Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – August, 2016


Welcome to August, 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We have already taken up the following topics for the familiarization of different elements of new version of ISO 9001-

For the present episode we will look at Change Management, in general, then move over to what ISO 9001: 2015 has to state on the subject, ending the present discussion with how two other major management system standards also look at the subject.

Before we closely look at the subject of change in the ISO management system standards, let us quickly recapitulate a broader view of the subject and look at some randomly selected picks from the vast literature available on the subject on the internet.

Change Management process has 5 key phasesAdaptive HVM Ltd.’s Change Management process has 5 key phases

Torben Rick’s blog on his website Meliorate, we find a full section dealing with is posts on change management. We have picked up four among these ones here:

Top 20+ awesome quotes on change management: Here are a couple of representative ones:

The key to change …… is to let go of fear Rosanne Cash

People don’t resist change. They resist being changed! – Peter Senge

Top 12 reasons why people resist change. Again a pick at some:

Misunderstanding about the need for change/when the reason for the change is unclear

Fear of the unknown

Poor communication

Top 12 change management comic strips has quite a representative messages delivered through the medium of cartoon strips —

Top 12 change management comic strips

Organizations don’t change. People do – or they don’t

Organizations don’t change. People do – or they don’t

Change Management Iceberg

The change management iceberg suggested by Wilfried Kruger emphasizes that manager mainly consider the hard issues for change i.e. cost, quality and time. These issues represent only the tip of iceberg i.e. only about 10% of the total issues.

Most of the issues – soft issues – are below the surface.

Change Management Iceberg

Change affects 4 types of people in the organization:

  • Promoters – People those who support the change
  • Potential promoters – People who may support change when fully convinced
  • Opponents – People against change
  • Hidden opponents – People who appear to support change but secretly are against it.

Therefore attitudes – perceptions and beliefs, and behavior – power and politics, need to be managed.

There is additional related material too:

We also have picked up a few videos as well:

Overcoming Resistance to Change – Isn’t It Obvious? – The World with Theory of Constraints

Management of Change vs Change Management  – Life Cycle Engineering

How to Lead Change Management – DeAnne Aguirre, senior partner with Strategy&Buisness

Change Management vs. Change Leadership — What’s the Difference? – Dr. John Kotter

Kotter’s 8-Step Organizational Change Model – Steven Thomsen

How to Conduct a Management of Change (MOC) – Baker Hughes

We now move over to a closer look at how ISO Management System Standards address the subject:

5 Practices for Managing Change When ISO 9001:2015 Arrives – Terrance Holbrook, Senior Product Manager, MasterControl – While there is no single one-size-fits-all change management methodology, there are established practices that can be adopted and customized to better manage change and cultivate opportunity.

  1. Accept the changeManaging Change When ISO 9001-2015 Arrives
  2. Communicate change
  3. Engage employees
  4. Provide adequate training
  5. Introduce change gradually

ISO 9001:2015 Addressing Change : Once the organization has identified its context and interested parties and then identified the processes that support this linkage, addressing changes becomes an increasingly important component of continued success.

How change management is addressed in ISO 9001 2015 Standard? – Any change – may be it is in process, manpower, machinery, instruments, technology, raw materials, suppliers, customer requirements, legal requirements etc.…. shall be go through a defined change management process.

Change Management and ISO 9001:2015Raghu Malayanuru has described in details clauses of ISO 9001:2015 that focus on change management. For the purpose of maintaining brevity of our episode, we have listed out the clauses here:

  1. Clause 4.4.1( g);
  2. Clause 5.3 (e);
  3. Clause 6.3
  4. Clause
  5. Clause 8.1;
  6. Clause 8.2.1 (b);
  7. Clause 8.2.4
  8. Clause 8.3.6;
  9. Clause 8.5.6;
  10. Clause 9.2.2 (a)
  11. Clause 9.3.2 (b)
  12. Clause 10
  13. Clause 10.2.1(f)

The essence is captured here:

Change Management and ISO 9001_2015

ISO’s Technical Committee no.176, Sub-committee no.2 (ISO/TC 176/SC 2) has also published an explanatory paper – How Change is addressed within ISO 9001:2015

How to manage changes in an ISMS according to ISO 27001 A.12.1.2Antonio Segovia states that the requirement exists, but there are no particular instructions on how to implement the control (i.e., Change procedure is not a mandatory document), so in this article he suggests one of the ways to manage changes.

