Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – April, 2016

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Welcome to April, 2016 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We will commence our present episode with My Favorites: Songs of Spring. The only restrictions placed in the selection of the songs were that the lyrics should actually mention the word ‘Spring’ in any of its synonyms – Bahaar. Basant. Vasant-  and that the picturisation should show some signs of the season, even if it only means that the song is picturised outside. This is why Aaya basant hai aaya from Subhadraharan (1964) or Dekho mausam kya bahaar hai from Opera House (1961) do not make it to the list. It’s also why Ketki gulaab juhi (Basant Bahar / 1956) is missing from this list, even though the lyrics describe the season so well. Here are some of the less heard songs from this list –

  • Bahaar aayi khili kaliyan  – Alif Laila (1953) – Lata Mangeshkar – Shyam Sundar – Sahir Ludhianvi
  • Aayi bahaar hai  – Hamari Shaan (1951) -Kishore Kumar, Shamshad Begum – Chitragupt – Raja Mehdi Ali Khan
  • Din suhane mausam bahaar ka  – Poonam (1952) – Lata Mangeshkar – Shankar Jaikishan – Shailendra
  • Shaam-e-bahaar aayi Shama Parwana (1954) – Mohammed Rafi, Suraiya – Husnlal Bhagatram – Majrooh Sultanpuri
  • Aayi jhoomti bahaar –  Insaniyat (1955)  – Lata Mangeshkar, Talat Mehmood – C Ramchandra

I have also added one from my side –

We now move over to our regular Anniversaries section.

Lalita Pawar: The Dominating Matriarch And Scheming Manthara – A tribute to the prolific Indian actress, with some interesting anecdotes on her life and times By Niilesh A Raje on her 100th birthday .

Lalita Pawar - in 1940s

Before she met with a freak accident in 1942, Lalita Pawar- born Amba Laxman Rao Sagun on 18 April 1916 – used to play the lead roles.

We have one song from a 1938 film. The clip does not have the original soundtrack with video, but the video uploader, Shalin Bhatt has filled in the gap with some rare images of Lalita Pawar

Sakhi Prem Sudhaa Bharne Aayi – Duniya Kya Hai (1938) – Music: Anna Saheb Mainkar .

Big FM had a Lalita Pawar Birthday Special

The Swar Kokila Kanan Devi – A tribute to Kanan Devi (22 April 1916 to 17 July 1992) on her birth centenary – Here is pip into her well-known and not-so-well-known songs –

On Mac Mohan’s Birthday, Remembering Sholay’s Forgotten Villain – Khalid Mohamed completes the whole picture of Mac Mohan’s persona.

Shamshad Begum’s songs by OP Nayyar is a tribute to Shamshad Begum (14 April 1919 – 23 April 2013) on her 97th birth anniversary. The back-to-back posts on Shamshad Begum’s songs by Naushad and C Ramchandra last year there was inevitably a reference to OP Nayyar as he is the third member of the trinity which made the greatest contribution to her. To this list we can expect Hansraj Behl in the future who has77 Hindi songs (solos and duets), and 50 songs from Punjabi films. Shamshad Begum’s songs by SD Burman had been presented under the title East meets West. Here are some of the less heard ones –

‘Jo Bhi Ho Tum Khuda Ki Kasam, Lajawab Ho’: Remembering Shakeel Badayuni By Peeyush Sharma – One rare feat (for those times) that gets associated with Shakeel is his hat-trick of Filmfare Best Lyricist Awards in the years 1961, 1962 and 1963. Forty six years ago, on 20th April, lyricist, poet, shayar, Shakeel Badayuni breathed his last owing to diabetes related complexes. He was just 53 years old

Two of his great ghazals, rendered by Begum Akhtar

Silsila Khatm Na Hoga Mere Afsaane Ka: Shakeel Badayuni, a Tribute – Pavan Jha – He sang his own song in Paak Daman (1957)

We now take a look at posts on other subjects –

Simple melodies of Ravi would normally have dominance of santoor and flute in their orchestration. In most of the cases, the lyrics came first and the tune later. Please enjoy 24 of his lovely songs from LINK TO SIMPLE MELODIES OF RAVI.

Ten of my favourite funny songs is a list of ten songs that are actually funny, funny because of the lyrics, the rendition, the picturization—whatever (in some stellar instances, all of the above). These may not be songs that make one laugh out loud, but they are songs that always make you smile rather more widely than usual.

We have picked up a couple of less heard songs

How Bhupinder Singh blends the ghazal with the guitar – Bhupinder had a tough call to take: should he be behind the microphone or strum a guitar? Having both wasn’t going to be easy. Some of Rahul Dev Burman’s greatest songs, including “Dum Maro Dum” (Hare Rama Hare Krishna, 1971), “Chura Liya Hai Tumne” (Yaadon Ki Baaraat, 1973) and “Mehbooba Mehbooba” (Sholay, 1975) were backed by Singh’s musical fingers. Singh has a formidable body of work in film music, having sung for over 50 films. “Dil Dhoondta Hai” (Mausam, 1975), “Naam Gum Jayega” (Kinara, 1977), “Karoge Yaad Toh” (Bazaar, 1982), “Kisi Nazar Ko Tera Intizaar”(Aitbaar, 1986), “Baadalon Se Kaat Kaat Ke” (Satya, 1998) are just a few of his most popular songs, but the ones that need to rediscovered, like the man himself.

‘In Aradhana, Sachin Karta Gave Me My Life’s Biggest Hit’: In Conversation with Shakti Samanta By Peeyush Sharma -In this never-published-before interview, Shakti Samanta recalls the superlative and everlasting music that became the hallmark of his films.. Shakti Samanta made four films each with O P Nayyar, Shankar Jaikishen and S D Burman. With R D Burman, he did the maximum number of films – 11 in Hindi plus four more in Bengali. Three of his films were with the famous Bengali singer-composer Shyamal Mitra and two each with Ravi and Ravindra Jain.

The post has several very-well songs. I have located one which is not much heard.

Dekho Dekho Jee Balam  – Bahu (1955) – Geeta Dutt, Talat Mahmood – Hemant Kumar – S H Bihari

Kite (Patang) Songs  is a result of several factors that happened in the background. To us what matters is the outcome –

Hindi film songs in SwahiliManish Gaekwad – Taarab, a fusion of Indian, Arabic, and African sounds popular on the Swahili coast of Southeast Africa, has a special place for Hindi film music. Traditionally sung in the Swahili language at weddings and social gatherings, Taarab songs weave several themes into the lyrics, including romance and politics…… There are over two dozen of these songs on YouTube – yet another instance of the phenomenal popularity impact of Hindi film music beyond its traditional markets.

Nutan on the sets of Laila Majnu (November, 1953)

Costumed as Laila, the youthful Nutan signs autographs for fans who visited the “Laila Majnu” set

Costumed as Laila, the youthful Nutan signs autographs for fans who visited the “Laila Majnu” set

Madhubala Goes Chinese (January, 1957) – Members of the Chinese Women’s Delegation dropped in on madhu bala-chinesethe sets of Om Prakash’s – whom most of us know as a veteran comedian and character actor –  “Gate­way of India” the day they arrived in Bombay. Madhubala welcomed them cordially and is seen chatting with two of the members.

