Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – February, 2015 edition

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Welcome to February, 2015 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

As has become a set pattern, we begin with articles form or regular blogs, commemorating anniversaries:

Kavi Pradeep: The singer of Message Songs  – As tribute on the centenary of Kavi Pradeep (6 February 1915 – 11 December 1998) –  the article goes on to present some songs sung by him, because he is in the class of singers who could not sing anything which was less than captivating.

Happy Birthday, Waheeda ji, from where we have picked up these two songs:

Jaane kya tune kahi (Pyaasa, 1957, Geeta Dutt, S DBurman) so as to bring up its original Bengali version Mono Dilo Na Bandhu sung and composed by S D Burman

Haaye gazab kahin taara toota (Teesri Kasam, 1966. Asha Bhosle, Shankar-Jaikishen). We will add Mubarak Begum’s piece Hai Muhobbat Bahutto this list. Just as a bonus, here is her dance number (Yaeru pooti poovaye from Kaalam Maari Poochu (remade into Telugu as Rojulu Marayi). This tune was adapted to in Hindi for the film Bambai Ka Babu, as Dekhane Mein Bhola Hai, some years down the line.

My Favourite Geeta Bali songsJanuary 21, 2015  was the 50th anniversary. Our pick of the songs is : Yeh Din Hai Khushi KeJab Se Tumhen Dekha Hai (1963) – Manna Dey and Suman Kalyanpur

My favourite songs of Madhubala , from which we have picked up – Aye bhola bhala man (Jhumroo, 1961, Asha Bhosle and Kishore Kumar, Kishore Kumar)

The Masters: Khayyam spans the career that spanned more than six decades, with long stretches in between where Khayyam did not compose for films at all. In all, he composed for 54 films (and 17 other unreleased ones) and totalled up 626 songs (including those for TV serials and other non-film albums including those for Begum Akhtar and Mohammed Rafi).

And now onto some of the other – regular- offerings:

UttarMegh and Dekh Kabira Roya is also the inspired by the Meghadutam, which has been a source of inspiration of many an artist.  ‘While PurvaMegh describes the scenic beauty that the cloud messenger would pass by on his way to Alaka nagari, as narrated by a certain Yaksha who is separated from his wife on account of negligence of duty and hence cursed by Kubera to be exiled for a year, UttarMegh is full of virah-bhava. ..The great painter Nana Joshi has created nine visualisations of the verses of UttarMegh…. That UttarMegh was a possible inspiration for the great lyricist Rajinder Krishan when he penned the lyrics for Dekh Kabira Roya – Meri Veena Tum Bin Roye  and  Ashqon se teri hamne [It is also interesting to note that the two songs are back to back in the movie] as well as Bairan Ho Gyai Raina –  or even Amiya Chakraborty, the director of the movie, is what this post sets out to explore.

Some Favorite (Relatively) Contemporary Versions of Classic Hindi Film Songs is the result of the urge to throw together some of my favorite contemporary versions of old Hindi film songs. The songs included here – Hai Apna Dil To Awara, Chin Chin Choo, Piya Tu Ab To Aaja- also come from a slightly wider range than the area that the blog usually focuses on these days, stretching in one case all the way into the early 1970s. But all of these songs were composed by music directors who produced many classics during the Golden Age, and all of them were originally sung by artists who became prominent during the Golden Age or the Vintage Era.

Different versions of ‘Tum Bhulaye Na Gaye’ by  Feroza Begam… This is one of the loveliest songs that one cannot get tired of listening it again and again. There is something special about it. Firoza Begum in her unique and beautiful voice has infused agony and angst into this engrossing composition of Kamal Dasgupta…. original version , subsequent version   and the one when she was almost 70 .

A few random musings:

Salil Chaudhury – A narrative documentary movie on Salil Chowdhury directed by Jagadish Banerjee and produced by Films Division…..

Cinema Cinema - Director Shah Krishna compiled this compelling documentary of Indian cinema after spending two years searching through film archives from all over the world. Included are films from the turn of the 20th century through the 1970s to illustrate various schools of filmmaking and the historical progression of the art form.

Our friends Samir Dholakia and Bhgawan Thavrani have remembered

Naresh Mankad also chips in with

Whilst on Pankaj Mullik, we also recall that Samir Dholakia has sent

 Tu Dhundhata hai jisako – Yatrik by Anulekha Gupta Mullick, the daughter of Pankaj Mullik. Here is the original song.

And now over to exclusive articles on Mohammad Rafi…

Mohammad Rafi Timeline showcases his endless collections.

Mohammed Rafi: An Antique voice of showman Raj KapoorAn Accolade to Raj Kapoor and Mohammed Rafi on their 90th Birthday Raj Kapoor - Google DoodleBy Biman Baruah – Mohammad Rafi has sung second highest songs for Raj Kapoor, after Mukesh, in films like Barsaat (1949), Andaz (1949), Dastan (1950), Sargam (1950), Amber (1952), Paapi (1953), Do Ustad (1959), Chhalia (1960), Nazrana (1961), Ek Dil Sau Afsane (1963) and Mera Naam Joker (1970).

We continue our pursuit of the golden period of Hindi Film Music …….

Dilip Kumar: The Substance and The Shadow ǁ 2 of 4

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Dilip Kumar: The Substance and The Shadow – An Autobiography – as narrated to Udayatara Nayar

Hardback | 230 x 150 | 450pages | ISBN 9789381398869

Publishers: Hay House India


We have read the first of the four parts – The Seeds of a Flight of a Fruit Merchant’s Son, Yousuf Khan, The Substance, To The Legendary Thespian Dilip Kumar, The Shadow – on  5 February 2015.  We carry on to the second part….


First and Second Innings at the Hindi Film Cinema

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The narrative of Dilip Kumar’s life and times at the Hindi Cinema World spans another 8 chapters. Some of the reviews written when the book was originally released do lament about somewhat sketchy treatment to the subjects like his co-stars or his highly gossiped love affairs or his own views on some of his landmark films. However, as Udayatara Nayar has noted in the book, (at this stage and age) Dilip Kumar has certainly been selective in choosing to open up on topics in his long career, spanning over six decades and around 60 films on the silver screen. So, be it.

Bombay Talkies was the best thing that happened to the young Yousuf Khan at a juncture when he had no clue to what acting in front of camera was. Ashok Kumar taught him to “do what you would do in the situation if you were really in it. If you act, it will be acting and it will look very silly.” Devika Rani conferred him with a screen name by which he would be better known, appropriate enough for his audience to relate to, one that would be in tune with the romantic image he was destined to acquire through his screen presence. That set him to be launched with his maiden film Jwar Bhataimage (1944) directed by Amiya Chakraborthy. It was the beginning of the journey into the world of Lights, Camera, Action that even as passed on without much impact, Dilip Kumar had realized that it would a difficult job, where he would have to find his own way to continue. An actor has to ‘strengthen his instincts because the duality of real and unreal cannot be sorted out by mind, which is more concerned with truth and logic in any normal situation’.

