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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs : October 2021

Shankar (Jaikishan) and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory: 1955 -1956 (Part)

Shankar (Singh Raghuvanshi) – B: 25 October 1922 | D:  26 April 1987 – was one of the genius composers of the famous duo Shankar Jaikishan. Shankar had a long stint of training in classical music. He was a tabla player at the core, but went onto learn several rhythm and string instruments successfully in the initial period of struggle He got the basic training in the nitty-gritty of film music composition as assistant to Ram Ganguli in Raj Kapoor’s maiden venture, Aag (1948)

When Raj Kapoor took up his next project, Barsat (194) he invited Shankar to take charge of the music direction. Shankar roped in Jaikishan as his partner. During the decades of 1940s, 1950s and 1960s several composers dominated Bollywood films. Naushad Ali, S D Burman, C Ramchandra, Vasant Desai, Salil Chowdhury, Roshan, Madan Mohan, OP Nayyar, Ravi etc. all had the class, and style of their own. Among these stalwarts, Shankar Jaikishan created their own space – with RK and other leading banners, critics as well as common fans – and went on to compose music in almost 195 films in that golden age.

Shailendra (a.k.a. Shankardas Kesarilal, B:  30 August 1923 – D: 14 December 1966) ‘s poetry and films songs reflected his temperamental proximity to the common man. In the famous quartet of Shankar Jaikishan Shailendra and Hasrat Jaipuri, Shankar and Shailendra worked as one part of the team with Hasrat Jaipuri, and Jaikishan made up the other half. Apart from the personal preferences and proximity related to friendship, this division of work was more in accordance with the inherent composition patterns of the two composers. Shankar always loved composing serious thematic songs with a lot of emotional content that only Shailendra could do justice to whereas Jaikishan was more into composing light- hearted romantic stuff that came so naturally to Hasrat.

To commemorate the birth anniversary of Shankar Singh Raghuvanshi, we have commenced the present series of Shankar (Jaikishan) and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory from October 2018 and have been covering their less familiar songs from the films released in chronological order of year.

Till now, we have covered the years

1949 – 1953 in 2018

1953 (Continued) in 2019.

1954 in 2020

Presently, we would listen to Shankar- (Jaikishan) and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory for 1955 and part of 1956. The variety of the film subjects and the corresponding song compositions, coupled with the steeply increasing the numbers of the films in a year clearly indicate the beginning of the upsurge in the wave that Shankar Jaikishan created in the ocean of Hindi film music. In fact, 1956 had as many as 7 films under the baton of Shankar Jaikishan with a staggering total of 61 songs, distributed between Shailendra and Hasrat Jaipuri as 46 and 15 songs respectively.

Seema (1955)

Seema had 6 songs, with Shailendra and Hasrat Jaipuri scoring lyrics for three songs each. Hasrat Jaipuri’s one song runs into two parts whereas Shailendra’s Tu Pyar Ka Sagar Hai appears twice, in different contexts, in the film. None of the songs from the film can ever be classified as the Fading from The Memory category. Therefore, I have picked up one song that I like more than other songs.

Man Mohana Bade Jhoothe, Haar Ke Haar Nahi Maane – Lata Mangeshkar

Based on Raag Jaijaiwanti, the song is all the way a Shankar Jaikishan song. The composition, though sounds so simple and pleasing, was so difficult to render that Nutan chose to attend the recording session to note the way Lata Mangeshkar negotiates the nuances of the song, so that she herself can truly reproduce these on the screen. Shailendra is at full simplicity blossom when he says –

Bane the khiladi piya, nikale anadi,
Mo se beimani kare, mujhse hi roothe

… … … … …
… … … … …

Tumhari ye bansi kanhaa, ban gai fansi
Taan sunake mora, tan man loote

Aside Trivia: One for more film with the title Seema was made in 1971, for which music director was Shankar Jaikishan!

Shree 420 (1955)

Shree 420 remains one of the most celebrated of RK Productions’ films, with seven of nine songs of the film remaining quite popular even today. Shailendra scored lyrics for

Shaam Gayi Raat Aayi Ab To Sanam Aa Ja , TaaroN Ki Barat Aayee Ke Balam Aa Ja  – Lata Mangeshkar

The song opens with prelude that has faint resemblance with famous ‘Albela’ (1951) song Bholi Surat Dil Ke Khote, Gujarati folk dance garba based, notes before Shankar Jaikishan’s signature base rhythm of dholak picks up the song. Such a melodious song remained relatively less known as compared to other songs, perhaps because it has not been included in the film.

Halaku (1956)

Directed by D D Kashyap, Halaku was a period film. It had Pran in the title role of emperor of Iran. The film revolves around his love for a common citizen beauty, who in fact is deeply in love with other young man. Halaku had 8 songs, of which Shailendra scored lyrics for 5 songs and Hasrat Jaipuri that for the other three.

Of the five songs of Shailendra, three duet songs – Aaja Ke Intzar Mein, Jaane Ko Hai Bahar Bhi (Rafi, Lata); Dil Ka Na Karana Aitbar Koyii, Bhule Se Na Karana Pyar Koyi (Rafi, Lata) and Aji Chale Aao, Tumhein AankhoN Se Dil Ne Bulaya Hai (Lata, Asha) – were quite popular.

Yeh Chand Yeh Sitare, Yeh Saath Tera Mera, Shab-e-Jhindagi Ka Na Ho Ab Savera, O Dilruba, O Dilruba – Lata Mangeshkar

In sync with the background of the story of the film, Shankar Jaikishan has composed the song mainly on the strength of the string instruments, both in the rhythm and in the interlude and obbligato orchestra support.

Teri Duniya Se Jaatein Hai Chhupaye Gam Apana., Liye Jaateein Hai AankhoN Mein Kisi Ke Pyar Ka Sapna – Lata Mangeshkar

Shankar Jaikishan once again follow different than their usual style of composition in the song.

The song was ultimately not included in the film.

Kismat Ka Khel (1956)

Kismat Ka Khel, directed and written by Kishore Sahu was so total failure as a film that its music also ha been packed off to a dust bin with its reels! Film had 7 songs, 5 of which were by Shailendra and two by Hasrat Jaipuri.

Aside Trivia: Kismat Ka Khel is a (just) the fourth film of Sunil Dutt’s career, the earlier three being, Railway Platform (1955) Kundan (1955) and Ek Hi Rastaa (1956).