Om Prakash entertained the Delegation to the screening of a special Chinese song-and-dance number filmed for “Gateway of India”. – Chal Mere Dil Ke Udan Khatole Udata Ja Tu Hole Hole  – Mohammad Rafi – Madan Mohan-  Here Madhubala, Bhagwan and a party of Chinese children dance together.

Madhubala – The Biggest Star in the Worldby David Cort for Theatre Arts – August, 1952 – The actress, born Mumtaz Ataullah in Delhi in 1933, with the greatest following, in numbers and devotion, is not to be found in Hollywood, but on the opposite side of the planet — in Bombay, India.

Poster of 1951 film 'Badal', based on Robin Hood theme

Poster of 1951 film ‘Badal’, based on Robin Hood theme

‘Badal’ was quite successful. Most of the songs of the film also had done well. We will take up one of those for the records

Do Din Ke Liye Maheman Yahan – Badal (1951) – Lata Mangeshkar – Shanker Jaikishan

Two Timir Baran songs

We end our present episode with a posts/ articles that cover Mohammed Rafi, from a wide-ranging point of views –

When Dev Anand lent his voice to a Mohammad Rafi song –This is an article that was published on 4-12-2011 – ‘Hurray Hurray’ @0.08  in the song Pyar Mohabbat Ke Siwa Ye Zindagi Kya Zindagi,(Pyar Mohabbat1966Mohammed Rafi, Asha Bhosle – Shanker Jaikishan)is recorded in Dev Anand’s voice. According to some reports, Dev Anand had also lent his voice to another Rafi song from Kala Bazar (1960) – Sooraj Ki Jaise GolayiS D Burmanby adding ‘Om dhan hai namah’ and ‘Hari dhan hari dhan’ @4.52.

Philatelic Tribute to Great Legend – Mohd Rafi

Rafi 30001

An Open Letter to Rafi Demeanors – J.K. Bhagchandani – The post is a point-to-point rejoinder to the contention that Mohammed Rafi did not have natural pain in his voice for sad songs and he has to bring in sobbing effect to infuse the right impact. The author of the post strongly states that it is not only sad songs that he has provided us with different shades/ sub-genres but almost all genres of songs sung by him have that diversity factor

I look forward to receive your inputs for further enriching the contents of the posts…..

Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs: April, 2016

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Holi has still left its imprint on this page, by way of some quite rare songs remembered by our friends on this occasion.

Sumantbhai (Dadu) has sent in two songs –

A 1939 song – Phagun Ki Rut Aayee Re – Sitara Devi and Amrit Lal –  from ‘Holi’, composed by Khemchand Prakash

And a 1944 song Holi Mai Khelungi Un Sang – Miss Manju (Gaali, Pt.Hanuman Prasad).

Samir Dholakia  has remembered  Sadanand Kamath’s post Jab Phaagun Rang Jhamakte Hon wherein Sadanand Kamath reminisces the Nazms of Nazeer Akbarabadi (1740-1830; real name Shaikh Wali Mohammed). The Holi song – Jab Pahagun Rang Jhamakte Ho – that he has remembered in particular, is sung by Chhaaya Ganguli in a concert ‘Husn-e-Jaana’ held in New Delhi sometime in 2001. Later, it was included in the music album ‘Husn-e-Jaana’ (2001).

In Ode to the Great Indian Family, Songs of Yore had reminded us that Holi also was the festival that brought back the diaspora populations back to their native places to congregate with the, typically larger, Indian Family. In the technological age of very high connectivity, this tradition may still not have lost its value. But the increasing miniaturization and fragmentation of the families have certainly led to fading out of quite a few relations that the Indian larger family has fostered. Add the impact of now prevalent practice of calling these relations by the generic English nomenclature, and one may see over some years from now that some of these distinct terms will, quite likely, be fossilized. We have picked up such relations here, well supported by equally colorfully vivid songs, so as to help retain the longevity of these relations.  In order to focus on the songs while embedding the memory of the relation, I have stayed away from mentioning the underlying relationship explicitly —

Kaka Abba Bade Khiladi – Padosi (1941) – Gopal, Balkram and Balwant Singh – Master Krishna Rao  – Pt.Sudarshan

Baanke Nainon Se Kar Ke Ishaare Haye Mora Chhota Sa Devar Pukaare – Tadbeer (1945) – Naseem Akhtar – Lal Mohammad – Swami Ramanand Saraswati

Meri Ayi Hai Teen Bhabhiyan – Hum Ek Hain (1946) -Zohra Ambalewali and Rajkumari – Husnlal-Bhagatram – PL Santoshi,

Naana Se Kehti Thhi Naani Hamaari – Renuka (1947) – Baby Shaila, Uncredited Male Voice – Sardar Malik – Qamar Jalaalabaadi

Tune Jahan Banake Ehasan Kiya Hai – Maa Ka Pyar (1949) – Lata Mangeshkar – Pt. Govindram – I C Kapoor

We have had several more songs still in our stock on this account. So we will venture into the Indian family relations from this post through the songs of 1950s in our next episode.

Now let us move over to songs that our other friends have remembered, for the present episode.

From the festivities of color, we now join Harish Raghuvanshi who has recalled two of the   K L Saigal songs.  KL Saigal songs indeed have an eternal life!

Suno Suno He Krishan Kala is one of the bhajan genre songs that Saigal had so successfully experimented with.

Panchchi Kahe Hot Udas (My Sister) Songs composed by Pankaj Mullik and rendered by Saigal is that classic treasure that has no expiry date…

We venture into our search for songs of the 1950s that seem to have faded through our memories through Peeyush Sharma’s post – The Magic of the Melodies of Roshan and Chitragupt.  As can be expected, the post has quite a few songs of these two great, but relatively unsung music directors, which are still as fresh in our memories. But there are some which call for an effort to refresh. Of these, we have picked up songs of Chitragupt only for the present episode. After struggling for around 4-5 years, it was Sindbad The Sailor (1952) that brought huge fame and credit for Chitragupt. ‘The Sailor who was dancing and singing in 1952 had a grown up son and a daughter by 1958. The father and son films were directed by Nanabhai Bhatt. Chitragupt held the hierarchy rights and gave music for both Daughter of Sindbad and Son of Sindbad.’

We have picked up one song form each of these films –

Tera Mera Mera Tera – Sindbad The Sailor (1952) – Kishore Kumar, Shamshad Begum

Suniye Suniye Hamara Fasana – Daughter of Sinbad (1958) – Geeta Dutt, Mohammad Rafi

Chhedo Ji Aaj Koi Pyar Ka Tarana – Son of Sindbad (1958) – Geeta Dutt, Lata Mangeshkar

Avo Kabhi Milne Ko Meri Gali  and Zamane Ke Darr Se Na Daman Chhudana are Dolly Katrak (Kwatra)’s Obscure songs from an unreleased film – Teer (1958). The music is composed by equally obscure music director Suleman  Dafrani.  Of course, the songs are quite a treat to listen to.