The new identity of Dilip Kumar had liberating impact, in that what had no need to see or study, Dilip surely needed to acquire and accumulate New Aspirations, New Experiences, in terms of reproducing the emotions, speech and behaviour of fictitious characters in front of the camera. By the time Dilip Kumar had completed his work in Jugnu, he was still not noticed when he would be walking on the pavement near Churchagte (a station on Western Railway, in Mumbai), despite having acted in three films, Jwar Bhata (1944), Pratima (1945) and Milan (1946). But the release of Jugnu (1947) brought him in the acclaim due to a (film) star, even within his own family. His father also had come to terms with the reality that his son had (finally) chosen a profession he had least expected him to enter.

Then followed a period Between The Personal And The Professional lives when Yousuf Khan had endure the loss of brother so close to him, Ayub Sahab, who succumbed to his chronic lung ailment and his mother, Amma, passed away, on 27 August, 1948, ‘peacefully from the turmoil of life to eternal tranquillity’. It took all his ‘strength and will power to supress the pain and deep sense of loss to stand up manfully before his brothers and sisters, giving them implicit understanding of being both mother and father to them’. On the professional front, Dilip Kumar’s contract with Bombay Talkies was coming to an end. As it was, by that time studio employment system was being replaced by actors and technicians working on a freelance basis. Dilip Kumar opted for S. Mukherjee’s Filmistan for Shaheed (1948). There he had ‘an understanding and facile co-actor in Kamini Kuashal (real name Uma Kashyap), who was very attentive to the demands of the director and had the intelligence to grasp the intrinsic sensitivity of more poignant situations in the script.’ The success of Shaheed had the pair teaming up for two more films at Filmistan – Nadiya Ke Paar (1948) – based on Rabindranath Tagore’s story Nauka Dubi- and Shabnam (1949). Being in twenties at that time, he was no super human being and did ‘prefer company of colleagues who were educated and well informed. Stardom bothered more than’ it pleased him. Possibly, he was drawn more intellectually than emotionally to Kamini Kaushal. “if that was love, may be it was.” Dilip Kumar has always been asked somewhat ‘intrusive question as to whether it makes a difference to the potency of emotions drawn from within one self in an intimate love scene if the actors are emotionally involved in their real lives’. An answer that is Yes and No, draws up Dilip Kumar to scenes as Prince Salim with Anarkali (Madhubal on the screen) for Mughal-e-Azam(1960), described in greater details in the later chapter “Madhubala“. It was also in this period that he met Mehboob Khan and Nuashad Miyan, relationships with whom blossomed into two enduring friendships and professional relationships. The meeting with Naushad led to Mela (1948). Dilip Kumar notes that among the major lessons that he learned while working with Directors like Nitin Bose or senior artist like Devika Rani was that even as it is not easy for an actor to rise above the script, if the collaboration among the writer, actor and the director worked well it was not impossible either. A director may be satisfied with the given shot, it is also for the actor to discern for himself whether he had really given his best. The actor would be within his (or her) rights for another shot if he (she) felt he (she) could do better.

Mela evokes some wonderful memories of the past in Reel Life versus Real Life. Firstly, this was the film that Dilip Kumar’s father watched in a cinema house. Secondly, it established enduringimage friendship between him and Naushad and between him and Nargis. Raj Kapoor and Nargis shared a chemistry that made a good equation for their scenes together. With Nargis, Dilip Kumar shared a different equation in front of the camera. He could attain similar ease with Madhubala in Tarana (1951), which has remained, for many reasons, one of the films that Dilip Kumar counts as the memorable one, from among the ones of his early part of the career. During early 1950s, Dilip Kumar was advised to switch over to comedy roles by an English psychiatrist. The doctor was certain that Dilip Kumar took his work home in his subconscious and turned the spoken lines and the scenes over and over in his mind to review the work done during the day. It was not as if he did not realize that whatever he was doing in the fimageilms was unreal and diametrically opposite to his real life and real self. That led Dilip Kumar to take up Azaad (1955), a remake of Malaikallan (1954), featuring M G Ramchandran (MGR) as hero. This also was a pleasant experience working with Meena Kumari. Dilip Kumar had presented himself with his first car after the success of Shabnam (1949) and his own residence in Mumbai after Azaad. Dilip Kumar does accept here that he was attracted to Madhubala as a fine co-star and as person who had some attributes he hoped to find in a woman at that age and time. Because of the rumours of this emotional involvement, their pairing in Mughal-e-Azam made sensational news in early 1950s. However matters began to sour between them when her father attempted to make the proposed marriage a business venture. The outcome was that halfway through the production, they were not even on talking terms. The classic scene with the feather coming between their lips was shot when they had completely stopped even greeting each other – one of the rarest examples of Reel Life versus Real Life.

The book has a full chapter on Madhubala. Contrary to the popular notions, her father Ataullah Khan, was not opposed her marrying with Dilip Kumar. He had his own film production company and two of the most popular stars under the same roof in his company, singing duets in his productions till the end of their careers was what he would have wanted. However, Dilip Kumar had his own way of functioning wherein he would not permitted any laxity even if it were his own production house. Madhubala persisted that these details can easily be sorted out once they were married. In the circumstances, it seemed best that they did not decide to marry or even give each other a chance to rethink of a union that would not be good for either of them. The parting of ways did not affect him. He categorically states that he chose to remain bachelor because he had young sisters to be married off, and for me the taking care of, and ensuring happiness of his brothers and sisters were paramount. Madhubala’s father got her entangled in a lawsuit with producer-director B R Chopra over the outdoor shooting work for Naya Daur (eventually released in 1957). Madhubala was replaced with Vyjayantimala, when ‘all sincere and genuine’ efforts on Dilip Kumar’s part became futile. The announcement of the renewal of the project of fresh shooting for Naya Daur created a stir in the media. It was made to appear that Dilip Kumar ‘had got Madhu out of the film, while the truth was that her father pulled her out of the project to demonstrate his authority.

imageThe professional relationship with Vyjayantimala finds a special place in the book, in the form a full-fledged chapter: Devdas, Naya Daur and Beyond. Dilip Kumar was in two minds to take up Devdas (1955), the first of the seven-films that Dilip Kumar and Vyjayantimala did together. On one hand, it troubled him ‘initially to experiment with the rendering of a character who carried a heavy measure of pain and despondency under the skin and could mislead the more vulnerable youth to believe that alcoholism offered the best escape from the pain of losing in love. On the imageother hand, the subject was already successfully filmed with K L Saigal in the title role and Dilip Kumar had that opportunity to match his histrionic prowess with that benchmark and etch his name in the annals of Hindi Film history. Some of the dialogues from the film, penned by one of the very known literary names, Rajinder Singh Bedi, have become legendary and have lasted out the tests of time. (In fact, dialogue delivery was one of the very predominant weapons the armoury of Dilip Kumar’s histrionics. Here are five iconic dialogues from among many.) After Devdas, when they paired for Madhumati (1958), Vyjayantimala certainly draws a very fond word of praise from Dilip Kumar. Even as the film had tale of three incarnations of the heroin (played by Vyjayantimala), the story gets unfolded through the narrative of hero’s character (played by Dilip Kumar). He has fond memories of being able to score one-man-up-ship over her, while filming the fourth of their films, Paigham (1959), when during a visit to the sets by none less than the them Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, he gets a personal mention from Panditji, when it was Vyjayantimala who was expected to score on this front. However, it was during the making of Naya Daur, that Dilip Kumar noticed Vyjayantimala’s ‘ability to feign a rustic character’s mannerisms with conviction. So she was her first choice as the co-lead star for his home production, Gunga Jumna (1961).

