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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music, February, 2019

Welcome to February, 2019 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

A Google Doodle created by Bangalore-based artist Muhammed Sajid on Madhubala’s 86the birthday tribute

MADHU BALA: The Bewitching Beauty of Bollywood – DP Rangan pays a rich tribute.

6 Iconic fashion statements we owe to Madhubala!’ looks back to some of the fashion trends that she made popular.

We also have post to remember Valentine’s Day – Ten of my favourite romantic serenades. It’s a list of romantic serenades, of people singing in praise of the person they’re in love with (or, as in the case of a couple of fraudulent characters in this list, pretending to be in love with).

For the Love of a Goddess – The article first takes through the narrative journey of a music documentary, Music for Goddess (by Amy Catlin-Jairazbhoy and Nazir Ali Jairazbhoy), which explores the sacred music, dance and rituals of devidasis and devidasas, women and men dedicated to the goddess Renuka/Yellamma. It then introduces the instrument, the chaundka—also called chaundke, which the followers of the Goddes use mainly in their dancing and singing. The chaundka sounds similar to the damru. Our cinema has used the chaundka in several songs. The article has listed some of these songs.

Suman Kalyanpur – Sweetness Personified – The name conjures memories of lilting sweet songs, solos and duets that have gained immortality and enriched our music heritage. Peeyush Sharma revisits some of her evergreen melodies, enjoyed and cherished by generations of music lovers. Of the two duets she could get to sing with Mohammad Rafi, Din ho ya raat hum rahein tere saath (Miss Bombay, 1957, Hans Raj Behl / Prem Dhawan)  is perhaps more known than Duniya Ye Kehati Hai.. Meri Kismat Mein Likhi Wo Jo Mere Peechhe Baithi Hai

In a tribute to Bharat Vyas in his centenary birth year, last month we had touched  Bharat Vyas – The Prolific Lyricist – I and Bharat Vyas – The Prolific Lyricist – II . In part III of the series, his songs from ‘70s has been covered.

Here’s to the Birth or Death Anniversaries of Three Classic Hindi Film Artists Who Certainly Should Not Have Died In Poverty – The article refers to Cuckoo, Meena Shorey and Rajkumari. [I have searched a song in which each one is associated in a duet with Mohammad Rafi. The songs are at the end of the present article.]

Shailendra Sharma @ Golden Era of Bollywood has posted following memorial tribute posts:

The flashback series has why you should watch Waqt (1965), because it’s a near-perfect summary of the “masala” film before the term was commonly used and why you should watch Mem Didi (1961) for the beautiful chemistry between three elderly character actors.

Waheeda Rehman 2.0 – The Grand Diva Of Hindi Cinema – Staying relevant is one of the most crucial elements of Hindi film industry and Waheeda Rehman is a living legend who has stayed relevant in every era since her debut in 1955 in Telugu and Tamil cinema.

Zameen Kha Gayi Aasman Kaise Kaise – Some Non-picturised Songs Of R D Burman – Part 1 and Part 2 – the songs that either recorded but not filmed at all or filmed, but subsequently removed.

February, 2019 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs takes up Talat Mahmood’s duets with Mubarak Begum and Madhubala Jhaveri, in continuation to  the previous articles . Some of the Talat Mahmood Duets receding from the memory and Talat Mahmood’s Duet Combinations with Rare Co-singers.

And, now the posts on other subjects:

Romancing the Pardesi is a varied collection of beautiful Pardesi songs of separation, longing, betrayal and hope.

What Time It Is? is a theme-based list that has songs mentioning the actual time in the opening line.

With Claps As Percussion – Songs With A Difference, which has several over-riding conditions, one of which it is that it should not be an O P Nayyar composition. Here is one song that comes up as result:

 Nacho Jhoom Jhoom Ke – Sarhad (1960) – Chitalkar – C Ramchandra – Majrooh Sultanpuri

By the Sea Shore remembers the songs from the films of 50s-60s and 70s, picturized on a seashore or a beach.

Reluctant Singer? Take a Boat Ride – Transformation happens to many people when they are on a boat that has left the shores some time ago. The songs listed herein are the ones that were sung by such “What, me sing?” folks when on the land. This is a celebration of people who themselves manage to move a sea vessel from one place to another.

Tujhe chaand ke ‘bahaane’ dekhun ki ‘chhat’ par aa ja goriye is a rich collection of songs in which an excuse to go to the terrace is linked up.

‘The Guide’ in English: The story of Dev Anand’s abortive attempt to storm Hollywood – Based on RK Narayan’s novel of the same name, the film was directed by Tad Danielewski. But reviewers thought it was ‘clumsy and artless’.