Naresh Mankad is fascinated by that ring in the young voice of Manna Dey in Suraj Zara Aa Paas Aa, Aj Sapno Ki Roti Pakayenge Hum (Ujala – 1959 – Shanker Jaikishan – Shailendra).  The menu that the song offers also is quite a strong attraction:

aaloo tamaatar ka saag
imli ki chutney bane(sssssssssss)
roti karaari sikein
ghee uspe asli lage!:)

Hats off to Shailendra for weaving such a complex egalitarian philosophy in so simple manner that song comes off quite comfortably as children song!

For 1960s, we have  Meri Zindagi Ke Chirag Ko Teri Berukhi Ne Bujha Diya ( Jaal – 1967 – Lata Mangeshkar  – Laxmikant Pyarelal)  for which Samir Dholakia has noted the very striking Madan Mohan style.

To conclude our present episode, we have two Mohammad Rafi songs. The first one is an Anil Biswas composition from a 1957 film, ‘Abhiman’,. Saraswati Kumar ‘Deepak’ has penned the lyrics.

Chali Jawaani Thokar Khaane, Duniya Ke Bazaar Mein – With Asha Bhosle  –

For the second one, we go over to two more decades. This one is composed by Jaidev for a 1974, rather obscure, film, ‘Alingan’. The song is filmed on Romesh Sharma and Zahira and penned by Jan Nissar Akhtar.

Iss Tarah Jaao Nahin

We will meet again on 2nd Sunday of the next month… with more unforgettable songs that have started slipping out of our memory….

If you have such songs to share, you are most heartily welcome…..

More Than Bollywood: Studies in Indian Popular Music

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–Guest Article by  Tadatmya Vaishnav#

More Than Bollywood - Studies in Popular MusicI recently had opportunity to read through most of the book titled “More than Bollywood: Studies in Indian Popular Music “. It is a collection of essays on popular, film and non-film, Indian music. The book is edited by musicologists Gregory D. Booth and Bradley Shope. The essays are in a scholarly style and were meant to be a formal study of Indian film music as well as certain non-film music genres, such as pop, rap and rock.

‘More than Bollywood’ includes many of the leading scholars currently working on Indian popular music and culture. The volume offers a wide perspective on contemporary and historical popular music in India, and confronts the inescapable importance of the Indian film song; but it also offers the largest collection to date of research on “non-film” popular music in India. It can be treated as one of the most comprehensive single volume on a subject that is of growing interest to scholars and students in music, ethnomusicology, film studies, popular music studies, and South Asian studies. It is intended to stand on its own as a work of scholarship, but it is also simultaneously intended as a fundamental resource for courses on popular music and music in India.

All the chapters were not, in fact, interesting, as far as I am concerned. So, I take up the three chapters that I did find interesting.

Chapter 1 – A Moment of Historical Conjuncture in Mumbai

In this chapter, Gregory Booth presents an interesting case of how the Hindi film song, as we knew it until 1990 or so, was shaped substantially in the five year period of 1948-52, immediately after Independence. He treats the 1931 – 1947 period as a period of aesthetic and professional transition. Among major changes, he identifies growing sophistication in cinematography of song sequences and a change in the sound of the female voice in film songs. During this period, the film song also got to occupy the role of the most important form of popular song. He has taken a set of three representative music directors – Naushad Ali, Shanker Jaikishan and C Ramchandra- and two arrangers – Antonio Vaz and Sebastian D’Souza and only one full-time playback singer (Lata!) as having played a major complementary role in shaping the Hindi film song. Collectively, they effected sophistication of film song orchestration, explicit engagement with classical Indian and foreign popular music and redefinition of the sound of female playback singing, among others. Destiny seemed to have chosen them as ‘right person in the right place at right time.’

The musical and professional patterns that were established during 1948 and 1952 remained almost unchanged till at least until 1970. For a further 20 years, the rise of a new generation of musicians took over major roles. The shift in the basic structural composition of the film music is seen by examining the proportion of composers who composed more than one film in a year. Only a few, generally two or three, music directors dominated the year in terms of those soundtracks that were ‘most heard’. By 1952, the percentage of music directors with multiple releases had increased to 62%. For the next ten years this figure hovered around 50%, declining back to 30% in in 1967. The corresponding figure for 1932-1947 was seen in the range of 60%. Of the 60 highest net grossing films during 1947 to 1957, 32 % were during 1948-1952. Of these, Naushad, SJ and C Ramchandra had 68% share.

The rise of an oligarchy in the world of playback singers was also equally pronounced. Among male singers it was Mohammad Rafi who ruled the roost before Kishore Kumar took over in 1969. Nevertheless, the number of important male singers was greater as compared to that of female singers. In the case of female singers, the shift was far more dramatic and extreme. 1952 was the year that virtually brought an end to the richly textured and individually timbred voices of the earlier era. Lata Mangeshkar, Asha Bhosle and Geeta Dutt collectively recorded slightly over one-third of the songs recorded in 1951. With the fading away of Geeta Dutt, by end of 1950s, Lata Mangeshkar and Asha Bhosle shared between them more than one-third of all songs. Having given a quantitative background, the author has taken up the examination of more interactive musical, aesthetic and industrial practices in this chapter.

One may disagree, as I did, with some of the conclusions – that it was Naushad who “tightened” the concept of a ‘film song’, as distinct from ‘singing in the film’, by way instrumental interludes, tempo, orchestral size, recording techniques and professionalization of the singers. Or, that the style of the male voice in Hindi film songs followed mainly from Saigal’s style while the style of the female voice changed radically with Lata (I agree only with the latter part).

The statistics quoted at various places are useful and some of the points do note important conclusions. The last point about the technology that enabled separation of on-screen voice and playback voice and the emergence of the playback singer as a distinct role, is well-made and pivotal to Hindi film music.

Chapter 2 : Global Masala – Digital Identities and Aesthetic Trajectories in Post-Liberalization Indian Film Music is written by Natalie Sarrazin.

It is a very well-written account of how globalization, as well as new technologies, has influenced the creation of popular music, mainly film music, in India since the 1990s.

The author goes into a very detailed, second-by-second, analysis of the prelude music of the title song of Roja, in order to show how digital recording techniques can marry the audio to the video much more effectively than in the past.

Another good section is the one titled “Aesthetic Decisions”. It shows how the role of the music director has changed and how the sound engineer may be the most influential person behind the final finished song. This change may be revolutionary, but like many revolutions, the outcome may not be anything to be proud of. The author seems to take this major change in her stride, perhaps because she is a Westerner and does not have emotional ties to old music.

