Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – February, 2018

Welcome to February, 2018 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We have chosen the theme –Dorian Shainin of Jim L. Smith’s three part article – Dorian Shainin’s Influence on Quality Professionals – for our February, 2018 episode.

Before we go the Jim Smith’s article(s) in details, let us first know a little more about Dorian Shainin and his method(s).

Dorian Shainin was one of quality’s most accomplished contributors, died January 7, 2000 at the age of 85. Shainin had acquired nearly 60 years’ experience improving the professional approach to industrial problem solving.. Among the awards bestowed upon Shainin are ASQ’s Brumbaugh Award, the Edwards Medal, the Eugene L. Grant Award and the Shewhart Medal. In 2003, ASQ established a medal to recognize the development of statistical methods for solving quality problems in products or services. The medal was named for Dorian Shainin. The medal is presented at the annual ASQ World Conference on Quality and Improvement. More information on the Shainin Medal is available @ asq.org/about-asq/awards/shainin.html.

Shainin wrote more than 100 articles and was the author or co-author of several books, including Managing Manpower in the Industrial Environment; Tool Engineers Handbook; Quality Control Handbook; New Decision-Making Tools for Managers; Quality Control for Plastics Engineers; Manufacturing, Planning, and Estimating Handbook; and Statistics In Action.

ShaininR : The Red XR Company – Shainin’s most significant contribution was his discovery of the Red X model of systems variation. The prevailing wisdom held that variation causes could be discovered and controlled until the system reached a state of statistical equilibrium. At that point, the remaining causes were believed to be random and undiscovered. Any further improvement would require a redesign of the system. However, Shainin found that by talking to the parts, he could find variation causes within stable systems. He concluded that Juran’s Pareto principle must apply to the causes of system variation. No matter how many causes had already been identified and controlled, among the remaining causes there must be one that contributed more to the overall variation than any other  – The Red X. He called this cause-effect relationship the Big Red X. To support his system Shainin created more than 20 engineering and statistical tools that aided in the search for the Red X.  Shainin followed three principles for solving variation problems:

  • There is always a Red X.
  • The fastest route to identifying the Red X is a progressive search using a process of elimination.
  • Talk to the parts with tools that are both rigorous and statistically simple.

Background on Shainin based problem solving –  Jo Moore – Real-life quality problems, just like people, are simultaneously different and the same. It is impossible to get a tough problem solved by just applying a pre-defined ‘cook book recipe’. Recognizing the distinctive characteristics of a problem is critical since the devil can lie in the detail… Problem solving is very much a human activity and reasoning has a prominent role in it… Erroneous beliefs and faulty reasoning can doom problem solving to failure… Lack of structure is another hurdle that can complicate problem solving activities. The circumstances in which tough problems have to be analyzed and solved is often not clear from the start… An effective approach takes all these aspects into account!… Statistical engineers, following the discipline developed by Shainin, solve problems by finding “what is different?”

Cause-to-effect versus effect-to-cause

For those who would prefer a brief introduction, the video clip – Shainin based problem solving | Philips Innovation Services – is a good source.

An Overview of the Shainin System TM for Quality Improvement – Stefan H. Steiner and R. Jock MacKay – The goal of this article is to provide an overview of SS, a critical assessment, and a brief comparison with other industrial problem solving systems.

Shainin method: edge over other DOE techniquesA.K. Verma ; A. Srividya ; A.V. Mannikar ; V.A. Pankhawala ; K.J. Rathanraj –  Shainin methods refer to a collection of principles, which make up the framework of a continually evolving approach to quality. After the classical design of experiments (DOE) and Taguchi DOE, the third approach is Shainin DOE, which is a collection of simple, but powerful techniques invented or perfected by Dorian Shainin of the United States. In this paper, three cases of Taguchi experiments have been taken from literature and the above method has been tried to find out whether the authors have got the positive results from their experiment. If not, authors emphasize on the importance of giving the check in the start of the experiment (screening experiment) with minimum number experiments prior to the Taguchi approach.

Another Look at Dorian Shainin’s Variable Search Technique – Tirthankar Dasgupta, Nagesh Adiga, C. F. Jeff Wu – The article provides an in-depth analysis of Shanin;s variable search  (VS) method.

Quality 2020 – A study by AIAG conducted in conjunction with Deloitte entitled Quality 2020 Report  – This study illustrates the Automotive Industry’s View of the Current State of Quality and a Strategic Path Forward : “OEMs and Suppliers both identify Problem Solving is their #1 most critical issue.” 

Dorian Shainin’s Influence on Quality Professionals ǁ Part II ǁ Part III : Shainin, like Juran who popularized “the vital few and trivial many” (also known as the Pareto Principle), came to realize that quality defects had an unequal frequency in that only a relative few accounted for most of the defects. This led to what he called the Red X, which he theorized was the primary cause of process and product problems. Shainin stressed “talking to parts” which consisted of swapping pairs of parts of functional and non-functional parts until the culprit was discovered. With the Shainin method there was a certain degree of a theoretical step, but mainly it was to determine possible causes of a problem. This was accomplished by one or more techniques designed to determine root cause or the Red X.

Why haven’t we heard much of Shainin’s methods since the Six Sigma/lean operations rage has taken hold? That’s not easy to pinpoint. One reason may be that users who are aware of his philosophies aren’t willing to accept product that’s “good enough.”

What came to be known as the Shainin System (SS) was developed for problem-solving in medium to high volume processes where data are readily available, statistical methods are widely used, intervention in the process is difficult, and ‘conformance to specification thinking’ was expected.

A hidden benefit of SS just might be that it prevents a lot of impulsive, poorly designed experiments which are wasteful and expensive. One reason why certain problems are unsolved is because people often take ineffective approaches. Their approach is usually based on a set of assumptions, tools and techniques that are less effective for solving tough, chronic quality problems.