Kismat Ka Khel Hai Janab-e-Ali…. Aapke Paas HaiN Moti Khazane Aur Apni Jeb Khali – Lata Mangeshkar

In those days, one would just a small opening to let in a song in the film. Here, the protagonists, Vyjayanti Mala and Sunil Dutt seem to be travelling in train, but obviously have no money for the ticket. On being asked to pay the penalty by the TTE, the lady proposes to sing a lilting dance song (in an obviously crowded train coach of those times!) to collect the required sum……!!!

Na Bure Na Bhale Hum Gareeb Gam Ke Pale, Tum Kya Jaano Basti Hamari Rajaa, Ladli Zindagi Apne AnsooN Mein Dhali – Lata Mangeshkar, chorus

The song is presented as a grand presentation of the basti, where Anokhi (Vyjayanti Mala) reigns and Prakash (Sunil Dutt) takes shelter, is the main arena for the film story. It is this situation that makes Shailendra to blossom out in the only stanza the song has:

hamari bhi gali me muskaraye chandani
badal jhumke gaye rasili ragini
tumhare mahal se kuch kam
nahi ye basti hamari

Arz Hai Aapse Aur Apse, Bhed Ki Baat Hai ApanoN Se Kahi Jaati Hai …… Balam Aayega…. – Lata Mangeshkar

The song is some occasion for Vyajayanti Mala to present herself as a damsel waiting the arrival of her beloved, of course in the form of a dance!

The song opens with a sakhi, which has harmonium in the obbligato support

Tu Maane Ya Na Maane Balam Anajaane, Bedardi Tere Liye… Nache Meri Zindagi – Lata Mangeshkar, chorus

The song is presented as a street-side tamaasa dance, but the appears very synthetic. The compositing seems to be set to mid-east Asian culture but lacks the melodious touch of SJ music.

Chalo Le ChaluN Mein Taaron Mein Rang Rangeele GulzaroN Mein – Asha Bhosle

The stage dance song begins with gorgeous prelude and then goes onto become a fast-paced song.

Basant Bahar (1956)

Shankar Jaikishan’s bag of variety of film subjects for the year 1956 had Basant Bahar as a major challenge since the subject revolved around the life and travails of a n astrologer’s son who is keenly interested in music. As such the film had to have songs based on either classical raags or should have a classical core.

The challenge was to stand up to the unprecedented success of music of Baiju Bawara. Success would have placed them in the first row of the then top class music directors and failure would have branded them as ‘also ran’ club membership. Shankar Jaikishan responded the challenge with as many as nine songs. Of these nine Shailendra scored lyrics for eight songs. Forcefully selecting one for the present episode, all other seven bore the class as well as mass popularity. These were: Ketaki Gulab Champak Ban Phoole (Manna Dey, Bhimsen Joshi); Sur Na Saje Kya GaooN Main and Bhay Bhanjana Vandana Sun Hamari (both, Manna Dey); Nain Mile Chain KahaaN (Manna Dey, Lata Mangeshkar); Badi Der Bhayi and Duniya Na Bhaye (both, Mohammad Rafi) and Ja Ja Ja Ja Re Balamwa (Lata Mangeshkar). Even the only one song by Hasrat Jaipuri, Main Piya Tori Tu Mane Ya Na Mane (Lata Mangeshkar) is not a shade less than the other eight.

Kar Gaya Re Kar Gaya Re Kar Gaya Mujhpe Jadoo Sanwariya – Lata Mangeshkar, Asha Bhosle

The dancing, outspoken, one lady spells out her feelings in the form of the second line of the song, Ye Kya Kiya Re, Gazab Kiya Re, Chor Ko Samaji Main Sadhu, which the other, rerved one, shuns to use is the subtle way to set the tone of two competing ladies for the love of Bharat Bhushan. Shankar Jaikishan has very deftly weaved in the two differing appeals in the form of Asha Bhosle singing a dance sequence and Lata Mangeshkar singing a pensive mood sequence. So has Shailendra, by so aptly choosing the lyrics for each mood.

We will foreclose the other four films – New Delhi, Rajhath, Chori Chori and Patarani – the year 1956 for continuation in the next (year) episode, because of sheer variety of each film and listening load of son=me very popular and some not so popular but meritorious songs.

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month next year too……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs : September 2021

(Shankar) Jaikishan and Hasrat Jaipuri’s Songs Fading From the Memory: 1962

Hasrat Jaipuri (a.k.a. Iqbal Hussain) – B: 15-4-1922 | D: 17-9-1999 – was versatile poet and lyricist. He wrote a poetry that was accessible to the common man. Critics may not put him in the same roll of honor as Sahir Ludhianvi or Kaifi Azmi or even his long-time associate Shailendra. But his simple lyrics appealed the commos listener. His poetry was simple but the message it contained used to be quite deep. Many of his pure romantic songs carried most intimate and intense feelings. Hasrat Jaipuri also has written screenplay for ‘Hulchul (1951). His career spanned for the first film ‘Barsat’ in 1949 till his last, Hatya: The Murder (2004).

Jaikishan (a.k.a. Jaikishan Dahyabhai Panchal) – B: 4 November 1929 | D: 12 September 1971] is sometimes not equated with the music qualities of life-long partner Shankar. But his innate sense of melody lent a totally different dimension to the style of orchestration that made Shankar Jaikishan songs stand out quite distinctively. They led the trend of creating orchestrion style which as easily recognized as unique signature style of the music director.

The primary division of of who will compose which song would be worked out at very initial stage between Shankar and Jaikishan, based on the demands of the situation and their own inherent inclinations. Then, Shankar was considered to generally compose Shailendra’s songs and Jaikishan that of Hasrat Jaipur. And yet, the four were very close as friends in personal lives as well. Hasrat Jaipuri wrote ‘Geeton Ka Kanhaiya Chala Gaya when Jaikishan passed away in 1971.

In this month of Jaikishan’s birth and Hasrat Jaipuri’s death, we have commenced remembering (Shankar) Jaikishan and Hasrat Jaipuri’s Songs Fading From the Memory on this platform since 2017.Till now we have covered

1949 -1954 in 2017

1955 – 1957 in 2018

1958 – 1959 in 2019, and

1960 -1961 in 2020

Presently we take up Hasrat Jaipuri’s songs, composed by (Shankar)Jaikishan during the years 1962. We have selected relatively less remembered songs from among all the available songs. The order of presentation of the film is set to the first, English, alphabetical letter of that film’s title.

1962

1962 had 6 films of Shankar Jaikishan. Hasrat Jaipuri’s share of songs was 21 songs. Each of the song was well received then and many remain still well-known.