What is “Management of Change?”Thea Dunmire explains requirements related to management of change were added in section 4.3.1 of OHSAS 18001: 2007…In addition, reference to Management of Change was also included in section 4.4.6.

These new requirements cover four important concepts:

  • Identification of the hazards associated with “change”
  • Assessment of the risks associated with “change”
  • Consideration of OH&S hazards and risks prior to the introduction of the “change”
  • Implementation of the controls needed to address the hazards and risks associated with the “change”

For purposes of management of change within an OH&S management system, the changes that need to be addressed include:

  • Organizational changes (e.g. personnel or staffing changes)
  • Activity changes (e.g. changes to processes, equipment, infrastructure, software)
  • Material changes (e.g. new chemicals, packaging)
  • Changes to the OH&S management system (e.g. procedures)

Ineffective management of change is one of the major contributing factors in many of the incident investigations conducted by the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB).  To check it out, go to the CSB web site at  and enter “management of change” as your search term at the link “Search this Site.”

Change Management in ISO 14001:2015Ivana Strgacic states that unlike the changes in ISO 9001:2015, there is no “Planning of Changes” section.  So where can we find change management in the new standard?

The change all starts with the environmental aspects,

“When determining environmental aspects, the organization shall take into account: a) change, including planned or new developments, and new or modified activities, products and services;”

Once we identify the changed aspects, then there is a cascading or domino effect on the rest of the environmental management system.

While maintaining processes, it needs to underlined that some of the triggers that will result in a change to a process are:

  • changes to aspects,
  • changes to compliance obligations,
  • changes to controls.

Management review (element 9.3) requires the specific inputs of change into the process.  Specifically changes in:

  • external and internal issues that are relevant to the environmental management system,
  • the needs and expectations of interested parties, including compliance obligations,
  • its significant environmental aspects,
  • risks and opportunities.

The resulting output includes decisions related to any need for changes to the environmental management system systems, including resources.  Without managing change, the EMS cannot remain effective.  Change, through maintenance and continual improvement of the management systems, are the core tenets of the Plan-Do-Check-Act model.

We rest our discussions on the today’s topic here.

For the September, 2016 episode, we will take Organizational Knowledge in the new versions of these management standards.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

Among several update posts by ASQ CEO, Bill Troy in his ASQ’s Influential Voice we have picked up two ‘author interviews’ for our current episode:

It should be interesting to revisit one of the HBR classics, by Francesca Gino and Bradley Staats on the subject: Why Organizations don’t learn?

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episodes that deal with ISO 9001: 2015:

  • Change Management – Change management experts discuss key steps to consider when approaching employees with change and helping them through the process. Learn about the carrot-and-stick technique—which can be used to motivate employees—and a tool that can make meetings more efficient and keep change management plans on track.

Read Sunil Kaushik’s Quality Progress article regarding the carrot-and-stick method as well as additional motivational strategies.
Watch the full interview and read the Quality Progress article about the Joint Commission’s improvement initiatives.

  • Explaining Annex SL and Top Management’s New Roles – Annex SL is considered the common language and text that new ISO standards are being built around. John DiMaria, senior product manager at BSI Americas, discusses how this affects ISO 9001:2015, as well as the standard’s new roles for top management with regard to responsibility, objectives and compliance.

Here are two more which also are very interesting points of view in understanding the present scenario:

  • Quality in India – This episode takes a look at quality in India, from the perspectives of leaders at the Quality Council of India (QCI) and the National Accreditation Board for Education and Training.
  • The State of Quality in India in 2015 – What’s the state of quality in India in 2015? Dr. Himanshu Trivedi, chair of ASQ’s local member community in Ahmedabad, India, reflects.

In Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of May, 2016, we have –

Jim's GemsKey management support, or lack of support, manifests itself in many ways. One way is that mid-lower level management won’t get on board so initiatives encounter all sorts of hurdles; therefore, results don’t generally live up to expectations. .. Additionally less support for quality initiatives usually results in underfunding and cuts in resources. So what do you do.. (Please read on the article)..