In the current environment, the tendency is to focus on the complexity and not simplicity, The Shainin System, however, focuses on simplicity. We may be statistically more sophisticated, but is that what we really seek? I think not. As Leonardo DaVinci said, “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”

We conclude our discussion with a video clip we have an interview by Dr. ReVelle , of Continuous Improvement TV, of the founder and principal of Shainin Consultants, Inc., Dorian Shainin, about “Statistical Engineering,” his simple but extremely effective full factorial design of experiments.:

Gaining World Class Quality with Statistical Engineering

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up Josh Steimle’s article Focus On Outputs, Outcomes And Obstacles@ the column Measuring Performance (People & Enterprise) @ Management Matters Network, which discusses on the effect(s) of focusing on outputs, outcomes and obstacles as an integral part of the performance management system.  .

We now watch one of the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

Utilizing 5S in Everyday LIFE; ASQ member Alexander Tucker is a Chemist at Capsugel. While quality is important on the job, he has been using the 5S tool in his home life. You won’t stop smiling as he humorously recounts the ways he has organized his bathroom, planned trips to the grocery store and even trained his dog to be a quality canine.

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems postings for January, 2018 are:

  • Thoughts Influence Your Future:  No matter what you truly believe, when we focus our thoughts, we unleash tremendous energy working to achieve what we think about. When we choose to respond in positive and productive ways, it is relatively easy to predict or influence a positive, productive future – a future that we can essentially predict on a day-to-day basis.
  • Self-Awareness: The first thing is to realize that all meaningful and lasting change starts on the inside and works its way out! Therefore, if you want to be different than the way you are now, you must work on changing your self-awareness. You can use positive affirmations and visualizations to help, and once your self-awareness changes, you don’t have to work so hard to behave differently and success will come easier.

I look forward to your inputs / criticisms/ observations to enhance the utility of our Quality Management Blog Carnival.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – January, 2018

Welcome to January, 2018 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We open account of 6th year of our Blog Carnival with the present January, 2018 episode with Law of Opposites.

The first ever reference would naturally be to the Newton’s Third Law: To every action there is always opposed an equal reaction; or, the mutual actions of two bodies upon each other are always equal, and directed to contrary parts.

In respect of the applied sciences, the Principle of Opposites finds a very respectable and important mention on the Carl Jung’s treatises of Analytical Psychology. Jung described the operation of psyche in terms of three principles. He states that in terms of The Principle of Opposites, the energy of the psyche comes from the contrast between two opposite thoughts or desires, and then in terms of The Principle of Equivalence If you acknowledge your opposite thought, the energy is used to help your psyche grow; if you deny it, the energy goes into a complex that develops around an archetype.. This is followed by The Principle of Entropy, which in effect states that in the case of the psyche, as we grow older, extreme differences, such as masculine and feminine, become less extreme and we better acknowledge or “transcend” the opposite tendencies in us leading to a more balanced and stable personality….Thus, according to this model, the goal of life is to transcend the opposites within one’s psyche and develop a balanced personality or self, in which every aspect, conscious and unconscious, personal and collective, is expressed and harmonized.

The Law of Opposites, in the simple terms, states that no sooner will you call something into your reality than its exact opposite will also appear-and always first.

Law of OppositesDr. Mahboob Khan :  “Conversations with God” states, “The moment you declare anything, everything unlike it will come into the space.” This is known as the law of opposites.

The law of opposites presents the perfect opportunity for us to take full responsibility for our choices. All too often we choose the smaller choice, the painful yet comfortable choice, instead of pushing back on our craving.

So what is this law of opposites and why does it appear to conflict with the law of attraction, you may ask?  The law of opposites is simply providing a contextual field for our true desires to be experienced. We cannot know the joy and the power of stepping into a new creation without the resistance that this law provides.  Life is meant to be experienced, and the only way to do so is for the opposite of our desires to be present to show us the way. The application of this knowledge is crucial in overcoming addiction, obsessions, and compulsions. Why? It requires that one put faith in something outside of themselves. We must first believe that what is working for others can work for us. Then we have to put trust in something that is unseen.  When we experience the reward of this blind faith, we begin to build upon it.

Appreciating The Law of Opposites To Manifest What You Want … Here are seven tips:

  1. Bless the experience and say thank you.
  2. Be open to uncover any subconscious beliefs and programs potentially contributing to what you are experiencing that are ready to be healed, released, and replaced.
  3. Listen to your inner wisdom and guidance for clarity and perspective. It is the Gift of Wisdom that helps us to discern the difference between being up against a wall or at the entrance to a doorway.
  4. Allow your curiosity and wonder to guide you to a more joyful experience. Unleash the power of your imagination to dream of possibilities and opportunities on the horizon.
  5. Put your attention on all the gifts and blessings in your life. Gratitude is a powerful attitude shifter that moves us from a state of constriction to expansion.
  6. Remind yourself that the Law of Opposites exists to light the way to your desires. Monitor your thoughts and judgments so that you see and feel the truth rather than react to the story and illusion you are creating in your mind.
  7. Use your spiritual practices to stay connected to your heart and The Divine. Choose to do things that bring you joy. Reach out to the people who love and celebrate you.

The Important Law of Opposites .. Don’t be scared of what you don’t want…instead use it as a tool to get crystal clear on what you do want and start taking inspired action toward it.

The Law of Opposites—How Backward Thinking Can Change Your Life : The Law of Opposites says that I can always make a bad situation better by inputting positive energy into it as opposed to negative.

After these articles that explore various soft aspects of the Law of Opposites, we get a direct reference to the world of business:

Law 9 of The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing : Law of opposite:

If you’re shooting for second place, your strategy is determined by the leader.

Leverage the leader’s strength into a weakness.

Don’t try to be better than the leader, try to be different. E.g. By offering ‘free’ voice and SMS bundled with 4G data, Reliance Jio threw out the pseudo-competition rule book the existing warlords of the mobile service arena in India.

Sounds correct although doesn’t apply to those who do have ambitions to overtake the leader (e.g. Excel killed Lotus 1-2-3 by being a better spreadsheet, not a different spreadsheet).

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up Maximizing Opportunity (Not Profits) Is The Name Of The Game @ the column The Drucker Perspective @ Management Matters Network, which provides a unique opportunity learn from business masterminds and become a more effective competitor.

We now watch one of the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

  • Quality and Technology talks about how quality and technology can be woven together. Author Sunil Kaushik has found ways to use virtual reality applications to enhance current processes. Bill Hathaway says agile process helps process design keep up with technological advances.