At this stage, as he looks back On The Domestic Front, by the time his father passed away (on 5 March, 1950), Dilip Kumar did feel a sense of achievement that he could live up to his expectations.

imageGunga Jumna, expectedly, has very important personal space in the career so far as Dilip Kumar is concerned, and the making of the films is quite vividly captured in The Travails of Film Making: “Gunga Jumna And After. Dilip Kumar’s character had a very powerful script, in that his character Gunga takes the refuge in the lawlessness of the dacoits to get back to the society what was rightfully his. The story had a built-in conflict between the elder brother who flees the society, ‘where law favours the rich and the powerful and unjustly discriminates the poor and defenceless’ and the younger brother who has to uphold the law of the nation as a police officer. Dilip Kumar had done two other films where he had played negative ‘anti-hero’ roles, in Amar (1954) and Footpath (1953). This role was , however, closer to a the then social reality. IN any case, “life’s surprises never cease”. Ram Aur Shyam (1967), which was going to turn out to be a very special film to Dilip Kumar, started with a bit of turbulence. Vyjayantimala, slated to play the lead, was upset with the producer on some matter and was peremptorily replaced with Waheeda Rehman. That ended seven-film association on a sour note.

While taking up narrative of of A New Role: Taking Up Noble Causes in the public life, Dilip Kumar wonders – “I do not know if it is in my genes or if it is something that I have assimilated from the environment I was brought up in”. Quite vivid and lively discussions relating to his campaigning for V K Krishna Menon against Achrya J B Kriplani, for one of the most memorable Lok Sabha contests in 1962 or being the Sherrif of Bombay (1980) or his active participation @ National Association of the Blind (NAB), or (nominated) member of Rajya Sabha (2000 – 2006).

After Bairag (1976), Dilip Kumar found himself at the cross roads, once again after he had found himself in a similar predicament after Ram Aur Shyam, whether to take up retirement from the active humdrum of the film world. At that time it was Saira Banu who persuaded him to prospects of perusing the scripts of the films. However, after Bairag, Dilip Kumar got embroiled in a lawsuit slapped on him by A R Kardar. It was during the fag end of this trying phase that Manoj Kumar came to him the idea of Kranti (1981) that marked The Second Innings of his career. Then came (Subhash Ghai’s) Vidhaata (1982) in which he plays an earthy character of a railway engine driver.

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He went on to do Karma (1986) and Saudagar (1991) too for Subhash Ghai. If his pairing with equally established Raaj Kumar in Saudagar had caused many a ripples, his pairing with just branded Angry Young Men Amitabh Bachchan in Shakti (1982) or his portrayal of veteran upright journalist – editor in Mashaal (1984) evoked fair degree of laurels form the public as well as critics. He credits the extremely involved acting in the famous sequence in Mashaal, in which Vinod Kumar (the character played by him) tries to stop his dying wife, to the deeply etched memories of his own father wailing to get the medical help for asthmatically gasping His mother.

 


Filmography:

Filmography Dilip Kumar – The Substance and The Shadow


The third of the fourth part of the article – Marriage and Life with Saira Banu - on 5 March, 2015…………………….

Dilip Kumar: The Substance and The Shadow ǁ 1 of 4

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Dilip Kumar: The Substance and The Shadow – An Autobiography – as narrated to Udayatara Nayar

Hardback | 230 x 150 | 450pages | ISBN 9789381398869

Publishers: Hay House India

In a very technical sense, this is the third book on Dilip Kumar, the previous two being Dilip Kumar: Star Legend of Indian Cinema by Bunny Rueben and Nehru’s Hero: Dilip Kumar In The Life Of India by Lord Meghnad Desai.

In fact, the very genesis of the present autobiography is that whatever has been written earlier about Dilip Kumar is considered to be ‘full of distortions and misinformation’. So less is known about Yousuf Khan, the substance, and it is so natural to get myths floating around a towering figure of the stature of Dilp Kumar, the shadow, that “an authentic, heartfelt and compelling narrative”, in the form of an ‘autobiography’ would invariably whip up the appetite for the various ‘aspects of life and times of THE titan of Indian Cinema.

This is not a review of the book, but a fairly selective, critical appraisal that would provide a reasonable insight into the contents of the book, and thereby in the principal protagonist, Dilip Kumar, born on 11th December, 1922 as Mohammad Yousuf Khan, the fourth among eleven children of nice, gentle and pious Pathan couple – Mohammad Sarwar Han and Ayesha Bibi.

The contents of the book is spread over four phases – The Personal Life of Yousuf Khan; First and Second Innings at the Hindi Film Cinema; Marriage and Life with Saira Banu and Reminiscences by actors, directors, friends and relatives.

We would take up each section every week, starting with –

The Seeds of a Flight of a Fruit Merchant’s Son, Yousuf Khan, The Substance,  To The Legendary Thespian Dilip Kumar, The Shadow

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The book opens with a Foreword by Dilip Kumar’s wife Saira Banu. She extols ‘widely known admiration’ in an ardently pride narrative and in the process, presents some quite interesting facets of the persona of Dilip Kumar: image

§ Dilip Kumar is a fanatically voracious reader. The range of the subjects he reads is as much varied as is his range of histrionics. Dilip Kumar is also very keenly fond of good poetry, classical music and dance.

§ His persona transcends lands, religions and castes. He sternly refuses to see negative side of anyone or any situation.

§ His secular beliefs spring straight from his heart and his respect for all religions, castes, communities and creeds. His closet friends are Parsis.

§ He is very fond of his family.

§ He would never want to miss out on enjoying any of the splendour of nature’s beauty.

§ Flying kites, with the whole family in the toe, is great love. He maintains his treasure of his kites and manja with as much care and as much detail as he maintains his personal wardrobe.

imageUdaytara Nayar, a veteran journalist and writer on her own, is also a very close friend of Dilip Kumar and Saira Banu. In Introduction (A Dream Come True), while presenting the challenge of drawing out Dilip Kumar from his dislike of talking about himself, has been quite painstaking in documenting the frequent use of chaste Urdu in a fairly flowing English narrative. Of particular interest are the accounts of Dilip Kumar’s grasp of management skills as a complete professional and awareness of social responsibilities as a star and a role model. His uncanny choice of Premnath in a negative role in Aan (1952) as a key driver of the publicity or “He never faked anything, be it his appreciation..or his concern for a colleague” or meticulously studying the script and character and then to draw upon from his keen sense of observation are typical takeaways for a professional in any field of activities.