In her concluding remarks, the author notes that ‘Hindi film must project carefully crafted identities and desires onto the world stage, embodying Indian values in musical idioms palatable to an international music market and appealing to interesting non-Diaspora audiences. India’s active embrace of and enactment upon the promise of globalization require new Indian sonic agents, ones that portray India’s current energy, as well as image as a suitable global economic partner. Such music, to be successful, must create space for dreams and desires of Resident Indians and NRIs, while offering up musical fantasy escapism to the rest of the world.’

In Chapter 10: Latin American Music in Moving Pictures and Jazzy Cabarets in Mumbai, 1930-1950 Bradley Shope explores the period between mid-1930s and early 1950s when Latin American music in Hollywood films influenced jazzy cabarets that some of the Indian communities like Goans, Anglo – Indians and Parsis. The first half of the chapter traces the popularity of a native Brazilian dance, the Carioca – introduced to the world in the 1933 release Flying Down the Rio[i] in Mumbai and explores the relationship between this film and development of Hindi film songs containing Latin American sounds and images. The second half of the article uncovers the relationship between live cabarets in Mumbai and the development of Hindi films songs containing Latin American sounds and images.

The film Flying Down to Rio (1933) was successfully screened in urban India in 1934. The carioca dance shown in this films attracted vast audiences in Mumbai in nightclubs, restaurants, hotel ballrooms, social clubs and cabarets. Audiences learned the dance by watching the film or through lessons at local dance schools. By the 1940s, many jazz orchestras understood that learning Latin American repertoire could help secure jobs in a larger scope of avenues. It was no coincidence that when C Ramchandra composed Gore Gore O Banke Chhore (Lata Mangeshkar, Amirbai Karnataki, Samadhi, 1949),

he heavily borrowed from Chico Chico from Puerto Rico (Doll Face, 1945).

Latin characteristics were heard as early as in Naushad’s score for 1943 film Kanoon in the song Ek Tu Ho, Ek Main Hoon (Suraiya). The staged cabaret sequence Deewana Yeh Parwana from 1951 film Albela showcased great fusion of the chief arranger of ‘His Music Makers’, Chic Chocolate, and C Ramchandra. Chic Chocolate and his orchestra are dressed in stylized Latin American costumes in this song.

Carmen Miranda’s song sequence of ‘Week-End in Havana’ from 1941 film of the same name bears noticeable similarities to this song. And that includes not only the music, sounds or dance, but even Geeta Bali’s costumes as well.

One can find a similar beat of three+two clave (Dil Dhadake Nazar Sharamaye) or a music sound of rolling piano (Mere Dil Ki Ghadi Kare Tick Tick) in some other song sequences of ‘Albela’. Since the audiences of Hindi films were not typically exposed to these Latin American films or songs. That helped in creating that tantalizing element of fantasy in the Hindi film songs which brought up the entire effect far above real-life limitations of mundane restriction in the Indian society.

To be sure, other thematic, such as Hawaiian, Island, Spanish, Arab, French and the like, also suitably found way into Hindi films songs. Barring a few cases, the credit should also be given to director or music director that these adaptations were seen as highly innovative depictions that completely fused into the Indian cultural environment.

To illustrate each chapter author’s points, and to make available music not easily accessible in North America, the book is ably and vividly supported by Oxford web music companion website of audio and video tracks.

Bibliographic Information:

Print publication date: 2013 ǁ 380 pages ǁ Print ISBN-13: 9780199928835

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

Paperback edition: Published: 12 December 2013 | 384 Pages | ISBN: 9780199928859

Other books:

Behind the curtain: making music in Mumbai’s film studios – Gregory Booth

American Popular Music in Britain’s Raj – Bradley G Shope

# Tadatmya Vaishnav can be contacted @ tavaishnav@gmail.com

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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs: March, 2016

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March also happens to be the month which has Holi, a festival of colors, which so popularly, particularly in North India, symbolizes the advent of spring.

Bhagwan Thavrani had recalled a Mohammad Rafi, Manna Dey duet from Biradari (1966) – Tum Jo Ho So Khuda To Nahin Ho.

That reminded me another of Chitragupt – Mohammad Rafi gem from the film – Abhi Na Phero Nazar Ke Zindagi Sanwar To Le

With this preamble, we come back to the opening line of our present post and listen to one of the most popular Holi songs – A..Ra.Ra. Rang Do Sabhi Ko Ek Rang Mein. This Mohammad Rafi, Manna Dey, Suman Kalyanpur triad chorus would remain in the folds of fading memory, if it was not the ensuing Holi festival.

From the festivities of color, we now join Harish Raghuvanshi, to retrospect into the vintage era melody with the help of playlist – Very Old Songs of ‘30s and 40’s

Samir Dholakia has sent in several posts from Atul’s Song A Day, which, as always, provide not only the lyrics and some very interesting information relating to the song, but also help us to refresh our memories of some of the Unforgettable Songs that have been Fading out from our Memories..

Mujhe dard toone ye kyaa diyaa (by Atul) – is a Basant Prakash solo composed for Lata Mangeshkar for Saloni (1952).

Phir milne ke zamaana aa gaya re saanwariya (by Atul) is a rare Shamshad Begum, Asha Bhosle duet composed by Aziz Hindi for Danka (1954).

Tu maane ya na maane balam anjaane (by Atul) is a Lata Mangeshkar solo, from Kismat Ka Khel (1956), composed by Shanker Jaikishan and penned by Shailendra.

Bezubaan Dil Shor Na Machaa (by Sudhir Kapoor) is also a Shanker Jaikishan – Suman Kalyanpur solo which Shnaker has probably composed well after the painful passing away of Jaikishan and Shailendra for Door Nahin Manzil (1973)

Naresh Mankad has remembered S D Burman’s trademark beautiful composition that combines the sweetness of Lata Mangeshkar’s vocal chords with the accompaniment of sitar in playful ‘harkat’ of deftly executed ‘meend’, with flute chipping in the support in creating the ambience for Dr. Vidya (1962)’s Khanke Kangana Beendiya Hanse

Three of Lata Mangeshkar songs, which are comparatively forgotten kept coming to Bhagwan Thavrani’s mind again and again . All of them has that intense feeling of longing for the beloved…

Here they are:

  1. We all remember N. Dutta film BLACK CAT (1959)for the playful Lata number ( strictly speaking, a duet as the song begins with a Sakhi of Rafi ) ‘ Main Tumhin Se Poochhti Hun Mujhe Tum Se Pyaar Kyun Hai ‘ but many of us have forgotten that the movie had a haunting Lata solo ‘Sitare Raah Takate Hain, Chale Aao Aao ( सितारे राह तकते हैं चले आओ चले आओ ‘ . The song is based on BHIMPALASI and is penned by Jaa Nissar Akhtar. It is filmed on Minoo Mumtaaz, a rare choice for heroines role. The repetition of the words ‘ चले आओ ‘ in different tones and modulations by Lata is incomparable!

