi film must project carefully crafted identities and desires onto the world stage, embodying Indian values in musical idioms palatable to an international music market and appealing to interesting non-Diaspora audiences. India’s active embrace of and enactment upon the promise of globalization require new Indian sonic agents, ones that portray India’s current energy, as well as image as a suitable global economic partner. Such music, to be successful, must create space for dreams and desires of Resident Indians and NRIs, while offering up musical fantasy escapism to the rest of the world.’

In Chapter 10: Latin American Music in Moving Pictures and Jazzy Cabarets in Mumbai, 1930-1950 Bradley Shope explores the period between mid-1930s and early 1950s when Latin American music in Hollywood films influenced jazzy cabarets that some of the Indian communities like Goans, Anglo – Indians and Parsis. The first half of the chapter traces the popularity of a native Brazilian dance, the Carioca – introduced to the world in the 1933 release Flying Down the Rio[i] in Mumbai and explores the relationship between this film and development of Hindi film songs containing Latin American sounds and images. The second half of the article uncovers the relationship between live cabarets in Mumbai and the development of Hindi films songs containing Latin American sounds and images.

The film Flying Down to Rio (1933) was successfully screened in urban India in 1934. The carioca dance shown in this films attracted vast audiences in Mumbai in nightclubs, restaurants, hotel ballrooms, social clubs and cabarets. Audiences learned the dance by watching the film or through lessons at local dance schools. By the 1940s, many jazz orchestras understood that learning Latin American repertoire could help secure jobs in a larger scope of avenues. It was no coincidence that when C Ramchandra composed Gore Gore O Banke Chhore (Lata Mangeshkar, Amirbai Karnataki, Samadhi, 1949),

he heavily borrowed from Chico Chico from Puerto Rico (Doll Face, 1945).

Latin characteristics were heard as early as in Naushad’s score for 1943 film Kanoon in the song Ek Tu Ho, Ek Main Hoon (Suraiya). The staged cabaret sequence Deewana Yeh Parwana from 1951 film Albela showcased great fusion of the chief arranger of ‘His Music Makers’, Chic Chocolate, and C Ramchandra. Chic Chocolate and his orchestra are dressed in stylized Latin American costumes in this song.

Carmen Miranda’s song sequence of ‘Week-End in Havana’ from 1941 film of the same name bears noticeable similarities to this song. And that includes not only the music, sounds or dance, but even Geeta Bali’s costumes as well.

One can find a similar beat of three+two clave (Dil Dhadake Nazar Sharamaye) or a music sound of rolling piano (Mere Dil Ki Ghadi Kare Tick Tick) in some other song sequences of ‘Albela’. Since the audiences of Hindi films were not typically exposed to these Latin American films or songs. That helped in creating that tantalizing element of fantasy in the Hindi film songs which brought up the entire effect far above real-life limitations of mundane restriction in the Indian society.

To be sure, other thematic, such as Hawaiian, Island, Spanish, Arab, French and the like, also suitably found way into Hindi films songs. Barring a few cases, the credit should also be given to director or music director that these adaptations were seen as highly innovative depictions that completely fused into the Indian cultural environment.

To illustrate each chapter author’s points, and to make available music not easily accessible in North America, the book is ably and vividly supported by Oxford web music companion website of audio and video tracks.

Bibliographic Information:

Print publication date: 2013 ǁ 380 pages ǁ Print ISBN-13: 9780199928835

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

Paperback edition: Published: 12 December 2013 | 384 Pages | ISBN: 9780199928859

Other books:

Behind the curtain: making music in Mumbai’s film studios – Gregory Booth

American Popular Music in Britain’s Raj – Bradley G Shope

# Tadatmya Vaishnav can be contacted @ tavaishnav@gmail.com

[i]

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – December 2015

Welcome to December, 2015 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We will begin our present issue with a post that could well have been included in our last episode –

Four Aces and A Queen – Geeta Dutt’s songs with 4 ace music directors that may be missed because of the dominance of SD Burman, Hemant Kumar, OP Nayyar in her list of hit songs. On the birth anniversary of Geeta Dutt, the Queen of Bhaav Gayaki, Parag Sankla explores her lesser heard gems from the repertoire of four music directors Hansraj Behl, Chitragupt, Bulo C Rani and Avinash Vyas.

And since we are on that very site, we certainly get more to read on Geeta Dutt:

Geeta Dutt’s list of her best songs in 1957 – For some reason, may be because C.H. Atma sang it first (?), she did not include Preetam Aan Milo

Raj Kapoor – Musically – Raj Kapoor with different instrument in each of the song is remembered here. We have picked up the less heard song from the ones presented here.

Remembering Raj Kapoor- The Showman And His 7 Iconic Heroines – Nargis, Nimmi, Simi Garewal, Zeenat Aman, Dimple Kapadia, Mandakini, Padmini Kolhapure – on his 91st birthday.

C Ramchandra as Chitalkar – continuing the series on the Year of Naushad (with C Ramchandra in tandem), SoY presents the songs of CR as a singer. C Ramchandra has also sung for other music directors, such as Mir Saheb (Lal Haveli, 1944), Anil Biswas (Jwar Bhata, 1944; Veena, 1948), Husnlal-Bhagatram (Apni Chhaya, 1950), Hemant Kumar (Samrat, 1954; Lagan, 1955), Roshan (Baraati, 1954), Usha Khanna (Faisla, 1965), Laxmikant-Pyarelal (Chhaila, 1967. We have picked up some of the less heard songs:

Naushad’s gems before ‘Rattan’ (1944) – a very fine researched article that brings up the (real) vintage Naushad – Before Rattan, Naushad did over a dozen films, having over 120 songs…. The Internet (YouTube) has brought to us a large number of his early songs….. a large number of his early songs are of outstanding quality. One for one, these songs are no less melodious and enjoyable than Rattan’s.

Upperstall has presented profiles of Saeed Jaffrey by Shoma A Chatterji; Shyam Benegal by Karan Bali and Dharmendra also by Karan Bali.

We also have a couple of more pieces to celebrate Dharmendra’s birthday:

Just be yourself: Dharmendra in Guddi, and other reflections on his 80th birthday.

[A related piece here: the Amitabh cameos. And an earlier post about Dharmendra is here]

Happy Birthday Dharmendra and Sharmila Tagore! Here are our favourite films featuring the pair – Anupama (1966), Devar (1966), Satyakam (1969), Yakeen (1969), Mere Humdam Mere Dost (1968), Chupke Chupke (1975), Ek Mahal Ho Sapno Ka (1975), Sunny (1984). Devdas (1976), a Gulzar venture did not go beyond mahurat.

“Thoda Sa Dil Laga Ke Dekh” – Shammi Aunty (nee Nargis Rabadi) passionately looks back on her long career . We see her playing sitar in Ye Hawa Ye Raat Ye Chandani (Talat Mahmood – Sangdil -1952 – Sajjad Hussain). In our December, 2015 episode of Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs we had listened Thoda sa muskara ke dekh apana bana ke to dekh (Musafirkhana (1955) – with Shamshad Begum – O P Nayyar).

We now move over to other regular posts.