The first eight chapters vividly describes the built up of base of Yousuf Khan’s metamorphosis into Dilip Kumar takes place.image

Yousuf Khan’s date of Birth, in the Kissa Khwani Bazaar of a famous city of Peshawar in the then undivided India’s North West Frontier Province itself would find a mention in the chronicles, because a huge fire had gutted the goldsmiths’ workshops in that area. Yousuf’s Dadi’s opinion of her grandson’s arrival on this earth amidst blizzard and fire was further bolstered by fakir’s prophecy that the child was “made for great fame and unparalleled achievements.” Dadi’s extra efforts to protect her grandson form the evil eyes of the world seemed to transform Yousuf into an ‘loner at school, getting lost in the make-believe world of pictorial books.’

The pain of The Matriarch and Her Brood giving infant Yousuf a very ugly look to protect him from the evil of the world was to surface from the subconscious of Dilip Kumar while playing early tragic roles in career of the soon to be titled tragedy king. The isolation at the school did not seem to affect young Yousuf’s activities at home, but the mental agony of the characters that Dilip Kumar portrayed on the screen did lead him to seek help of psychotherapy.

The Escapades and Adventures of childhood years of Yousuf certainly seem to have ignited Dilip Kumar’s sense of storytelling. Young Yousuf would walk to the city square every day, in the toes of his father, Aghaji, to listen to unfolding of a narrative by one of the maulanas. He would not only enjoy the narrative but also let his fertile imagination conjure up characters and situations in his mind so graphically that back home he would try enacting the characters with the lines spoken by maulana. Several years later these embedded experiences were to unfold in the storytelling exercises for the cinema! Dadi was the first censor Yousuf came across in his life. She would abruptly curtail a story being told at the congregation of the family members around a bon fire of a sigdi on winter night, if she felt it was it was not good enough to be told in the presence of women and children. In his solitudes Child Yousuf also indulged in the pastime of imitating ladies and men who came visiting his parents. Among these visitors was the elder son of Yousuf’s father’s Hindu friend Basheshwarnath Kapoor, who would stun the ladies with his handsome appearance. That was Raj Kapoor’s father, Prithviraj Kapoor.

Off To Bombay: A New Chapter Begins when Yousuf’s father shifted to Bombay to explore the business potential in the wake of the news of impending world war. During the journey to Bombay by Frontier Mail, family friends would come to meet them with refreshments at some of the stations. Some of them were Hindus. When the trains stopped at stations, the vendors would sell ‘Hindu Chai, Hindu Paani, Muslim Chai, Muslim Panni. The travelling Khan family did take little notice of the difference. Adolescent Yousuf grew up in an atmosphere of warmth and affection. He was extremely shy, but not unhappy. There was no more shaving of his pate now (in the year 1937). The growth of thick black hair elicited compliments form all ladies, which would yield into a ritual by his mother for shooing away the evil eye. ‘Today, in (his) ninety-second year, (Saira Banu) performs the same ritual every time a visitor says something about,, looks or good health or when… dozens of people come for (autographs) and praise.. work!’

In The Growing Up Years, the family had shifted to Deolali (a hill station in Maharashtra, located about 180 km form Mumbai). Yousuf learnt English to a quite proficient degree. He also started taking keen interest in soccer. In fact, at that stage he had a desire to become a soccer champion and his father desired an OBE attached to his name. He met Raj Kapoor after many years at Khalsa College. In fact, theirs was not merely a friendship of two individuals in the same profession but a bonding that grew from well-placed trust and respect. Even as Yousuf was always trying to help his father, a destiny was being cared for him by the Almighty.

The Poona Interlude helped teenaged Yousuf find his own bearings, gain some valuable experience. That taste of a little bit of ‘freedom’ also made him unsure whether he would be able to continue to submit to the will of his father, and take over his mantle.

At that point of time, inevitable changes led to The Return of The Prodigal to Bombay, pining for warm, indescribable security of family and familiar surroundings.

Whilst in Bombay, Yousuf was now keenly searching for a meaningful occupation. One morning he happens to meet his father’s acquaintances. Dr. Masani. One thing led to another. Yousuf met Devika Rani and landed up with a job of Rs 1250 per month. This was The Turning Point. He also met Ashok Kumar, marking the beginning of a friendship that was to last and entire lifetime.

In addition to these chapters on his-pre-film life, Dilip Kumar has chosen to end the book with Family Matters to present his reply to persistent question asked to him: Whether there is anything at all that (he regrets) and wish(es) to obliterate from the canvas of (his) life. One such episode is his getting involved, under pressure, with lady named Asma Rehman. That mischievously perpetuated ‘second marriage’ was an error of judgement by a fallible human being. Saira Banu, despite the hurt caused to her pride and because of her intense faith in him, stood solidly by him. The whole episode strengthened their closeness and emotional dependence on each other. During the episode it was wrongly represented that Saira could not bear a child. The truth is she did conceive a child (in 1972), but was lost in the eighth month of the pregnancy because of several medical complications. Dilip Kumar also goes into a deep retrospective when he passionately narrates his attempts to give each of his brother and sister to scale the heights that he dreamt for them. He felt a moment of proud and that lump in the throat when Lata Mangeshakar, whom he fondly calls his ‘younger sister’, sang for him Allah Tero Naam on the eve of her soulful rendering of Ae Mere watan Ke Logo at a function in the presence of the then Prime Minister Jawhar Lal Nehru in Delhi.


We will take up next part of the article – First and Second Innings at the Hindi Film Cinema – on 19 February, 2015

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – December 2014

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Welcome to December, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We begin our journey with anniversary tributes.

One of the finest actors, Deven Varma, passed away on 2nd December, 2014

Tribute to Great Actor Deven Verma and Tribute to Deven Verma are the clips from the TV programmes .

Remembering Deven Varma, intimately describes him as “one of Hindi cinema’s finest and most atypical funny men in the 1970s and 1980s, most memorably in the work of Hrishikesh Mukherjee, Basu Chatterji and Gulzar – films where Varma provided a counterpoint to the louder comedy elsewhere in the industry.It’s telling to look at the function Deven so often performed in those films: sutradhaar, vidushak, naatak-rachita rolled into one.

In an article in (gujarati) Divya Bhaskar, Dipak Soliya remembers Deven Varma’s contribution to subtlety that he introduced to the comedy in films. Of the three Filmfare awards that he got, even as two – Chor Ke Ghar Chor and Chori Mera Kaam- were for the traditional loud roles, his third award for Angoor established his subtle style at a very high pedestal.

Among many songs that Deven Verma had enacted on the screen, we pick up Baa Adab Baa Mulahisa Hoshiyar (Aaj Aur Kal – 1963- Ravi) epitomizing his style.

Happy Birthday, Sharmila Tagore and Dharmendra!, marks the 70th birthday of the lovely Sharmila Tagore and the 79th birthday of the hunky Dharmendra, and Ten of my favourite Dharmendra songs has pre-70s film songs that the author has seen. To make this challenge a little tougher, only solos (No duets) in which Dharmendra’s character does the singing are included..

Ten of my favourite Geeta Dutt  solos and its follow up article Ten of my favourite Geeta Dutt duets have pairing articles The Unforgettable Geeta Dutt and Unforgettable Geeta Dutt – Part 2 respectively. Among very memorable songs presented in these articles, we pick up Yaaron Kisi Se Na Kehna, Chhabili (1960), Snehal Bhatkar, with Nutan as a co-singer for a special mention.

Happy Birthday, Dilip Saab remembers his 92nd birthday on 11th December.

