Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – June, 2017

Welcome to June, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We will commence our episode with a lighter perspective of Quality.

I have picked up a few recent articles from CQI|IRCA:

Fish Fraud: How the Marine Stewardship Council tackles unregulated fishing – In the early 1990s the impact of overfishing on the marine environment and on seafood supplies was reaching a critical point. This year the Marine Stewardship Council is celebrating its 20th anniversary and the picture is looking far healthier. In an extract from June’s Quality World magazine, Dina Patel speaks to supply chain standards director Michael Platt and manager Jaco Barendse to discover how they are leading the sustainable seafood movement.

The cost of rework: Finding the key to improving productivity in construction – Seán Connolly, the quality leader at Expanded, a Laing O’Rourke company, asks whether reducing rework is the key to improving productivity in construction.

Getting value from your supply chain – Bob Hughes, CQP FCQI, explains why an organisation’s products and services are only as good as its supply chain.

Brexit: Quality challenges facing new supply chains – Adeyemi Shodipo, director at training and consultancy company Charis Management Systems, explains why the quality profession will play a crucial role post-Brexit now that companies may have to engage more with three new trading blocs: ‘The First World’, the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) and the developing world.

When we talk of the challenges of productivity, innovation and competitiveness there is one profession that sits squarely at the centre of this – quality.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up the article The Lesson We Can All Learn From the Way Drucker Questioned Clients from William Cohen, Ph.D.’s column Lessons from Drucker @ Management Matters Network. Drucker asked not only his Famous Five Questions[i] and they may not be the most important questions he used as he analyzed an organization’s situation and needs. As a teaching technique he did not ask many questions to encourage intellectual interaction or get students to reason to a predetermined logical conclusion. These were the question meant to demonstrate just how elusive definitive answers were, even if the author of these principles was Drucker himself….When Drucker consulted for companies, he didn’t ask questions to demonstrate the problems with the solutions. Instead, he asked questions to enable the client, or group of clients, to reach an optimum answer for their business…..These questions came, as he himself stated, not out of his knowledge or experience, but out of his ignorance of the industry, the company, or other facts or factors that consultants sometimes collect…The lesson to be learnt is that you can find good answers, not only by listening to Drucker (or any expert for that matter), but by asking questions and listening to yourself.

From Ask The Experts, I have picked up a question from the archives – Audit by exception. The question seeks to know whether this technique, deployed mainly in financial audits, can be done in a manner compliant of management system standards. The response to the question states that “A robust internal audit report will identify non-conformances, but will equally focus on areas that can be improved or that have improved. …One of the ways to accomplish this, is to share audit results that report on findings, OFI and the status of objectives or targets that have been established. Auditing by exception, usually will not provide this level of reporting.”

In our ASQ CEO, Bill Troy column this time there appears to be now new post. So we pass on to our next regular column.

We now watch the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of May, 2017:

  • Expanding the Quality Professional’s RoleQuality professionals should be in the culture change business : One of the foundational truisms is that management must lead any culture change if it is to be successful. Quality professionals can expedite this by showing leadership the potential power of a statistically minded organization based on a few basic principles-
  • Maintain a bottom-line focus. Quality professionals must move beyond “show me the data” to “show me the money.” The principle of all project management should be bottom-line impact.
  • Focus on the vital few tools integrated with a problem solving framework that is sequenced and linked together. The key is to confine the set to the vital few (of the hundreds available) and make sure each tool generates outputs that become targets for the next tool in the sequence.
  • Employ top talent to lead the effort. The organization will judge the effort as crucial if it has been staffed with top talent.
  • Create a supporting infrastructure, which typically should consist of a project selection process, formal training program, project tracking and monitoring systems, an audit process for closed projects, a communications plan, and an employee reward and recognition plan.
  • Provide focused training. Resistance can often be overcome by combining training with live projects as many companies do already.
  • Focus early on “quick wins.” People like to succeed. When they see early tangible results, they are eager to repeat the process.
  • Plan for longer term improvement. We should be reminded that maintaining momentum comes from the effect that achievement of significant, measureable benefits has on the outcome.
  • Clarity is Key: A line in Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland popularly states that, “If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will get you there.” Hence, create your vision of what you truly want to accomplish. You must get completely clear about what you do want to have happen. Only then you’ll discover that you are indeed able to make it happen. Think about it, and you’ll realize that you are extremely well equipped and intended for achievement.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

[i]

Nothing Changes: Drucker’s questions are eternal | Jorge Sá | TEDxGrandRapids

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – May 2017

Welcome to May, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We will commence our episode with a very different perspective of Quality.

Zen and the Art of Quality – By Brad Stulberg – On 24th April, 2017, Robert M. Pirsig, author of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance and Lila died at his home in South Berwick, Maine. He was 88. Though he wrote only those two books, each will be remembered as classics of modern philosophy. For the uninitiated, the main thread underlying both books is something called Quality, a word Pirsig capitalized to indicate that it represents a unique type of event. It’s when a subject and object (or actor and act) become so intertwined that they are hard to separate; they become one. Out of that relationship, wrote Pirsig, emerges a special kind of Quality….. “To live for some future goal is shallow,” he writes in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. “It’s the sides of the mountain that sustain life, not the top … The only Zen you find on the top of the mountains is the Zen you bring up there.”

Robert Pirsig : Photo – William Morrow-HarperCollins

As can be expected, different obituaries have some or other additional input on Robert Pirsig. We have picked up two from these:

Robert Pirsig has looked at Quality not from the traditional view of the word Quality. The following discussions will open us the world of his interpretation of Quality.