Bengal’s Music and Its Influence in Hindi Film MusicAntara Nanda Mondal and Peeyush Sharma take us on to a journey of discovering and enjoying gold nuggets of Bengal’s music strewn in Hindi film songs – a presentation made at the Romancing the Song Meet in India Habitat Centre, New Delhi, November 14, 2015.

Bengal’s Music and Its Influence in Hindi Film Music

In our last episode we had first time landed upon a couple of posts on the Silhouette, the magazine section of Learning & Creativity. It is time to catch up with some of the several interesting posts:

We have three posts by Arun Kumar Deshmukh on Atul’s Song A Day, which also throw quite an insight into the topic that is intrinsically related to the song under discussion. Even as we will listen to the songs mentioned in these posts in our next issue of Fading Memories.. Unforgettable songs (10th January, 2016), here is the brief take on each of the posts:

Tu mera copyright main teri copyright Mohammad Rafi has given playback to Kishore Kumar more number of times than others.

S No. Movie Song Co-singer Music Director
1. Miss Mala (1954) Chori chori aana naa* Asha Bhosle Chitragupta
2. Bhagam Bhag (1956) Chale ho kahan Asha Bhosle O P Nayyar
3. Bhaagam Bhaag (1956) Hamen koi gham hai Asha Bhosle O P Nayyar
4. Raagini (1958) Man mora Bawra O P Nayyar
5. Shararat (1959) Ajab hai dastan teri aye zindagi (happy and sad versions ) Shanker Jaikishan
6. Sharaarat (1959) Tu mera copyright Lata Mangeshkar Shanker Jaikishan
7. Baaghi Shahzada (1964) Main is masoom chehre ko Suman Kalyanpur Babul
8. Pyar Diwana (1972) Apni aadat hai Lala Asar Sattar

Incidentally, the other singers who gave playback to Kishore Kumar are Manna Dey ( 3 times), S D Batish (1), Amanat Ali (1) and Asha Bhosle (once in film Baap Re Baap-1955).

[*The video clip shows some other actor singing this song.]

Samaa ye pyaar ka bahaar ke ye mele traces the most creative period – years 1955-60 – of SJ. The author attributes the loss melody in the din of popularity in post-1960 period to the growing differences between the partners.

Aa jaa aa jaa aa jaa nadiyaa kinaare Author Ganesh Anantharaman, in his book “Bollywood melodies”Bollywood Melodies says, “Perhaps success came too early to them from the very first film, depriving them to develop a bond which comes after struggling together for success.” Over and above the support of RK, quality lyricists and singers, the strong arrangers like Sebastian D’Souza played a major role in SJ’s great success. The post has quite succinctly presented a full range of ranking arrangers of that time.

Incidentally, I have been also able to locate a very interesting clip, on the subject of ‘Conviction and Leadership: Insights from the World of Bollywood Music’, in which Ganesh Anantharaman presents his ‘evolving thoughts on what can be learnt from the world of Bollywood music about conviction and leadership.

Three versions of a songMan Mor Machaye Shor – Ladki (1953) – Lata Mangeshkar and Geeta Dutt . The Hindi version sounds a bit different from the Tamil (by T.S. Bhagavati and M.S. Rajeshwari) and Telugu (by T.S.Bhagawati and P.Suseela) versions.

Scroll.in continues to provide a variety of posts:

Bollywood raags: Hindustani classical vocalists who made film music – Featuring Bade Ghulam Ali Khan, Amir Khan, DV Paluskar and other legends – Aneesh Pradhan :

Incidentally, I watched Ankahee (1985) a few days back. The film has a Tulsidas bhajan, composed by Jaidev, rendered by Pandit Bhimsen JoshiRaghuvir Tumko Meri Laaj

HMV studios: In Kolkata, the home of India’s melodious past struggles for relevance

Some say it was Satyajit Ray’s favourite place. Now, the dappled HMV studio complex wears a mostly deserted look. – Chandrima Pal  · Fading tune – Next year, Mumbai will lose a significant piece of its musical history when Rhythm House at Kala Ghoda shuts down for good. Some 1,652 km or more away, in the dusty neighborhood of Dum Dum north of Kolkata, another icon of the country’s musical legacy awaits the inevitable. [I was a regular visitor to Mumbai’s Rhythm House from 1974 till 1979. I had also occasion to visit Rhythm House sometime in 2009, when I was in that area in a case relating to a customs case. I had purchased a couple of film CDs then.]

Music and the monument: Songs inspired by the Taj Mahal – The seventh wonder of the world has always fired up the imagination – Nate Rabe  · sunday sounds :

The Carnatic vocalist who sings Urdu blues – Hariharan has invented a whole new genre in ghazal singing – Manish Gaekwad – Hariharan’s singing career began with a ghazal. Jaidev signed him to sing for the movie Gaman (1978). Hariharan sang Ajeeb Sanehaa Mujh Par Guzar Gaya Yaro, written by poet Shahryar. Hariharan later came to create a new genre within the ghazal called Urdu Blues. He incorporated elements of jazz and blues music in the song Yeh Aaine Se (Kaash, 2000). Guitars and drums play on a slow beat alongside the sitar and sarangi moving into a noir space.

We would conclude our Blog Carnival 2015 with a post that was originally published on 31st July, 2015, but I landed up only this month. So welcome an opportune coincidence!

Mohammed Rafi: For The Record By Gajendra Nand Khanna – During my of vinyl records purchasing years in mid 70s, I had collected a fairly large collection of Mohammad Rafi’s LP records. At least so I believed till I came across this post. This collector’s collection documented here is simply mind-blowing. In one of the responses to the article, Antara very aptly comments that this article has become a reference point for many. (What) an eclectic collection of Rafi’s versatility!!!

As we continue our pursuit of the golden period of Hindi Film Music …….

Wishing you all a most fruitfully joyous and happy 2016….

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – September, 2015

Welcome to September, 2015 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We begin our recall of the anniversaries with Fearless Nadia (?)singing a romantic song 1943, apparently sung by Rajkumari and Mansoor), from Hunterwale Ki Beti , composed by Chhannalal Naik – Chanchal Dhara Nadi Kinara AND An Evening With Nadia – Karan Bali – Fearless Nadia films, produced by Wadia Movietone, were a genre unto themselves, a certain draw to many more visits to Movies at the Museum…

Another important memory is rekindled in “Guzra Hua Zamana Aata Nahin Dobara” – S. Mohinder. The interview presented herein no doubt is worth reading. But I have not been able to resist temptation of reproducing here the songs presented in the article. The songs pan S. Mohinder’s career.

Some more songs are also available @ S.MOHINDER SONGS.

Quite interestingly, Samir Dholakia also has remembered Sudhir Kapoor’s article – Kyun Chamke Bijuriya Saawan Ki posted on the birthday of S Mohinder and Asha Bhosle. This gem of a song is from film Bekhabar (1965). The article also leads us to Phool Muskuraye Kyon, Chand Jagmagaye Kyon. . . which is a duet by Mohammad Rafi and Asha Bhosle from ‘Sarfarosh’ (1964).