The joker and his disguises – Raj Kapoor as innocent and masochist presents a very fine analysis of persona of Raj Kapoor. The article also chooses the occasion to present author’s favorite the “Yeh Mera Prem Patra” sequence, including a two-minute prelude before the song itself starts, as one of the finest presentation of declaration of love on the silver screen.

Jiyo Toh Aise Jiyo (Bahu Beti, 1965) has led to remembering My favourite Shailendra songs

We had also remembered some very informative articles on Shailendra’s songs in our issue of December 2013.

Now we move onto other articles.

SoY has concluded its series of articles on Best Songs of 1951.

The penultimate article seeks to choose the best duet for 1951, from among 38 duets (which include songs having both male, both female, and more than two singers) in the list of 144 memorable songs of the year in Best songs of 1951: Wrap-Up 4. The article has first shortlisted the duets which are immensely popular till today, or which can be indisputably regarded as all-time great songs, regardless of their popularity. It may be observed that the duets of 1951 would easily figure among all-time great songs. The final choice crowns Seene mein sulagate hain armaan – Tarana – Talat Mahmood /Lata Mangeshkar jointly with Dum bhar jo udhar munh phere – Awara – Mukesh and Lata Mangeshkar.

The concluding article, Best songs of 1951: Final Wrap-Up 5, has very aptly presented the analysis, with the help of analytical tools, in continuation of the summing up of views by SoY’s very knowledgeable readers. The active multifaceted, discussions make the series quite engrossing and interesting. The final choice has rested with Anil Biswas, as The Music Director for the year 1951.

Item songs leads to Special issue ‘item’ of Motherland Magazine with several articles linking film item songs to older traditions.

12 must-have Hindi songs for your travel playlist! is a motley mix of old and new that should be in every traveller’s playlist.

Ten memorable prayer songs from Hindi films is a consensus-based selection, iterated through several criteria.

Discussion, Info and Great Pics Related to the Earliest Appearances of Cuckooo (thanks to Mel!) provides the link that Mel supplied for a very comprehensive post that he wrote about Cuckoo in French…… this post is worth a look just for the pics, clips, and extremely extensive filmography.The post also pose an exploratory question as to whether the little girl in the following picture, from 1943 film Prithvi Vallabh, is Cuckoo?

Is this CuckooWhilst on Prithvi Vallabh, here is one of its iconic song – Tailap Ki Nagri Gaana Nahin Bajana Nahin.

We also have some interesting posts from some new searches or from some of the friends who have not been regularly contributing articles on the subject of our blog carnival”

Captain NarendraPhanse has, in his usual poetic style, remembered some forgotten gems by Lata Mangeshkar, with an icing on the cake with a Juthika Roy and Suraiya songs each. Since the article is in Gujarati, I have listed out these songs here:

Sapana Bin Sajan Aayen – Shokhiyan (1951) – Jamal Sen

Tum Kya Jaano Tumhari Yaad Mein Hum Kitna Roye – Shin Shina Ki Boobalaa Boo (1952) – C Ramchandra

Mai Ri main kaase Kahoon - Madan Mohan , second version Lata Mangeshkar – Dastak 1970 – Madan Mohan

Aye Dil-e-Nadaan – Razia Sultan (1983) Khayyam

Tumhare Bulane Ko Ji Chahata hai – Ladli 1949 – Anil Biswas

Unko Ye Shikayat Hai Ke Hum Koochh nahin Kahate – Adalat 1958 Madan Mohan

Man Mohana Bade Joothe – Seema (1955) Shanker Jaikishan

• And a few Non-Lata Mangeshkar gems-

Meri Veena Ro Rahi Hai – Juthika Roy – Kamal Dasgupta

Man Mor Hua Matwala,- Afsar(1950) – Suraiya – S D Burman

• Kaun Bujaye Tapat More Man Ki – First version – Padma Devi, second version K L Saigal Amar Saigal

Old Hindi Songs Collection – from 50’s to 90’s era. On a blog dedicated to golden age of hindi music industry.

Shrikant Talageri has painstakingly collected Songs not included in the film Pakeezah, or perhaps intended for a sequel? These songs seem to be in a different style from the official Pakeezah songs.

Our friend Bhagwan Thavrani writes in to send the video clip – Tum Meri Jindagi Mein Kuchh [Unreleased Version] | Bombay To Goa – this tune was originally recorded in Hement Kumar-Geeta Dutt voice for GURU DUTT’s unreleased film RAAZ, later used by RDBurman in BOMBAY TO GOA, again not included in the film. See the similarity with KUCHH NA KAHO, KUCHH BHI NA KAHO (by Kumar Sanu) of ” 1942 – A Love Story. The song has a twin too, sung by Lata Mangeshakar.

And now over to exclusive articles on Mohammad Rafi…

Mohammed Rafi and Super Star Rajesh Khanna has critically laid up the songs under all the music directors and does make a very fascinating study by Moahammed Rafi fans.

In the telephonic interview, referred to in the article Royalty was the not main cause of Rafi-Lata Dispute: Usha Timothy, the readers share the fond experiences of singing with the top singers of India like Mohd. Rafi, Mukesh, Mahendra Kapoor (Dhol Baja Dhol Jania Film Vishwas), Kishore Kumar (Rafta Rafta Dekho Aankh Meri Larri Hai’ Film Kismat), , Shamshad Begum, Asha Bhonsle, Suman Kalyanpur, Hemlata, Krishna Kalle in a very short duration.  But Ms. Usha Timothy tells proudly that she always tried to copy like Mohd. Rafi sahib, not like Lata ji or Asha ji. Among many songs listed therein, we would take note of Usha Timothy’s maiden song (of course with Mohammaed Rafi) – Tu Raat Kharhi Thi Chhat Pe… Himalay Ki God Mein (1965) – Kalyanji Anandji.

We wish that New Year  2015 yield all the fruits of joy, happiness, usher in best of health and wealth and make happen the most memorable moments… to You and Your Family….

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – October 2014

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Welcome to October, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We have a discovery to report this month. It is a discovery on two counts – first one being that fact that I landed upon this blog only this month, though ought to have done so a little earlier, and the second one is because the blog itself is Back after a long hiatus!.

So, we will devote our beginning to posts on Songs, Stories, Books and More… Random Musings. However, we would pick up posts for the normal period of this edition and would find opportunities to delve into (relatively) older posts in the future editions of our carnival.

We have two posts on one subject, wherein both the posts have approached the subject from totally different angle. The subject is Lata Mangeshkar’s birthday (on 28th September). The First one is Happy Birthday, Lata ji,… despite loving Asha Bhosle to the core, there are many Lata songs that I am very fond of…The volume and quality of work she has behind her is unmatched and unparalleled. And this is an Asha fan saying this.. And the Second Post is: The Swar-Saamraagyi and the the Sangeet-Maartand: Best of Lata Mangeshkar by Anil Biswas, as can be expected on any SoY post, doing full justice the selection of the songs from 123 songs that Anil Biswas – LataMangeshkar combination has provided from 30 films.