Metaphysics of Quality (MoQ) is a theory of reality introduced in Robert Pirsig’s philosophical novel, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974) and expanded in Lila: An Inquiry into Morals (1991). The MOQ incorporates facets of East Asian philosophy, pragmatism, the work of F. S. C. Northrop, and indigenous American philosophy. Pirsig argues that the MOQ is a better lens through which to view reality than the traditional Dvaita/dualistic subjective/objective mindset found in the West and originated in the East. The book talks about the Indian concept of Tat Tvam Asi as opposed to Dvaita.

Robert Pirsig’s Metaphysics of Quality has a rich repertoire of resources on this subject. MOQ.org exists to provide a forum for discussion and study of the Metaphysics of Quality as proposed by Robert M Pirsig in his books.

An overview of the Metaphysics of Quality provides good basic information on the Here are some video clips on the subject.

What is the Metaphysics of Quality?

Robert M Pirsig NPR Interview July 12, 1974 is an excellent interview

YT has several more interesting video clips on the subject.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up the article Abandonment, Concentration & Pareto’s Law: A Tested Way to Achieve Quantum Leaps in Individual and Organizational Productivity from Drucker Perspective column @ Management Matters Network.

“Concentration is the key to economic results… Economic results require managers concentrate their efforts on the smallest number of products, product lines, services, customers, markets, distributive channels, end-uses, and so on, that will produce the largest amount of revenue.” — Peter F. Drucker

Drucker, Zipf, and Juran observed that aggregate data misinform, misdirect, mislead…Every manager, to be effective, must assume an imbalance exists with respect to resource allocation—and must work hard to incrementally change the ratio…The relationship between efforts and results are generally in a state of imbalance. The imbalance may be 65/35, 70/30, 75/25, 80/20 or 99/1, or any set of numbers in between. ..The key is to alter the ratio between effort and results.

From Ask The Experts, I have picked up a question – Defining Qualification, Verification, and Validation – which many of quality professional would be interested in revisiting. The answer has laid out the classic definitions from ISO 9000 and explained the terms from different angles as well.

There is no update in our ASQ CEO, Bill Troy column this time. So I went to the beginning of the A View from the Q and find a post:  The Century of Quality – That in other word would mean: “What would it take for the 21st Century to be the Century of Quality?” This is a challenge for the quality community. We need to reach executives and convince them to provide visible leadership on the topic of quality. What language do we use (to communicate with others in this regards)? Jennifer Stepniowski provides great advice— keep it simple and relevant….Let’s pay special attention to executives who get it and work to make sure their voices are heard!

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episode:

  • Ralph de la Vega, Vice Chairman at AT&T, announces today as the Golden Age of Quality; a time when companies need to build quality into the product and service and detect problems before they occur.
  • SR and Quality: A Perfect FitWilly Vandenbrande, founder and president, QS Consult, tells quality professionals they are in a perfect position to take on their organizations’ SR initiatives and that SR fits well into the future of quality.
  • Lean, Change, and Invaluable People – Scott McAllister, Vice President of Growth, Prosci, describes research detailing the direct correlation between change management effectiveness and business results improvement. The research also shows sponsorship to be the most important factor. McAllister shares a method to get the most out of sponsors.
  • Root Cause Analysis – Learn about a new approach to Five Whys and Root Cause Analysis and get a refresher on the “Is/Is Not” analysis — plus, the case for asking “Why not?”

“Square in the Crosshairs”, Matthew Barsalou, QP, 2017

  • Asking “Why Not?” – The five whys method is a way of drilling down to the root of a problem. Consider adding the question “why not?”

“Five Whys and a Why Not”, Alan Fogle and Edward Kandler, QP, 2017

  • Is/Is Not Comparative Analysis Tool – An “is/is not” comparative analysis can be a good tool for figuring out the root cause-or, what the problem is or is not about. This tool is useful when you need to: Understand plausible problem causes amid many possible causes Identify issues that are not related to the problem.

“Get to the Root of it”, David M. Rucker, QP, 2010

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of April, 2017:

  • Human Side of Six Sigma : The tools are nice, but they are less important than the team process – No matter how elegant a quality tool is it is impossible to implement solutions without giving consideration to the human factor. For Six Sigma, this means focusing efforts on employee involvement far beyond the color of someone’s belt.
  • You Become What You Think – The focus of your thinking becomes important when you realize the following formula RT = E + B. Your thoughts create results, which stem from your emotions, from which your behavior is created. It is actually your behavior that produces results whether it’s good or not so good…Mike Dooley, entrepreneur and best-selling author, says “Choose Them wisely: Thoughts Become Things.”

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – January 2017

Welcome to January, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

I plan to revert back to our original model of reviewing the articles/ blog posts on the current topics related to quality and /or quality management from our present episode of the Quality Blog Carnival..

A Look at Quality’s Past – When we look back at some of Quality’s anniversaries, we can’t say what 2017 will bring to the quality community, but we do know that the quality community will continue to bring a lot to the world.

Increasingly, quality is no more considered as an essential but not so directly contributing the business activity. We have a few articles that discuss this changing perception.

Quantifying the Financial Benefits of Quality – Holly Lyke-Ho-Gland

  • Part One—How You Use Quality Matters– Once organizations get clarity on the financial impact of quality, the next step is to understand what practices and applications help improve the financial value.
  • Part Two – Quantifying the Financial Benefits of Quality — the Role of Governance and Transparency – Governance determines how the organization “operationalizes” the policy established through the design, implementation, and continuous improvement of the enterprise quality system itself….Though previous research indicates that successful quality programs rely on support and guidance by senior leadership, organizations that use a centralized committee, comprised of leaders in multiple functions, see greater financial gains. This makes sense given that a cross-functional team provides a broader perspective, strengthens buy-in, and fosters adoption of quality, its benefits, and standards throughout the organization.
  • Part Three – Bringing Suppliers into the FoldBest-in-class quality organizations use training with their suppliers to drive quality and are twice as likely to train suppliers. Supplier training ensures that all critical parties in the value chain understand the organization’s standard of quality—around quality measures and efficacy and what it wants to achieve with its product offerings.
  • Part Four – Employee training and incentives – Best-in-class organizations use training to drive a commitment to quality and help employees understand their role in quality — including their impact on the end customer and driving value.  However, organizations need to consider the purpose of their quality efforts before making decisions on incentives, the types of training, and even which employees to target for training.