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – May 2016


Welcome to May, 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We have taken up familiarization of different elements of new ISO 9001-

December, 2015: the changes in the Revision of ISO 9001 (:2015)

January, 2016: Process Approach in 9001:2015

February, 2016: Risk-Based Thinking in 9001:2015

March, 2016: Risk-Based Thinking – a general perspective

April, 2016: Context of the Organization in ISO 9001: 2015

In the present episode, we will take up an important element of the Context of the organization – The Relevant Interested Parties.

The Cambridge Business English dictionary defines Interested Parties  as ‘any of the people or organizations who may be affected by a situation or who are hoping to make money out of a situation’.

For the purpose of the ISO Management System standards, an interested party is anyone who can affect, be affected by, or believe that they are affected by a decision or activity.

any of the people or organizations who may be affected by a situation, or who are hoping to make money out of a situation any of the people or organizations who may be affected by a situation, or who are hoping to make money out of a situation.

Intersted Parties 2

ISO 9001:2015 – Interested PartiesSara GuloSo far in the evolution of this standard through the years and through the different stages of development, the customer has been almost the sole focus, mentioning suppliers, employees and regulators as carriers of key requirements but not specifically involving any other entity that could have had an impact on the actual results achieved. Not even owners of the organization….the new standard drills deeper in the risk based thinking, widening the view for all probable actors that could pose any risk to the customer. That is why interested parties were included in the new standard: they are probable sources for risks for customers. Consequently they matter and their requirements shall be considered.

Interested parties could be split into three different groups:

– Usually enforced interested parties: this group includes those stakeholders that could seldom be disregarded because of their usual impact on outcome and customer satisfaction such as customers (obvious), employees, suppliers, owners, and regulators, all them in different shapes and modalities.

– Possible interested parties: this group includes those stakeholders that could or could not affect the outcome and customer satisfaction such as unions, banks, neighbours, etc. but it could be valid to analyse their eventual impact.

– Openly interested parties: this group includes those stakeholders that for some reason the organization believes they are important to assure the outcome and customer satisfaction, even though its relationship is not that obvious.

How to determine interested parties and their requirements according to ISO 9001:2015 – Mark Hammar – The ISO 9001:2015 standard has several requirements that involve the knowledge you have acquired when determining the relevant interested parties and their requirements

  • The QMS scope needs to include the requirements of relevant interested parties (Section 4.3).
  • The Quality Policy is to be made available to relevant interested parties when appropriate (Section 5.2.2).
  • Measurement traceability needs to be maintained when this is an expectation of relevant interested parties (Section 7.1.6).
  • Requirements for products and services may need to include those from relevant interested parties (Section 8.2.3).
  • Design and development activities need to take into account requirements of relevant interested parties, including how much control is expected in the design and development process (Section 8.3).
  • Management review needs to include issues that concern relevant interested parties (Section 9.3).

Are all interested parties equally interested in the organization?  – Once you have identified the interested parties the next step you can take is to analyze these interested parties on two parametersPower vs. Interest model (the standard does not require this but this might help you in understanding your interested parties better).

  • Power
  • Interest

Depending upon these two factors you can choose the appropriate approach. Stakeholder analysis is typically used in the project management.

We have also picked up some video clips on the subject:

Understanding ISO 9001:2015: Interested parties –

How you can decide and demonstrate which interested parties are relevant to your Quality Management System and / or your Environmental Management System?

– Dixon Brian

Alar Sistok

How to make an analysis of interested parties?

The new version of the management system standards now requires the organization’s top management to be far more proactive and involved. We will take up, the Leadership in the ISO Management Standards in our June, 2016 episode.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy in his ASQ’s Influential Voice talks about ASQ’s World Conference on Quality and Improvement, held May 16-18 in Milwaukee. We will have an update on the event in our June 2016 issue.

We now watch the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

  • The Voice of the Customer – This episode discusses converting the voice of the customer (VOC) into critical-to-quality-characteristics by looking at how to make the perfect cup of coffee. You’ll also learn how social media has amplified today’s VOC, and how organizations are responding to and leveraging online customer information with big-data analysis.

In Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of April, 2016, we have –

  • Quality Professionals Should Lead the Parade – It is not uncommon to blame senior management Jim's Gemsfor most of what ails an organization. However, it is past time to rethink this attitude! The ultimate question is: “Are you prepared and willing to put in the time and effort to demonstrate the power of the basic quality techniques?” Are you ready to lead the parade or do you find it easier to complain?
  • Remain Determined – If you’ve ever been disappointed by the results of your first effort to “take something on,” that’s no reason to quit. As James Whitcomb Riley says, “The most essential factor is persistence—the determination never to allow your energy or enthusiasm to be dampened by the discouragement that must inevitably come.”
  • Give Your Best – When there’s a job to be done, do more than just getting it done. Do remember what John Wooden, the great basketball coach, said, “Just do the best you can. No one can do more than that.”[i]

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

[i] The Difference Between winning and Succeeding

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – April, 2016


Welcome to April, 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We commenced the familiarizing ourselves with the changes in the Revision of ISO 9001 (:2015) with the December, 2015 episode of our blog carnival. Then, in the January 2016 episode, we took up Process Approach in the 2015 revision of the standard, as our first topic. In February, 2016, we had taken up first part of Risk-Based Thinking that primarily addressed the concept as has been taken up in ISO 9001: 2015, followed by Risk-Based Thinking, in the general perspective in March, 2016,

Now, in this month’s episode we will take a look at the subject that aims to align the organization’s QMS with the Context of the Organization.

Context of the Organization & ISO 9001:2015Kevin Gholston

According to the Merriam Webster Dictionary the word “context” has the following meaning:

noun con·text \ˈkän-ˌtekst\

The words that are used with a certain word or phrase and that help to explain its meaning; the situation in which something happens; the group of conditions that exist where and when something happens

Full Definition of CONTEXT

1:  the parts of a discourse that surround a word or passage and can throw light on its meaning
2:  the interrelated conditions in which something exists or occurs


What is the Context of the Organization? – Itay Abuhav –

The context of the organization, in the ISO 9001:2015 is the set of functions, processes, inputs and outputs and limitations that creates the business environment of an organization. It is how business entities (functions or subsystems –intern or external) of an organization relate together and how the information travels through these elements.

The context of the organization is shaped through the integration of the business entities. The ISO 9001:2008 expresses it with the words” the relation and sequences between the main processes” (Chapter 4.1,b) and requires for example a diagram that describes those relations.

Context of the Organization

How to identify the context of the organization in ISO 9001:2015 – Strahinja Stojanovic

Context of the organization is a new requirement in ISO 9001, stating an organization must consider both the internal and external issues that can impact its strategic objectives and the planning of the QMS. It pretty much changes the concept and application of clause 4. Requirements regarding the context of the organization do sound a little bit vague, so what does this clause actually require?

Clause 4 of ISO 9001:2015, Context of the organization, requires the organization to evaluate itself and its context. This means that you need to define influences of various elements on the organization and how they reflect on the QMS, the company’s culture, objectives and goals, complexity of products, flow of processes and information, size of the organization, markets, customers, etc. It is also a means to detect risks and opportunities regarding the business context.

Where to start?

First, you need to determine which of the new requirements are already met in your existing documentation, because some of the requirements related to the Quality Manual in ISO 9001:2008 are now transferred into this new clause

To determine external context, you should consider issues arising from its social, technological, environmental, ethical, political, legal, and economic environment. Examples of external context may include:

  • government regulations and changes in the law
  • economic shifts in the organization’s market
  • the organization’s competition
  • events that may affect corporate image
  • changes in technology

Basically, all this information is in the heads of the CEO and other members of management, but it was never put on paper; the best way to gather it is by organizing some brainstorming. Systematization of all this information can be very valuable and demonstrate where you stand as an organization.

ISO 9001:2015 Revision Explained: ‘Context of the Organisation’ – by Alastair Atcheson

While there is no prescribed method of determining the context of the organisation in relation to the ISO 9001, a simple and pragmatic approach to understanding your organisation’s context consists of four steps:

  1. Identify the internal issues that can affect your organisation’s products, services, investments and interested parties.
  2. Identify the external issues that can affect your organisation’s products, services, investments and interested parties.
  3. Identify who are the interested parties and what are their requirements.
  4. Institute a system for regular review and monitoring of the internal issues, external issues and interested parties as identified above.