Asha Bhosle with reluctant Naushad and C Ramchandra: Part 1 (solos) : The two dominant composers of the era, Naushad and C Ramchandra, gave a look-up to Asha Bhosle very sparingly in the early years. From the array of songs presented in the article, we have picked up some of the songs that may be fading up from the memory –

Asha Bhosle with reluctant Naushad and C Ramchandra: Part 2 (duets) : Asha Bhosle’s duets, too, composed by them are no less memorable. Therefore, to have a complete picture of the songs that Naushad and CR composed for Asha Bhosle, we have been presented with her duets made by the two reluctant Masters.

Happy 89th Birthday, Madam Noor Jehan! 21st September was Noor Jehan’s 89th birthday. Here is the list of previous posts: 83rd Birthday (2009) || 84th Birthday (2010) || 85th Birthday (2011) || September 2012 – Noor Jehan and Lata, with a clip of one fine song from each. || 87th Birthday (2013) || 88th Birthday (2014) .

India’s loss, Pakistan’s gain: The journey of singing great Noor Jehan after 1947Karan Bali – It took Noor Jehan until 1951 to appear in a movie in Pakistan. We have picked those songs from the article that represent her (second) acting career.

Shailendra was the proverbial moth who got burned too quickly – The lyricist died 49 years ago, leaving behind a legacy of exquisite songs that make you cry and think.- Akshay Manwani [Akshay Manwani is the author of Sahir Ludhianvi: The People’s Poet (HarperCollins India 2013)]– Shailendra would have been 92 on August 30. In Ganesh Anantharaman’s National Award-winning book Bollywood Melodies: A History of the Hindi Film Song, eminent lyricist and filmmaker Gulzar said about Shailendra: “In my view he was the lyricist, who understood films as a medium distinct from poetry and theatre perfectly, and adapted to it beautifully. For his ability to know the medium, understand the situation, get into the characters, and writing in a language suiting the character, he was without peer… I’d go as far as to say that among all the lyricists of Hindi cinema, only Shailendra became a part of the film medium, expertly and successfully. All others remained poets who wrote for films.”

Dolls and puppets, child-like(?) dances, sprightly singing by Lata, Shankar Jaikishan… A series of songs that come to mind because of a number of associations, all described in the title here… The last is quite different from the first, but it’s interesting how the songs actually progress from the first to the last – while being in chronological order, too!

We now move over to other posts from our regular blogs.

Ten of My Favorite Background Songs is an interesting compilation of a very popular genre of background songs. Excluded here are the songs that appear in the credit titles of the film. The readers have further enriched the collection.

R.D. Burman – The Man, The Music is a follow up of the review of reading Gaata Rahe Mera Dil .

Basant (1960) : While not one of OPN’s best and popular score, it has some very fine tunes. And we would certainly enjoy – Chori Chori ik ishaara ho gaya hai, Naino mein suraj ki kiranein, Raaste mein ik haseen.

Bells and Whistles – “Bells and Whistles” is a popular English idiom. It means extra or fancy add-ons. However, when you hear bells or whistles in some Hindi film songs, they seem very much an integral part of the song and not something fancy or extra.  There are literally hundreds of songs that feature bells and whistles. We have here a playlist of 15 lively and popular songs with bells and whistles. These songs have been picked from movies from the mid 1960s to the mid 2000s.

From back-up to the front row: Reintroducing Bollywood dancer Edwina LyonsNandini Ramnath – Surjit Singh’s book ‘Edwina An Unsung Dancer of the Bollywood Era‘ focuses attention on a minor Anglo-Indian dancer who shimmied across the screen between the 1950s and the ’70s.

Before we pay visit to MUSINGS, we have Nigahen Milane Ko Ji Chahta Hai – The combination of Roshan’s admirable music, Sahir Ludhianvi’s beautiful words, Asha’s flawless rendition, Nutan’s lovely expressive face and the Qawwali style makes this quite irresistible. Here is the song:

rAz kI bAt hai mehfil mE.n kahE.n yA na kahE.n
bas gayA hai kOI is dil mE.n kahE.n yA na kahE.n

nigAhE.n milAnE kO jI chAhtA hai
dil-O-jA.n luTAnE kO jI chAhtA hai

While we went visiting other sections of the blog, MUSINGS has added the film reviews – Laat Saheb (1967), Grahan (1972), Anjaam (1978) and Kasturi (1978).

Now we move over songs remembered by our friends in this month –

Bhagvan Thavrani

[Asides: Here is one of a very rich list of songs on Raag Bhimpalasi].

  • Kanha Bole Na – Sangat(1976) – Manna Dey, Lata – Salil Choudhary – Janisar Akhtar

Samir Dholakia has referred songs wherein the actor has also rendered the song or the singer has acted in the film. This should pertain the period after vintage era, when playback singing by specialist singers had become the rule. This can be a very long list, which we will take up separately in due course:

Sumant (Dadu) Vashi form Chicago (U S A) had sent in these songs

We have been posting a series of posts on the widely discussed and participated exercise of annual review of songs of a particular year – Best songs of 1950: And the winners are?. We have covered up documentation of the further micro-review of the songs C Ramchandra, Husnlal Bhagatram and Ghulam Mohammad, Anil Biswas and other Music directors’ Lata Mangeshakar’s songs, as well as those of Suraiya and Shamshad Begum in June 2015 and Rajkumari, Geeta Roy and Other female Singers in July 2015.. We had then continued to explore Male Solo Songs of Mukesh, Talat Mahamood, Mohammad Rafi, G M Durrani and Chitalkar, Manna Dey, Arun Kumar, Manmohan Krishna and Others as well as Songs by several other playback singers for Raj Kapoor in July 2015. For August-, 2015, we covered Male Female Duets of Mukesh, Mohammad Rafi, Talat Mahmood, G M Durrani, and those of Chitalkar and other Male Singers.

Our onwards journey had:

We have concluded the series with.…

I have also prepared an edited compilation of all the posts @ The Songs of 1950 @ SoY

SoY has also published Best songs of 1950: Wrap Up 2, covering Other’ Female Singers

In the end, we have (our customary) very special songs of Mohammad Rafi taken out from the songs.

We continue our pursuit of the golden period of Hindi Film Music …….

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – June 2015

Welcome to June, 2015 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

It is a matter of great pleasure to commemorate Songs of Yore completing quite a trail-blazing journey of 5 years. The article contains an excellent write up, including some very light to some quite erudite pieces on the subjects ranging from “Hemantkumar’ Ravi, Discovering after three decades, Auto-inspiration or Laziness, Joyous Jaunpuri, Darbari Delights, Darbari and Mukhtar Begum. Chitrapatsangeet has added two excellent illustration of Raag Jaunpuri – one of them is Meri Yaad Mein Na Tum Aansoo Bahana – Madhosh (1954) – Talat Mahmood – Madan Mohan. We will look at the other one at the end of present episode of the blog carnival in our regular section on Mohammad Rafi.

Naushad’s “The Singing Girl Next Door”: Suraiya pays tribute to Suraiya with some of her most melodious songs by Naushad on her 86th birth anniversary (15 June 1929 – 31 January 2004).