 + “Virtual Reality for Quality”, Sunil Kumar V. Kaushik, 2017

 + Full Interview with Bill Hathaway

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems postings for December, 2017 are:

  • Power To Achieve: Benjamin Franklin was the first to say, “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” Therefore, failure becomes the default option to success…Once we clearly commit to a specific target; our mind uses feedback, just like GPS, to keep us on track. This feedback, positive and negative, coming from our internal and external surroundings is used to adjust our behaviors and actions…It’s important to have a clear vision of your target. Once that’s done, set milestones to help you achieve your target, and assess your progress. Write your plan down so your path is well-defined but remain flexible
  • Self-fulfilling Prophecy: We cannot alter the situations because we have little control over what is happening; however, we can change how we react to it…The self-fulfilling prophecy, however, can be pointed in a different direction. Something as simple as a sincere greeting or a heartfelt smile can defuse tension – in you as well as in the receiver. It can also be very contagious!.. Be prepared for frustrations and challenges but meet them with a positive attitude.

I look forward to your inputs / criticisms/ observations to enhance the utility of our Quality Management Blog Carnival.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – December, 2017

Welcome to December, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

With our last issue for 2017, we will have opportunity to celebrate completing 5 years of the Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs. Howsoever retrospect I may, I will confine that analysis for myself so as to help chart the course this blog carnival chart in 2018. That leads to me search for Trends To Look for in 2018 and set it up as the topic for our December, 2017 issue.

5 Quality Management Trends To Watch Out For In 2018:

Trend #1: Quality is omnipresent

Trend # 2: Manage quality as project

Trend # 3: Quality as a strategic tool

Trend # 4: Sustainability and Quality management

Trend # 5: Quality Management is SMAC – Social Media, Mobility, Analytics & Cloud-ked

The Leading Quality Management Trends For 2018 also reflects a similar thought process:

  • Quality management will become universal
  • Quality management will be implemented as a project
  • Quality will be used as a strategic tool
  • Social media integration in quality initiatives
  • Internet of Things implementation in quality initiatives
  • Quality management and sustainability will be integrated
  • Cloud-based quality management system

We now broad-base our look:

Top 5 Trends For Marketers And Entrepreneurs In 2018

  1. We are in an experience economy. Antiquated rules of engagement no longer apply.
  2. In the age of experience, EVERYONE is a customer.
  3. We are in an era of purposeful business driven by collaboration, inclusion, and the notion of leaving the world a better place. Empathy is the NEW BLACK.
  4. Stop worrying about Artificial Intelligence. Start focusing on Augmented Intelligence – where man’s abilities will be enhanced by machine learning and cognitive technology.
  5. Don’t just be smart. Be emotionally intelligent – As Simon Sinek told us all this year, it is much more important today to focus on the why and who as opposed to the what.

Top 10 Manufacturing Trends For 2018 – According to a recent IQMS survey, to 92% of manufacturers say product quality defines their success in the eyes of their customers.  56% of manufacturers find their customers most frequently demand short notice production capabilities as a value-added service. 50% define their success by their ability to meet on-time deliveries consistently… Expect manufacturing trends for 2018 to focus on meeting and exceeding those challenges with the best product quality possible to drive the most efficient path to higher growth:

  1. 2018 is going to be a pivotal year in manufacturing software usability.
  2. Demand for manufacturing engineering, business analysts capable of xinterpreting operational data, and data scientists who are familiar with manufacturing will skyrocket.
  3. Despite the many fears that robotics will take jobs, in 2018 robots will be given repetitive, manual tasks freeing up engineering and production teams’ time for more cognitive, valuable tasks.
  4. Nascent technologies including collaborative robots, 3D printing, virtual reality and voice-activation assistants will be piloted next year with broad adoption by 2021.
  5. Industry 4.0 and smart factories will win more converts in 2018 driven by the need to improve product quality and enable more efficient strategies for attaining compliance.
  6. OEE and traditional metrics of manufacturing performance will go through a transformation due to real-time monitoring and predictive analytics.
  7. Reducing global supply chain risk through by more effective quality management strategies, compliance programs, and supplier collaboration will become a strategic priority.
  8. The Internet of Things (IoT) hype of having a sensor on literally everything on a shop floor will give away to unique use cases where millions of dollars of savings are attained and higher accuracy levels achieved.
  9. Manufacturing Intelligence will emerge as the system of record, providing a wealth of data to drive more efficient production operations.
  10. The combination of new on-premise, hosted and cloud-based manufacturing applications will make integration a critical success factor for manufacturing in 2018.

The Top Business Trends To Look Out For in 2018

  • The arrival of Augmented Intelligence – Augmented intelligence is, for many industries, a fundamental part of work. Instead of replacing productive workers, technology at this stage is being used to amplify performance.
  • Artificial Intelligence moves to the mainstream – Artificial intelligence has been democratized…..AI is still in its infancy so job loss for most people is negligible. And it’s likely to stay that way for at least the next decade. That’s good news for most people because it means they won’t be replaced, at least until…
  • Automation achieves dramatic growth – Automation, driven by AI and advanced hardware, is set to disrupt work as we know it. We’re automating traditional jobs out of existence on a daily basis.
  • The end of quality, the rise of the experience economy – Quality is a given. It’s not something you’re rewarded or recognized for. It’s expected, but its an afterthought. People want companies to provide a consistently wonderful experience from beginning to end. The good news is, if the experience and values are there, customers are willing to spend more.
  • The brick and mortar apocalypse-trends are accelerating as businesses struggle to adapt to the new paradigm(s).
  • Values over the bottom line – Shared values have always been important to customers. The expectation and demand for these values continue to grow. Customers expect you to understand what matters most to them. Then, they expect you to use that data to capture their attention and improve their wellbeing.
  • The frightful 5 monopoly – We’re addicted to the frightful five – Google, Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft. They’ve created an ecosystem that’s filled with your friends, family and favorites. They’ve created a business model around two specific ingredients – constrained relationships and dedicated relationships. Constrained relationships use pain to keep us connected. Regret avoidance, loss aversion and a desire for control keep us locked in. Dedicated relationships rely on shared values, benevolence, integrity and competence. The intangible details motivate us to stay. These frightful 5 have embedded them deeper into these cues.
  • Blockchain everything – In essences, blockchain is a different way to process transactions or records. Like a shared document that can be recorded and remembered several different ways. Blockchain is emerging in healthcare as well as financial tech. And no matter the fate of Bitcoin as a currency, blockchain will be here to stay. This is an excellent primer about how blockchain works and its underlying technology.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up the two-part article, Crafting & Executing Strategy: Part 1 and Part 2 @ the column The Drucker Perspective @ Management Matters Network.