Internal issues can include the organization’s

  • regulatory requirements
  • strategies to achieve its policies and objectives
  • relationship with its staff and stakeholders, including partners and suppliers
  • resources and knowledge (e.g. capital, people, processes and technologies)
  • internal risk appetite
  • assets
  • product or service
  • Standards, guidelines and models adopted by the organisation
  • information systems

ISO 9001:2008 vs. ISO 9001:2015 – Context of the Organization By Itay Abuhav

With the ISO 9001:2008 it is necessary to evaluate whether the organization’s quality management system follows the general requirements. Wr.t. the ISO 9001:2015 and the requirements of  context of the organization – the organization shall analyze which issues (external as well as internal) that may affect its QMS or already have an effect.

Context-of-the-Organization - tongue in cheek view

Context of the Organization” and the Power of SWOT Analysis


We will take up, “Interested Parties”, one of the vital considerations for understanding the ‘Context of the Organization’, in our May, 2016 episode.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy in his ASQ’s Influential Voice blog-column, has presented a roundtable discussion on the Voice of CustomerWhat exactly should voice of the customer mean to the quality professional? How important is it? What are the best ways to gather it?.  Luciana Paulise discusses some new tool to capture the voice of the customer. Pam Schodt considers the best way to gather VoC standards is through face-to-face meeting followed up by written and verified specifications. To Dr, Suresh Gettala, key is to hear from horse’s mouth and not to surmise about what the customer wants. Luigi Sille attaches equal importance to data gathering its use

We now watch the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

  • Metrics for Management – Tim Adams, Engineering Assurance Specialist, NASA, spent a few minutes with ASQ TV to talk about some of the main ideas of his 2015 ASQ World Conference on Quality and Improvement presentation. In this interview, Adams discusses some of the finer points of identifying and using metrics.
  • Benchmarking – Today, we’ll learn the basics of benchmarking, review the recommended six phases of a successful benchmarking process, and finally, we’ll get reacquainted with one vital ingredient in benchmarking: metrics.
  • The Torque Chain of Quality Large – For more information go to   Daily torque testing is becoming more common place because it makes good business sense. But is daily testing error proofing? No, and far from it. …. If your torque wrench is out of spec, using a torque wrench to prevent errors only leads to a false sense of security. What if the torque tester you are using is out of spec and you don’t know it?   This video and the subsequent series take you through every link in the chain of quality in order to help you understand all the places where the wheels can fall off. Specifically it takes a look at the places we tend to overlook or take for granted.

In Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of March, 2016, we have –

Jim's Gems♦ Integrate DFSS with Existing Design Processes – Many organizations make a mistake when trying to replace their design process with Design for Six Sigma. DFSS was never intended to completely replace an organization’s existing design process.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites, and have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – March, 2016


Welcome to March 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We commenced the familiarizing ourselves with the changes in the Revision of ISO 9001 (:2015) with the December, 2015 episode of our blog carnival. Then, in the January 2016 episode, we took up Process Approach in the 2015 revision of the standard, as our first topic. In February, 2016, we had taken up first part of Risk-Based Thinking that primarily addressed the concept as has been taken up in ISO 9001: 2015.

Now, in this month’s episode we will look up as to how Risk-Based Thinking is looked upon in more general perspective.

Risk Management Process - ISO 31000











Managing Risks: A New Framework by  Robert S. Kaplan and Anette Mikes – presents a new categorization of risk that allows executives to tell which risks can be managed through a rules-based model and which require alternative approaches.

Category I Risks – Preventable Risks – arising from within – best managed through active prevention: monitoring operational processes and guiding people’s behaviors and decisions toward desired norms.

Category II: Strategy risks -A company voluntarily accepts some risk in order to generate superior returns from its strategy…A strategy with high expected returns generally requires the company to take on significant risks, and managing those risks is a key driver in capturing the potential gains.,, Strategy risks cannot be managed through a rules-based control model. Instead, you need a risk-management system designed to reduce the probability that the assumed risks actually materialize and to improve the company’s ability to manage or contain the risk events should they occur.

Category III: External risks – Some risks arise from events outside the company and are beyond its influence or control. Sources of these risks include natural and political disasters and major macroeconomic shifts. External risks require yet another approach. Because companies cannot prevent such events from occurring, their management must focus on identification (they tend to be obvious in hindsight) and mitigation of their impact.

The Changing Role of Risk Manager takes the sense of 10 senior risk experts across Europe to understand the role of risk manager and explore what skills and behaviours tomorrow’s generation of risk managers will need.