Sajjad Hussain’s birthday also coincides with that of Suraiya, So, Happy Birthday, Suraiya and Sajjad! has presented Suariya’s songs for film 1857, for which Sajjad has scored the music. Suraiya and Sajjad Hussain worked together in Suraiya’s swan song film : Rustm Sohrab.

My favourite Hemant Kumar Songs is a tribute to Hemant Kumar on his 95th birthday. He had many other, quite notable, songs under several other music directors as well. Here are a few solo songs that come to my mind:

C Ramchandra:

Aye baad-e-shaba jara ahista chal, tahan so hui hai Anarkali – Anarkali (1953)

Jindagi Pyar Ki Do Char Ghadi Hoti Hai – Anarkali (1953)

Zameen Chal Rahi, Aasman Chal Raha Hai – Pheli Jhalak (1954)

Ital Ke Ghar Tital – Bahurani (1963)

Madan Mohan:

Kho Gaya Jaane Kahan Arzoon Ka Jahan – Mohar (1959)

Shankar Jaikishan :

Ham Kathputle Hai Kath Ke – Shikast (1953)

Rula Kar Chal Diye Ek Din Hasin Ban Kar Jo Aaye The – Badshah (1954)

Chitragupt :

Aasman Aasman Tu Kya Jaane – Daakaa (1959)

N Dutta :

Ye Baharon Ka Shama, Kho Na Jaayen Aa Bhi Jaa – Milaap – 1955 ( A solo and duet with Lata Mangeshakar)

R D Burman

Aaja Mere Pyar Aaja – Heeralal Pannalal (1978)

On Hemanta Mukherjee’s birthday, Upperstall on hemanta kumar has recalled one of the immortal composition of Hemant Kumar – Saqiya Aaj Mujhe Neend Nahin Aayegi – Sahib Bibi Aur Ghulam (1962) – Asha Bhosle and an equally memorable duet, composed by C Ramchandra – Jaag Dard-e-Ishq Jaag, Dil Ko Bequarar Kar – Anarkali (1953)

Two songs by Hemanta kumar presents O Nadi Re Ekti Kothai and Ganga Aaye Kahan Se.

On her 79th birthday on 4th June 2015, My favourite Nutan songs has consciously left out songs which show her weeping. This wonderful list brings Man Mohana Bade Jhoothe (Seema (1954) – Lata Mangeshkar – Shanker Jaikishan – to the memory.

For the records Let’s talk About Bollywood has an exclusive page dedicated to articles on Nutan. Nutan’s intelligence is a brief treatise on Nutan’s all-round virtuosity, that sets her apart as an artist. Nutan-bollymusings.com/ informs of the official launch of MUSINGS, a new blog by S. Basu which he has announced will deal chiefly with Nutan.

Musings has posted reviews of two of Nutan;s movies– Aagosh (1953) and Heer (1956) till date.

We now move over to other posts:

The video leads to other Geeta Dutt songs : Jaaongi maike jaaongi : Geeta Dutt, G M Durrani – Paatal Bhairavi (1952) Ghantasala This video is made by superimposing Hindi audio on the original Telugu clip.

Two Geeta Dutt Duets : Ta Thaiya Kar Ke Aana O Jagugar More Saiyan – Panchayat (1958) – Iqbal Qureshi – with Lata Mangeshkar and Jaanu Jaanu Re Kahe Khanake Hai Tora Kangana – Insan Jaag Utha (1959) – S D Burman – with Asha Bhosle

Anil Biswas and Meena Kapoor (via Arun Kumar Deshmukh) – Some of their songs together

I have picked up following two songs from My Favourite Cycle songs

Ten Ganga songs from classic Hindi cinema is a good collection of songs from pre-70s (mostly, with one minor exception from 1971) Hindi films which mention the Ganga, in different contexts, to different extents. I have picked up Ganga Ki Reti Pe Bangla Chhwaii De (Sudha Malhotra – Mirza Ghalib (1954) – Ghulam Mohammad ) and Ganga Ki Bhari God Mein (Manna Dey – Mere Apne (1971) – Salil Chaudhary) from the comments of the readers.

“Cricket Se Cinema Tak”- Mac Mohan captures the accidental journey of Mac Mohan (a.k.a. Mohan Makhijani). Here is the songs wherein Mac Mohan plays a lead joint-lead role:

Ye jhuki jhuki jhuki nigahein teri – Mohammad Rafi – Aao Pyaar Karein (1964) – Usha Khanna

(Very Very Interesting Trivia: Sanjeev Kumar can be seen as a very insignificant artist in some of the long shots !!!!)

Johnnie Walker in Bollywood – is a continually updated collection of some of Johnny Walker bottles …. found over the years from various Hindi (and maybe some Tamil and Telugu) filums.

Talat Mahmood: singer, actor, gentleman – Talat Mahmood was in demand not only in the recording studio but also on the screen – Manek Premchand – The article is a brief peep into the book.

Listen to virtuosos of an instrument once banned on All India Radio – Since it was introduced to the subcontinent by missionaries, the baajaa ki peti has become a part of the Indian soundscape. – Aneesh Pradhan – Meend (or a glide between notes) and gamak (or rapid oscillation of a note) are two important embellishments that cannot be produced on this instrument.  It was for this reason that the instrument was banned for broadcast on the All India Radio in 1941. Here are a few early recordings of harmonium solo recitals.

Three pioneering musicians who helped turn the harmonium into a solo instrument – Bashir Khan, Shankarrao Kalpeshwari and P Madhukar demonstrated that the ‘baaja ki peti’ wasn’t just meant for accompaniment. – Aneesh Pradhan

I remember a short, sharp, sweet, opening harmonium notes of Raat Bhi hai kuchch bheegi bheegi, which is repeated over several times.

A tribute to Guide in its 50th year – Vijay Anand’s Guide is now 50 years old and yet timeless, this is one of our cinematic landmarks, and a testament to the possibilities of artistic collaboration within a commercial system. [A longer post about “Tere Mere Sapne” is here. And more about RK Narayan’s “Misguided Guide” here]

Now we move over songs remembered by our friends in this month –

Bhagvan Thavrani

  • Kiseeko Yoon Tamannaon Mein Uljhaaya Nahin Karte – Meena Kapoor -Return of Superman (1960) – Anil Biswas: ‘This forgotten Meena Kapur solo is a stunt film nobody knows or remembers..it is picturised on Jayraj and Shila Ramani ( taxi driver and railway platform fame.. ) ….Surprise of surprises, the music is by Anil Biswas…perhaps the last flicker before he vanished..! The film has a duet sung by Anil da and Mubarak Beghum ! This song is written by films producer Manmohan…this film came and went in 1961….
  • Aap Ki Inayatein Aap Ke Karam – Lata Mangeshkar -Vandana (1975) – Ravi: ‘A simple, soothing song from a forgotten film…!’
  • Kaho Aa Ke Bahar Kare Mera Singar Mujhe Pyar Mila – Mukesh & Asha Bhonsle – FORTY DAYS (1959) – Babul Bose – ‘Film चालीस दिन was famous for that sweet Asha – Manna Dey duet ” Naseeb hoga mera meharbaan kabhi na kabhi ” and great Asha solo ” baithe hain rehguzar pe dil ka diya jalaaye “. This sweet duet of Asha – Mukesh is lesser known but so sweet…Asha is at her playful mischievous best…music director Babul Bose gave a very few but memorable films..in a few films, he teamed with Bipin and gave music under the name ” Bipin Babul ‘.
  • Na Phoolon Ki Duniya – Lata Mangeshkar – Saaz Aur Awaaz (1966) – Naushad Ali : PALKI, LEADER and SAAZ AUR AAWAZ were supposed to be Naushad’s twilight years movies and hence the Music of these films was said to be weak as compared to old Naushadian standards….A Lata chorus..it has a mystic aura about it and the chorus female voices add to the atmosphere.. Based on raag SOHINI (perhaps )..’