  1. Ravi’s favourite female singer was always Asha and he made no qualms for it. It was always obvious and there for all to be seen. He however has a few solos sung by Lata and all are memorable. (Lo aa gai unki yaad, Woh dil kahaan se laaun, Badle badle mere sarkar nazar aate hain, Ai mere dil-e-naadaan ) . But to me, this one takes the cake. It is from EK SAAL (1957) which had a dual version solo song Sab Kuchh Loota Ke Hosh Mein Aaye To Kya Hua, rendered by Talat Mahamood and Lata Mangeshkar. The song’s mukhda is Chale Bhi Aao Chale Bhi Aao, Tumhen Kasam Hai Chale Bhi Aao. The song is written by Prem Dhavan and is based in Pahadi . Here it is :

Song is picturized on The Eternal Beauty (no need to name her, she’s there in all our hearts! ) . Note the words. Here ‘ chale BHI aao ‘ instead of ‘ chale aao ‘ adds a sort of intensity as a sense of pleading is there as if saying ” Do come, please do come, life is no more life without you ! “

  1. And lastly, a truely divine song !  (My favorite songs are divided into 4 categories. Very good , excellent , par – excellent and DIVINE , where the least number is in the last category and naturally so! ) . The painful words are by the Maestro Sahir and music by the MASTER Shyam Sunder (of LAHORE fame) . The film is ALIF LAILA (1953). The mukhda is Bahar Aai Khili Kaliyan, Hanse Taare Chale Aao, Hamen Jine Nahin Dete Ye Nazarr, Chale Aao Here it is :

It is filmed on Nimmi and is based on my favorite SHIVRANJINI . The words depict the intensity of INTEZAR and when Lata sings ” जुबां पर आह बन-बन के तुम्हारा नाम आता है , मुहब्बत में तुम्हीं जीते हमीं हारे चले आओ “, heavens just fall on me ! This is the height of love and longing when one of the two raises his hands in desperation and says “ok, I admit defeat. But do come”

This song incidentally, is the oldest of the 3 and has that teenage tenderness in Lata’s voice which was adapted from Noorjehan which disappeared with the course of time (whether for good or otherwise is for you connoisseurs to decide! )

Sumantbhai (Dadu) has remembered a Lata Mangeshkar song in an altogether new mood, from Daman(1951) – Tiru Lilla Tiru Lilla Tiru Lilla La, Gaye Lata Gaye Lata Gaye Lata Ga Haule Haule Re. Hindi Geetmala has provided the full lyrics of the song. The song is composed by K Datta and penned by Raja Mehndi Ali Khan.

As has been settled, we shall conclude our present episode with Mohammad Rafi songs.

Ek Dil Ne Kaha Ek Dil Ne Suna – Parda (1949) – Sharmaji – Sawami Ramanand. The song was remembered by Samir Dholakia and incidentally has strong influence of Husnlal Bhagatram’s style.

For more of such rare songs of Mohammad Rafi, we will cast net in the films that have been covered in this episode:

Khamosh Kyon Ho Taaro – with Lata Mangeshkar – Alif Laila (1953) – Shyam Sunder – This film had the lead male solos in the voice of Talat Mahmood.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJICGrjSR10

Ajeeb Zindagi Hai Yeh – Door Nahin Manzil (1973) is filmed on Sanjeev Kumar. Sanjeev Kumar appears younger that may lead us to believe that film may have been released later.

We have been listening to the songs that carry immense pathos. So let us switch over to a couple of light songs.

Dil To Kisi Ke Denge – Ek Saal (1957) – Ravi. A signature song lip-synched by Jhonny Walker. This film had another Mohammad Rafi song which appears, in background, three times in the film – Kis Ke Liye Ruka Hai Kis Ke Liye Rukega, Karana Hai Jo Bhi Kar Le Ye Waqt Ja Raha Hai . Mohammad Rafi was considered a specialist plyabck singer for songs of this genre.

Similarly, Black Cat (1959) had a signature Jhonny Walker song – Kaun Tujhe Roke Kaun Tujhe Toke.

We will meet again on 2nd Sunday of the next month… with more unforgettable songs that have started slipping out of our memory….

If you have such songs to share, you are most heartily welcome…..

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – February, 2016

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Welcome to February, 2016 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We take up the tributes first.

Suraiya - A personally autographed pictureSuraiya: The Last Singing Star of Indian Cinema – a tribute to her on her death anniversary on 31st January – By Parag Sankla“Almost eighty five years ago, God must have said “Today I am sending three great artists to this world. A natural actress, a beautiful lady and a melodious singer! Acting, beauty and singing. These are not three different persons, this is one girl! And here I present you Suraiya.”… Along with Kanan Devi and Noor Jehan, she was one of the most prominent female singing stars of the golden era of Hindi films….Her first two songs as a singer (“Aao aao hil mil kar khushiyan manayein” and “Rana ji ki jai jai se”) came for a film titled Taj Mahal (1941) composed by Madhavlal Damodar. This golden period of Suraiya’s career (1941 – 1946) is often ignored in many of the articles on her……I love the song “Suno more raja, nazariya milaaike” for composer Neenu Majmudar from “Main kya karoon” (1945).”…..From among other songs that have find mention in the article, we pick up Jab badal ghir ghir aayenge, kaho jee kit jaayenge – Daak Bangla. 1947 – Naresh Bhattacharya as a song that is we get to hear less.

Waheeda Rehman and Soumitra Chatterjee in Abhijan (1962)Waheeda Rehman: Quintessential Beauty with Intense Acting Prowess – By Antara Nanda Mondal – Impressed by her enigmatic screen persona and acting panache, Satyajit Ray picked her for the role of Gulabi in his celebrated Bengali film Abhijan (1962).

More about Waheeda Rehman :

Indurani, a star of the 1930s is a rich tribute on death anniversary of Ishrat Jehan Imamuddin aka Indurani on 18th February by film historian Arunkumar Deshmukh, enriched by photographs and posters by Harsh Raghuvanshi.

Ye Sama Ye Khushi Kuchh Bolo Ji Bolo Ji” – Azra – now known as “Farhana”, for the most part, acted in second heroine and character roles in around two dozen movies viz. ‘Junglee’, ‘Ganga Jamuna’, ‘Ganga Ki Lehrein’, ‘Ishara’, ‘Baharon Ke Sapne’, ‘Bandish’, ‘Wapas’, ‘Raja Saheb’, ‘Mahal’, ‘My Love’ and ‘Ilzam’ and finally bid adieu to Filmdom after she got married. In ‘Ganga Jamuna’, she was the second lead opposite Nasir Khan. Movies ‘Shaan-e-Khuda’ (1971) and ‘Pocketmar’ (1974) released after her marriage. ‘Shaan-e-Khuda’ was directed by her father Nanubhai Vakil.

Happy Brithday, Cuckoo! – Some readers of the blog Dances on the Footpath know about the incredible Cuckoo news and trivia post that have developed there. It started with so many comments to the 2011 Cuckoo birthday post (linked to below). And here are a couple of the Cuckoo birthday posts, both of which include a bunch of really good song clips. …. This blog contains a whole lot of Cuckoo…. 2011 Cuckoo Birthday Post ǁ   2014 Cuckoo Birthday Post

The Unlucky Genius Ghulam Mohammad’s best songs for Talat Mahmood – If you associate Anil Biswas, C Ramchandra, Madan Mohan and SD Burman for the best of Talat Mahmood, Ghulam Mohammad would rank at the equal footing with them.