Dr. Armand Feigenbaum on-

  • Managing for Quality – You have to understand that quality problems, like bananas, come in bunches. And if you try to go at them a banana at a time rather than at the stalk, you’re going to wind up with a lot of sour fruit.
  • the Cost of Quality and the Hidden Factory – By cost of quality I mean two things: the cost of getting it right and the cost of failing to get it right.

Results driven improvement process, which has the following characteristics:

  1. Organizations only introduce management and process innovations if necessary;
  2. Empirical tests show what works and what not;
  3. Frequent successes create new energy for improvement;
  4. Management creates a continuous learning process by applying lessons learnt in new phases.

Quality & Excellence: The Quality 136— Tom Peters presents Random Thoughts on Quality, Emphasizing the Elements That Are Often Missing in Conventional Quality Programs.

Quality management: caught in the tensions between quality, costs and timeWillfried Heist, Vice President Quality, Product Safety and HSE Management, T/QM, Knorr-Bremse SfN GmbH – Due to the increasing technical complexity of products an increasing number of companies from other sectors are becoming partners in our supply chain. This is confronting the quality manager of today with completely new challenges: how can new companies be optimally integrated into the supply chain? What will it require to guarantee our quality standards along the global supply chain all the way through to the n-tier companies?

Risk: A four letter word for quality management?  by Bryce Day, CEO of Catch and the driving force behind the development of the highly successful QA management tool Enterprise Tester – To me as a manager, quality is a reflection on how much risk I’m prepared to take. For example, I would want to buy a high quality car because my risk appetite for a car breaking down is low, but I’m willing to purchase a low quality $2 toy from a discount store because my risk appetite is much higher that it will break.

Why Customer Care is the Life Blood of any QMS  – Christopher StainowHow do you go about putting your customers at the forefront of your quality management goals? Here are a few things to consider to help you go that extra mile…

Quality Management in Everyday Life and Work  – From yoga to childcare; meetings to housework… quality management strategies work in the boardroom and at home. Here are some ways that you can use these tools for everyday life situations…

We will add Ask The Experts, ASQ, as one more regular section from the current episode. We will take any topic that has been discussed on this forum, based on the relevance to the core theme of the articles for a given episode of our blog carnival. For the present episode we have chosen – Creating a Culture of Quality. The question is how to change the attitudes toward quality management at all levels of the organization. The expert reply states that since most of the management understand well what is in for them, beginning may happen by examining some of the “pain points” in your organization and showing how quality tools can help to solve them.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy has December Roundtable: What is the best way to ensure quality and customer integration grow together?.

customer concept with business elements
customer concept with business elements

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episode:

  • The Hidden FactoryIn this episode, learn about the concept of the hidden factory and how it can affect any organization regardless of industry. And discover how it can create misleading metrics that cause productivity to outrun quality.

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of December, 2016:

  • jimsmith_200ISO 9001 is only the Foundation – If you want a manageable QMS, then better build it that way from the start. Excessive paperwork that seems to be the leading cause of disappointment is an indication that they implemented the ISO9001 requirements the wrong way.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs, September, 2016

Welcome to September, 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We have already taken up the following topics for the familiarization of different elements of new version of ISO 9001-

For the present episode we will look at Organizational Knowledge, in general, and then move over to what ISO 9001: 2015 has to state on the subject.

Before we closely look at the subject of change in the ISO management system standards, let us quickly recapitulate a broader view of the subject and look at some randomly selected picks from the vast literature available on the subject on the internet.

What is Organizational Knowledge

  1. Organizational knowledge is equated with professional intellect (Quinn, Philip, & Sydney, 1996). Organizational knowledge is a metaphor, as it is not the organization but the people in the organization who create knowledge

 Learn more in: Explicit and Tacit Knowledge: To Share or Not to Share

  1. The body of knowledge contained, but not categorized, within the members of an organization.

 Learn more in: E-Learning Design for the Information Workplace

  1. The organizational knowledge is created and transferred within the organizational context, is rooted in: (1) company and industrial atmosphere (King & Zeithaml, 2003), (2) tacit knowledge (Grant, 2002); and is fitted in firm culture (Saint-Onge, 1996).

Has the following properties: (1) is shared between the members of the organization (2) is connected to organization history, and (3) allows a common language.

 Learn more in: Critical Success Factors and Core Competencies

Defining Organizational Knowledge : The paper starts by defining what is meant by ‘knowledge’ and ‘knowledge management’, and follows on by presenting the knowledge processes which are at the basis of knowledge management practices.

Five Types of Organisational Knowledge : In Knowledge, Knowledge Work and Organisations: An Overview and Interpretation, Blackler builds on Polanyi’s distinction between tacit and explicit knowledge (in Polyani, 1967) and identifies five types of knowledge to be found in contemporary organisations. His ideas provide useful insights into the process of knowledge management. These conceptual distinctions were first suggested to explain the psychological and behavioural aspects of knowledge. They were later adapted to describe the different ‘images’ of knowledge within the organisation.

%d8%b2the-knowledge-pyramid

Knowledge Conversion : The organization should identify and nurture knowledge-building activities that expand and enhance its core competence.