For Peter F. Drucker, strategic thinking was not a mechanistic set of rules but a process of thinking through the organization’s purpose and objectives.  According to Drucker, executives in organizations of all kinds and sizes must start by systematically asking themselves three questions:

  • How do we make our present organization more effective?
  • How do we identify and realize the organization’s potential for growth?
  • How do we make our existing organization into a different organization for a different future?

Said Drucker: “Each of these questions requires a distinct approach… Each asks different questions… Each comes out with different conclusions… Yet they [are] inseparable…

The remainder of this two part article focuses on the question “what should our business be?”

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy section does not have anything of interest at present.

We now watch one of the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

  • Quality Gurus :  In this episode of ASQTV, we’ll look back at six thought leaders who changed the quality landscape.

“Guru Guide”, QP, 2010

  • Auditing Process-Based Quality Management Systems (Part 1 of 2) and (Part 2of 2) – Learn the basics of internal quality auditing and process auditing directly from Jack West and Charles Cianfrani, co-authors of How to Audit the Process-Based QMS, Second Edition. Part 1 covers the following topics:
  • What is an audit?
  • How to prepare for an audit
  • How to plan an audit

Part 2 focuses on how to conduct an audit and prepare an audit report.

  • Root Cause Analysis for Beginners (Part 1 of 2) and (Part 2 0f 2) – Jim Rooney, an ASQ Fellow and quality veteran with more than 30 years’ experience in numerous industries, walks through the basics of root cause analysis in this two-part webcast series.

From Quality Magazine, we pick up three articles that are more in alignment with the main topic of the present episode:

  • 2017: A Year of Transitions in ISO-related StandardsAaron Troschinetz – The most important thing is not to simply meet the requirements but to identify how and why the requirements work to make organizations better.
  • A Paradigm Shift to a Culture of QualityChuck Cimalore – Manufacturing professionals in quality assurance and process improvement are not new to understanding the importance of quality. However, do they know the difference to be made in creating a culture of quality with regards to driving the policies, practices, and processes needed to accomplish an organization’s work? Developing a culture of quality begins with embodying core values: guiding philosophies, behaviors, and attitudes that, when combined, contribute to day-to-day operations.
  • The Next Generation of Manufacturing ProfessionalsEdward McMenamin – Recruitment, diversity and outreach are key to filling the manufacturing jobs of the future.

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems posting for November, 2017 is Today. – Looking forward to next month, or even next year, what actions will you wishes you had already taken? Now, today, is your chance to change each of them from a future wish into the present reality…Today, the future is yours to write so be the author of your destiny.

It is on that note that we end 2017 and look forward to a more meaningful 2018.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – August, 2017

Welcome to August, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

Our topic for the August 2017 is Quality of Translations. The trigger for taking up this topic, in our present issue, for a brief overview, was an email from Mr. Ravi Kumar, the founder of Hindi Center  /Modlingua Learning Pvt. Ltd.. However, we will deal with that a little later.

First the basics:

Quality of translation : The term quality of translation is used to refer to the desirability of properties or characteristics of a translated text or content.

“In manufacturing quality is the concept of making products fit for a purpose and with fewest defects. Many different techniques and concepts have been tried to minimize defects in production, including Zero Defects, Six Sigma, and the House of Quality.”

Thus, in the translation process quality would be the concept of making the target text (the translated text) fit for a purpose and with the fewest errors (in terms of sense, grammar, orthography, style, omissions, etc.)

What is a “quality” translation? : The quality of translation has two constructs: In one sense, quality refers to whether the translation is acceptable. In another sense, there are different quality levels that could be needed for a given translation.

‘What is the quality of a translation?’ is the Lecture by Anthony Pym at the University of Vienna, April 13, 2015, as part of a course on academic Translation Studies.

And then a few pointers to the Quality of Translation:

10-Step Quality Assurance Process: All translation projects undergo a multi-layered process of checks and reviews in order to ensure the highest degree of quality. Presented here is a 10-Step Quality Assurance process that enables delivery of spot-on translations and the highest quality output.

10 crucial ways to ensure high quality translations has shared 10 blog posts that have given numerous tips and professional advice on how to implement and monitor processes to ensure you get high quality translations.

Ten Common Myths About Translation Quality that can actually do more harm than good.

Measuring Translation Quality: Constraints, Challenges and Solutions: Without clear goals and a repeatable, objective and accurate methodology, quality can be hard to measure, especially in the localization industry. From lack of knowledge to outside factors to subjective reviews, there are many reasons quality is hard to measure. In a webinar called “A Practical Approach to Measuring Translation Quality”, David Sommer discusses challenges with measuring quality and potential solutions.

That brings us to the core of e-mail message from Mr. Ravi Kumar:

Translation-quality standards: Like any supplier of goods or services, a translator potentially bears ethical and legal obligations toward his patron or employer. This has turned to be of enormous importance with the development of the language industry at global scale. For the protection of both parties, standards have been developed that seek to spell out their mutual duties.

In the e-mail referred to at the beginning of the article, Mr. Ravi Kumar informed me that Modlingua has recently released these videos on the subject of Translation-Quality standards:

Quality Standards and Translation:

Seven Quality Standards one must know:

As can be expected, these videos provide the strong ground work for following up the more structured approach the task of translations (services).

Moreover, Modlingua has also presented a project management perspective to the translation services:

Fundamentals of Project Management:

Project Management in Translation Business:

We can look forward to more such videos to be uploaded on language, translation and culture @ YT channel Modilingua.

Mr. Ravi Kumar, himself a language-translation entrepreneur, has presented The Translator as Entrepreneur: An Indian Perspective . –  This paper deals with Translators as entrepreneurs who are slowly getting aware of their profession and have begun coming to a common platform to share knowledge, experience and resources – a most desired step necessary for the better future of the profession. Further, this paper proposes “networking” as a possible solution to entrepreneurs who can economize their process and speed up their growth by using available resources and infrastructure without having to invest huge resources.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up two articles @ the column The Drucker Today @ Management Matters Network.