[Side Note: I landed up on a Suman Kalyanpur number – Poonam Ki Raat Aayi – which I am not able to recollect very easily now. Hence brought it up here.]

  • Aye Saba Unse Kah Jara – ‘A rare Rafi- Asha duet from “Alibaba 40 chor ” . The music credit is given to S N Tripathi and Chitragupta but none of the film songs seem to have Chitragupta touch. Maybe , he gave background music only…..Strangely, in the same year 1954, a film named 40 BABA EK CHOR was also released with music by S D Burman with good, average, songs……Enjoy the lilting Arabian tune…!’

In the last episode of our carnival, we had talked about the very widely discussed and participated exercise of annual review of songs of a particular year – Best songs of 1950: And the winners are?. We have taken up documentation of the further micro-review of the songs therein. Here are the posts published during the present month:

We will continue with the series in the next couple of months as well……

In the end, we have picked up (our customary) very special songs of Mohammad Rafi from the lead we get from the articles / films discussed here before in the present episode of our blog carnival –

That incidentally takes us to two more songs from the same film – a solo by Mohammad Rafi, Zindagi Ke Mod Par, Akele The Ham, Mil Gaye Tum To Dil Ka Sahara Mila, and a duet of Mohammad Rafi and Asha Bhosle, Aankhon Mein Na Jaane

  • Recall of Mohammad Rafi songs from Saaz Aur Awaz

Pyaar Ki Raah Bahaar Ki Manzil – Mohd.Rafi & Asha Bhonsle – – A tonga song – after a long time.

Kisne Mujhe Sada Di (part i) – Mohd.Rafi & Suman Kalyanpur – Another haunting song, which typically has more than one version (part ii) in the film.

We continue our pursuit of the golden period of Hindi Film Music …….

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – April 2015

Welcome to April, 2015 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Come 1st April and rest assured that SoY will come up with something brilliant. For the present, Some thoughts on taxonomic-mathematical analysis of Hindi films and songs has a fairly lashing tongue in the cheek, but that would not take away the merits of three core ideas – viz. Duet Balance Index (DBI) – ‘Duets that are really solos’, Popularity-Quality Index (PQI) – Popularity versus quality and Mathematical Analysis of Bollywood Triangles and Other Films presented therein.

We turn our sails to our regular fair –

Shamshad Begum songs by Naushad – SoY’s tribute to Shamshad Begum on her 96th birth anniversary (14 April 1919 – 23 April 2013). Shamshad Begum’s entry is credited to Ghulam Haider. Nonetheless she sang with same élan with most of the music directors of the vintage era. When Naushad used her voice first time in Shahjehan (1946) , Shamshad Begum was already at her peak. As she went on to sing a wide range of moods and scales in around 60 songs with Naushad, her portfolio was concurrently getting richer with other music directors like C Ramchandra, S D Burman, Ghulam Mohammad and others. She blazed a scorching trail with O P Nayyar. It remains a very typical irony of the vagaries of Hindi Film Music that she was quite easily replaced with Lata Mangeshkar and Asha Bhosle by Naushad and O P Nayyar respectively in course of 50s.

SoY has picked up Shamshad Begum songs of C Ramchandra in Shamshad Begum songs by C Ramchandra as a tribute on the 2nd death anniversary of the legendary singer.” During a brief period in the late 1940s, before Lata Mangeshkar happened in a big way to C Ramchandra, Shamshad Begum was his most important singer, and he was at his creative best. The combination gave some everlasting songs, which are an important part of our musical legacy.”

We recall our April 2013 episode of our blog carnival, wherein we carried a few more articles and a downpour of obituaries on her passing away. We add a few more here:

Naushad on Shamshad Begum in an interview on BBC, shared by Raza Ali Abidi on his youtube channel.

Shamshad Begum Interview, Part 1 of 2 and 2 of 2

By selecting a range of songs form films of different time scale, Asha Parekh-A charming and talented actress provides a fan’s insight to Asha Parekh’s career graph. To this we supplement Unknown Facts About Asha Parekh.

Words by Anna Morcom on Pakeezah (with accompanying videos from Tommydan) – looks back at (main) songs as interestingly seen in the book, Illicit Worlds of Indian Dance on 43rd anniversary of Meena Kumari’s death.

We pick up two songs from My favourite Meena Kumari songs:

Uff Ye Beqaraar Dil Kahan Luta Na Poochhiye is a tribute to (Smt.) Bela Bose Sengupta on her 74th birthday on 18th April, 2015. We pick up a few of the songs listed out at the end of the article:

The Lost Films of Helen – This video slideshow shines a light on some Helen films that haven’t been seen since they were originally released many years ago. They are presumed to be lost forever.

Tune, Composer, Language – It’s All the Same attempts at highlighting some examples where a wide arrange of music directors have re-use their tunes within the same language, within the same period of 1940s -1950s.

Double delight with FusionFusion in this post is to mean something totally different from a mere fusion of instrumental music – a mix of two different singing styles in the vocals in the same song. 12 of these ‘Fusion’ songs (from 1950s to 2010) are placed in the player.

Now we move over to Samir Dholakia ‘s choice for the month –

Naresh Mankad has remembered Budhdham Sharanam Gachchami – Angulimaal (1960) – Anil Biswas – Manna Dey, Meena Kapoor, and Chorus. This is indeed a more known song. But it has a very different version (predecessor, in terms of timeline) in Anjali (1957), sung by Mohammad Rafi, and composed by Jaidev.

In the end we take up (our customary) very special songs / articles on Mohammad Rafi –

We will end April month’s episode with a very typical Shanker-Jaikishan – Mohammad Rafi songs of 1960s – from (of course) the film ‘April Fool’ – a song which has one of the longest prelude, studded with a huge ensemble of violins, wherein Rafi has taken flights to all the scales –

Aa Gale Lag Jaa, Mere Sapane, Mere Apne, Mere Paas Aa…….

We continue our pursuit of the golden period of Hindi Film Music …….

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – March, 2015 edition

Welcome to March, 2015 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

March has a very important festival – Holi – linked mainly to onset of the spring in the North India. The celebration of the festival is deeply ingrained into the fabric of the entire social culture of the people. As a natural corollary, it is but natural that the festivities are reflected into the mainstream (Hindi) Cinema. From the mellow and richly classical Holi songs in the 50s to the fun songs in the 70s, the flirtatious songs of the 80s to the power-packed, rigorous dance sequences in the new millennium, Holi songs have seen a gradual but marked change in style of music and the manner of filming the sequences. It is natural that we devote the opening session of the current edition of our blog festival to the articles featuring Holi songs in the Hindi Films.