Mose Chhal Kiye Jaaye – Kya Se Kya Ho Gaya – Guide – The Twofold Stunner -The Writer / Director, Vijay Anand, wants his songs to take his story forward. He opts for two different songs…back to back and Burman da composes those two songs. Both songs have the same notes!!!! Whereas Lata Mangeshkar song is an accusation of the feeling of cheating, Mohammad Rafi’s song is a romantic plea for the sake of his love.

Songs of दास्तान- ए – हाल – ए -दिल weave anguish or agitation, and some time happiness, or sheer romance, when a person comes up to tell his / her heart-felt feelings.

We are bit late in documenting ‘Songs in the Snow: Ten of my favourites’. The songs should feature some amount of snow; it need not necessarily be all against a backdrop of snow. And the snow, even if it’s not real should at least not look patently fake.

In our tradition of ending our post with article on Mohammad Rafi or a topical song of his, I have picked up a few songs, each one of which basically has a link with the topics discussed in the present post.

Akhiyan Mail Ke Jara Baat Karo Ji – Pardes (1950) – with Lata Mangeshkar – Ghulam Mohammad – ShakeelBadayuni

Aao Chale Manwa More Door Chale Kahin Re – Amar Prem (1948) – with Rajkumari – Dutt Thakur – Mohan Mishra

Tumhein Chupke Se Dil Mein Liya – Ek Do teen (1953) – with Asha Bhosle – Vinod – Aziz Kashmiri

Chowpati Par Kal Jo Tujhse – Afsana (1951) – with Shmashad Begum – Husnlal Bhagatram – Chander Oberoi

Kehdo Kehdo Jahan Se Kehdo Ishq Par Jor Nahin – April Fool (1964) – with Suman Kalyanpur – Shanker Jaikishan – Hasrat Jaipuri

Auraton Ke Dibbe Mein Mard Aa Gaya – Mud Mud Ke Na Dekh (1962) – With Suman Kalyanpur – Hansraj Behl – Prem Dhawan

Tere Peechhe Phirte Phirte Ho Gaya Pura Sal – Mud Mud Ke Na Dekh (1962) – With Suman Kalyanpur – Hansraj Behl – Prem Dhawan

I earnestly solicit your inputs for further broad-basing our cache for the content for our carnival of blogs on the Golden Era of Hindi film music.

Disclaimer: This monthly series of posts is my best-effort-based compilation of posts on Hindi film songs that I normally visit regularly. As I record my sincere thanks to all the original creators of these posts, any other posts that I have nor covered herein shows my lack of awareness of existence of such posts and is by no means any disrespect to their work. The copyrights to the posts, images and video clips remain the properties of the original creators.

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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs: February, 2019

Talat Mahmood Duets with Mubarak Begum and Madhubala Jhaveri

In memory of Talat Mahmood’s birth anniversary (24 February, 1924), we have commenced a series of annual articles on Talat Mahmood’s Rare Duets. We commenced with an omnibus overview – Some of the Talat Mahmood Duets receding from the memory – in February, 2017. We had covered one duet per pairing partner and the music director in that article. Then, in February, 2018, we narrowed down to Talat Mahmood’s Duet Combinations with Rare Co-singers. In that article we had covered on Talat Mahmood’s duets with co-singers who can be considered as ‘rare’ combinations.

Now onward, we will further narrow down our focus to Talat Mahmood’s duets with individual co-singers. In the process, we would maintain that either the Talat Mahmood[1] – Co-singer combination is rare enough or the duet song is relatively less heard one. For the present we will take up Talat Mahood’s duets with Mubarak Begum and those with Madhubala jhaveri.

Talat Mahmood and Mubarak Begum

Mubarak Begum[2] may not be treated as much ‘front-ranking’ playback singer as Talat Mahmood was, but she has quite a few very well-known solos to her credit. She has some of the very well-known duets to her credit, too. A couple of Talat Mahmood – Mubarak Begum share the top billing of ‘best duets ever’ category. These ‘well-known’ duets can be treated to the rule that the combination of Talat Mahmood – Mubarak Begum remains a ‘rare’ combination.

We have (just) 6 duets and 1 triad from Hindi Film and one NFS   At a very first glance, it can be observed that these songs are spread over later part of Talat Mahmood’s mid-career to his end-of-the career years. Whether the Talat-Mubarak duets became hit or remained obscure, the common thread that runs through these songs is that even as none of the films had succeeded on the box office, these songs are the cherished gems for the most of Talat Mahmood or Mubarak Begum fans.