Three Types of Organizational Knowledge:  Implications For The Tacit-Explicit AND Knowledge Creation Debates – Nancie Evans  and  Mark Easterby-Smith-  Lancaster University : The paper theorizes and represents organizational learning and knowledge management as a framework of organizational knowledge  consisting of three distinct knowledge types each with a tacit and explicit dimension.

Organizational Knowledge Sharing Practices : Organizational knowledge (vs. knowledge) has distinct characteristics given its action-centered, contextual and collective nature. It is composed of both explicit manifestations as well as intangible forms of knowledge. The choice of options to implement various knowledge sharing strategies, and enabling technologies, would depend on the forms of knowledge that are the most important to the organization.

Challenges in managing organizational knowledge : IBM Institute for Knowledge-Based Organizations has identified a number of important roadblocks that organizations typically face when implementing knowledge management programs. These roadblocks are:

  • Failure to align knowledge management efforts with the organization’s strategic objectives
  • Creation of repositories without addressing the need to manage content
  • Failure to understand and connect knowledge management into individuals’ daily work activities
  • An overemphasis on formal learning efforts as a mechanism for sharing knowledge
  • Focusing knowledge management efforts only within organizational boundaries.

Journal of Organizational Knowledge Management is a full-fledged journal which covers

the topics of interest, but not limited to:

  • Knowledge management empirical research
  • Knowledge management case studies
  • Knowledge management application is education
  • Legislative issues

Here are two pictorial views TQM way and Life-Cycle Approach, respectively:

tqm_modelknowledge_lifecycle_05

We now take up a few of the many articles available on internet dealing specifically with the subject w.r.t. ISO 9001: 2015.

ISO 9001:2015 Clause 7.1.6 Organizational Knowledge : By introducing the term “knowledge,” ISO 9001:2015 aims to raise organizations’ awareness of the management and linking of know-how in order to position them for the future.

ORGANIZATIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND ISO 9001-2015Raghu Malayanuru looks at other clauses where Organizational Knowledge is addressed, knowledge requirements of an organization, documents that may provide evidence of Organization Knowledge. Nacaro Williams in his studied comment, places more emphasis on reliance on the Notes to clause 7.1.6.

Organizational Knowledge Introduced in ISO 9001:2015  – Brian Reece

ISO 9001:2015 defines requirements for the handling of organizational knowledge in the following four phases, which are analogous to the PDCA cycle:

  1. Determine the knowledge necessary for the operation of processes and for achieving conformity of products and services
  2. Maintain knowledge and make it available to the extent necessary
  3. Consider the current organizational knowledge and compare it to changing needs and trends
  4. Acquire the necessary additional knowledge.

ISO 9001:2015 and Effective Organizational Knowledge   – Andrew Holt analyzes the new organizational knowledge requirement in ISO 9001:2015 through the lens of SECI model.  

Image 1: The SECI Model (Nonanka & Takuchi, 1995).
Image 1: The SECI Model (Nonanka & Takuchi, 1995).

What is Organizational Knowledge in ISO 9001:2015? – It will be imperative that an organization performs its due diligence through risk management when determining what knowledge is necessary and how it is maintained and made available.

ISO 9001: 2015 – Organizational Knowledge Management Requirements Webcast

In this new webcast, standards expert and active member of the U.S. Standards committees, shares some insights on the new elements of knowledge management within ISO 9001:2015, and provides tips for meeting the requirements of documenting, tracking, and making value-added knowledge available, for the health and continuous improvement of the organization.

How to meet the Knowledge Management requirement within ISO 9001

  • As part of a Knowledge Management Strategy, you define your critical knowledge needs
  • You create a Knowledge Management Framework for your organization that ensures knowledge is created, discussed, captured, synthesized, and re-used. This framework contains the four critical enablers; Roles, Processes, Technologies, Governance. The contents, scale and complexity of this framework will vary enormously – from very simple (in the case of a small company) to sophisticated and complex for major multinationals.
  • You run a scan or audit of your critical knowledge topics, to ensure each of these is in an acceptably managed state

How to manage knowledge of the organization according to ISO 9001 – Mark Hammar – It is specific knowledge to the organization, generally gained by experience, which is used and shared to achieve the objectives of the organization. This can come internally, such as intellectual property, lessons learned from failure and successes, or the results of improvements; or it can come externally from conferences, customer knowledge, or supplier knowledge.

Knowledge Management and ISO 9001:2015 – This newsletter explores the implications of the ISO 9001:2015 knowledge clause, and how this can impact Knowledge Managers (and their Quality department colleagues) worldwide.

Organizational knowledge in ISO 9001:2015 – The ‘glass-half-full’ here is that Knowledge Management has started to appear in ISO 9001. The ‘glass-half-empty’ is that it is so very high-level in its stated requirement. It’s barely even a guideline.

7.1.6 Organizational knowledge – When implementing this clause or when explaining to the auditor, how this clause is implemented, some basic understanding of knowledge management can be useful.  Knowledge can be classified into two broad categories.

  • Explicit Knowledge or Formal Knowledge is one that can be formally documented
  • With Tacit Knowledge, people are not often aware of the knowledge they possess or how it can be valuable to others. Effective transfer of tacit knowledge generally requires extensive personal contact, regular interaction and trust. Example: how to ride bicycle.

Let us look at a few videos on the subject:

Organizational Knowledge

How to Manage Organizational Knowledge Effectively? by David Hershfield, SVP at Redcats

KM Audit & Measurement

Knowledge Management – Managing Tacit and Explicit Knowledge

ISO9001:2015 Transition Part 14: Organizational Knowledge, Job Insecurity, and Change Resistance

It appears to be quite an obvious case that the introduction of this subject as requirement has challenges at different levels, but is not yet fully deciphered as to how and to what it can be gainfully shown to have been implemented.  So, for the time being, we rest our discussions on the today’s topic here.