Nashili Raat Hai, Saare Charag Gul Kar Do, Khushi Ki Raat Mein Kya Kaam Hai JalanewaloN Ka…….Lo Aayi Milan Ki Raat Sahaani Raat… NainoN Se Kisi Se Ke Nain Mile HaathoN Mein Kisi Ka Haath – Aashiq (1962) – Lata Mangeshkar

The song opens with prelude of sharp strains of violin ensemble, followed by a sakhi (couplet) and then the mukhada presents us the situation.

This one song epitomizes all that SJ-HJ combination has been offering in abundance- sensitive, rich orchestration, Hasrat Jaipuri’s signature sakhi and simple word that deliver profound message. The song apparently describes the happy situation of marriage but the deeper meaning of each lyric and every note of orchestration, as well Lata Mangeshkar’s subdued delivery, in fact, conveys the pathos of the protagonist (Padmini). (Shankar) Jaikishan’s signature touch is reflected in Lata Mangeshkar hitting high pitch at those lyrics of pain…

Pyar Ka Saaz Bhi Hai Dil Ki Awaz Bhi Hai, Mere GeetoN Mein Tum Hi Tum Ho, Mujhe Naaz Hai ……Chheda Mere Dil Ne Tarana Tere Pyar Ka, Jisne Suna Kho Gaya, Pura Nasha Ho Gaya – Asli Naqli (1962) – Mohammad Rafi

Here is another typical example of SJ-HJ combination – an easy, pleasing song with no complicated lyrics or orchestration and yet catchy enough.

Asli Naqli had 7 songs of which 5 songs are penned by Hasrat Jaipuri and 2 by Shailendra. Hasrat Jaipuri’s Tujhe Jivan Ki Dor Se Bandh Liya Hai (Mohammad Rafi, Lata Mangeshkar) was quintessential romantic duet, Gori Jara Has De Has De Tu Has De Jara (Mohammad Rafi) was a simple, lilting children song and Lakh Chhupao Chuup Na Sakega Raaz Ho Kitana Gehra.(Lata Mangeshkar) is a title song. We, thus, get to see full panorama of Hasrat Jaipuri’s versatility and how imaginative treatment (Shankar) Jaikishan has given to each composition.

Let us take one more song in detail:

Ek But Banaunga Tera Aur Pooja Karunga, Arre Mar Jaunga Pyar Agar Main Duja Karunga – Asli Naqli (1962) – Mohammad Rafi

Use of the word ‘But” which has two meanings, a statue and a beloved one, is a typical master stroke of Hasrat Jaipuri in a song which essentially is about the hero trying to please his beloved and assure her she has neither anyone else in mind nor will ever have one.

Once the mukhada gets free form this difficult word for the meter and melody, the song moves into an easy-paced song even though the subject of all through remains the statue. (Shankar)Jaikishan too have smartly chosen to repeat the line ‘Arre Mar Jaunga Pyar Agar Main Duja Karumga’. The song opens with a very melodious violin ensemble that seems to bring the thoughts from the deep imagination of the mind to the lips.

Even if the song did not become as popular as other songs of the film, perhaps because SJ and HJ moving along an experimental track, it retains all the charm of SJ-HJ combination..

Najhar Bachakar Chale Gaye Woh, Varana Ghayal Kar Deta, Dil Se Dil Takra Jata To Dil Mein Agni Bhar Deta  – Dil Tera Deewana (1962) – Mohammad Rafi

I like very unusual opening note of the prelude of the song in an otherwise a quint essential, very pleasing to listen to, SJ-HJ-Rafi songs tailor made for Shammi Kapoor.

Dil Tera Diwana had 7 songs – 4 by Shailendra and 3 by Hasrat Jaipuri. Dhadakane Lagata Hai Mera Dil Tere Naam Pe (Mohamma d Rafi) seems to turn on a Mehmood song on the screen but

Masoom Chehara Ye Qatil Nigahein Ke Bemaut Mare Gaye Hum Bichare – Dil Tera Diwana (1962) – Mohammad Rafi and Lata Mangeshkar

Unfortunately got hidden the razzle dazzle glare of the two other duets – Dil Tera Diwana Hai Sanam and Mujhe Kitana Pyar Hai Tumse (incidentally Shailendra songs) – but is the one that would remain more etched in the minds to a discerning SJ fan with Lata Matching higher scale notes to Rafi’s natural high-note style – for which Lata Mangeshkar always had a (sweet) complaint against Jaikishan..

Kho Gaya Hai Mera Pyaar….Dundhata Hun Main Mera Pyar – Hariyali Aur Raasta (1962) – Mahendra Kapoor

In line with the trend of those times, Shankar Jaikishan’s most of the songs would have been either filmed on the main character(s) or any other character which has major role in the film. The present song is not only an exception to that norm, but also one of the rare Shankar Jaikishan – Mahendra Kapoor song.

Hasrat Jaipuri’s lyrics amply express the message in the boatmen’s songs to the hero and Shankar Jaikishan has set the song to a very fast, relatively hitch pitched scale to reflect the heightened turmoil of thoughts and emotions in the mind of hero.

Hasrat Jaipuri has a rather minority quantitative share of 4 songs out of a staggering 11 songs in the film, Hariyali Aur Rasta, but having a title song Bol Meri Taqdeer Mein Kya Hai (Lata Mangeshkar, in happy and sad versions) and a song starting with an exceptionally heavy Urdu phrase Ibtida-e-Ishq Mein Ham Saari Raat Jaage hitting the top of the charts qualitative more than made for the quantitative share.

Ye Umar Hai Kya Rangeeli, Ye Najhar Hai Kya Nashili, Pyar Mein Khoye Khoye Nain, Hamara Rom Rom Bechain, Hamara Bhi Jamana Tha – Professor (1962) – Manna Dey, Asha Bhosle, Usha Mangeshkar

In an otherwise truly light-mood, foot-tapping song, Hasrat Jaipuri comes up with a profound message when he writes

jiwan kya hai haste rahna, man maujoN mein bahte rahna
chupke baitho mane na hum
chupke baitho mane na hum batein wo purani
ye umar hai kya rangili

Aye Gulbadan…PhuloN Ki Mahak, KaatoN Ki Chubhan, Tujhe Dekh Ke Kaheta Hai Mera Man, KahiiN Aaj Kisi Se Mohabbat Na Ho Jaye – Professor (1962) – Mohammad Rafi

With so romantic lyrics, so easy yet very rich musical composition and Mohammad Rafi at his full care-free flow, it was no wonder that this had caught the minds of the youth of those days. However, the beauty of the effect of entire composition is that one would like to listen to the complete song every time one gets to listen the song, even now.