Ghir Ghir Aaye Badarwa Kare… Rang Bhare Ras Bhare Pyare – Dak Babu (1954) – Dhaniram – Prem Dhawan

Here we have a duet, in praise of the gathering clouds of monsoon, set to a semi-classical tune. No wonder that the song is so melodious.

Tera Bachpan Ek Kahani..Bhool Na Jana Balapana Ki Kahaani – Sangam (1954) – Ram Ganguly – S H Bihari

This is a beautifully crafted duet. Talat starts mukhada in a solo, continues with stanza in a solo, while reminiscing those lovely childhood moments, when Mubarak Begum joins him to carry forward those moments to the youth. For that portion of Mubarak Begum solo, the song runs on an altered rhythm, when Talat joins into a complete the stanza in duet. The style repeats in the next two stanza as well.

Aside Trivia:

This ‘Sangam’ is in the middle of the other two ‘Sanagam’s on each side – first one in 1941 and the later one in 1964.

Meri Bhi Dastaan Bhi Kya Dastaan Hai – Taatar Ka Chor (1955) – a triad with Asha Bhosle – Khayyam – Prem Dhawan

From the title, film appears to be based on some folklore of Tatarstan, a small kingdom on the banks of River Volga. The songs begins with recital of ‘shaers’ by Talat Mahmood and Asha Bhosle. Mubarak Begum, then, seamlessly picks up the mukda.

I listened to this song for the first time.

Asides Trivia:

This is the 3rd film after Khayyam adopted this pseudonym, first two being Footpath (1953) and Dhobi Doctor (1954).

Raat Kitni Hasen, Zindagi Maherbaan, Baat Kuchcha Nahin, Ban Gayee Dataan – Badal Aur Bijli (1956) – Bipin Babul – Anjum Jaipuri

Here is song that is so much poetic, so melodious, so soothing, set to a pleasing mid-eastern tune… and yet placed in an obscure “B’ grade movie, is destined to be consigned as a ‘forgotten gem’.

Chanda Ke Rang Liye, Taaro Ka Sang Liye…Sapno Ki DUniya Mein Aaj Aa – Harihar Bhakti (1556)  – K Datta – S P Kalla

The film is a typical mythology drama, however the song is a sheer beauty of romance. Interstingly, Mubarak Begum is so melodious that many listeners mistake her voice as that of Lata Mangeshkar.

Itne Qareeb Aake Bhii Kyaa Jaane Kis Liye Kuchh Ajnabii Se Aap Hain Kuchh Ajnabii Se Hum – Shagoon (1964) – Khayyam – Sahir Ludhyanvi

Theoretically, the song can be said to be belonging to the end of Talat Mahmood’s career, but Talat’s voice has not lost any of his vintage charm. Mubarak Begum also retains her melodious charm in the company of Talat Mahmood.

This is not only one of the most known of Talat-Mubark duets, it is undoubtedly regarded as one of the finest ever duets of Hindi Films.

Zara Keh Do Fizaaon Se Hamein Itna Satae Na.. Tumhi Keh Do Hawaon Se, Tumhaari Yaad Dilaye Na – Gogola (1966) – Roy Frank – Balkavi Bairagi

We again have a B grade movie, a not-much-known music director pair that has one of the most-remembered romantic duet

We will wrap-up Talat Mamood – Mubarak Begum duets with a NFS, which in fact is a Naat, a form folk-style Muslim prayer.

Hum Sunaate Hain Mohammad Mustafa Ki Dastaan

Talat Mahmood – Madhubala Jhaveri

Madhubala Jhaveri (19-1-1935 // 11-9-2013) active singing career in films is just 7 years from 1951 to 1958. She has sang 110 songs – 55 in Hindi, 27 in Marathi and 3 in Gujarati films. Obviously, Madhubal Jhaveri’s vocal skills have been tested in multiple ways in her songs across different languages. For example, here is a Gujarati poem which has been set to a quawalli-style format:

She was also very active on All India Radio as well. However, we do not have access to that wonderful treasure. For such a promising artist, her duets with Talat Mahmood are few in numbers and quite a few of them may be even less-heard-ones. But the paucity of numbers is more than made up by the pleasure of listening to these two unique voices in different moods.

Madhubala Jhaveri’s on-record debut is Rajput, a 1951 film, for which music was composed by Hansrah Behl.

Jao Jao Aa Gaya Bulawa Jang Ka – Rajput (1951) with Manna Dey – Hansraj Behl – Bharat Vyas

Madhubala Jhaveri was just16 when she recorded the songs for Rajput… but she has been able to passion for patriotism with the romantic emotions like a pro.