Risk Based Thinking Handbook – William A. Levinson has done an excellent job of explaining the role of waste (from the LEAN perspective) and how it can increase risk to organizations who fail to “see and think” that the many forms of waste are a source of operational risk to the organization. Among this book’s most important takeaways is that a risk or opportunity can hide in plain view unless our workforce knows how to identify it….Another of this book’s key missions is to equip the reader to “grok” ISO 9001 as a synergistic framework that helps an organization achieve its goals. “Grok” is originally from Robert A. Heinlein’s Stranger in a Strange Land, and it means to understand and internalize something completely.

What is Risk-Based Thinking?…. In order to successfully implement the concept of risk-based thinking, be sure to follow these tips:

  • Analyze risks and prioritize them.What risks are acceptable no matter the outcome, and what risks should be avoided?
  • Have plans for addressing risk.Can any risks be avoided and how? How can risks be minimized?
  • Check effectiveness.Once plans have been called into action, reassess the situation, several times of needed, to understand how effective it has been.
  • Learn from experience and push to improve.No matter the outcome of risk assessment and mitigation, use all the information possible for creating improvements.

How People Can Get Better At Risk-Based Thinking and Improve Their Organization’s RBM – Ben Locwin takes the process of buying lotteries, evaluating risk of use swimming pools by the toddlers and similar examples to emphasize the fact that most of us tend to take the past behaviour as an indicator of the future. That can be classified as a classic understatement.

Q9C Quality Consulting’s blog tag Risk Management has several more articles of interest on this subject.

We take a look at some video clips:

Risk Management 101: What is Risk Management?

Introduction to Risk Management

A New Look at Risk Management is an ASQ video.

Understanding ISO 9001:2015: Risk and Opportunities

This is the first year of implementing ISO 9001: 2015, Certainly, in the days to come, the concepts like Risk-Based Thinking will evolve and attain higher level of maturity, We, therefore, will continue to look at the developments over next couple of years.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy in his ASQ’s Influential Voice blog-column, has presented a roundtable discussion on Careers in Quality.

We now watch the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

  • Creating and Sustaining a Culture of Quality – In this episode we dig deeper into transforming the organizational culture into a culture of quality and a simple communications tool that can help create a culture of quality.
  • Quality and FDA – Quality plays an important role in industries regulated by government bodies like the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. A representative from the FDA talks to ASQ about this role, as well as an upcoming regulation that will affect consumers. The quality tool flowcharting is also explained and demonstrated.

In Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of February, 2016, we have –

Jim's Gems

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – January 2016


Welcome to January 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

In the previous episode of our blog carnival, we have taken up an overview of the changes in the just published Revision of ISO 9001 (:2015). From the present episode, every month we will take up each key change individually for a closer look.

We first take up the most fundamental underlying concept – Process Approach..

The present version of the standard now “promotes the adoption of a process approach when developing, implementing and improving the effectiveness of a quality management system, to enhance customer satisfaction by meeting customer requirements. {Ref: Introduction – Clause 0.3.1} The process approach involves the systematic definition and management of processes, and their interactions, so as to achieve the intended results in accordance with the quality policy and strategic direction of the organization. Management of the processes and the system as a whole can be achieved using the PDCA cycle (see 0.3.2) with an overall focus on risk-based thinking (see 0.3.3) aimed at taking advantage of opportunities and preventing undesirable results.

Schematic representation of the elements of a single process

Schematic representation of the elements of a single process

The ISO Technical Committee 176 has published a paper The PROCESS APPROACH in ISO 9001: 2015 (ISO/TC 176/SC 2/N1289) and a detailed presentation on the PROCESS APPROACH in ISO 9001:2015

ISO’s Process Approach also lucidly presents concepts like Process Approach, Process Definition, Process Examples, Inputs and Outputs – outputs could include not only services, software, hardware, and processed materials, but also decisions, directions, instructions, plans, policies, proposals, solutions, expectations, regulations, requirements, recommendations, complaints, comments, measurements, and reports. Clearly, an output could be almost anything – Process interactions, Process-based QMS.