3 Questions Drucker Would Ask You And Your Management Team

  • What is our business? – The Mission
  • What will our business be? – The changing environment that we are certain about
  • What should our business be?” – The Vision

Dr. Robert Swaim also goes into more detail on the concepts discussed in this article in chapters 2 and 3 of his book The Strategic Drucker.

Notes From A Drucker Lecture: Six Questions Every Manager Must Ask To Empower Their Team

  1. The performance of your people.
  2. Taking responsibility for your relationship with others.
  3. Establishing and maintaining your relationship with others.
  4. Accountability for results.
  5. Relationship with your manager.
  6. Assignment control and staffing.

When you have completed this analysis, you may want to ask yourself one more question: When I leave this organization, what will be different because I was there?

From Ask The Experts, I have picked up a question that relates to how much (of process details / documentation) is enough so as not to jeopardize the ISO certification. The answer is demonstration of objective evidence for the process being implemented ‘under controlled condition’ (Clause 8.5.1 of ISO 9001:2015)

We do not have anything of note in the  ASQ CEO, Bill Troy at present. In the last issue we had proposed to take up the detailed view of Industry 4.0. I submit that we carry forward that proposal for the next month’s episode.

We now watch one of the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

  • Customer Journey Maps: Tool and Example – Lisa Custer, Firefly Consulting, discusses how to create a customer journey map, how it becomes more than a robust voice of the customer tool, and provides a real-world example of a customer journey map in action.

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of July, 2017:

  • The Role of Specification Limits – They are primarily for interactions with customers and management – Many people, from engineers to managers to quality professionals to technicians, possess limited understanding of product and process (manufacturing) limits. The third types of limits are: disposition limits… The specification limits are defines as – The general definition is limits within which a product would be expected to perform its stated and intended function for customer use. Specification limits, therefore, are related to product design. They should be set in the product design phase and effectively fixed for manufacture.. The specification limits may not play a direct role in process control limits within the manufacturing environment, but they do facilitate determination of useful product disposition limits. Additionally, they can even play a role in determining required sensitivity levels in setting process control limits.. Furthermore, specification limits are primarily for interactions with customers and management. Also, they are very useful in the calculation of Process Capability Index (Cpk) statistics.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Business Sutra |3.1| Ethical and Moral Dilemmas

Business Sutra |3| Business Ethics and Morals

In the first episode of the TV serial on CNBC 18, spread over three segments, Devdutt Pattanaik presented to us the most visible form of the business – the corporation : its meaning, its purpose and its action perspective.

In the second episode Devdutt Pattanaik discusses Leadership: Role of the leader, Context of the leader and Leadership in different business cycles.

The third episode relates to the ethical and moral dilemmas of the leader, and hence in turns that of the organization. The ethics and morality are the human concepts. Animals and plants belong to Prakriti or nature, where no one has choices. Everyone is fettered to their nature. Purusha or humans have the unique ability to make choices and hence reject what is ‘in their nature’ – the idea of dharma comes from this space, the core ethical and moral values of the human being. The concept is beautifully illustrated in the Ramayana and the Mahabharata. Dharma is a principle, not a rule, which is why in Ramayana rules are upheld and in Mahabharata rules are broken. Beneath the actions of Ram and Krishna is dharma – which may result in rule making or rule breaking, depending on the context.

Business Sutra |3.1| Ethical and Moral Dilemmas

Let us begin with first  things first and take a glance at what do values, ethics and morality mean- in the western management literature.

Bahaudin Mujtaba presents Understanding ethics and morality in business . He states that values are professed statements of one’s beliefs, ethics is delivering on one’s professed values and morals are actions of good conduct as judged by the society that enhance the welfare of human beings. ..With an understanding of values, ethics and morals while using ethical principles, a business owner or leader can form a framework for effective decision-making with formalized strategies. The willingness to add ethical principles to the decision-making structure indicates a desire to promote fairness, as well as prevent potential ethical problems from occurring.

Surbhi S has clearly presented the Difference Between Morals and Ethics . The word Morals is derived from a Greek word “Mos” which means custom. On the other hand, if we talk about Ethics, it is also derived from a Greek word “Ethikos” which means character. Put simply, morals are the customs established by group of individuals whereas ethics defines the character of an individual.

Basis for comparison Morals Ethics
Meaning Morals are the beliefs of the individual or group as to what is right or wrong. Ethics are the guiding principles which help the individual or group to decide what is good or bad.
What is it? General principles set by group Response to a specific situation
Root word Mos which means custom Ethikos which means character
Governed By Social and cultural norms Individual or Legal and Professional norms
Deals with Principles of right and wrong Right and wrong conduct
Applicability in Business No Yes
Consistency Morals may differ from society to society and culture to culture. Ethics are generally uniform.
Expression Morals are expressed in the form of general rules and statements. Ethics are abstract.
Freedom to think and choose No Yes

Business Ethics is a brief, structured, treatise on the subject.

Conventional Approach to Business Ethics  is a presentation prepared on the 7th Chapter – Business Ethics Fundamentals – from the book Business and Society. We get a quick-glance view of serval fundamentals of the subject.

12 Ethical Principles for Business Executives : Ethical values, when translated into active language, establishing standards or rules that describe the kind of behavior an ethical person should and should not engage in, are ethical principles. The following list of principles incorporates the characteristics and values that most people associate with ethical behavior. 

  • HONESTY – honest and truthful in all their dealings.
  • INTEGRITY – personal integrity and the courage of their convictions by doing what they think is right even when there is great pressure to do otherwise.
  • PROMISE-KEEPING & TRUSTWORTHINESS – worthy of trust.
  • LOYALTY – worthy of trust, demonstrate fidelity and loyalty to persons and institutions by friendship in adversity, support and devotion to duty.
  • FAIRNESS – fair and just in all dealings.
  • CONCERN FOR OTHERS – caring, compassionate, benevolent and kind.
  • RESPECT FOR OTHERS – respect for the human dignity, autonomy, privacy, rights, and interests of all those who have a stake in their decisions.
  • LAW ABIDING – abide by laws, rules and regulations relating to their business activities.
  • COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE – pursue excellence in performing their duties, are well informed and prepared, and constantly endeavor to increase their proficiency in all areas of responsibility.
  • LEADERSHIP – conscious of the responsibilities and opportunities of their position of leadership and seek to be positive ethical role models.
  • REPUTATION AND MORALE – protect and build the company’s good reputation and the morale of its employees.
  • ACCOUNTABILITY – acknowledge and accept personal accountability for the ethical quality of their decisions and omissions to themselves, their colleagues, their companies, and their communities.