Aawaz Deke Hamein Tum Bulao, Muhobbat Mein Hamko Na Itana Saataao – Professor (1962) – Mohammad Rafi, Lata Mangeshkar

The third song from Shankar Jaikishan – Hasrat Jaipuri combination – set to Rag Shivranjani, in which Shankar Jaikishan have composed some of their best ever songs –  yields a totally different outcome, that one may be tempted to attributing to Shankar (Jaikishan)- Shailendra combination.

Chau Chau Bombaiyana Ishq Hai Marz Purana, Dil Ki Dafli Se Sabhi Gaate Hai Yeh Gaana – Rungoli (1962)  – Manna Dey, chorus

Hasrat Jaipuri takes up the opportunity to put in the ‘right’ message(s) in an apparently a comedy song that is meant to spell out the worries and gloom –

humne jahaN bhi dekha mile haiN diloN ke rogi
apna hi raag alape shayad mohabbat hogi
tere mere dil ka juda hai afsana

duniya mein jab tak rahna
gham ko na aane dena
ban jana mast kalander
jeena ho hans ke jeena
badi badi ankhiyoN mein aansu nahiN lana

On this note of philosophical light mood, we bring curtains to the present episode, to continue our journey of Shankar (Jaikishan and Hasrat Jaipuri’s songs fading from the memory.

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month next year too……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs: September 2020

(Shankar-) Jaikishan and Hasrat Jaipuri’s Songs Fading From the Memory 1960 – 1961

Hasrat Jaipuri (a.k.a. Iqbal Hussain) – B: 15-4-1922 | D: 17-9-1999- had his own distinctive   style, whether it was his Urdu or Hindi poetry of Hindi film lyrics. One of the basic corner stone of RK’s Shankar-Jaikishan- Shailendra Hasrat music team. Starting with Barsat (1949), the first break-up came when Shailendra passed away in 1966, Jaikishan’s death in 1971 is said to have so loosened the bond, that Shankar started to seeking collaboration with other lyricists as well.

Jaikishan (a.k.a. Jaikishan Dahyabhai Panchal) – B: 4 November 1929 | D: 12 September 1971] was considered to be more creative with  romantic tunes. Background scores were his forte. Jaikishan also had fair amount of training and exposure to music in his early years. His father was a musician to royalty in Gujarat.

SJ- Shailendra-HJ team is one of the most unique examples of four persons of very different temperaments working as a seamless team, complementing each other’s strengths and supplementing the weaknesses. The outcome was always an incredibly unique blending of four individual talents into most melodious, ever green, works of sheer brilliance.

Even as it is quite difficult to filter out Hasrat Jaipuri’s lyrics in Shankar Jaikishan composed songs that would not have been popular, I usually scan the titles of the songs and filter out the ones that does not immediately ring up in my memory. In this month of Jaikishan’s birth and Hasrat Jaipuri’s death, we have commenced remembering (Shankar-) Jaikishan and Hasrat Jaipuri’s Songs Fading From the Memory on this platform since 2017.Till now we have covered

1949 -1954 in 2017

1955 – 1957 in 2018

1958 – 1959 in 2019.

Presently, we will spread our net over the years 1960 and 1961. 1960 had 5 SJ films and 13 Hasrat Jaipuri songs, whereas 1961 has 6 films and 23 songs. Incidentally the songs that got filtered in this selection provides not only a very representative kaleidoscopic view of his style, but also present Shankar- Jaikishan’s knack of working out a popular song with due amount of experimentation. 1961 also is the year which had Junglee, which is considered to be game changer in Shankar Jaikishan’s approach to song compositions,

Itni Badi Mehfil Aur Ek Dil Kisko Du – Dil Apna Aur Preet Parayi (1960) – Asha Bhosle

The film had serious storyline, so in spite of having an ample sprinkle of some of the great songs, need to fit in an item song (which is how these songs are known today) must have been felt. SJ has come up with an innovative improvisation of Harry Belafonte’s  Banana Boat song

Bata De Meri Jaan ke Tere Dil Mein Kya AaiChalaak (UR) (1960s) – Mukesh

The film is an unreleased project that had Raj Kapoor and Madhubala in the lead roles. Madhubala is said to have gamely put in efforts to complete the film despite of her extremely aggravating health. The film ultimately had to shelved. The clip here is a version that Mukesh had rendered in a stage show at South Africa.

Tirchi Nazar Se Yun Na Dekh – Ek Phool Char Kaante (1960) – Mohammad Rafi

Here we have a mandatory Johnny Walker song. Rafi follows copybook mannerisms to suit Johnny Walker’s antics on the screen in the mukhada. SJ have cleverly weaved in a cat sound, too. Rafi is to render the first two lines of first stanzas is in a breathless singing to correspond with actors making a fast lap in the swimming pool. The camera has smartly moved away from Johnny Walker, who returns with his antics at the end of the stanza, with Rafi repeating the charm of mukhada with some more spices.

Ho Maine Pyaar Kiya, Haye Hay Kya Zulam Kiya – Jis Desh Mein Ganga Behti Hai (1960) – Lata Mangeshkar, chorus

It is said that when SJ-HJ-Shailendra team first heard the story idea, they could hardly see any room for Hindi film style songs in a dacoit-reform based story. However, Raj Kapoor’s showman instinct had more than enough scope for songs, which were accepted very well by the public. Raj Kapoor has very conveniently squeezed in a heroine- swimming scene vide this song, even her friends too joining in the bonus.

Dekho Ji Dekho Sun Lo Ye Baat, Jivan Mein Ek Baar Aana Singapore – Singapore (1960) – Lata Mangeshkar, chorus

Here we have title cum theme song from this film. The song is lip synced by Maria Menado, an Indonesia born actress (who played a Singaporean girl Maria in this movie) and some Singaporean extras.

Aside: The film had one more title song in Ye shahar badaa albelaa (Singer: Mukesh; Lyrics: Shailendra). However, since the titles were used as part of the song orchestration, the preceding song was also, perhaps, required!

Arre Tu Kahan Kho Gaya Balam Matwaraa Main Dhundhu Tujhe Kahan GaliyaN Aur Chaubara – Singapore (1960) – Lata Mangeshkar

The full scale participation of SJ and their orchestration team has made this mandatory Padmini dance song into a grand spectacle, with dholak as base rhythm instrument, A Dattu Theka slipped in very dexterously, with multi-instrument large scale orchestra in the interlude scores in the accompaniment.

The following three songs have been actually filmed as one sequence in the film!

Seeto Peeto Reeto…Jaan-e-Bahaar Assalaam – Jab Pyaar Kisi Se Hota Hai (1961) – Lata Mangeshkar

This dance song is thrown in the film as an item number. Hasrat Jaipuri chips in with Anokhe Bol in the first line to add spice to the songs.