And here are some of the randomly selected articles published in the mainstream journalistic flavor:

We now turn to the anniversaries:

Conversations Over Chai has three articles to commemorate Talat Mahmood’s birth anniversary on 24th February (1924):

The Legends: Talat Mahmood – has a few ‘quintessential Talat’ songs, each one for a different music director. While reading the article and comments thereto, Tum To Dil Ke Taar Chhed Kar, Kho Gaye (Roop Ki Raani Choron Ka Raaja – 1961- Shanker Jaikishan) came up from my memory. This, incidentally, is a twin version song. Furthermore, looking for some other songs, I landed upon Tera Khayal Dil Ko Sataye To Kya Karen (Naqab – 1955 – Govind Ram).

My Favourites: Talat Mahmood – Lata Mangeshkar Duets

In addition to a fairly rich collection and the contents in the main article, these songs in Comments also catch our attention:

Yaad aanewale phir yaad aa rahe hain Anmol Ratan – Vinod. He gave another great duet Shikwa tera main gaaun in the film.
Mat chhed zindagi ke khamosh taar le jaRaag Rang – Roshan.
Saawan ki raaton meinPrem Patra – Salil Chaudhary
Chaahe nain churao chaahe daaman bachao pyar ho ke rahegaAas – Shanker Jaikishan

Mausam Ye Pukare Masti Mein Le Chal – Burmah Road (1962) – Chitragupt

The Legends: Talat Mahmood – Part 2 – has lined up duets with different singers.

SoY continues with Focusing on Naushad as the theme of the year while undertaking comparisons with C Ramchandra in Talat Mahmood by Naushad and C Ramchandra. Naushad used Talat Mahmood in lead only once in Babul (1950) and then as a co-singer with Mohammad Rafi in Kaisi haseen aaj baharon ki raat hai (Aadami – 1968). In the queer twist of commercial considerations, Talat Mahmood was replaced by Mahendra Kapoor in the final track, but the records were already in the market. In comparison, C Ramchandra has a fairly large share of ‘great’ songs with Talat Mahmood. Here also, Talat Mahmood was on the losing streak once – Kitna haseen hai mausam kitna haseen safar hai – which is finally rendered by Chitalkar himself.

Naushad-C Ramchandra duel for Amirbai Karnataki, is an innovative tribute to Amirbai Karnataki, on the 50th death anniversary (c.1906 – 3 March 1965). Naushad had About fifteen songs in seven films in a span of eight years whereas C Ramchandra had Eight films and about fifteen songs in a span of eight years – same as Naushad’s. ,,,, If we look at Amirbiai Karnataki’s singing career in overall perspective, Anil Biswas first catapulted her to great fame with Kismet (1943); she sang the maximum number of her songs for Gyan Dutt and maximum number of his songs were sung by her…. Vidur Sury has written an exhaustive and excellent article – Amirbai Karnataki – A Legendary Indian Singer on Amirbai Karnataki. He has also contributed to Atul’s bollywood song a day- with full lyrics Amirbai Karanataki’s Deendayaal sakal dukhbhanjan (Narsi Bhagat – 1940)……..And this in turn takes us to the categories Ameerbai Karnataki songs, which has 118 posts and Ameerbai Karnataki solo, (78 posts) on Atul’s bollywood song a day- with full lyrics

‘Bags, Books and More’ pays tribute to Ravi, through his scores to Sahir Ludhyanvi’s songs, in My favourite Sahir Ludhianvi – Ravi songs, on the third death anniversary. In terms of getting less to hear a song , we pick up Mahendra Kapoor-Asha Bhosle duet Rangeen Fiza hai (Bahu Beti, 1965) from among the ‘favorites’ .

We now turn to other posts on our regular blogs:

Tennis, Pathakji and ‘Tere sadke balam’ – There would many who have very strong association with a song….But it takes SoY to make it a memory to be shared with all as if we lived all those moments ourselves.

Film Songs Based on Classical Ragas (8) – Pilu – Guest article by Subodh Agrawal in which he discusses the best film songs based on this Raga and some fine classical pieces. Pilu is the one that truly captures the mood evoked by this earthy smell, possibly because it is the raga of the Gangetic plain, where the summers are long and severe, and the rain – when it comes – comes in torrents, as in a fragment from the film Sara Akash (1969), as it captures the traditional movement better than any other clip one could locate.

As can be easily expected, the advent of spring should have led to posting of articles on the subject. Ten of my favorite spring songs takes up the task with the rules: the synonym for spring—basant, bahaar, etc—should actually be present in the lyrics, the word (especially in the case of bahaar, which can also refer to scenery or enchanting environs) should specifically refer to spring itself and the word should be used in the literal, not the metaphorical, sense, making the reading even more interesting.

Ten of my favourite cloud songs is a thematic songs-list article, which follows these rules: firstly, the synonym for cloud must be in the first line of the song, and secondly, the reference to clouds should be literal; clouds should not be used only in the metaphorical sense. On a similar vein, there have been other posts on rain songs and wind songs.

Ijaazat (1987) very fondly traces the origin for writing up the review to Mera kuch samaan from the album You’ve Stolen My Heart: Songs from R.D. Burman’s Bollywood

Word Play: Shaam presents the Shaam songs with the self-imposed rules : the song had to begin with the chosen word. (At the most, the word could be the second one in the first line.) Preludes to songs didn’t count. And two, it has to be the word itself, not its variations., which have yielded three posts – Raat, Piya and Chand – in the past. We pick up, again on the basis of the criterion of not-getting-to listen-often:

Shaam gayi raat aayi – Shree 420 (1955) – Lata Mangeshkar – Shanker Jaikishan- a song that is recorded and then discarded from the film is classic fit for Mystery of the Missing Songs, strangely, this song was never used in any subsequent RK film either

Shaam dekho dhal rahi hai -Anjaan Hai Koi (1969) – Mohammed Rafi, Usha Khanna – Music: Usha Khanna

Gulzar’s “shaam se aankh mein nami se hai – Mukesh .The original Salilda tune has been used in another song and has also been sung by Mukesh.

The succinct review of Aah – 1953 has very judiciously provided a link to the jukebox filled with songs from the film.

Dances By Egypt’s Naima Akef -Egypt’s Golden Age of cinema happened very close in time to India’s, beginning in the 1940s and extending into the ’60s. …there also are close parallels between this cinema and Indian cinema in the song-and-dance sequences, with the main difference being that the Egyptian dances were mostly Middle Eastern…..the present selection starts with Naima Akef’s most strange and possibly most modern dance, “Mambo.” After that one, thrown in are six more, which fall all along the spectrum from modern cabaret to traditional Egyptian folk dance. Rather than going into any descriptions of those, let the dances speak for themselves (because they certainly do speak for themselves….).

Kahan Le Chale Ho Bat Do Musafir – Beena Rai – a career starting form Kali Ghata (1951) ran into some 18 films ending with Apna Ghar Apni Kahani (1968). The post has provided links to some of her very famous songs.