The article is a tribute to the Unlucky Genius with his best songs for Talat Mahmood as a tribute to the singer, too, with velvet voice on his 92nd birth anniversary.

Here are some of the less heard songs:

Meri Yaad Mein Tum Na Aansoo Bahana: Remembering Talat Mahmood – Talat Mahmood was grand-uncle, naani’s (maternal grandmother’s) brother of Sahar Zaman. She reminisces her association with Talat Mahmood over the years in this article.

Talat Mahmood, the photogenic ghazal superstarManish Gaekwad notes that Talat Mahmood sang over 700 songs in his career, including a rare solo “Kadale Neelakadale” in the Malayalam film Dweepu for composer MS Baburaj. His last recording was “Mere Shareek-e-Safar”, a duet with Hemlata, for the film Vali-E-Azam (music by Chitragupta). Lyricist Ahmed Wasi writes, “Mere shareek-e-safar, ab tera Khuda hafiz” (My companion in this journey, I take your leave now). It turned out to be Mahmood’s swan song. He died on May 9, 1998, at the age of 74.

मण्टो का बम्बई” narrates the 21 minute docudrama directed by Dharmendra Nath Oza, which was first aired on TV on Sahara Samay on 3rd April, 2005. The documentary can be seen on Dharmendra Nath Oza’s YouTube Channel in six clips.

Nalini Jaywant – Down Memory Lane – is based on interview was conducted in 1960.

Remembering Nadira: The Diva Who Didn’t Want to be Rescued – Ranjib Mazumder – Remembers Nadira on her death anniversary – Two Jewish women stood out in the race among many prolific names starting from the early days of cinema. In the silent era, Ruby Myers was the most successful star known in film history as Sulochana, and in the post-independent Hindi cinema, Florence Ezekiel, better known as Nadira shone the brightest…..She was the anomaly in a society where women didn’t dare. The viewing public limited her career in a swift stroke of judgment in Shree 420, and in real life, men couldn’t gather the courage to handle an informed mind…..She craved companionship without having to be rescued, but we didn’t have enough imagination to understand that.

The Real and Reel Life of Pran, Bollywood’s Villain Extraordinaire – Ranjib Mazumder looks at some of the interesting aspects of the real and reel life of the villain extraordinaire who would have been 96….Here is one example …. “Pran was very close to Dilp Kumar and Raj Kapoor owing to their long association in the film industry……. When Dilip was getting married, Pran was shooting in Kashmir. Despite heavy rain, he managed to reach Bombay to attend his friend’s wedding. The entire gang including Raj Kapoor got drunk, banged on Dilip’s nuptial-night bedroom door relentlessly till he opened up to say hello to them.”

We now move over to the blog spots on other subjects.

Multiple Versions Songs (24): Songs having versions across different films – similar initial lyrics in mukhada – is a presentation of interesting variety of songs which have multiple versions across different films. In some cases these may be a traditional bandish, where you may find some versions outside films.

One can come across widely differing versions on the circumstances that led to the actual performance of Aye Mere Vatan Ke Logo. Subhash K Jha presents one more – India’s most patriotic song: How Lata Mangeshkar almost turned down ‘Ae mere watan ke logon’ .

Shankar-Jaikishan’s dance songs for Lata Mangeshkar – SoY now picks up one music director around him one set of posts remain anchored during the year. 2014 was the year of Anil Biswas, 2015 was that of Naushad with C Ramachndra in tandem with. S D Burman was organically covered concurrently. Now, 2016 has been dedicated to Shanker Jaikishan, with a limit of the year 1959 for the selection of the songs.

My Favourites: ‘Me Tarzan, You Jane’ Songs creates a list with ‘I am…, you are…’ motif.

Here are a few songs that typically represent the theme while not being heard often enough.

Ten of my favourite romantic duets – of pure, outright romance…Nothing to adulterate the headiness of being in love, of being confident, too, that one’s love is returned.

Ten of my favourite ‘Jaa’ songs – begin with ‘jaa’ (and being strict about this; no variations, like jaaiye or jaao). What or who is being sent away differs, but the crux of the matter remains: go. Go away. This post sprang out of an earlier post on ‘Aaja’ songs….Some interesting coincidences…Jaa tose nahin boloon Kanhaiyya (Parivaar, 1956) has, interestingly, another song in another film begins with exactly the same words: in Samrat Chandragupta, a song picturized on Nirupa Roy and Bharat Bhushan begins Jaa tose nahin boloon…..Jaa Jaa re chanda jaa re from Private Secretary (1964), is created by music director, Dilip Dholakia He has another jaa song from the same film, fabulously rendered by Manna Dey – Ja Re Beiman Tujhe Dekh Liya Jaa.. Another song, nearly decade earlier, which is similar to that of the Lata song from Private Secretary is Ja jaa re chanda teri chandani jalaye from Albeli (1955) – music director – Ravi.

Sadanand Kamath also recites similar interesting coincidence in Kaliyon mein Raam mera kiranon mein Raam hai –-It was a surprise to know just a few days back that Amirbai Karnataki, the Kannada Kokila as she was known in Karnataka, had faced a situation when she was required to lip sync in Sudha Malhotra’s voice for the song ‘Kahaan nahi Ram hai’ from the film PAWAN PUTRA HANUMAN (1957). The song is written by Saraswati Kumar Deepak and is set to music by Chitragupta. Apart from Amirbai Karnataki, the other actor in the role of Hanuman is S N Tripathi. Incidentally, Chitragupta assisted S N Tripathi before he got independent assignment as music director in 1946. Here is the song that provides the title to the post: Kaliyon mein Raam mera kiranon mein Raam hai – Pawan Putra Hanuman – Geeta Dutt .

‘Gata Rahe Mera Dil was Patchwork’: In Conversation With Vijay Anandnever-before-published interview of Vijay Anand – in conversation with Peeyush Sharma we have some interesting aspects of S D Burman’s music. “No one could dictate Burman Dada about which song must be sung by which singer. He had his own style of testing and selecting the voice. Once he would conceptualize a song and decide on the singer for the particular song, no one could influence that decision. He would go to the final limit of even scrapping the song altogether. He would then create a new song but he would not change his decision on the singer. He had the courage of his conviction. He knew which song would best suit a singer. And that decision would be the best decision and the song of course, would be a hit….There was no singer of his calibre in the entire film industry. The kind of highly complex ‘murkiyan’ (tonal embellishments) or ‘gayaki’ (rendering style) he would come up with was simply out of this world. But when he would sing the same tune for Lata or Rafi or Kishore or Asha, he would make it simpler than before.

More to read :

We end our present episode with some (interesting) posts on Mohammad Rafi

I look forward to receive your inputs for further enriching the contents of the posts…..