This song was in fact a prequel to build the atmosphere for the song which was to follow.

Is Hirsoo Hawas Ki Duniya Mein – Jab Pyar Kisi Se Hota Hai (1961) – Lata Mangeshkar

A signature Sakhi – a two-line couplet, recited without any instrumentals support – from Hasrat Jaipuri has been given a very special dimension by the Lata Mangeshkar’s rendition to exactly rhyme with Asha Parekh’s expression, and even her diction.

Is Hirsoo Hawas Ki Duniya Mein
Armaan Badalte Dekhe Hai
Dhokha Hai Yaha Laalach Hai Yaha
Imaan Badalte Dekhe Hai

Daulat Ke Sunehre Jaadu Se
Ae Dil Tadapnaa Achhaa Hai
Chaandi Ke Khanakte Sikko Par
Insaan Badalte Dekhe Hai

The main song now takes the center stage.

Teri ZulfoN Se Judai To Nahi Mangi ThI, Qaid Mangi Thi Judai To Nahi Mangi Thi..- Jab Pyar Kisi Se Hota Hai (1961)  – Mohammad Rafi

The composition is noted in the annals of Hindi Film Music as one of the finest composition.

Anand Desai and Antara Nanda Mondal have presented the lyrical and musical nuances with meticulous details in  Love is… Claiming Rights: Teri Zulfon Se Judaai to Nahin Mangi Thi

Nain Tumhare Mazaedar O Janab-e-Ali – Junglee (1961) – Mukesh, Asha Bhosle

50s and 60s films ready-mix recipe always had a comedian song as a standard ingredient. Shankar Jaikishan have added color to the element by using Mukesh’s voice. Shashikala in a comedy role is sort of scoop.

Jana Tumhare Pyar Mein Shaitan Ban Gaya Hun – Sasural (1961) -Mukesh

The rustic innocence of Mukesh’s voice is matched by Mehmood’s credulity-mannerisms on the screen. Whether the whole experiment was conceived by the direction- music team by design or is enacted by Mehmood to synchronize with the way song is composed, is not known.

Aye Aasmaan Ke Rahi, Tu Hi Gavah Rahena…. Haye Sawan Ban Gaye Nain – Karorepati (1961) – Asha Bhosle

SJ again comes up with a very successful experiment of using Asha Bhosle’s voice for a poignant song. It should be interesting to know what factors will have moved SJ to this decision, since they are normally considered to be die-hard users of Lata Mangeshkar voice for such songs. Hasrat Jaipuri also shows his mantle as master of al types of moods.

Kabul Ki Mein Naar, Meri Aankhein Rasili Katar – Karorepati (1961) – Kishore Kumar, Geeta Dutt

SJ have used a very smart improvisation of Gujarati folk dance rhythm – evidenced in more clear way during the interlude pieces – in this Pathani mood song. Use of Geeta Dutt is also a rare occasion in SJ songs.

Suno Bhai Humne Peeli Hai – Roop Ki Rani Choron Ka Raja (1961) – Talat Mahmood

It is interesting to note that the version used in the film has the word “suno bhai hamne PAA li hai thhodi”, whereas the original sentence of the song was “suno bhai hamne PEE li hai thodi”, on the objection by the Censors. Talat Mahmood would probably have not sounded drunk ieven if he really was. We do not have any authentic information on how Mukesh sounded drunk when he was fully drunk in the company of Raj Kapoor, but his songs sounded as pious as his sheer romantic songs. K L Saigal would come heavy with a few pegs for his shootings, but his dialogue delivery of song diction never hinted even a trace of that heavy dose of Whisky!.

Aiga Aiga Ye Kya Ho Gaya – Boy Friend(1961) – Mohammad Rafi, Aarti Mukherjee

Hasrat Jaipuri has very deftly weaved in Marathi words from the scene preceding the song, wherein Dev Anand collides with a (Marathi) Bhajiwali (the vegetable vendor)

And of course, SJ are at their experimentative mood in using voice of Arti Mukherjee to partner Mohammad Rafi in this duet in these days of Lata – Rafi tiff over royalty issue. Incidentally, it was Jaikishan who played the role of mediator to solve the difference.

Aside trivia: Madhubala is her usual naughty jesting self. She ought have trade-marked her these mannerisms. She has already tested these mannerisms in Achhchhaa Ji Main Haari Chalo Maan Jaao (Kala Pani , 1958). And, yes Dev Ananad too seems to be veteran of facing these jests on the screen, having tested at the hands of Kalpana Kartik in Aa Ja Panchhi Akela Hai (Nau Do Gyarahaa, 1957)!

Ab Char Dinon Ki Chutti Hai – Aas Ka Panchi (1961) – Mohammad Rafi, chorus

Shankar Jaikishan have used Subir Sen and Mukesh also as Rajendra Kumar’s playback in Aas Ka Panchhi. This is the only song they have brought in Mohammad Rafi, and with what a telling effect….

We will continue our journey of Shankar Jaikishan’s songs in Hasarat Jaipuri’s lyrics in our future episodes.

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs : September, 2019

(Shankar-) Jaikishan and Hasrat Jaipuri’s Songs Fading From the Memory 1958 – 1959

September is the month of death anniversaries of Jaikishan (Dahyabhai Panchal) [4 November, 1929 – 12 September 1971) and Hasrat Jaipuri, a.k.a. Iqbal Hussian, [15 April, 1922 – 17 September, 1999].   Hasrat Jaipuri- Shailendra and Shankar-Jaikishan formed a seamless, one the most enduring, creative and profusely productive teams in the history of Hindi Film industry. Usually, the whole team would be associated with story of the film and would choose the who would compose situation for the given situation on the basis of who felt more comfortable with situation of the song.

However, there was a school of the then critics / journalists / writers who strongly accepted a thumb rule to identify the composer of a Shankar–Jaikishan song is based on the song’s lyricist – Shailendra wrote lyrics for Shankar’s tunes and Hasrat Jaipuri penned Jaikishan’s compositions.

We have based our annual series of articles that bring the songs written by Hasrat Jaipuri and, in all possibilities, composed by (Shankar) Jaikishan. Like most of the SJ-composed songs, till, the passing away of Shailendra, most of the songs Hasrat Jaipuri wrote for (Shankar) Jaikishan were well-known then, but some may be receding from our memories as well. Till now we have covered such of (S)J-HJ songs from 1949 to 1954 and 1955 to 1957. Presently, we will take up songs from the films released in 1958 and 1959.