Whilst on Beena Rai, we may recollect Ashok Dave;s review of Vallah Kya Baat Hai (1962) (in Gujarati), and enjoy these two exceptional Roshan songs –

Enjoyable western beats has compiled a special list of 15 songs on the player, applying the criteria that You should distinctly hear the bongo, conga or drums played as a lead instrument for at least a few seconds, in some part of the song, hindi film songs from the 1950s to the 1970s (with one song from 1980).

Rhythm of CastanetsCastanets are relatively tiny instruments that fit into the palms of the two hands and were originally used in European music. They can be played quickly in continuous notes to create a roll type of sound, or they can be played with each click on the castanet being a discrete note. The representative songs are on Rhythm of Castanets.

Jinhen Naaz Hai Hind Par, from Pyaasa 1957 takes us to Madhukar Shukla’s Translation of the original poem, and in turn to original version in Roman Urdu and the modified film song version. Here is the video clip of the song, wherein @ 6.26 we have my most favoured portion:

vo ujale dareechoN meiN paayal ki chhan-chhan
thaki haarii saaNsoN pe tabale ki dhan-dhan
ye be-ruuh kamroN meiN khaaNsii kii Than-Than
jinhe naaz hai hind par vo kahaaN haiN?

And its English translation:

The jingling trinklets at casement bright,
Tambourins athrob’ mid gasping life;
Cheerless rooms with cough alive;
Where are they who praise, the pious eastern ways?

On this rather sombre note, we now turn over to articles from the random search of other blogs/ sites:

The Hindi film song & the soundtrack of our livesSantosh Desai in City City Bang Bang -..It would be far too simplistic to connect the change in Hindi film songs to the harsher angrier discourse that we see in our public conversations, but surely the inability to find little islands of gentleness into which we can periodically retreat must take its toll. With no better self to find refuge in, no song to hum with eyes closed in melancholic bliss, the world is a harsher place full of people resigned to their hardness.

The “Indian” Dances in Kali Yug (1963, Italy/France/Germany) – The four dances in the films all center around the character Amrita, an exotic-enough sounding Indian name, played by the French actress and “Bond girl” Claudine Auger.

And now over to exclusive articles on Mohammad Rafi…

clip_image002The search for songs on Holi had led to writer and journalist Vinod Viplav’s article होली से कटती मुंबइया फिल्में. A little more exploration of the blog leads us to the category Mohammad Rafi, where we come to know of publication of the second edition of his biographical book Meri Awaz Suno (ISBN – 81-904097-1-9), which in turn led to:

As we close our books for this edition, we get the news that Shashi Kapoor, who just celebrated his 77th birthday, will receive this year’s Dadasaheb Phalke Award.

We continue our pursuit of the golden period of Hindi Film Music …….

Categories
Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – January 2015

Welcome to January, 2015 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

It is Songs of Yore once again to bang start the New Year with The Jewel in the Crown of Naushad: ‘Rattan’ (1944) so as celebrate 2015 as the Year of Naushad in the 75th year of his debut.

On Naushad’s birthday (25th December), a different aspect of his music is presented in Eight Instrumental Dance Numbers by Naushad (and a pic from a ninth), which are positively delightful, even though they might not be as well-known as his vocal songs:

  1. Cuckoo in Anokhi Ada
  2. The snake dance from Dastan
  3. The festival dance in Mela
  4. Cuckoo in Aan
  5. The “Blind Man’s Bluff” dance in Dillagi
  6. Sitara Devi’s dance in Mother India
  7. The festival group dance from Dulari and 8. Geeta Bali’s gypsy dance in the same film

And a pic from Suraiya’s lovely little semi-classical dance at the miserable wedding in Anmol Ghadi:

suraiya-anmol ghadiOn C Ramchandra’s birth anniversary (12th January) SoY has chosen The Master of Musical Comedies C Ramchandra and his ‘Patanga’ (1949), “because it comes in the watershed year of the change of era when Lala Mangeshkar hits the scene like a tornado, and sweeps away the yesteryear singers like Amirbai Karnataki, Shamshad Begum etc.” On a more broader canvas, Ten of my favourite C Ramachandra songs….is specifically (the) songs which he composed, not just songs he sang.

My favourite O.P. Nayyar songs – It is an irony that one of the finest music composers in Hindi cinema is known today more for the one thing he did not do [did not record a song with Lata Mangeshkar], rather than what he did!

I have picked up Poocho Na Hamein (Mitti Mein Sona, 1960, Asha Bhosle) from the songs listed in the post.. There is no video available and the longer version of the song is also not easily traceable. There is another beautiful song in the same film sung by Asha Bhosle, Yeh duniya rahe na rahe kya pata, mera pyar tujhse rahega sada.

We have two excellent links to the Radio Ceylon program on O P Nayyar: Tribute to O.P.Nayyar~Radio Ceylon 28-01-2013~Morning – Part 1 and Part 2 and Part 3

OPN died a reclusive man, in touch with only a few friends on 28th January, 2007.

Remembering N. Dutta (Datta Naik) – 30th December, 2014 marks the 27th death anniversary of the unfairly under-rated and lesser known composer, Datta Naik, also credited as N. Dutta.

I have picked up these songs from the songs posted:

Chand Bhi Koi Diwana Hai (Apna Ghar Apni Kahani, 1968, Singers: Mahendra Kapoor and Asha Bhosle):

Aye Dil Zuban Na Khol (Naach Ghar, 1959, Lata Mangeshkar)

Nashe Mein Hum Nashe Mein Tum Mohammad Rafi-Suman Kalyanput (Black Cat, 1959).

Naina Kyun Bhar Aaye (Dharmputra, 1961, Asha Bhosle)

Laage To Se Nain (Chandi Ki Deewar, 1964, Talat Mahmood and Asha Bhosle)

In addition, I have one more song Askon Ne Jo Paaya Hai (Chandi Ki Diwar, Talat Mahmood), which has been very fondly been referred to by Captain Narendra Phanse in his regular article in Web Gurjari.

My favourite Mahendra Kapoor songs – Ends with a very rare song sung by Asha Bhosle, Usha Khanna and Mahendra Kapoor from the 1969 film B-grade film Killers, starring Ajit, Dara Singh and Sheikh Mukhtar. “Mere Dil Zindagi Safar Hai” is picturised on Helen and Dara Singh in a circus. A lovely song, Usha Khanna sings surprisingly well and MK has a small bit right towards the end. Brilliant music by OPN.

On her 76th birth anniversary on 8th January, from My favourite songs of Nanda, I have selected

Kajrey Badarwa (Pati Patni, 1966, Lata Mangeshkar, R D Burman)

Pyar Bhari Yeh Ghatayein (Qaidi No 911, Manna Dey-Lata Mangeshkar, Dattaram)

From my side I would add Thahariye Hosh Mein Aaoon To Chale Jaaiyega (Mohabbat Isko Kahate Hain, Mohammad Rafi, Suman Kalyanpur, Khayyam).

IMIRZA777 pays A Tribute… People who left us in 2014.