Melodies, Movies & Memories – Nalin Shah

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Movies, Memories and Melodies - Nalin Shah

Melodies, Movies & Memories – Nalin Shah © 2016
Publisher: Saarthak Prakashan, Ahmedabad ǁ Price: Rs. 300
ISBN: 978 – 93 – 84076 – 17 – 7 ǁ Buy Online

 

 

 

“The act of writing on vintage Hindi Music is akin to documenting the Ganga without having any idea of Gangotri”, writes Urvish Kothari in the preface to a well – known writer of film history-related articles, Nalin Shah’s maiden book Melodies, Movies & Memories.

nalin shahHowever to Nalin Shah, the obsession of the vintage Hindi films and its music is rooted in his early boyhood, when he wrote articles for various Gujarati periodicals on the subject of vintage film music. Later on, his writings for Filmfare, G (a film magazine of Vaju Kotak’s Chitralekha group), Playback & Fast Forward, The Pioneer, The Times of India, Hindustan Times, The Hindu, Mid-day etc. attained the stature for their authentic content, objective point-of- view and accurate analysis. ‘Writing for press enabled (Nalin Shah) to reflect on artistes as people and their place in the wider world. As a Development Officer at Life Insurance Corporation of India, in his primary professional career, Nalin Shah also had had frequent opportunities to travel to different cities all over India. These helped him to clarify his thought-process, as well as to check (and many times cross-check and re-check) and to verify “facts”. All these experiences and interactions then were distilled into lucid and engrossing stories, covering a wide panorama of subjects. He has conducted lecture-demonstrations on the history of film music and staged audio-visual shows on KL Saigal, Naushad, Khemchand Prakash, New Theatres, Mehboob Khan, Bombay Talkies. We now get to read these stories between the two covers in the present book.

In spite of relatively active publishing of film related works, the fact remains that over the years, different communication channels of the industry, like Gramophone companies, or the public communication media or the film correspondents or journalists, as a whole has not enough to preserve or document the multiple facets of the film-making, its music and its history. The advent of internet and the evolving digital platforms have been now very imaginatively been put to use by some of the very dedicated, little-known film enthusiasts to supplement the very pioneering and path-breaking works in the print media in so far as the first two decades of the Hindi Films and its world of music. Nalin Shah’s present book is not simply a documentation of history nor is it the plain narratives of stories. While maintaining very high standards of reporting, he develops story in quite an interesting style of writing. He has also been very particular in maintaining a professional arm’s length objectivity even with people, events or songs for which he has developed a deep personal like or proximity. Here is one typical illustration, picked up from the very first chapter – In Search of Gold – of the book:

I find the music of 1940s more enchanting than anything heard before or after. The music of 1950s too was extremely melodious though more ostentatious. The decline started in 1960s….However, the relevance of term ‘Golden’ to a musical age is dependent on many factors including the time and the environment. But the academic question cannot take away the appeal of any music composed at any time if it has an inherent charm.

The book apparently does not have very specified divisions, in terms of the subjects of the contents of the stories. But a little more analytical view reveal a few discerning patterns of presentations of the subject matters.

Subjects, like travails of the artistes through the days of glittering Sunrise adulations to abject poverty or loneliness of the Sunset days or A Matter of Inspiration behind a particular song have been dealt with in fairly insightful details.

Nalin Shah’s discerning choice of songs to illustrate or emphasize the matter of the subject, on one hand imparts high clarity to the point of view being presented, and on the other hand helps the reader to rekindle memories of some of very rare gems of that era.

The book also has very judiciously enriched the memories of the era with the help of some very rare photographs of the artistes with whom Nalin Shah has maintained personal contacts. References to these rare songs and use of these photographs elevate the book to a level of a collector’s prized trophy.

Nalin Shah with Naushad at Viramgam where Naushad wanted to revive his past in Viramgam before the start of his career as music director

Nalin Shah with Naushad at Viramgam where Naushad wanted to revive his past in Viramgam before the start of his career as music director

When the author takes up the subjects of reasons and aftermath of break up music duos or the First Lady of Hindi Film Music directors (Saraswati Devi), the Rhythm in Songs, or the legendary tales of Peti- masters (as the music directors were then known), he seems to have chosen a very concise narrative format to drive his point of view home.

The articles, like The End of an era – Studios and Institutions, Vintage Music – The Saviour or Radio Ceylon: Jane Kahan Gaye Who Din, not only place some of the otherwise hazy or misattributed or misinformed records straight, but also have documented some of the pioneering and path-breaking roles played by several individuals. Some of these endeavours reached the status of the institutions that left profound impact on the industry. It would not be out of place to record at this stage, that articles of this stature, and any other representation for that matter, can go a long way in building up the right type of public opinion about the different aspects of films.

The role of lyricists also has been given its due recognition in the book. The portrayal of how different lyricists tackled the themes for a particular song or the how the use of the original literary works of the poet-lyricists have been used with or without modifications or the role of a lyricist or the music director or the star who enacted in on the screen is spread over different articles – The Writer’s Dominance, The Poet’s Lament and The Song, ShAIR and the Star.

In any historical perspective analysis, the topics like how much role the destiny played in making the preeminent position of Lata Mangeshkar in the post-partition years or how would the music scene have taken shape if Noorjehan had chosen not to migrate to Pakistan have always remained quite contentious and thorny issues of the debate among film critics, historians and fans. In ‘Daughter of Destiny – Why a Lata Can Not Be Reborn’ and ‘Noorjehan, Lata and Partition’, Nalin Shah has succeeded in balancing the facts with perceptions and opinions.

We also get the taste of Nalin Shah’s considered forthright views on the subjects of film awards in ‘A Matter of Awards’, ‘Phalke, Who ?’ or ‘An Award named ‘Lata Mangeshkar’’.

The author also opines that ‘Moral Values’ in films not necessarily reflect the times but the degeneration in the minds of the films maker. Whilst on the subject, he does not miss the opportunity to record ‘the irony that delinquent film-makers welcome the controversy that can help generate some free publicity for a product which may otherwise may not be that sale-able on its own merits.

The book also finds adequate space for other contemporary subjects of Menace of Remix or The Genesis of Piracy, which underscore the fact that no one can claim to be holier than thou. The big service can be made if the original (genuine) music is ‘made available at an affordable price to the public.

‘Melodies, Movies and Memories’ must have scratched only the tip of vast treasure of treasure of documents, photographs and memories of insightful anecdotes that Nalin Shah has very assiduously built along with his “enviable storehouse of 78-RPM records”. We fondly hope that when the book is published in a digital format of e-book, addition of the soundtracks of the songs that have been referred to in the book also (as far as possible) be added on to make this book as the most memorable and immortal gift that a person who has been witness to more than half of the life span of the Hindi Film industry can bequeath the future generations.

We join the publishers in wishing that the present book “is just a precursor to many more”.

Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs: January, 2016

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The songs that we have for the present episode, incidentally, presents quite an interesting mix – both in terms of music directors or playback singers or even the year in which these songs were first released.

Harish Raghuvanshi remembers:

All songs of ‘Saawan’ (1959) – Hansraj Behl – Prem Dhawan

As we listen to this anthology, we get to listen to several songs that have faded up in the memory, along with some which remain evergreen…..

For those who would prefer to listen to each song individually, here is the bouquet of these gems to pick and choose from:

Bhagwan Thavrani has remembered a wide range of the songs, with equally interesting commentary:

Mere Laadlo Tum to Fulofalo – Sant Gyanenshwar (1964) – Lata Mangeshkar – Laxmikant Pyarelal

This is a wonderful lori with wonderful words and usual Lata magic, still it’s almost forgotten…

There is a second version of this song.. in Mohammad Rafi’s voice

O Mrignayani Chnadramukhi – Rang Birangi (1983) – R D Burman

It’s a classical song by Pt. Vasantrao Deshpande with (perhaps) Arti Mukherjee…but I like the picturisation of the song and wonderful rendering by the Maestro Om Prakash and Chhaya Deviboth actors enact their “seen it all ” feelings in a deft manner and their love for each other shows…and how !  साथ जियेंगे साथ मरेंगे गाते गाते गाना.. ..lyrics is by Yogesh ( or is it Maya Govind ! )..

Saari Duniya Se Poochha – Milan (1958) – Lata Mangeshkar – Hansraj Behl

We all remember this 1958 film MILAN for that divine Lata number हाए जिया रोए, but listen to this one…it is a wonderful tune which all of you might have heard often …just trying to take it out from the shadows of more famous one….!

Jahanwale Tune Ye Kya Jindagi Di Jo Aaj Tak Hua Na – Gule Bakawali (1963) – Mohammad Rafi – Hansraj Behl – Gulshan Bawra

Immortal Rafi … Raag Darbari tune by Hansraj Behl . same Raag as in . हाए जिया रोए

Alvida Jaan-e-wafa – Benazir (1964) – Lata Mangeshkar – S D Burman

This gem is from Bimal Roy’s BENAZIR, a flop and forgotten film of the 60’s. It was directed by an unknown director Khaled. It was a Muslim social featuring Ashok Kumar, Meena Kumara, Shashi Kapoor and Tanuja among others. Music had the unique combination of Sachin Dev Burman and Shakeel Badayuni. The film had famous Rafi solo ‘ Dil Me ek Jaan-e-Tamanna Ne Jagah Pai hai ‘ and a couple of other Lata solos which are excellent yet not very popular. To me, this Lata song takes the cake. It was deleted from the film, hence only audio of the song is available. The lyric is so meaningful and a bit tragic.

Samir Dholakia remembers songs –

Beeta Hua Ek Sawan – Shokhiyan (1951) – Lata Mangeshkar – Jamal Sen, as remembered by Mahesh Joshi of Rajkot

One of his melodious but lesser known song…… This song was originally created for film “Shokhiyan “of Kedar Sharma, who introduced him in film. But somehow this beautiful song was not included in that film. After the death of Jamal Sen in 1979 , Kedar Sharma utilized the same in tele film named “Pahela kadam” in 1980.

Here are two songs which were the main subject of Arun Kumar Deshmukh’s posts on Atul’s Song A Day

Samaa Ye Pyaar Ka Bahaar Ke Ye Mele – Baaghi Sipaahi – (1958) – Manna Dey, Asha Bhonsle – Shankar Jaikishan –

This is the 2nd of Manna Dey – Asha Bhosale duets. First one – Raat Gayi Phir Din Aata Hai – was in 1953 film – Boot Polish. Boot Polish also had triad – Thahar Jara O Jaanewale (Manna Dey, Asha Bhosle, Madhubala Zaveri). They went on to record 168 duets till 2005. As against this, Manna Dey – Lata Mangeshkar pair have recorded 106 duets.

Aaja Aaja Aaja Nadiya Kinaare – Raajhath (1956) – Lata Mangeshkar -Shankar Jaikishan – Shailendra –

presented by Helen on the screen

In Four Aces and A Queen, Parag Sankla has presented less remembered songs of Geeta Dutt, by Hansraj Behl, Chitragupt, Bulo C Rani and Avinash Vyas. We have picked up one representative song of each of the music directors mentioned in the article but for which the video links were not provided

Do Roz Ka Jalwaa Hain, Dikhane Ke Liye Hain – Rajput (1951) – Geeta Dutt, Hameeda Bano and Chorus – Hansraj Behl –

An all-female quawaali, indeed a rare one in so far as Geeta Dutt is concerned.

Nadiyaa Kinaare Mora Dera, Mashal Jale Saari Ratiya – Tarang (1952) –

a quartet with Mohammad Rafi, Shamshad Begum, Geeta and composer Chitragupt himself singing a few lines! Between the year 1958 and 1963, this wonderful singer and Chitragupt created as many as fifty plus songs….

Jawaniya Nigodi Sataaye, Ghoonghat Mora Khul Khul JaayeDarogaji (1949) – Bulo C Rani – Geeta’s voice could turn so youthful and natkhat…..

Gun Gun Gunjan Karata Bhanwara – Har Har Mahadev (1950) – Avinash VyasGun Gun so creatively succeeds in recreating the humming of the wasp…

K S Bhatia and other readers have been in enriching the post My favourite ‘special’ Asha Bhosle songs by way of quite interesting add-on comments. In fact the avalanche of such songs by all the readers would call for several separate posts to do the justice. We have picked up one song here:

Aap Ki Baaten Aap Ki Kasmen Sab Jhoote – Kala Samunder (1962) – N. Dutta

The discussion also has added a few songs like this one by Suman Kalyanpur as well.

Meri Preet Mera Pyar Bole Aaj Baar Baar – Teerath Yatra (1958) – Suman Kalyanpur – Suresh Talwar

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qnkA_d_No4

I had fairly encouraging discussion with Maulika Dersari w.r.t. our December, 2015 episode. While she fondly remembered Zindagi Kitni Khoobsurat Hai, Aayie Aap Ki Zaroorat Hai (Hemant Kumar in 1963 film ‘Bin Badal Brsaat’ ). This one has twin version in Lata Mangeshlar’s voice as well. That led me to search for Hemant Kumar’s duet with Lata Mangeshkar :

Ho Dheere Dheere – Aagosh (1953) – Roshan – Shailendra

We shall conclude our present episode with Mohammad Rafi songs composed by Anil Biswas for ‘Heer’ (1956)

O Khamosh Jamana Hai – with Asha Bhosle – Majrooh Sultanpuri

Le Jaa Uski Duaaen, Jo Tera Na Ho Saaka – Majrooh Sultanpuri

Preet Ka Rogi Ho Ya Jogi, Allah Teri Khair Kare – Rajendra Krishna

We will meet again on 2nd Sunday of the next month… with more unforgettable songs that have started slipping out of our memory….

If you have such songs to share, you are most heartily welcome…..

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