1958

1958 has only two films wherein Shankar Jaikishan have composed the music. Here too, Hasrat Jaipuri’s share is even markedly smaller. And, it also so happens that these songs have been (only) Lata Mangeshkar. As such, within the scope of our article, we have picked up two of the total three songs from Baaghi Sipahi and, the only, one available from Yahudi.

Sharab-e-Ishq Ke Aage Maja Kya Kadwe Paani Ka….Muskurati Zindagi Ko Chhhod Ke Na Ja – Baaghi Sipahi (1958) – Lata Mangeshkar

Hasrat Jaipuri pens the song with his, by now known as unique style, of presenting a couplet in the prelude, to which Jaikishan supports with a very innovative orchestration piece. The song is set to quite a difficult tune, with varying rhythm.

Dil Laganewale Mat Sun Meri Kahani  Baaghi Sipahi (1958) – Lata Mangeshkar

On the screen, the song is shown being rendered by a professional courtesan singer, but the emotions of the song seem to reflect the state of the Madhubala’s heart. Lata Mangeshkar very soulfully renders the pathos of the song.

Aansoo Ki Aad Leke Teri Yaad Aayi – Yahudi (1958) – Lata Mangeshkar

This is the only song that Hasrat Jaipuri has penned in this film. It can also be said to be one of the least remembered song of the film. The song plays on a dholak-based rhythm and has a very mid-east-oriented interlude orchestration. Again, not a very easy-to-sing song.

1959

1959 has Shankar-Jaikishan’s the then normal average number of films – seven – in the year, and each one had almost all songs that are well remembered even today. The proportion of Hasrat Jaipuri’s songs is again a very balance one and we have a fairly wider base of choice of songs that have been rendered by singers other than other than Lata Mangeshkar. Our catch is so wide and big that we had to drop quite a few songs that were, and are, more remembered.

Ban Ke Panchhi Gaaye Pyar Ka Tarana… Mil Jaaye Agar Aaj Koi Saathi Mastana – Anadi (1959)  –  Lata Mangeshkar and  chorus

Here we have very light and playful song, with matching vivacious tune, interlude orchestration,  lyrics and Lata Mangeshkar’s lilting rendering to Nutan’s very near-to-perfection lip-synching on the screen.

Hasrat Jaipuri has also written a very romantic Mukesh – Lata Mangeshkar duet – Wo Chand Kila Wo Taare Hanse – in the film.

Jaoon Kahan Bata Aye Dil Duniya Badi Hai Sangdil – Chhoti Bahen(1959) – Mukesh

If one looks at the song from the perspective of singer-songwriter and music director (Respectively Mukesh, Hasrat Jaipuri and Shankar Jaikishan), then song fits into the very well-known, sweet, pattern of a pathos song. The unusual part is that Raheman sings the song, somewhat, in penance for his grey-shade character in the film.

O Kali Anaar Ki Na Itna Satao– Chhoti Bahen (1959) – Manna Dey, Asha Bhosle

Here we have a non-normal combination of Manna Dey and Asha Bhosle singing a duet for Shankar Jaikishan, made rarer by it being filmed on Raheman and Shyama on the screen, whose characters were to turn grayish later in the film.

Mein Rangeela Pyaar Ka Rahi Door Meri Manzil – Chhoti Bahen (1959)  – Subir Sen, Lata Mangeshkar

Shankar Jaikishan boldly experiments using Subir Sen’s voice for a playfully romantic song, that too for Mahemood on the screen.

Kahan Hai Kahan Hai Kanhaiya – Kanhaiya (1959) – Lata Mangeshkar

Here too Hasrat Jaipuri gets two songs to write, both being played back by Lata Mangeshkar. The present song is a classic-Hindi-Film-pathos song whereas the other one – O Kanhaiya O Kanhaiya – is a very romantic dream-sequence song, with a Shankar Jaikishan’s signature extended prelude. Both the songs have used ensemble of flutes very creatively in the main orchestration as well as in the counter-melody orchestration.

Dekh Aasmaan Mein Chand Muskaye – Shararat (1959) -(Kishore, Geeta Dutt

The song has a rare Shankar Jaikishan- Geeta Dutt combination. Shankar Jaikishan has used their very fond waltz tune, as well as has creatively inserted innovation in the song composition – this time that of switching over to dholak rhythm in the beginning of the stanza before ending the with the original western rhythm instruments.

Tune Mera Dil Liya, Teri BaatoN Ne Jadu Kiya, Haye Na Jane Kya Kar Diya, Ye Tere Pyar Ki Jeet Hai – Shararat (1959) – Kishore Kumar, Geeta Dutt

Shankar Jaikishan has brought up the memory of vintage Geeta Dutt in this song.

Dekha Babu Chhed Ka Maza Mitha Mitha Dard De Gaya – Shararat (1959) – Lata Mangeshkar

The song is a the then popular genre – a street song wherein the performer echoes the feelings of the silent protagonist.

Tera Jalva Jisne Dekha Woh Tera Ho Gaya – Ujala (1959) – Lata Mangeshkar

We have to toss for the choice of selecting the songs – the present one or Ho Mora Nadaan Balma – for a detailed video view today. Both are a very romantic mischief-oriented dholak-rhythm based signature (Shankar)Jaikishan dance songs. Well, the coin has ruled in favor of the present song.

We now have natural choices for Mohammad Rafi songs, which also seamlessly syncs with our tradition of ending each episode with relevant Rafi song(s).

She Ne Khela He Se Aaj Cricket Match, Ek Nazar Mein Dil Bechara Ho Gaya LBW – Love Marriage (1959) –  Mohammad Rafi, chorus

Here we have a song which is played on a cricket ground, uses a cricketing dress code for (only) Dev Anand and  some well-known cricket terms – to in fact play the then popular genre of pre-courtship eve-teasing.

Lo KhuN Se KhuN Juda Hua – Main Nashe Mein Hoon (1959) – Mohammad Rafi

Hasrat Jaipuri – (Shankar)Jaikishan have several excellent Mohammad Rafi scores in their account. The present song – being a background song – adds to the wide range of such songs.

Our journey of Hasrat Jaipuri’s songs, composed by (Shankar)Jaikishan continues…..

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs: September, 2018

(Shankar-) Jaikishan and Hasrat Jaipuri’s Songs Fading From the Memory 1955 – 1957

As long as all four were alive Shankar – Jaikishan did not work with any other lyricists than Hasrat Jaipuri and Shailendra, even as Hasrat Jaipuri and Shailendra did work with other music directors in that period, with probably two exceptions. One is O O Mujhe Kisi Se Pyar Ho Gaya from ‘Barsat’ (1949) and the other being Arzoo 1965). However, our topic of the present discussion is not this matter.