The Seven-Step Path to Better Decisions : We make thousands of decisions daily.  Most do not justify extended forethought but when confronted by major decisions with no clear answers it can be easy to feel overwhelmed.  This seven-step guide to making good decisions is an excerpt from the book Making Ethical Decisions .

  • Stop and Think – One of the most important steps to better decisions is the oldest advice in the word: think ahead.
  • Clarify Goals – clarify your short- and long-term aims.
  • Determine Facts – You can’t make good decisions if you don’t know the facts.
  • Develop Options – make a list of options, a set of actions you can take to accomplish your goals.
  • Consider Consequences – Two techniques help reveal the potential consequences: “Pillar-ize” your options.  Filter your choices through each of the Six Pillars of Character: trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, fairness, caring and citizenship, and, “Identify the stakeholders” to determine how the decision is likely to affect them.
  • Choose – make your decision.
  • Monitor and Modify – re-assess the situation and make new decisions, if the outcomes do not follow the plan.

Having covered some details of the fundamentals of Ethics and Morals- as perceived by the West, we move on to what the present management literature has to state on the subject.

In a well presented article – How did Peter Drucker see Corporate Responsibility? –   in HBR, Frances Hesselbein notes that, according to Peter Drucker, “Leaders in every single institution and in every single sector … have two responsibilities. They are responsible and accountable for the performance of their institutions, and that requires them and their institutions to be concentrated, focused, limited. They are responsible also, however, for the community as a whole.”…Peter Drucker strived to make business leaders see the community as the responsibility of the corporation. He called on leaders to embody “the Spirit of Performance” by exhibiting high levels of integrity in their moral and ethical conduct; focusing on results; building on strengths; and leading beyond borders to meet the requirements of stakeholders, ultimately serving the common good.

In ‘What is Business Ethics?’, Peter Drucker  categorically states that the traditional Western moralist would probably treat Business Ethics as oxymoron. However, all the authorities of Western tradition are, however, in complete agreement on one point: There is only one ethics, one set of rules of morality, one code, that of individual behavior in which the same rules apply to everyone alike. They would accept the difference between what is ethically right or not would be grounded on social or cultural context. He then goes onto detail the evolution of term Business Ethics over 18th Century till now.

The individual ethical thinking and behavior in an organization has to be translated into the organizational level integrity.

Lynn S. Paine looks at the role of the organization in shaping the individual’s ethics in an HBR article, Managing for Organizational integrity.

We look at (only) some of the videos:

DuPont Sustainable Solutions  has compiled Workplace Ethics Scenarios that show, in the lighter style, the “wrong way” and the “right way” of handling 17 common ethics issues at the workplace.

Creating ethical cultures in business: Brooke Deterline at TEDxPresidio –

As Corporate Director for the Heroic Imagination Project (HIP), Brooke Deterline helps boards, executives, and teams at all levels develop the skills to act with courage and ingenuity in the face of challenging situations. This fosters leadership credibility and candor, builds trust, engagement and reduces risk.

Legal vs. Ethical Liability: A Crisis of Leadership and Culture | Mel Fugate | TEDxSMU

Professor Fugate argues that leaders at all levels and across industries need to focus on ethical liability above and beyond legal liabilities for themselves and their organizations. Ethical liability tests the true character of a leader and determines the character and quality of an organization’s culture. He illustrates this point in the context of higher education, where he contends a lack of accountability has led to a crisis of leadership and culture. Fugate uses scandals in college sports as common examples of a pervasive and larger problem of university leadership (at all levels) that fails to meet its ethical liabilities. He outlines a number of potential causes for the patterns of unethical behavior in higher education and also provides a few suggestions on how to overcome the challenges of this crisis.

We are now geared up to listen to what Devdutt Pattanaik has to say, in Segment 1 of the episode 3 – Dharma and Dharma Sankat.

Humans are the only creatures on earth that can choose to overturn the law of the jungle to outgrow the beasts within us. Firing this eternal struggle is our ability to imagine, imagine a better place.

But the problem with imagination is also that it amplifies our fears. I can think of the worst situations. I can imagine problems which do not exist. Even in times of abundance I can think of drought and go into a depression. So it is a tragedy of imagination, while I can imagine good things I can also imagine horrible things. It amplifies joy, it amplifies fear too. The most tragic and interesting thing about imagination is suddenly we ask ourselves and because you can imagine and because are aware we can die, we start asking the question what’s the point of it all. That is where everything starts. That is the home. That is the source of our solutions and our problems.

How is it connected to Dharma?

I can imagine not being afraid. If you look at all the gods, they have their hand sticking out and what they are saying is ‘do not be afraid’. This is the Fearlessness Pose (Abhaya Mudra). The fact is any deity, anyone, is holding the hand out. That is what a leader is supposed to do.

Just visualize a simple number chart. There is a positive axis and there is a negative axis. Now imagine the number zero as what is call in Sanskrit as Matsya Nyay, A Law of the Jungle. The big fish can eat the small fish in the sea.

This means I am allowed to be territorial. I can be dominating because I want to survive. That is an animal instinct. If I can outgrow this animal instinct of survival, then I start thinking about others. I empathize because I can imagine your fear, and because I can imagine your fear I can empathize with you. If I can walk towards empathy that is outgrowing the beast, But if I allow the fear to amplify my fear then in my fear I will say that I have to stay alive and I have to thrive and others don’t matter. Nobody else matters, but me. Then I start exploiting people. I will tame other people. I will dominate. I’ll become worse than an animal. Animals don’t exploit, humans do. Animals are not cruel, humans are. So exploitation comes or the empathy comes from the human imagination. Both these, the exploitation and empathy come from the same space of the human ability to imagine and be creative. So both are possible. If I move more towards positive scale, then this is Dharma. It is a work-in-progress.  It is not an endpoint, it’s not destination, it’s a process. If I move in the opposite direction, overwhelmed by fear, it is Adharma. The choice is ours and every choice has consequences, if not in this life, then in the next life.