October sets in… oh yes, Happy Birthday Asha Parekh… has chosen to present songs from Phir Wohi Dil Laya Hoon. Lakhon Hai Nigah Main, Zindagi Ki Raah Mein obviously draws a parallel with Jawaniyan Yeh Mast Mast Bin Piye  [Tumsa Nahin Dekha]. “Both songs are favourites though (I) prefer to watch the Tumsa Nahin Dekha song and listen to Lakhon Hai Nigah Mein!”

Gungunaoonga Yehi Geet Main Tere Liye – Remembering Sachin Dev Burman and Majrooh Sultanpuri is in memory of 108th and 95th birth anniversaries respectively. “Mohd Rafi .. happens to be.. favourite singer and I remember reading somewhere that Dada Burman wanted him to sing this song. He wasn’t in favour of Talat saab because of that tremble in his voice. But luckily for us, Jaidev (his assistant then) convinced Dada Burman to give Talat saab this song. Thank god for that. However much, I adore Rafi, no one could have sung this song better than Talat saab.”

We have a pair of very interesting posts on Asha Bhosle and Geeta Dutt on “Songs…and More”.

The recent one Chali Re Chali Re Main toh Des Parayee (Saranga, 1961) presents a haunting, plaintive number from film Saranga, one of the films that did make a very special space for Sardar Malik as quite an accomplished music director. The second one is w.r.t. Asha Bhosle’s birthday – Thank you for the music and memories, Asha ji! – which has picked up quite a melodious piece of Humming in Kashmir Ki Kali (1964), among other songs.

Geeta Dutt’s song Rut Phire Par Din Hamare was not there Pyasa.(1957), but has found its place here on account of “Thou shalt write a long post on at least one Sahir Ludhianvi song per week” policy. Rut Phire Par din Hamare Phire Na (Pyaasa, 1957) recollects the topic of this song in Nasreen Munni Kabir’s book (Conversations with Waheeda Rehman). According tConversations with Waheeda Rehmano Waheeda, this song had been filmed with her rowing in a boat and everyone had appreciated the picturisation. However Waheeda Rehman differed with the view and she apparently pointed out that having that song slows the pace of the story and is just boring. Guru Dutt had heard her criticism and after the first screening, had agreed with her observation (seeing people walk out for a bathroom or coffee break), had taken it off. Excerpts from this bok can be glanced at Excerpt | Conversations With Waheeda Rehman. The other one is Na Main Dhan Chahun Na Ratan Chahun (Kala Bazaar, 1960), This duet, by Geeta Dutt and Sudha Malhotra is said to have ben (actually) composed by Jaidev, the then assistant to S D Burman. This seems quite logical since “Jaidev’s bhajans from Hum Dono (1961) are remembered to the day – Allah Tero Naam, and Prabhu Tero Naam.”

Guru Dutt’s 50th death anniversary brings in San San San Woh Chali Hawa – Kaagaz Ke Phool, 1959 ‘to remember Guru Dutt not as the melancholic, unhappy genius film maker but in happier times with a happy number! He was after all only 39 when he died.’

We have several other anniversary posts in the present episode of the carnival.

Happy 88th Birthday, Madam Noor Jehan! has clips of the entire ‘90s interview on BBC plus all of Noor Jehan birthday posts going back to 2009. A veritable treasure in on Noor Jehan, in one place !

On Begum Akhtar’s birth centenary, a musical tribute at her grave…..One hundred years after she was born, Begum Akhtar is being remembered and celebrated at the place where she was laid to rest.

clip_image002How Begum Akhtar changed my life: a tribute on the singer’s 100th birth anniversaryTisha Srivastav

“Now as a woman in my 40s, having lived life a little, the Begum is back in my life, as a modern-day primer to soothe me into understanding the subtext of experiences. Of love, shocks, surprises, loneliness, romancing life itself and laughing at one’s obsessions.”

The Lonely Ghazal Queen: Begum Akhtar , a legend in her lifetime, who achieved enormous fame at a very young age, and gave joy to millions of listeners of many generations, including doyens like Mehdi Hasan, Talat Mahmood, Madan Mohan, Pt. Jasraj and Pt. Ravi Shankar, Begum Akhtar’s own life seems to be full of sorrow, pain, abusive relationships, betrayal by people she loved and a deep melancholy.

Unfathomable greatnessSaleem Kidwai

The way [Begum Akhtar] would split words or combine them into musical phrases shows how comfortable she was with Urdu’s poetic idiom. This musical comfort level with the language also marked out some of her younger contemporaries like Mehdi Hasan, Iqbal Bano and Farida Khanum, and is sadly missing from most other singers.

Kishore Kumar’s duets by SD Burman : “With 115 songs, he gave Kishore Kumar more songs than any other (male) singer. Surjit Singh’s site indicates that out of this only 53 were solos, and 51 were Male –Female duets, 8 Male duets and 3 other songs. “.. and even die-hard opinionated person like me would very happily concede that quite a few of these pre-Aradhana duets did creditable justice to S D Burman’s marked preference to Kishore Kumar.

Geet Gaya Paththaron Ne – Rajakamal Studio is very passionate retrospective of films that have created a very respectable distinctive position for V. Shantaram. The post also carries link to a song each from Rajakamal Studio’s films from Shakuntala (1943) to Pinjra (1973).

My Favourites: Songs of Yearning – This ‘someone’ is a very hazy concept. We don’t usually know who, or how or when or where we will meet this particular person; we don’t even know that we will meet that special someone. And we do, perhaps – through choice, through circumstance, through fate. Or the someone we find becomes special. But in the meanwhile, we have our own hopes, dreams and expectations of finding that glorious love

Ten of my favourite string instrument songs, where it’s not an orchestra (Ted Lyons and His Cubs, anyone? Or The Monkees?), but a hero or heroine, not a professional musician, being the one ‘playing’ an instrument?

Radio Playback India has presented Raag Hansdhwani by Hariprasad Chaurasia.. I have especial fascination for Raag Hansdhwani, primarily because of Jaa To Se Nahin Bolun Kanhaiya , A Lata Mangeshakar – Manna Dey Duet from film Parivar(1956) , and then because of this song I landed upon this very famous Taranaa by Pandit Amir Khan Saheb Incidentally one of initial blog post is a compilation [Part I, Part II and Part III] of all that I could gather at that time on internet on Hansdhwani.

In our now a regular visit to Suresh Chandvankar’s articles, we have a topical article – When Bollywood maestros collaborated to put a Gandhi prayer to melody. The film musician Vasant Desai cut a disc of Gandhiji’s poem, sung by Manna Dey and Chorus. Gandhiji is credited as the lyricist .

How a goatherd and Mozart inspired the score for Bimal Roy’s ‘Madhumati’, is an excerpt, from Bimal Roy’s Madhumati: Untold Stories from Behind the Scenes by Rinki Roy Bhattacharya published by Rupa Publications India Pvt. Ltd..

Tamilnadus’ (ex)CM J. Jayalalitha was in the news recently. But we recall hereFour dance sequences from classic Jayalalithaa movies, of which one is from Hindi film Izzat (1967) – Jaagi Badan Men Jwala, Saiyan Tune Kya Kar Dala.