For the October, 2016 episode, we will take Control of Human Errors w.r.t. Quality Management, in the new versions of these management standards.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy in his ASQ’s Influential VoiceAugust Roundtable: Integrating Technical Quality and Human Management Systems’ has set the tone for our next month’s subject.

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episode :

  • Quality and Sports – Learn about the ever-growing connection between quality and sports: How assessing one’s ability to adjust to failure can lead to better performance in athletics—and beyond.

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of August, 2016 does not have any article.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – June, 2016

Welcome to June, 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We have taken up familiarisation of different elements of new ISO 9001-

In the present episode, we will take up one more key change in the 2015 version of ISO 9001 – Leadership and Commitment.

What Does ‘Top Management’ Commitment Mean for Management Systems?

The article lists lot of actions, objectives and ‘ensuring’ for Top Management to do! Yes, such listing is just a superficial summary of the clauses from the ISO 9001 standard. For a detailed discussion on these specific requirements, their implementation or demonstrated effectiveness, a full-fledged article is called for.

How to comply with new leadership requirements in ISO 9001:2015 – Mark Hammar

In many ways, the leadership requirements in the (draft version of) the 2015 update to ISO 9001 are not new. ISO 9001 has always had the leadership importance of top management as one of the seven quality management principles that form the basis of the standard.

Here are some things that are important to show that top management has a commitment to the Quality Management System:

  • QMS effectiveness is measured, and management is involved in assessing this.
  • The Quality Policy and objectives are in place per management direction, communicated in the organization, and tracked for progress.
  • The QMS is part of the business processes, not a side project.
  • Resource needs are reviewed and addressed by management.
  • Continual improvement is promoted and supported by management.
  • There is a way to ensure customer, statutory, and regulatory requirements are understood and met, and people understand why this is important.
  • There is a management focus on customer satisfaction.
  • Organizational roles, responsibilities, and authorities are assigned, understood by the person who is assigned, and known to those employees who need to assess a person in a certain role.

Role of Top Management in ISO’s 2015 – Leadership or Management? – Cliff Poon

 Leadership - Cliff Poon

Leadership impacts behaviour of individual whereas Management focuses on processes.

Correlation matrices between ISO 9001-2008 and ISO 9001-2015

Leadership and commitment 9001-2015

ISO 9001 Responsibilities of Top Management is initiated right from the design stage and spans through the implementation and maintenance of the QMS after registration stage:

  1. Define ‘quality’ in the form of objectives to help internal communication of what is to be achieved (product and service requirements, process effectiveness and efficiency, customer perception etc.)
  2. Show that the business is central to the system: use your normal business language, not ‘quality’ or ISO 9001 terms.
  3. Produce a simple top-level, “big picture” of your business processes to show how the system improves results by focusing on the improvement of processes.
  4. Demonstrate your commitment to continual improvement by focusing on the next improvement and by taking it seriously.
  5. Show that the ‘quality’ approach is becoming instituted by integrating reviews into normal management cycles.
  6. Ensure that records are turned visibly into management information so that people keeping them understand their importance.

The Changing Role Of The Quality Management Representative (QMR)

“For increased leadership and commitment by top management to be successful, top management must not see quality management as an appendix in addition to the actual requirements of business processes”, explains Ulrich Wegner, Technical Head of TÜV SÜD Management Service GmbH. “Instead, quality management should be closely intermeshed with strategic planning and, where possible, the management control system, and thus with actual corporate management. To reach this goal, organisations must clearly define the roles and responsibilities of managers and executives in the field of quality management.”

Those rare organisations in which QMRs are still operating as ‘lone warriors’ will definitely need to undertake some adjustments to meet the requirements defined in the new ISO 9001.

10 Ways Leaders Can Drive Continual Improvement

  • State Your Belief in Continual ImprovementContinual-Improvement - 10 leadership ways
  • Explain Why Continual Improvement is Important
  • Empower, but be a Servant Leader
  • Participate in Continual Improvement Yourself
  • Ask for Continual Improvement Ideas and Opportunities
  • Don’t Require Every Improvement to be an Event or Project
  • Emphasize Small Ideas
  • Ask for More than Just Cost Savings
  • Look at Processes Instead of Blaming People
  • Keep Asking for Continual Improvement

Top Managers management of Management System

Management-of-Management-System Jan Olsson

A Management System is a tool for top management to enable successful business. Often this tool is managed by an Operational Development manager. Top management shall transform strategic directions, threats and opportunities together with stakeholder interests in to requirements on processes, organization structures and controls. Operational Development manager will design the details of the management system in close cooperation with operational management. Managers will drive and ensure utilization and performance will be monitored. Top management will then be involved in the evaluation of the Management System performance Review and additional or changed requirements will be given in order to improve the Management System.

Success without top management commitment?

Top Management

ISO 9001:2015 – Practical Leadership – .