Last month, we had taken note of the articles published on Shailendra’s birth anniversary. We have been able to find two more very interesting video features – An Affair to Remember: Celebrating Shailendra, the lyrical genius and Rajya Sabha TV’s Virasat in which Rajesh Badal has anchored Lyricist ‘Shailendra’

A thumri from different films has presented Baat Chalat Nahi Chunari Rang Daari from Ladki – 1953 (Singer: Geeta Dutt, composer: C Ramchandra) and Rani Rupmati -1959 (Singers: Mohammad Rafi and Krishna Rao Chonkar, Music: S N Tripathi)

Our friend Samir Dholakia has forwarded Hanste dekha to boley sitaare…o piyaa pyaare, which sounds C Ramchandra-like, is composed by S D Burman for “Chaalis Baaba Ek Chor”(1954). Bhagwan Thavrani helps in remembering Jaane Kitni Baar Hriday Se Maine Use Pukara (Sapna – 1969 – Jaidev).

The story of Film Music will never be complete without taking the due cognizance of some of the great musicians and arrangers who worked ‘behind the curtain’ in creating these songs were Antony Gonsalves, Antanio Vaz (Chic Chocolate), Sebastian D’souza, Frank Fernand, Enoch Daniels, Van Shipley, Manohari Singh, Kersi Lord, Maruti Rao Keer among many others. One such unsung music arranger is Kishore Desai, presented @ Bahaaron se keh do mere ghar na aayen. A few of the popular songs of the golden period of Hindi film songs in which he played mandolin/sarod are as under:

Song Movie Music director
Bechain nazar betaab jigar Yasmeen (1955) C Ramchandra
Dil ka na karna aitbaar koi Halaku (1956) Shankar Jaikishan
Kaun aaya mere man ke dwaare Dekh Kabira Roya (1957 Madan Mohan
Ghadi ghadi mora dil dhadke Madhumati (1958) Salil Chowdhury
Sakhi re mera man uljhe tan dole (played Sarod) Chitralekha (1964) Roshan
Aage bhi jaane na tu Waqt (1965) Ravi
tum bin jaaun kahan (Rafi version) Pyaar Ka Mausam (1969) R D Burman

Kishore Desai composed many NFSes. The present article has remembered Bahaaron se keh do mere ghar na aayen (1965) Singer-Mukesh, Lyrics-Shiv Kumar Saroj. Incidentally, Captain Narendra Phanse in his regular article in Web Gurjari (referred hereinbefore, too) remembers Shiv Kumar Saoj’s song in Mukesh’s voice – Tere Labon Ke Muquabil Gulab Kya Hoga.

We also take note of Text of 75 Cult Songs (1931-2006), wherein, on the occasion of (in 2007) platinum Jubilee of talkies, ‘Screen’’s attempts to look at 75 cult songs – the creme-de-la-creme of mega-hits that have crossed economic, cultural and geographical barriers and thus defined and redefined tastes and trends in Hindi film music have been captured.

SoY has continued with the Multiple Version Songs series with Multiple Versions Songs (20): Male Solo and Duet or Chorus.

And now over to exclusive articles on Mohammad Rafi…

§ On the 90th birthday anniversary of Mohd Rafi saab some rare mix melodies

§ JIS RAAT KE KHAWB AAYE– RAFI (WITH NAUSHAD SPEAKS)- FILM- HABBA KHAATOON (UNRELEASED)

§ A Tribute to Mohd Rafi – Part 1- From among 25 songs presented in this part , I have selected Tum Poochtey Ho Ishq Bala Hai Ki Nahin (Nakli Nawab, 1962, Bipin-Babul)

§ A Tribute to Mohd Rafi – Part 2 also has a very wide range of duet songs, of which I have selected

Mat Poochiye Dil Hai Kahan, Dil Ki Manzil Hai Kahan (Hum Matwale Naujawan, 1961, Co-singer – Mukesh, MD: Chitragupta)

Tumhein Dil Se Chaaha Tumhein Dil Diya Hai (Chand Aur Suraj, 1965, Co-singer: Suman Kalyanpur, MD: Salil Choudhary

Dil Toh Pehle Se Hi Madhosh Hai (Baharein Phir Bhi Aayengi, 1966, Co-singer: Asha Bhosle, MD: OPN)

• And of course we have a score of recent posts on Meri Awaaz Suno

Ravi Shankar Sharma and Mohammad Rafi’s combination is remembered for generations

Why I see Rafi Sahab as a role model?

What makes Rafi Sahab the ONE and ONLY

Mohammed Rafi – Suron Ke Betaaj Badshah

Aa Rafi Phir Aa

We would continue our pursuit of the golden period of Hindi Film Music during 2015 …….

Categories
I Liked Music from films

Hamsadhawani – An amateur’s search for ‘Something More’ about his favorite film song

I do not remember how I came to know that the song that I inherently liked –  Jaa Tum se Nahin Bolun Kanhaiyaa – Manna Dey and Lata Mangeshkar, Shaliendra, Salil Chaudhary  (Is it because each of the apparently known ingredients of the creation also happen to be my inherent favorites, that I liked this song? – I really do not know. But like I do.)- is based on a variant of classical Raag [Taraanaa in Raag Hansdhwani].

A few days back, I wondered what more can we find out about this song or Raag! And , hence this post……..

First and foremost, let us listen to the melody:

Parivar – Ja Tose Nahin Boloon

This is really a very good example of Hamsadhwani.  The basic theme of this piece was “borrowed” from “Vatapi Ganapathim”, which is a traditional Carnatic piece from Dixitar [comment @ http://chandrakantha.com/raga_raag/film_song_raga/hamsadhwani.shtml]

Next, in the list to listen is the basis of this song – as I know – the Taraanaa in Hamsadhwani. And what a coincidence – the two pieces that I had landed upon were rendered by Ustaad Amir Khan Saa’b and Begum Parveen Sultana, again my favorites when it come my pleasures of listening Indian Classical Music.

Here they are:

“Ustad Amir Khan tarana Raag Hamsadwani – awesome.flv”         

Ustad Shahid Parvez Khan – pays homage to the great Ustad Amir Khan by playing his famous tarana in Raag Hansadhwani. This video was filmed during the closing moments of a shibir hosted by the SPK Academy of Music.  Raag Hansadhwani  

http://youtu.be/KyNsixJkZs0

Raga Hamsadhwani – Tarana  –  Parveen Sultana    – Taken from: Sadabahar  Hamsadhwani  Music Today – Living Media India Ltd, Jan 2006    
http://music.ovi.com/in/r/Product/r/r/5303634

Here is an alternative version  too:

Before we take a deeper plunge in the classical terrain, let us visit what we can find in ‘Other Film Songs’ variety.

And I have a surprise on my hand:

Visit to site http://chandrakantha.com/raga_raag/film_song_raga/hamsadhwani.shtml  shows another great favourite of mine – O Chaand Jahaan Woh Jaaye – Lata and Asha, Rajendra Krishna, C. Ramchandra composed in Raag Hamsadhwani in Tal Kaherva:

This site also quotes one more non-filmy Meera Bhajan, rendered by Lata, which is compsed by Hridyanaath Mangeshkar

Karam Ki Gati Nyari        http://youtu.be/wnGhZHhsDwg

We would continue this as series of posts……