Three Ways ISO 9001:2015 Will Encourage a Process ApproachDan Nelson

Instead of being suited to ISO 9001, a QMS is supposed to be suited to the unique operations of an organization. A process approach demands that an organization’s real, operational; core processes are developed in accordance with the “plan” phase of the plan-do-check-act cycle (PDCA). These are the processes needed for a QMS.

Second, also in the ‘Introduction, sub-clause 0.3 -Process approach’, the standard explains that the process approach is based on the PDCA cycle, mentioning W. Edwards Deming by name.

Finally, in ISO 9001:2008 sub-clause 4.1—General Requirements, contain requirements seemingly adequate to verify whether a process approach has been applied.

Process Approach

QMS is made up of a network of value-adding processes, like Customer Oriented Processes (COPs), Support Oriented Processes (SOPs), Management Oriented Processes (MOPs), Quality Managed Processes (QOPs), Outsourced Processes (OPs) that link, combine and interact with one another to collectively provide product or service. These processes are inter-dependent and can be defined by complex interactions. In order to plan and implement QMS using the ‘Process Approach’, one must:

  • Identify the processes needed for the QMS.
  • Determine their sequence and interaction (show the sequence and interaction of COP’s). There are many ways to document this, e.g., a high level flowchart or a process map.
  • Determine the application of QMS processes throughout the organization (show how MOP’s; SOP’s and QMP’s are applied to each COP and to each other). There are many ways of documenting this. A popular way is through graphical representation, e.g. process maps.
  • Determine (plan) the criteria, methods, information, controls and resources needed for each QMS process.
  • Identify the internal/external customer-required output.
  • Describe the process activity that produces the output.
  • Identify the resources needed for the process activity.
  • Identify the inputs for the process – information, materials, supplies, etc.
  • Define the process methods, procedures, forms etc., that may be needed to produce the output.
  • Define the controls to prevent or eliminate risk of errors, omissions, or nonconformities in process activity. controls may come from the IS standards; customer; regulatory and your own organizational requirements
  • Interaction with sources that provide the inputs (internal process or external supplier), uses the output (internal process or external customer), or provide the resources (internal support process) to perform the process activity.
  • Implement QMS according to the plan.
  • Monitor, measure and improve each QMS process and its interaction with other processes. Performance indicators to monitor and measure process performance may come from the IS standard, customer, regulatory and organization’s own requirements. Performance indicators may relate to the process output as well as the process activity.
  • Performance indicators for process output must focus on meeting customer and regulatory requirements. Performance indicators for process activity should focus on measuring process effectiveness and efficiency.

PROCESS MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS IN ISO 9001 (2015) – Lennart Brandt -By application of the definition of “process”, the number of processes concerned by the requirements in ISO/CD 9001 could be considered to be at least about 275.

ISO 9001:2015 – The Process Approach Approacheth – focuses on the new standard’s “process approach” requirements, how it differs from the current version, and the many problems companies and auditors will have interpreting it.

ISO 9001 series, Part 3: The Process Approach in ISO 9001:2015Ben Saxton, Business Development Manager and Alastair Atcheson, Digital Marketing Executive @ Qualsys – Auditors should be looking at the effectiveness of processes over exact compliance to procedure. This is in line with PDCA, which forms a basis for the process approach to begin with. A process approach is the best way to manage a QMS, not just in terms of the audit process, but as a business strategy in general. Auditors and organisations alike should remember that the process approach is being emphasised because fundamentally, it makes sense.

The Joy of ProcessSusannah Clarke says a process approach can inspire innovation and creativity – In Morecambe & Wise Make Breakfast, watch the brilliant example of how a process approach inspires innovation and creativity:

We will now turn to our regular sections:

Future of Quality - Report - 2015Since 1996, ASQ has published seven issues of the Future of Quality Report. The latest edition explores 11 topic areas—already impacting consumers, businesses, and society—that will have a profound effect on the future of quality. These thought-provoking, personal, and detailed essays are written by distinguished experts from around the world. The “2015 ASQ Future of Quality Report: Quality Throughout” challenges, enlightens, and sparks action. ASQ CEO, Bill Troy ASQ’s Influential Voice in Top 11 Insights From ASQ’s Future of Quality Study has compiled the “key” insights from each of the 11 essays in the Future of Quality research.