MANMOHAN KRISHNA SINGS FOR OP NAYYAR is one more post where we have very unique songs. Of the two non-film songs, both penned by Saroj Mohini Nayyar, the first one is Buje Diye Hua Andhera and the second one is Diya To Jala Sab Raat Re Balam. The latter song was also recorded in film Dhake Ki Malamal by C H Atma .

We round off this carnival edition with a post from Songs..Books and More – Sabhi Kuch Lutakar (Singer – Mohd Rafi, Movie Indrani, 1958) is a “wonderful romantic Hindi number was from an old Bengali film It is picturised on an unknown face. This man (a vagabond?) is strumming a guitar and singing this song. He is watched by Kumar and Sen – a just married couple – standing outside in the veranda of their house. Interspersed with Bengali dialogues, the mood of the song is indeed very romantic.”

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music–September 2014

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Welcome to September, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

The entire August 2014 edition of our blog carnival was dedicated to the memories of Mohammad Rafi. As result, we had not been able to visit any of the other published post in that episode. We will make good those inadvertent omissions in the present episode.

We begin out tour of our regular blogs:

Hemant Kumar’s songs by SD Burman

Besides his own compositions, Hemant Kumar freely sang under other composers. SD Burman was one of the most important for him, making him the voice of Dev Anand – one of the big three – in many films. Continuing the series on SD Burman for various singers, SoY presents songs for Hemant Kumar as a tribute to the latter on his 25th death anniversary.(b. 16 June 1920; d. 26 September 1989).

Best Songs of 1951: Wrap Up 2

This is the part Two of the Wrap Up round on Best songs of 1951: And the winners are? . Part 1 has addressed wide ranging discussions on Male Playback Singers for the Year 1951. The ‘other’ female playback singers bring immense variety and several of them had their landmark songs in the year. As a result, this year SoY has taken up a separate post for ‘other’ (than Lata Mangeshakar) Female Playback Singers. .

Aao bachcho tumhein dikhayen jhanki….ki

Jagriti (1954), has a more or less mirror image on the other side as Bedari. Actor Ratan Kumar (Nazir Rizvi) was the common link, where he played the same role of a differently-abled nice boy, who reforms the wayward boy

Multiple Version Songs (18): Hindi-Telugu exchange [Guest article by Arunkumar Deshmukh]

His first guest article in the series on Multiple Version Songs was on Hindi-Marathi, naturally.  Arunji surprised everyone by an equally erudite article on Hindi – Kannada versions. The Hindi- Telugu exchange is equally rich and interesting.

Ten of my favourite ‘male pianist’ songs’ is a veritable collection of songs picturised on men sitting at pianos, a worthy sequel to women pianists .

That also gives us cause to recall an archived article – My favorite piano-songs, from the 50s and 60s that have at least one character “playing” the piano throughout the song. Even as some songs would get repeated in these three articles, the presentations offer a varied fare that whets our appetite of different perspectives.

August being the month of festivals, it was high time a post on Festival Songs that would collate songs relating to various festivals was eagerly awaited.

My Favourites: Letters in Verse resurrects the now forgotten art and passion of writing letters.

August 27 is the death anniversary of Mukesh. ‘Made for each other: Mukesh and Kalyanji-Anandji’ pays tribute to Mukesh, by exploring one of the very special associations he had had with some of the leading music directors of his era.

Coincidentally we also have an exclusive post – Kalyanji-Anandji, the immortal duo detailing their notable films, songs, achievements and key recognitions that highlight their versatile talent. The post also discusses their distinctive composing style and more importantly, highlight their personal nature and why they are immortal.

We now stray beyond our oft-tracked path and take a look at occasional marvels that one lands up in such journeys:

First Ghalib ghazal to be used in a film was ‘Aah ko chahiye ek umr asar hone tak’ was the first Mirza Ghalib ghazal to be used in a movie (Masoom – 1941).

Whilst on Cutting The Chai, we also join the (still continuing) celebration of 100 years of Indian Cinema @ 100 Years of Indian Cinema: India Post’s 50 commemorative stamps.

This is also a diamond jubilee year of 1964 film Dosti, which is rightly commemorated @ Dukh To Apana Saathi Hai – Sushil Kumar.

And as coincidences would have, we landed upon The spirituality in Hindi Film songs, which also talks about immortal songs, of this 1964 movie, Dosti’, penned by inimitable Majrooh Sultanpuri and sung in the angelic voice of Mohammed Rafi”.

We have been a given an excellent lead for very unusual wealth of information in terms of several articles @ Scroll.in . Here is one example - A reminder for the Scots: India has a thriving bagpipe tradition too – Folk troupes in the country’s Garhwal region, especially those that play for weddings, often include a bagpiper. – by Mridula Chari.

Similarly Suresh Chandvankar, the Honorary Secretary of Society of Indian Record Collectors and the Editor of The Record News, the annual journal of the Society has contributed Marathi and English articles on the 78 rpm era to various periodicals, newspapers and websites. We take up one of the several articles for this edition, and will take up at least one article in each our subsequent editions.

Mimicry and comic songs from the dawn of the recording era in India – European recording companies scoured India looking for interesting sounds and songs, between 1902 to 1908.

We have a very interesting fare from our friend Bhagwan Thavrani :

In our regular ending of the carnival, we have “3-G: Great Lyrics, Grand Music and Golden Voice in Indian Cinema by Sri Biman Baruah , information shared by Sri Binu Nair, Founder, Rafi Foundation, Mumbai listing Mohammed Rafi solos written by Hasrat Jaipuri and filmed on different Actors:

Year Film Song Music Actor
1961 Jab Pyar Kisi Se Hota Hai Teri Zulfon Se Judaee Tu Nahin Mangi Thi Shankar Jaikishan Dev Anand
1962 Asli Naqli Chheda Mera Dil Ne Tarana Tere Pyar Ka Shankar Jaikishan Dev Anand
1963 Tere Ghar Ke Samne Dil Ka Bhanwar Kare Pukar, Pyar Ke Raag Suno Re S.D. Burman Dev Anand
1968 Duniya Falsafa Pyar Ka Tum Kya Jano, Tumne Kabhi Pyar Na Kiya Shankar Jaikishan Dev Anand
1964 Aayee Milan Ki Bela Tum Kamsin Ho, Nadaan Ho Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1965 Arzoo Aye Phoolon Ki Raani Baharoon Ki Malka Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1966 Suraj Chehere Pe Giri Zulfen Kehdo Tu Utha Do Main Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1968 Jhuk Gaya Aasman Kaun Hai Jo Sapnon Mein Aaya Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1961 Junglee Ehsaan Tera Hoga Mujh Par Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1962 Professor Aye Gul Badan Aye Gulbadan Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1964 Rajkumar Is Rang Badalti Duniya Mein Insaan Ki Niyaat Thik Nahin Hai Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1969 Tumse Accha Kaun Hai Janam Janam Ke Saath Nibhane Ko Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1966 Gaban Ehshan Mere Dil Pe Tuhmare Hain Dostoon, Yeh Dil Tuhmare Pyar Ka Shankar Jaikishan Sunil Dutt
1970 Bhai-Bhai Mere Mehbbob Tere Dam Se Bahar Aaye Shankar Jaikishan Sunil Dutt
1965 Gumnaam Ek Ladki Hai Jisne Jina Muskil Kar Diya Shankar Jaikishan Manoj Kumar
1964 Ziddi Teri Surat Se Nahin Milti Kisi Ki Surat S. D. Burman Joy Mukherjee
1966 Love In Tokyo Aaja Re Aa Jara Lehrake Aa Jara Shankar Jaikishan Joy Mukherjee
1964 April Fool Meri Mohabbat Paak Mohabbat Aur Jahan Ki Shankar Jaikishan Biswajeet
1972 Shararat Dil Ne Pyar Kiya Hai Ek Bewafa Se Ganesh Biswajeet
1968 Mere Huzoor Rukh Se Zara Naqab Utha Do Mere Huzoor Shankar Jaikishan Jeetendra
1969 Pyar Hi Pyar Main Kahin Kavi Na Ban Jaoon Shankar Jaikishan Dharmendra
1973 Naina Hum Ko Tu Jaan Se Pyaari Shankar Jaikishan Shashi  Kapoor