Practical Leadershp-Website-Blog-In-Article

 

“True *Freedom* is not the absence of structure but rather a clear structure which enables people to work within established boundaries in an autonomous and creative way.” Rosabeth Moss Kanter[i]

 

 

These video clips also help in understanding the subject :

Understanding ISO 9001:2015: Top managementPeter van Nederpelt

ISO 9001:2015 Leadership and Top Management CommitmentWarren Alford

ISO 9001 2015 Clause 5 Leadership

The new version of the management system standards now requires the organization’s top management to be far more proactive and involved. We will expand the subject and take up the ‘Leadership’ in the Other ISO Management Standards in our July, 2016 episode.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy in his ASQ’s Influential Voice had mentioned about ASQ’s World Conference on Quality and Improvement, held May 16-18, 2016 in Milwaukee. We now have the updates on the event:

Top 10 Books for Those New to Quality would prove to be a very handy reference to quality professionals of all hues:

  1. The Quality Toolbox, Second Edition by Nancy R. Tague
  2. The ASQ Quality Improvement Pocket Guide: Basic History, Concepts, Tools, and Relationships edited by Grace L. Duffy
  3. The ASQ Pocket Guide to Root Cause Analysis by Bjørn Andersen and Tom Natland Fagerhaug
  4. Process Improvement Simplified: A How-to Book for Success in any Organization by James B. King, Francis G. King , and Michael W. R. Davis
  5. The Certified Quality Improvement Associate Handbook, Third Edition: Basic Quality Principles and Practices edited by Russell T. Westcott and Grace L. Duffy
  6. Performance Metrics: The Levers for Process Management by Duke Okes
  7. The Memory Jogger 2, Second Edition: A Pocket Guide of Tools for Continuous Improvement and Effective Planning by Michael Brassard and Diane Ritter
  8. The Essential Deming: Leadership Principles from the Father of Quality by Joyce Nilsson Orsini PhD.
  9. Principles of Quality Costs, Fourth Edition: Financial Measures for Strategic Implementation of Quality Management edited by Douglas C. Wood
  10. Outcomes, Performance, Structure: Three Keys to Organizational Excellence by Michael E. Gallery and Stephen C. Carey

June, 2016 Roundtable: Employee Engagement discusses the question – To what extent do organizations engage employees about the importance of quality? How should companies approach this issue, and how can they avoid “sloganeering” and make a real difference?

We now watch the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

  • Employee Engagement: This episode discusses the importance of having engaged employees to boost initiative and creativity in the workplace, which ultimately leads to breakthrough performance. Determine whether changes are necessary in your business operations.

Workplace spirit: LINK
Maintenance Required: LINK

  •  Alternatives to Brainstorming: Carol Knight-Wallace, principal, Knight Vantage Consulting, says the traditional form of brainstorming is no longer effective. In this brief interview, Knight-Wallace, explains why you should look to other forms of brainstorming and what you should be looking for in the tool.
  • 2016 ASQ World Conference Recap on Quality and Improvement

In Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of May, 2016, we have –

  • Use Six Sigma Selfishly – Quality professionals should apply DMAIC six sigma processes to enhance their careers.

Jim's GemsFirst, define your career’s purpose and scope. Then determine how you are going to reach these milestones. Write down actions to needed to make the adjustments. Assess your current situation w.r.t. the requirements for attaining the milestones so as to identify the gaps. Now analyze your career process using these two important questions: do you now know better where you stand; and how to get where you need to be in order to fulfill your career goals? In this stage, it is helpful to involve a friend or mentor. An outsider can often help determine whether you have taken the appropriate steps or how realistic your process has been up to this point. In the control phase the challenge is to maintain your progress by learning from the past.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

[i]  Rosabeth Moss Kanter at TEDxBeaconStreet : Six Keys to Leading Positive Change

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – April, 2016

Welcome to April, 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We commenced the familiarizing ourselves with the changes in the Revision of ISO 9001 (:2015) with the December, 2015 episode of our blog carnival. Then, in the January 2016 episode, we took up Process Approach in the 2015 revision of the standard, as our first topic. In February, 2016, we had taken up first part of Risk-Based Thinking that primarily addressed the concept as has been taken up in ISO 9001: 2015, followed by Risk-Based Thinking, in the general perspective in March, 2016,

Now, in this month’s episode we will take a look at the subject that aims to align the organization’s QMS with the Context of the Organization.

Context of the Organization & ISO 9001:2015Kevin Gholston

According to the Merriam Webster Dictionary the word “context” has the following meaning:

context
noun con·text \ˈkän-ˌtekst\

The words that are used with a certain word or phrase and that help to explain its meaning; the situation in which something happens; the group of conditions that exist where and when something happens

Full Definition of CONTEXT

1:  the parts of a discourse that surround a word or passage and can throw light on its meaning
2:  the interrelated conditions in which something exists or occurs

Context-of-the-Organization-Overview

What is the Context of the Organization? – Itay Abuhav –

The context of the organization, in the ISO 9001:2015 is the set of functions, processes, inputs and outputs and limitations that creates the business environment of an organization. It is how business entities (functions or subsystems –intern or external) of an organization relate together and how the information travels through these elements.

The context of the organization is shaped through the integration of the business entities. The ISO 9001:2008 expresses it with the words” the relation and sequences between the main processes” (Chapter 4.1,b) and requires for example a diagram that describes those relations.

Context of the Organization

How to identify the context of the organization in ISO 9001:2015 – Strahinja Stojanovic

Context of the organization is a new requirement in ISO 9001, stating an organization must consider both the internal and external issues that can impact its strategic objectives and the planning of the QMS. It pretty much changes the concept and application of clause 4. Requirements regarding the context of the organization do sound a little bit vague, so what does this clause actually require?

Clause 4 of ISO 9001:2015, Context of the organization, requires the organization to evaluate itself and its context. This means that you need to define influences of various elements on the organization and how they reflect on the QMS, the company’s culture, objectives and goals, complexity of products, flow of processes and information, size of the organization, markets, customers, etc. It is also a means to detect risks and opportunities regarding the business context.

Where to start?

First, you need to determine which of the new requirements are already met in your existing documentation, because some of the requirements related to the Quality Manual in ISO 9001:2008 are now transferred into this new clause

To determine external context, you should consider issues arising from its social, technological, environmental, ethical, political, legal, and economic environment. Examples of external context may include:

  • government regulations and changes in the law
  • economic shifts in the organization’s market
  • the organization’s competition
  • events that may affect corporate image
  • changes in technology

Basically, all this information is in the heads of the CEO and other members of management, but it was never put on paper; the best way to gather it is by organizing some brainstorming. Systematization of all this information can be very valuable and demonstrate where you stand as an organization.