What is the Dharma Sankat (Ethical or Moral Dilemma)?

Dharma Sankat is the ability to take this decision, What is life all about?  Every moment we have to take decisions. At a moment of time what do I decide? What decision do I take? Let me give you an example through a story.  Once upon a time there was an eagle. The eagle was chasing a dove and the dove came to a king and told the king: save me. The king said I will save you and the Eagle said what will I eat now. So the eagle ate another dove. That is cruel. King said do not eat dove, eat rat. So the Eagle said, that’s cruel why should a rat die to save the dove. Finally the king said because I say so. The Eagle then said you are foolish. How long can you feed me? Sooner or later you will die and I’ll have to eat the Dove. So you are just delaying its death. This is Dharma Sankat.

In nature nobody would have come to the rescue of the dove. Now the King thinks he is very noble in saving the Dove. King is imagining that by saving the dove I am being a nice man, but in effect he is cruel to the eagle. You decided that the eagle is bad, the dove needs saving. Now look what is happening – the Dove is calling the king a kind king and the eagle is calling the king a cruel King. Who is right?

What should the king do?

There is no prescription.

How do you fit this in a business or corporate context? What are the more common Dharma Sankat situations that business leaders face and how are they supposed to overcome them?

There is a recession. Company has to cut costs. I have two ways of cutting cost: reduce salaries of the top management or give pink slips to the bottom of the pyramid. Which way should I go?

The former sounds less cruel. But, to those people it is as cruel.

That would mean that the top management which is running your organization may leave and the company can collapse and the shareholders will withdraw money.

What do you do?

That IS Dharma Sankat. That is why you need a leader. If there was a prescription out there then why do you need a leader? You have to ask yourself – if I have to evolve, I have to ask myself: why do I take the decision? Where from comes a decision that I am taking? Am I taking a decision because I’m afraid? Am I doing it to protect myself? Am I doing to protect my self-image? Am I doing to protect my business, which is actually an extension of my self-image? Or, am I doing it for the good of the people? More often than not it is never for the good of the people.

We have, thus, seen that West and Hindu points of view broadly converge on the basics of Dharma – the Ethics and the Morality. They also do take cognizance of the reality that ethics or morality is not the absolute – they manifest in light of the then socio-economic-cultural milieu in which the human being lives.

When we look at the literature on the values that shape the ethics and morals, we do find a subtle difference in the approaches of the West and the East. For the present, that is beyond the scope of our discussion. However, both ideologies do converge and agree that it is the value system that drives the (ethical and moral) behavior.

In our next session, we will take up the logical extension of the topic – Relationship between the owner and the organization – in the second segment of the Third Episode of Devdutt Pattanaik’s TV serial Business Sutra

Note: The images used in this post are the irrevocable property of their respective creator. They have been taken up courtesy the internet, so as to illustrate the point under discussion.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – June, 2017

Welcome to June, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We will commence our episode with a lighter perspective of Quality.

I have picked up a few recent articles from CQI|IRCA:

Fish Fraud: How the Marine Stewardship Council tackles unregulated fishing – In the early 1990s the impact of overfishing on the marine environment and on seafood supplies was reaching a critical point. This year the Marine Stewardship Council is celebrating its 20th anniversary and the picture is looking far healthier. In an extract from June’s Quality World magazine, Dina Patel speaks to supply chain standards director Michael Platt and manager Jaco Barendse to discover how they are leading the sustainable seafood movement.

The cost of rework: Finding the key to improving productivity in construction – Seán Connolly, the quality leader at Expanded, a Laing O’Rourke company, asks whether reducing rework is the key to improving productivity in construction.

Getting value from your supply chain – Bob Hughes, CQP FCQI, explains why an organisation’s products and services are only as good as its supply chain.

Brexit: Quality challenges facing new supply chains – Adeyemi Shodipo, director at training and consultancy company Charis Management Systems, explains why the quality profession will play a crucial role post-Brexit now that companies may have to engage more with three new trading blocs: ‘The First World’, the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) and the developing world.

When we talk of the challenges of productivity, innovation and competitiveness there is one profession that sits squarely at the centre of this – quality.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up the article The Lesson We Can All Learn From the Way Drucker Questioned Clients from William Cohen, Ph.D.’s column Lessons from Drucker @ Management Matters Network. Drucker asked not only his Famous Five Questions[i] and they may not be the most important questions he used as he analyzed an organization’s situation and needs. As a teaching technique he did not ask many questions to encourage intellectual interaction or get students to reason to a predetermined logical conclusion. These were the question meant to demonstrate just how elusive definitive answers were, even if the author of these principles was Drucker himself….When Drucker consulted for companies, he didn’t ask questions to demonstrate the problems with the solutions. Instead, he asked questions to enable the client, or group of clients, to reach an optimum answer for their business…..These questions came, as he himself stated, not out of his knowledge or experience, but out of his ignorance of the industry, the company, or other facts or factors that consultants sometimes collect…The lesson to be learnt is that you can find good answers, not only by listening to Drucker (or any expert for that matter), but by asking questions and listening to yourself.

From Ask The Experts, I have picked up a question from the archives – Audit by exception. The question seeks to know whether this technique, deployed mainly in financial audits, can be done in a manner compliant of management system standards. The response to the question states that “A robust internal audit report will identify non-conformances, but will equally focus on areas that can be improved or that have improved. …One of the ways to accomplish this, is to share audit results that report on findings, OFI and the status of objectives or targets that have been established. Auditing by exception, usually will not provide this level of reporting.”

In our ASQ CEO, Bill Troy column this time there appears to be now new post. So we pass on to our next regular column.