This is certainly not an exhaustive list. We will try to make good the misses in due course of time.

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music–August 2014–Part II

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Welcome to Part II of August, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We had broken down the present edition in the two parts to make the posts reasonably presentable.

In the first part of the article, we have has a d detailed look at arrange of sols under a range of music directors across the entire spectrum of Mohammad Rafi’s active career as well his duets with S D Burman.

We now move on…….

We take up one more post which looks at Mohammad Rafi’s solo songs, from the archives of Dusted off, for a detailed listing of the song..

Rafi in Ten Moods showcases the breathtaking versatility of this man and his voice in these ten songs.

Cynical: Yeh duniya agar mil bhi jaaye Pyaasa
Devotional: Man tarpat Hari darshan ko aaj Baiju Bawra
Exuberant: Duniya paagal hai ya phir main deewaana Shagird
Patriotic: Yeh desh hai veer jawaanon ka Naya Daur
Romantic: Deewaana hua baadal Kashmir ki Kali
Comic: Jangal mein mor naacha Madhumati
Melancholic: Dekhi zamaane ki yaari Kaagaz ke Phool
Seductive: Aaja re aa zara aa Love in Tokyo
Philosophical:  Man re tu kaahe na dheer dhare Chitralekha
Empathetic: Tukde hain mere dil ke Mere Sanam

Part I spurred Rafi in Ten Moods – Part II, which also needs to be tied up here:

Philosophical: Aaj puraani raahon se, Aadmi
Gloomy/Sad: Aye mere dost aye mere humdum, Meherbaan
Devotional: Insaaf ka mandir hai, Amar
Lovesick: Aanchal mein sajaa lena kaliyaan, Phir Wohi Dil Laya Hoon
Classical: Madhuban mein radhika naache re, Kohinoor
Heroic/Royal: Hoshiyaar! jaanewaale zara hoshiyaar, Raj Kumar
Praise/Taareef: Salaam aap ki meethi Boyfriend
Adoring: Yeh teri saadgi yeh tera baankpan, Shabnam
Patriotic: Jahaan daal daal par, Sikander-E-Azam
Romantic: Door reh kar na karo baat, Amaanat

We now again turn back to Mohammad Rafi in duets with female as well male singers in The Legends: Mohammed Rafi – Part 2. Each of the song is supplemented by a second choice as well, to which we have added choices by the readers.

With Lata Mangesgkar
Aansoo Husnlal Bhagatram Sun meri saajna re 1953
Maya Salil Chuadhary Tasveer teri dil mein 1961
Piya Milan Ki Aas S N Tripathi Tune Chhal Kiya
Dil Tera Diwana Shanker Jaikishn Mujhe kitna pyar hai tumse 1962
With Asha Bhosle
Banarasi Thug Iqbal Quereshi Aaj mausam ki masti 1962
Phir Wohi Dil Laya Hoon O P Nayyar Nazneen bada rangeen hai 1963
Chah Cha Cha Iqbal Quereshi Ek chameli ke mandve tale 1964
Kashmir Ki Kali O P Nayyar Deewana Hua Badal
Tu Hi Meri Zindagi Rono Mukherji Jidhar bhi main dekhun 1965
With Geeta Dutt
Aar Paar O P Nayyar Arre na na na na na na tauba tauba 1954
Mr. & Mrs. 55 O P Nayyar Udhar tum haseen ho 1955
Bade Sarkar O P Nayyar Jahan Jahan Khayal 1957
12 O’clock O P Nayyar Dekh idhar ae haseena 1958
With Noorjehan
Jugnu Feroz Nizami Yahan badla wafa ka 1947
With Shamshad Begum
Chandani Raat Naushad Chheen ke dil kyun pher li aankhen 1949
Kaise baje dil ka sitar
Sindbad The Sailor Chitragupt Adaa se jhoomte huye 1952
Sawan Hansraj Behl Bheega bheega pyar ka sama 1959
Rail Ka Dibba Ghulam Mohammad La de mohe balma aasmani 1953
Aag Ram Ganguly Solah baras ki bhayee umariya 1948
Wih Suraiya
Dastan Naushad Ta ra ri a ra ri 1950
Shama Parwana Ghulam Mohammad Beqarar sa koi 1954
With Suman Kalyanpur
Black Cat N Dutta Nashe Mein Hum 1959
Shagoon Khayyam Parbaton ke pedon par 1964
Jee Chahta Hai Kalyanji Anandji Ae jaan-e-tamanna
Bheegi Raat Roshan Aise ta no dekho 1965
Mohabbat Isko Kahete Hain Khayyam Thaheriye hosh mein
Brahmchari Shanker Jaikishan Aaj kal tere mere pyar ke charche 1968
With Sudha Malhotra
Detective Mukul Roy Aankhon pe bharosa mat kar 1958
With Lalita Deolkar
Saajan C Ramchandra Humko tumhara hi Aashara 1947
With Aarti Mukherjee
Boy Friend Shanker Jaikishan Aigo Aigo yeh kya ho gaya 1961
With Usha Khanna
Daku Mangal Sinh Usha Khanna Sone ke tere 1966
With Talat Mahmood
Sushila C Arjun Gham ki andheri raat mein  1966
With Kishore Kumar
Akalmand O P Nayyar Do Akalmand do fikarmand 1966
Chupke Chupke S D Burman Sa re ga ma 1975
With Manna Dey
Parvarish Dattaram Mama o mama 1958
Sachai Shanker Jaikishan Ae Dost Maine Duniya Part I 1969
Part II
Part III
With Mukesh
Do Jasoos Ravindra Jain Do jasoos kare mehsoos 1975
With Chitalkar
Sagai C Ramchandra Haseenon ki gaadi mein 1951
With S D Batish
Chand Ki Duniya S D Batish Hoke rocket pe sawaar 1959

We will also take a brief look at some more articles for the archives of several other blogs. Each of the article does merit a very detailed look in :

We do agree that what we have covered is hardly a drop from the ocean of facts, fictions and reviews written about Mohammed Rafi, during and after his lifetime.

That is the beauty of Rafi saga- after you have said everything you wanted to say, there is still so much left to say…….

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