ISO 9001:2015 Revision Explained: ‘Context of the Organisation’ – by Alastair Atcheson

While there is no prescribed method of determining the context of the organisation in relation to the ISO 9001, a simple and pragmatic approach to understanding your organisation’s context consists of four steps:

  1. Identify the internal issues that can affect your organisation’s products, services, investments and interested parties.
  2. Identify the external issues that can affect your organisation’s products, services, investments and interested parties.
  3. Identify who are the interested parties and what are their requirements.
  4. Institute a system for regular review and monitoring of the internal issues, external issues and interested parties as identified above.

Internal issues can include the organization’s

  • regulatory requirements
  • strategies to achieve its policies and objectives
  • relationship with its staff and stakeholders, including partners and suppliers
  • resources and knowledge (e.g. capital, people, processes and technologies)
  • internal risk appetite
  • assets
  • product or service
  • Standards, guidelines and models adopted by the organisation
  • information systems

ISO 9001:2008 vs. ISO 9001:2015 – Context of the Organization By Itay Abuhav

With the ISO 9001:2008 it is necessary to evaluate whether the organization’s quality management system follows the general requirements. Wr.t. the ISO 9001:2015 and the requirements of  context of the organization – the organization shall analyze which issues (external as well as internal) that may affect its QMS or already have an effect.

Context-of-the-Organization - tongue in cheek view

Context of the Organization” and the Power of SWOT Analysis

ISO9001-2015_at__a_glance-CLAUSE4_SWOT

We will take up, “Interested Parties”, one of the vital considerations for understanding the ‘Context of the Organization’, in our May, 2016 episode.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy in his ASQ’s Influential Voice blog-column, has presented a roundtable discussion on the Voice of CustomerWhat exactly should voice of the customer mean to the quality professional? How important is it? What are the best ways to gather it?.  Luciana Paulise discusses some new tool to capture the voice of the customer. Pam Schodt considers the best way to gather VoC standards is through face-to-face meeting followed up by written and verified specifications. To Dr, Suresh Gettala, key is to hear from horse’s mouth and not to surmise about what the customer wants. Luigi Sille attaches equal importance to data gathering its use

We now watch the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

  • Metrics for Management – Tim Adams, Engineering Assurance Specialist, NASA, spent a few minutes with ASQ TV to talk about some of the main ideas of his 2015 ASQ World Conference on Quality and Improvement presentation. In this interview, Adams discusses some of the finer points of identifying and using metrics.
  • Benchmarking – Today, we’ll learn the basics of benchmarking, review the recommended six phases of a successful benchmarking process, and finally, we’ll get reacquainted with one vital ingredient in benchmarking: metrics.
  • The Torque Chain of Quality Large – For more information go to www.srtorque.com   Daily torque testing is becoming more common place because it makes good business sense. But is daily testing error proofing? No, and far from it. …. If your torque wrench is out of spec, using a torque wrench to prevent errors only leads to a false sense of security. What if the torque tester you are using is out of spec and you don’t know it?   This video and the subsequent series take you through every link in the chain of quality in order to help you understand all the places where the wheels can fall off. Specifically it takes a look at the places we tend to overlook or take for granted.

In Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of March, 2016, we have –

Jim's Gems♦ Integrate DFSS with Existing Design Processes – Many organizations make a mistake when trying to replace their design process with Design for Six Sigma. DFSS was never intended to completely replace an organization’s existing design process.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites, and have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – February 2016

Welcome to February 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We commenced the familiarizing ourselves with the changes in the Revision of ISO 9001 (:2015) with the December, 2015 episode of our blog carnival. Then, in the January 2016 episode, we took up Process Approach in the 2015 revision of the standard, as our first topic.

Now, in this month’s episode we will look up as to how Risk-Based Thinking has been addressed in the 2015 revision of the standard.

We first take up the what the Standard itself states in Clause A.4, sub clause 0.3.3 of this concept –

Risk-based thinking is essential for achieving an effective quality management system. The concept of risk-based thinking has been implicit in previous editions of this International Standard including, for example, carrying out preventive action to eliminate potential nonconformities, analyzing any nonconformities that do occur, and taking action to prevent recurrence that is appropriate for the effects of the nonconformity.

To conform to the requirements of this International Standard, an organization needs to plan and implement actions to address risks and opportunities. Addressing both risks and opportunities establishes a basis for increasing the effectiveness of the quality management system, achieving improved results and preventing negative effects.

Opportunities can arise as a result of a situation favourable to achieving an intended result, for example, a set of circumstances that allow the organization to attract customers, develop new products and services, reduce waste or improve productivity. Actions to address opportunities can also include consideration of associated risks. Risk is the effect of uncertainty and any such uncertainty can have positive or negative effects. A positive deviation arising from a risk can provide an opportunity, but not all positive effects of risk result in opportunities.