Tum Kaun Ho Rajkumari, Yeh Chanda Sa Mukhra Idhar To Karo – Rajput (1951) – Hansraj Behl – Bharat Vyas

This seems to be the song for a famous tradition in those days, wherein the bride-to-be would choose her groom in open contest. The song therefore blends a trace of authority that a young daughter of king would manifest during such an occasion.

Pyar Ki Rut Dorangi Saajana Man Mein Holi Ankh Mein Sawan – Apni Izzat (1952) –  Hansraj Behl – Asad Bhopali

The song is created to reflect the pensive mood of the couple deep in the emotions of mutual love. Entire song runs on very soft scale.

Dil Mera Tera Diwana.. Bas Itna Mera Fasana – Apni Izzat (1952) – Hansraj Behl – Pandit Phani

We now have a classic styled duet wherein both the players accept the mutual love.

Jabse Maine Dl Lagaya, Dil Kahin Lagata Nahin – Dost (1954) – Hansraj Behl – Asad Bhopali

The song is set to a Punjabi folk rhythm.

Ae Zamaane Bataa Do Dilo Ki Khata Hamko Barbaad Karke Tujhe Kya Mila – Dost (1954) – Hansraj Behl – Asaad Bhopali

The spectrum of moods of Talat Mahmood- Madhubal Jhaveri is now complete with a pure pathos duet.

Kehne Ko Bahot Kuchh Kehna Thaa Takraayi Nazar Sharma Hi Gaye….Diwali Ki Raat (1956) – Snehal Bhatkar – Madhukar Rajasthani

Madhubal Jhaveri and Talat Mahmood are deep in the playful romantic mood of the song.

Hafiz Khuda Tumhara Hamein Bhool Na Jaana – Naqabposh (1956) – Dhani Ram – Munir Arzoo Kazmi

The song would have been a mid-eastern setting, befitting the subject of the film. Madhubala Jhaveri now does justice to urdu diction.

As is obvious, we do not have any song today in Mohammad Rafi’s voice. So we will slightly deviate from our main theme and pick up a Rafi-Talat duet to end our present episode –

Kavita Naam Hai Gyaan Ka Ise Likhanewale Gyaani – Kavi (1954) – C. Ramchandra – Rajinder Krishna

Though set to a bhajan-style rhythm, the duet underscores a discourse wherein one protagonist claims superiority of legacy of the race to the artistic prowess of poetry, to which the other one systematically rebuts.

We will take up Talat Mahmood’s less –heard duets with some more co-singers next year…..

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

[1] Talat Mahmood – Documentary

[2]  A Films Division film on Mubarak Begum

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – September 2013

Welcome to September 2013 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

As usual, we commence our blog festival with posts on Anniversaries.

Asha Bhosle turns 80 this year. Dusted Off presented 10 different moods of Asha Bhosle in Asha in Ten Moods.

Songs of Yore continues with the series of S D Burman’s association with different playback singer in Asha Bhosle’s best songs by SD Burman.

And here are some of the other articles on Asha Bhosle, which I ‘searched’ while looking for some more of the celebration articles.

Zee News presents an interesting slideshow – Asha Bhosle`s songs through the decades,  taking you on a journey with her through her decades in Bollywood and more.

Madhu in her tripod.com bog posts has A Musical Journey With MadhuAsha Bhonsle Songs – S. D. Burman music

Bollywoodlyrics.com articles gives an overview – Asha Bhosle: Working with great music directors

And HarveyPam’s Mohan Ki Asha, and very rich comments thereto, is a great post on Madan Mohan’s Asha Bhosle songs.

Songs of Yore has paid a very unique tribute to Mukesh, on his anniversary on 27th August, through quite an impartial discussion on “why did SD Burman use him so sparingly” in Mukesh’s best songs by SD Burman . Shri Arunkumar Deshmuks reveals, in Comment #1, that Mukesh- S D Burman combination output was (just) 12 songs (only). Shri N Venkatraman, in Comment#19, fills up the two remaining songs.

Conversations Over Chai comes back to active role on the scene, through  My Favourites: Songs of Praise – “songs that did liken a woman to more than a poultry dish?”. It is also a celebration (though a bit belated) of the Second Anniversary of the blog

Vithalbhai Patel, who contributed several earthy songs in late 1970s, also passed away on 7th September. Here is list of his Hindi Films songs, as a token of our tribute to the departed soul. Biren Kothari, Pallete,  has paid an objectively passionate tribute to Vithalbhai Patel in the article (in Gujarati) ગીતકાર વિઠ્ઠલભાઈ પટેલની વિદાય: પ્યાર મેં સૌદા નહીં.