We now watch the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of May, 2017:

  • Expanding the Quality Professional’s RoleQuality professionals should be in the culture change business : One of the foundational truisms is that management must lead any culture change if it is to be successful. Quality professionals can expedite this by showing leadership the potential power of a statistically minded organization based on a few basic principles-
  • Maintain a bottom-line focus. Quality professionals must move beyond “show me the data” to “show me the money.” The principle of all project management should be bottom-line impact.
  • Focus on the vital few tools integrated with a problem solving framework that is sequenced and linked together. The key is to confine the set to the vital few (of the hundreds available) and make sure each tool generates outputs that become targets for the next tool in the sequence.
  • Employ top talent to lead the effort. The organization will judge the effort as crucial if it has been staffed with top talent.
  • Create a supporting infrastructure, which typically should consist of a project selection process, formal training program, project tracking and monitoring systems, an audit process for closed projects, a communications plan, and an employee reward and recognition plan.
  • Provide focused training. Resistance can often be overcome by combining training with live projects as many companies do already.
  • Focus early on “quick wins.” People like to succeed. When they see early tangible results, they are eager to repeat the process.
  • Plan for longer term improvement. We should be reminded that maintaining momentum comes from the effect that achievement of significant, measureable benefits has on the outcome.
  • Clarity is Key: A line in Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland popularly states that, “If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will get you there.” Hence, create your vision of what you truly want to accomplish. You must get completely clear about what you do want to have happen. Only then you’ll discover that you are indeed able to make it happen. Think about it, and you’ll realize that you are extremely well equipped and intended for achievement.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

[i]

Nothing Changes: Drucker’s questions are eternal | Jorge Sá | TEDxGrandRapids

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – April, 2017

Welcome to April, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We will commence our episode with three articles on Quality, in general.

The Quest for Quality in the Modern EnterpriseMichael Heaps and Kathie Poindexter – The holy grail of quality is 360-degree visibility, measurable, real-time performance and the ability to go far beyond compliance into the realm of true, value adding and sustained improvement initiatives.

The other article – 4 Quality Management System Trends to Watch Out For In 2016  –  in fact, relates to QMS trends in 2016. However following takeaways seem relevant even for 2017:

  • Long and complex supply chains, along with an ever-changing regulatory landscape, present big compliance challenges.
  • The cloud has moved into mainstream business adoption as the value of subscription-based models and minimal on-premises infrastructure become clearly understood.
  • Business leaders are finally getting to grips with data analytics, and quality managers should be prepared to respond to this with meaningful uses of big data in their field.
  • The Internet of Things can play a transformational role in eliminating the human errors that can creep in with suboptimal systems and processes.

Jenny Brown in Top 7 Organizational Trends in Quality Management takes a quick look at the key trends that are offering the much needed competitive edge to organizations and impacting all quality initiatives to make them gain further momentum in future:

  1. Supplier-Specific Quality Standards of the Highest Levels
  2. Change Management for Higher Consistency in Work Processes
  3. Consistent and Continuous Evolutions in Quality Management
  4. ‘Six Sigma’ for Continuous Business Growth
  5. Quality Departments are Opting for Strategic Quality Planning by integrating many quality-related initiatives such as Lean, Kaizen, ISO registration, Six Sigma, and others in their strategy planning processes.
  6. Value to Supply—Quality Management is everywhere
  7. Social Equity and Environmental Sustainability

Quality management is being positively impacted by many latest organizational trends and is well set to dominate the future economy too. It’s expected that all industry sectors will be governed by this combination of project management and quality principles in the years to come.

We add one more column to our regular columns on our Blog Carnival for the current month. This is from Drucker Perspective column @ Management Matters Network. For the present we have –

Are You Asking the Right Questions? The most serious mistakes are not the result of wrong answers. The truly dangerous thing is asking the wrong questions….A wrong answer to the right question can, as a rule, be repaired and salvaged….But if you ask the wrong question and get the right answer, chances are it will take a lot longer to discover and it inevitably leads to even more costly errors.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

I have picked up the question with regard to clauses 8.4.1 and particularly 8.4.2 of ISO 9001:2015, should the other internal entities of the company (.i.e HR, IT, Sales …) absolutely necessary but outside of the perimeter be considered exactly like external providers. The answer being in affirmative, adds three comments: One, being captive, not all controls that would be applied to an outside body would be applicable. Two, use process approach (clause 4.4) to determine how these departments interact and interface with core QMS processes. And, three, exploit the concept of context of the organization (clause 4.1) to further explore these relationships.

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy has presented the Guest Post: How to Choose Continuous Improvement Software by Chris Moustakas, President & CEO of DevonWay. The best-performing organizations choose Continuous Improvement (CI) as the framework for achieving that agility of dealing with a barrage of regulatory hurdles, performance gaps, and inefficiencies, and have to move quickly to stay competitive. Most of the software models available in the market have their own challenges. ERP and QMS and BPM system software models do have elements what good CI software ought to incorporate, but it needs to be remembered that Continuous Improvement happens when you apply Quality principles to Operational needs.

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episode:

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of March, 2017:

Defining Variability – Special cause variation generally comes as a surprise to the systemIn the early 1920s, Dr. Walter A. Shewhart of Western Electric Company developed a theory that there are two components to variation: an inherent component from random variation he called chance-cause variation and an intermittent variation due to special cause which he referred to as assignable cause variation…..Dr. Shewhart’s improvement approach was that assignable causes could be removed with an effective diagnostic program. At the same time, he became convinced that random (chance-cause) variation could not be removed without making basic process or product changes….It is important, therefore, to understand the implications of the two alternatives before making a decision as to actions, or inactions, to be taken….‘Special cause variation generally comes as a surprise because it acts as a signal to the system that something’s gone astray.’

Whilst on the subject, it would be interesting to learn what Dr. Edward Deming has to say on the subject of variability –

Lynda M. Finn in the third of a 4-part series on Deming’s system of management, SoPK has listed 6 common mistakes that businesses make – and why they make them

Mistake #1: Failure to plot data over time

Mistake #2: Neglecting to normalize

Mistake #3: Neglecting to stratify

Mistake #4: Treating a continuous metric as discrete

Mistake #5: Not identifying key metrics

Mistake #6: Acting inappropriately in the face of common cause variation

For other three parts of the series, read:

Part I: Systems Thinking and the Three Musketeers

Part II: The Trouble with Motivation

Part IV: How Do We Know What We Know?

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.