Risk Management is the foundation of ISO 9001_2015

As its continuing initiative, to explain the new concepts in the revision of the Standard, ISO/TC 176/SC2 has presented on its site –

In the revised standard, ISO 9001: 2015,

  • in Clause 4.1 the organization is required to determine the risks which can affect its ability to meet these objectives
  • in Clause 1.2 top management are required to commit to ensuring Clause 4 is followed
  • in Clause 1 the organization is required to take action to identify risks and opportunities
  • Clause 8 – the organization is required to implement processes to address risk
  • Clause 1.3 and 9.3.2 the organization is required to monitor, measure, analyze and evaluate the risks and opportunities
  • In Clause 10 the organization is required to improve by responding to changes in risk

ISO 9001:2015 – Risk based thinking – Declan Cahill – Risk Based thinking is now present in so many standards….Examples include – ISO 14971, OHSAS 18001, ISO 14001 and ISO 31000. For most organizations, it is a mind-set that many are comfortable communicating and operating with on a daily basis.  By alignment with these standards, the ISO 9001 standard itself is being continually improved in order to minimize the work involved where requirements of various standards are integrated…..Where there are risks and the enterprise has put in actions or fixes to prevent or minimize the occurrence of these specific risks, every enterprise should be careful to consider how strong these fixes are and what these fixes are dependent on, i.e. human behavior, infrastructure & utilities.

Risk 4.1

“Risk Based” vs. “Threat Based” Thinking – Risk based thinking is entrenched in historical facts. It examines the past for clues to the future. Risk based thinking operates under the premise that if it has not happened in the past then it is not likely to happen in the future…..Threat based thinking is formed when it is understood that just because an event has not occurred in the past, that does not rule out the potential for it to occur in the future.

Risk - Lewis2005

A risk-based-thinking-model for ISO 9001: 2015 – Bob Deysher states that the concept of “risk” in the context of international standards relates to uncertainty in achieving the core objectives of the standards, viz. to provide confidence in the organizations’ consistent ability to provide customers with conforming goods and services and to enhance customer satisfaction. The risks and opportunities have to be identified in the context of the organization.

ISO 9001:2015 – Risk Based ThinkingOne of the key changes in the 2015 revision of ISO 9001 is to establish a systematic approach to risk, rather than treating it as a single component of a quality management system. Risk-based thinking is something we all do automatically and often sub-consciously. e.g. if I wish to cross a road I look for traffic before I begin. I will not step in front of a moving car. Risk-based thinking is already part of the process approach. e.g. to cross the road I may go directly or I may use a nearby footbridge. Which process I choose will be determined by considering the risks. Risk-based thinking makes preventive action part of the routine. Risk is often thought of only in the negative sense. Risk-based thinking can also help to identify opportunities. This can be considered to be the positive side of risk. Crossing the road directly gives me an opportunity to reach the other side quickly, but there is an increased risk of injury from moving cars. The risk of using a footbridge is that I may be delayed. The opportunity of using a footbridge is that there is less chance of being injured by a car. Opportunity is not always directly related to risk but it is always related to the objectives.

Risk-Based Thinking and ISO 9001:2015Chad Kymal and R. Dan Reid – Definitions of risk vary, even within documents published by the International Organizations for Standardization (ISO)… SO 9001 focuses on “risk-based thinking,” although it stops short of actual “risk management.”…. In ISO 9000:2015, “Quality management systems—Fundamentals and vocabulary,” risk is defined as the “effect of uncertainty.” Notes in the definition further describe risk as a “deviation from the expected,” either positive or negative. The term “uncertainty” is clarified as a lack of information or knowledge about an event that can be expressed in terms of consequences the likelihood of occurrence. Lastly, ISO 9000 states that risk is related to potential events, and that it’s typically expressed as a result of the likelihood and consequence of such an event…..Risk appears in the normative parts of ISO 9001 eight times, and risk-based thinking appears once. Risk and risk-based thinking appear many times more when we study the informative portions of the standard.

Here is a video of the Interview with Chad Kymal: Risk-based thinking and ISO 9001:2015,

Some more videos on the subject:

Corrective or Preventative Action – The new risk based methodology for ISO 9001:2015?

The Process Approach and Risk-Based Thinking – posted by T. D. Nelson – this webinar provides a more general education about the process approach and risk-based thinking as well as their implications for quality management system definition, documentation, and assessment.

We have far more material than what can be accommodated in one post. So we will continue our discussion on the subject of Risk Based Thinking in ISO 9001: 2015 in the March, 2016 episode as well.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy in his ASQ’s Influential Voice blog-column, in Changing Company Culture: December Round Up, takes up Luciana Paulise’s views about what determines organizational culture and how factors define a company’s culture and sums up the reflections of Influential Bloggers on how culture is changed within an entire organization in response of Luciana’s ideas.

He also presents a guest post, Evolving Quality to Enable and Support a Global Digital Organization by Prem Ranganath, who blogs @ The Art of Quality. In Prem Rangnath’s experience, the top three trends that shaping the future of quality in IT, based on current and emerging customer expectations are:

  1. Quality has a strategic role in enabling successful digitization and digital product management
  2. Focusing on a Minimum Acceptable Product (MAP) is important for Minimum Viable Products (MVP) to succeed
  1. Expectations for quality are increasingly focused on collective experiences

We now watch the latest ASQ TV episode:

Advice for Quality CareersIn this episode, learn why quality can benefit anyone’s job, how to develop qualifications employers seek in quality professionals, and see why salary trends are looking up for jobs in quality…

In the third year of ASQ TV, please take a moment to complete this brief survey. Your feedback is vital to the ASQ TV continuous improvement plan. Take the survey

Whilst on the subject of Quality as a career, tips for others in the field, and how Michael Jordan relates to the quality profession, read Jim Gem’s “13 Steps to Get Ahead”

In Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of January, 2016, we have.

Jim's Gems

  • Four Thoughts about Selling Ideas – “In my work with quality professionals, I am constantly amazed at how many lament that their wonderful ideas did not see the light of day because ‘short-sighted’ management didn’t endorse them.”
  • Choose to Make This Year Great – To have the best year you’ve ever had, live each of the coming days as the best person you’ve ever been.
  • Think Positively, Then Do It! – To achieve your dreams and aspirations, choose to put your time and energies into living and working toward your highest intentions.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………