September is the month of death anniversary of Jaikishan [4 November, 1929 – 12 September, 1971) and Hasrat Jaipuri [15 April, 1922 – 17 September, 1999].  In our present series we have been covering the songs written by Hasrat Jaipuri that have been composed by Shankar-Jaikishan in the month of September. In September, 2017 we had covered the (S)J-HJ songs from 1949 to 1954.

The quartet had very smoothly carved out a seamless division of work – who would compose whose songs, which situations will be handled by whom etc. In that arrangement Jaikishan and Hasrat Jaipuri worked in tandem.

For our present episode, we have covered (S)J-HJ songs from 1955 to 1957. As I started compiling the list for the post, the songs that came up from the initial films happened to be the songs that had been rendered by Lata Mangeshkar. Therefore, I went on to only select the (S)J-HJ_LM songs for the rest of the present episode, save of course the traditional end-of-the-post Mohammad Rafi song(s)..

Baat Baat Mein Rutho Na, Apane Aap Ko Loota Na – Seema (1955)

Here is typical Jaikishan composition, opening up with a melodious stroke of piano accordion that continues well into the first and the second interlude. Hasrat Jaipuri matches his lyrics well with the mood of the songs, but has not missed the chance to show his soft, poetic feelings in the lyrics.

O Jaanewale Mud Ke Zara Dekh Ke Jaana – Shree  420 (1955)

Here is one of the relatively-less-heard song from the film but is a signature HJ composition which begin with couplet. The second stanza of the song had been edited out in the film.

Main Piya Teri Tu Maane Ya Na Maane – Basant Bahar (1956)

Shailendra had lion’s share of songs for ‘Basant Bahar’, but the ones that HJ penned have also been equally melodious and well-remembered ones. The use of flute pieces in the orchestration add to the melodious effect.

Us Paar Sajan Is Paar Dhare Le Chal O Maaji Kinare Kinare – Chori Chori (1956)

The present video clip has very rightly captured the first few moments of the songs wherein Nargis is seen frantically swimming out in the sea. Jaikishan has captured the motion with a very quick stokes of violin ensemble. And the, Nargis seems to have reached a safe distance, symbolized the beginning of a chorus by the fishermen-women on the boats.

HJ has also additionally contributed one of the most iconic Manna Dey – Lata duets  (Aa Ja Sanam), or  a very lilting Lata song (Panchhi Banu Udati Pheeru) on one hand and a very light Rafi-Lata duet (Tum Arabon Ka Her Pher Karanewale) in the film.

Usse Mil Gayi Nayi Zindagi.. Jise Dard-e-Dil Ne Mita Diya – Halaku (1956)

Hasrat Jaipuri had a minor share of songs in this film too. The other two songs are also Lata Mangeshkar numbers – O Sunata Ja and Bol Mere Malik. Each of these three songs are written for totally different situations.

Koi Mere Sapnon Mein Aaya , Dheere Man Mein  Samaya – New Delhi (1956)

(S)J comes up with a complex tune that is orchestrated equally richly.

Saat Samundar Paar– Patrani (1956)

One more complex tune by (S)J.

I had originally selected “Nadiya Kinare Phiru Pyasi, Haay Pi Bin Jiyara Taras Taras Reh Jaaye” from Raajhath (1956). However, I could not locate audio / video link for this song. So, we move on to the next best choice.

Anatar Mantar Jantar Se Maidan Liya Hai Maar – with Usha Mangeshkar – Rajhath (1956)

As per the general understanding of the outsiders, the dance numbers were usually composed by Shankar. However, in this case, it is difficult to guess who would composed the tune and set it to orchestra.

Gori-Gori-Gori Main Pariyon Ki Chhori… Chham Chham.. Karati Aayi Hun Main Saat Aasma Se – Begunah (1957)

We have one more song wherein a very complex set of bass rhythm has been set, orchestrated over a multiple instruments simultaneously.

(S)J-HJ combination’s duet – Din Albele Pyaar Ka Musam (Manna Dey, Lata) – in the film is a very typical SJ tune.

So Ja Re So Ja Mere Raj Dulhare So Ja Taare Bhi So Gaye Dharati Ke Sitare So Ja– Kathputli (1957)

For Hindi Film lullabies this is very complex tune, perhaps befitting the mood the situation in the films

We conclude our each episode with a relevant Mohammad Rafi song. For the present episode I have picked one of the two songs from – Seema- and one from – Raaj Hath.

Hamien Bhi Dedo Sahara Ke Besahara Hai  – Seema – with chorus.

In terms of the poetical quality of the lyrics of Hasrat Jaipuri songs would go, this song perhaps would occupy top row.  (S)J have also excelled in composing the tune and setting supporting orchestration to the tune.

Aaye Bahar Ban Ke Lubha Kar Chale Gaye, Kya Raaz Tha Dil Mein Chhupa Kar Chale Gaye – Raaj Hath (1956)

(S)J – HJ have grabbed every opportunity to compose a ghazal in Mohamamd Rafi’s voice and we have had excellent scores to cherish. Here is one more that immediately comes to my memory – Teri Zulfo Se Judai To Nahi Maagi Thi  

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs : September, 2017

(Shankar-) Jaikishan and Hasrat Jaipuri’s Songs Fading From the Memory

Septmber happens to be the month of death anniversaries of Jaikishan [Jaikishan Dayabhai Panchal, 4 November 1929 – 12 September 1971] and Hasrat Jaipuri [Iqbal Hussain, April 15, 1922 – September 17, 1999].

Shankar Jaikishan and Shailendra- Hasrat Jaipuri are always spoken in one breath. However, it is said that Jaikishan would normally compose the song that Hasrat Jaipuri would write. There should be n-number of songs of this combination that were loved then, and are loved now too. That has germinated the idea for today’s post – let us bring back, from our Fading Memories, Hasrat Jaipuri’s songs that (Shankar) Jaikishan had composed.. I spanned 14 of SJ-composed films and some HJ-penned 67 songs, in the descending chronological order. Out of these, here are 15 (S)J-HJ songs for which I could not recollect the respective tune when I read the title of the song. Thus there is a personal, yet unintentional, bias in the selection of the songs.

Interestingly, we see a fair predominance of Lata Mangeshkar in this limited collection of 13 songs, covering the period from 1949 to 1953. That, in a way seems to reflect SJ’s marked inclination towards for Lata, among all other female playback singers of that time. It must, however, be recorded here that in comparison to total number of SJ-Lata songs in these 14 films, the numbers that appear is not of significant proportion.