We have an unfortunate situation, where we are to pay homage to Madhubala Zaveri, on her taking up that long, fateful journey on 11-09-2013. Biren Kothari has penned  મધુબાલા ઝવેરીનો સ્વરવિલય and placed video clips of some of her songs.Madhubala Zaveri

We will also bring some more sites / posts on Madhubala Zaveri on this page:

YT Channel – MADHUBALA ZAVERI/JHAVERI

Madhu’s Tripod.com page – Talat Mehmood & Madhubala Zaveri Duets

Cineplot.com’s Madhubala Zaveri

And of course one son that always bring memories of Madhubala Zaveri, even if shae ay have a small portion in it is Boot Polish’s Thaher Jara O Janne Wale

We now change our tack – to Mohammad Rafi.com

Vijay Bavdekar digs the equation of S D Burman and Mohammad Rafi deeper in  Maestro SDBurman, Evergreen Dev Anand & All Time Great Rafi Sahab & Hidden Truths. Here are the high points – the lips movement and expressions given on face by Dev Anand, perfectly matches the Rafi’s throw of words / look back to the Golden Era of Hindi film music, you will find that other music directors kept Kishore away & preferred Rafi for Dev Anand / One interesting thing is that Rafi was Burmanda’s first choice for other Heros  / Look at the ”Trend setter-Singer ” equations,”Dilip-Rafi, Dev-Kishore and Raj-Mukesh”. Rafi sang most of the songs for Dilip Kumar, Rafi has an almost equal share with Kishore for Dev Anand and off course Mukesh sang major number of songs for Raj Kapoor, but Rafi also gave playback to Raj Kapoor for 31 songs.

Dances on the Footpath’ has presented A Song Performed By Carmen Miranda and Vasunthara Devi aka Vyjayanthimala’s Mother. The two songs, one Vasunthara performs is “ayyayyo-vasuntharadevi-mangammasabatham 1941” and the one by from which the song is inspired is “That Night In Rio (1941) – Carmen Miranda – “I, Yi, Yi, Yi, Yi (I Like You Very Much)“.

Dances On The  Footpath” also has designed a very rich YT channel  LifeIsaTrain‘s which has Classical Indian dancing feet / Noor Jehan / Kumari Kamala Lakshman and Recent uploads sub-chapters awaiting to be explored.

The discussions on S D Burman and Vyjayantimala , in this edition as well as in the last edition of Blog Festival spurred me to visit “100 Years Of Bollywood” – an excellent channel on YT an return with S.D Burman- The King Of Melody  and Vyjayanthimala – The First Female Superstar Of Bollywood  respectively.

I would also like to document the finds, Music Maestros Part-1 and Music Maestros Part-2.

My friend Samir Dholakia had forwarded a message form his friend about another YT channel: Portrait of Director –  This is a series directed by veteran film-maker Ramesh Sharma for Doordarshan and it captures the various aspects of film-making of master directors like Mrinal Sen, Ritwik Ghatak, Manmohan Desai, Shyam Benegal, Raj Kapoor and Bimal Roy.

We would, now onwards, share at least one of the clips from both these channels to bring them on same page here.

Now, we pay our first visit to Indian film posters from 1930[silent] to1970 [color]. We will take up DIL DE KAR DARD LIYA HAI MAINE SUNG BY JAGMOHAN… (Jagmohan Sursagar NFS)(1940)  and film “Fariyaad” (1942). The first one may be a repeat to many, but it is a treat worth repeating, every time. We take to full listening of Fariyaad (1942)’s these songs:

Aye Dil-e-Bequarar Bol – Shamim Kamal Pasha

Kahoji Ji Na Lage Bin Tere  – Ishwarlal , Shamim Kamal Pasha

I chose to pick up Fariyad (1942) here, because that immediately reminded me of Fariyad (1964) which had memorable Snehal Bhatkar songs:

Aap Ne Huzoor Mujse – Suman Kalyanpur , Mohammad Rafi –

Teri Nazar Ne To  Kafir Bana Diya – Mubarak Begum, Mohammad Rafi

Wo Dekho Dekh Raha Papiha –  Suman Kalyanpur, Mahendra Kapoor

Songs of Yore has presented Best songs of 1953: Wrap Up 2. Undoubtedly a very difficult job of doing a putting in ‘other’ female singers in the most relevant and respectful consideration in an otherwise Lata Mangeshkar dominated category. As we had decided last time, we will take a look at all the ‘wrap-up’s together, in more details – may be as a full-fledged separate post.

It is heartening to note that we are able to expand our catchment sources for information to be shared. However, there must be much more that remains to be explored and shared…….

I, indeed, await your valued suggestions and inputs.. …