The 14th song is our traditional end-of-the-post-song, a Mohammad Rafi Song. Incidentally, this was the only Rafi song of the 67 that I had ran through before hitting upon a (Shanker)Jaikishan-Hasrat- Rafi song, of course, not considering Main Zindagi Mein Hardam Rota Hi Raha Hun from Barsat.

Here are the songs for the day:

Prem Nagar Mein Basnewalon, Apni Jeet Par Hasnewalon – Barsat 1949 – Lata Mangeshkar

In the standard format of a Hindi song, technically this may not be called a song. However, creative directors like Raj Kapoor very often used the audiovisual effect of a song like recitation to tellingly convey the intent of a situation. Such a demand of the director would pose a great creative challenge to the lyricist and the music director. In this particular instance HJ and Jaikishan have lived up to the challenge. Use of silhouette shots by the cinematographer Jal Mistry adds to the surreal effect.

Khushi To Qaid Mein Hai…Rota Hai Mera Dil Kisko Pukarun Kya Karun – Badal (1951) – Lata Mangeshkar

The song starts on a high-note-prelude-couplet (Sakhi), which was to become one of the signature styles of SJ compositions. The song is filmed on a budding beuty – Madhubala.

Jiyennge Jab Tak Talak Hum Unki Yaad Aayegi…Maine Kya Kiya, Sitam  Ye Maine Kya Kiya – Kali Ghata (1951) – Lata Mangeshkar.

The song follows quite difficult composition, but the result is quite mellifluous.

Tumko Apni Zindagi Ka Aasra Samje The Ham… Dil Bequar Hai Mera Dil Bequarar Hai -Nagina (1951) – CH Atma

SJ have experimented with CH Atma’s voice as playback of Nazir Khan.

O Pyar Bhari In Aankhon Ne.. Aaja Tujhko Yaad Kiya – Parbat (1952) – Lata Mangeshkar, Geeta Roy

SJ have not used Geeta Dutt as much others in the same period. However, this Lata-Geeta duet has picked up nuances of the vocal chords of both singers. Several pieces of orchestration manifest Jaikishan’s virtuosity of using different instruments quite imaginatively.

Ab To Aa Jao Balam..Furkat Ke Maare Ro Diye –Poonam (1952) – Lata Mangeshkar

Each stanza begins on high-scales with interlude orchestration using ensemble of violins. The song is filmed on Kamini Kaushal.

Apne Bimar-e-Gam Ko Dekh Le, Ho Sake To Aa Ke Dekh Le….Aaja Re Ab Mera Dil Pukara – Aah (1953) – Mukesh, Lata Mangeshkar

Here is a song which was quite popular then, and is now. The reason we have included in this post is the tellingly innovative use of the song in the narrative of the film. The original song is the manifestation of the condition of the loving couple who are getting separated by a queer turn of the circumstances – the hero going away on a long-drawn cure of what was considered near fatal TB to a faraway sanatorium.

The second version is set to a situation where the hero wants go back and meet his beloved, as promised, probably before his life comes to an inevitable end. The version begins from the stanza with which the first version had ended. Lata Mangeshkar joins in Alaap that signals the nearing reunion,

The film track has third version too – Janaaza Dekhne Mera Nikal Aaye…..Aaja Re Ab Mera Dil Pukara. Unfortunately we do not have its separate video clip.

Humko Chhedta Hai Dil,… Kaun Jaane Kya Hua, Tumne Baat Baat Meing Kya Jaadu Kar Diya – Aas (1953) – Lata Mangeshkar

Here is a happy mood song wherein rhythm-supporting bass has been used in the subdued manner. Note a short sweet opening prelude.

Aaj Ki Raat Kabhi Khatm  Na Hone Aaye…. Wo Aayenge Khushi Bankar, Baharein Saath Laayenge, Mere Ghar Mein Muhabbat Ke Nazaren Muskarayenge – Aurat (1953) – Lata Mangeshkar

For a change, we have a fast-paced song of a bubbling, happy mood.

Taaron Ko Dil Ki Baat Sunai Tamam Raat…Main Bahron Ki Natkhat Raani, Saari Duniya Mujh Pe Hai Diwani – Boot Polish (1953) – Asha Bhosle

The song has deployed a very rich orchestra for interlude, with sweet pieces of flute thrown in for support. Boot Polish must rank as one of those rare films wherein SJ have not used Lata in any song, solely on the merits of the demands of the film’s narrative! (Absence of Lata in films like Suraj or Mera Naam Joker was on account of very specific differences.)

The song is filmed on Chand Burke.

Hum Unke Paas Aate Hain Wo Ham Se Door Jaate Hain, Tadapkar Dastaan Apni Baharon Ko Sunate Hain – Naya Ghar (1953) – Talat Mahmood

SJ have used Talat Mahmood’s voice so naturally in all the songs where they came together, while retaining their musical style. We have here so sweet gem of Talat Mahmood that my heart pains to put under the omnibus category of Fading Memory songs.

Chamke Bijuriya Garje Megh Mat Ja Re Balam Pardesava – Shikast (1953) – Asha Bhosle, chorus)

SJ have used Asha Bhosle to so sweet effect in this song.

Jaage Mera Dil Soye Zamana – Badshah (1954) – Aparesh Lahiri

It appears to be very fitting to begin the end of this post with a song that is sung by a Bengali singer whose son made a big name in Hindi films in the 90s. The knowledgeable fans of Hindi Film Songs will have correctly guessed name of that 90s Lahiri – Bappi Lahiri.

Aparesh Lahiri and his wife Bansri Lahiri, of course, were famous Bengali singers and musicians in classical music. However, it must be to credit of SJ to have experimented to use Aparesh’s voice here.

Asides:

  1. SJ had used another well-known singer, Hemant Kumar, in the film for Rula Kar Chal Diye and Aa Neel Gagan Tale Pyar Ham Kare, penned by Shailendra and Hasrat Jaipuri respectively. Both songs are immortal.
  2. ‘Badshah’ was adaptation of Victor Hugo’s very famous novel, Hunch Back of Notre Dame, written in French in 1831, on which a Hollywood film of the same name also has been made.

For our traditional end of a post with a Mohammad Rafi song, we have

Soch Na Manwa…Haye Gam Ke Maaro Ka Jamane Mein Koi Na Saath Dega – Pooja 1954

By now a well-established practice of beginning the song with short prelude-couplet comes with an innovative support orchestration of a piano piece – so typical of a Jaikishan touch.

We will continue our search for Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.