We now watch the latest ASQ TV episodes:

Strategic Thinking – Business Skills – In this ASQ® TV episode, the concept of strategic thinking is examined. Learn how strategic thinking varies in theory and practice and be introduced to the analytic hierarchy process—a method that breaks down decision making into a series of comparisons. Watch now:

Strategy and Leadership: In this episode, learn a four-step method for setting organization-wide strategy that fosters employee engagement and empowerment, and get ideas for structuring your organization and communicating strategy … to employees to help achieve success. Read: Peter Merrill’s QP article on self-managed teams.

Making Strategy Visual – It is essential your staff connect goals, metrics and projects to get them engaged in the organization’s strategy. Hear how North Bay Regional Health Center in Ontario achieves this important goal by making strategy visual to employees and customers.

We would add Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems as our regular feature from this month.

Thought PowerJim's Gems: Choose to think the best about yourself, your world, and those people who are there to support you.

Dealing with Challenges:  Learning to overcome our challenges is what builds character and resilience.

Embrace efforts: Decide to embrace and enjoy the effort, and you’ll reap wonderful benefits from it.

20 Most Popular Posts on the Curious Cat Management Blog in 2015

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – November 2015

Leave a comment

Welcome to November, 2015 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

The search for “Improving measures of measurement of process” took us to the first building block -‘performance measures and metrics’, followed by the search for resources relating to the ‘structuring for the process of improvement’, “Deploying the Improvement Process” and “Implementing the Improvement Process”. While we were @ Measuring the Improvement Process, we had observed references to several techniques of measurements. Among these we had a detailed look at one of the most discussed one: The Balanced Scorecard.

In this last part of our journey of Continuous Improvement, we will take a look at some of the representative articles on “Sustaining Continuous Improvement’.

Sustainability of lean process System

How to Create and Sustain Successful Continuous Improvement Teams – Renee Bassett – Porter at Irving Oil: “Keep it fresh, keep improving the system.  Do not let it stagnate.  Your competition is making improvements every day; evolving change is now a way of life.” Click here to read how understanding human motivations can go a long way toward ensuring a successful continuous improvement program.

Sustaining Continuous Improvement Initiatives – Simon Bodie – Continuous Improvement Initiatives are often launched with a flurry of excitement .This can soon wane as executives fail to see value and question the rationale for continuing. Achieving longevity requires careful management of the program. Just completing ‘good work’ is not enough, benefits need to be understood calculated and extracted. Progress needs to be communicated effectively.

Sustaining a Continuous Improvement Culture in a World of Flux – It is not so much that we are afraid of change, or so in love with the old ways, but it is the place in between we fear….. like being in between trapezes……there is nothing to hold on to. CI should not merely be an institutional priority, but should be integrated into the strategic plan. A well-defined structure for implementing CI programs, transparent flow of information, listening to views of each stakeholder, showing the benefits to the individuals and maintaining the consistency of approach (towards CI) help build the culture that creates environment for sustaining the CI.

Visual Management Helps You Sustain Continuous Improvement – You can’t make your operations more efficient if your employees don’t know what is going on!  Communicating information throughout all departments and levels of your company is critical. Visual management is a fundamental element of process control that helps you sustain continuous improvement.

Creating and sustaining value: Building a culture of continuous improvementSaleem Chattergoon, Shelley Darling, Rob Devitt, Wolf Klassen have narrated a phased approach adopted at Toronto East General Hospital . These are: Phase 1 – Setting the stage ; Phase 2 – Team-driven performance management and Phase 3 – The daily management system and cross-appointment model. The three phased approach takes the movement beyond individual projects to the cultural transformation.

Continuous Improvement through a Productive Culture

Actions that Build a Productive Work Culture

  1. Practice good leadership at all levels
  • Create trust and respect
  • Be committed and persistence
  • Be patient and understanding
  • Be consistent
  • Allocate resources fairly & where needed
  • Explain the goals and reasons
  1. Lead by example, by “walking your talk”
  • Role model desired behaviours
  • Coach, mentor and teach
  1. Determine appropriate criteria for rewards, praise, and status
  2. Select good people and supporters – Put individuals in the right roles
  3. Practice open 2-way communication
  4. Manage by walking around
  5. Develop and communicate values, behavioural expectations and norms – Deliver common and consistent messages and behaviours at all levels
  6. Focus on the quality of relationships – respect people
  7. Ensure the physical and emotional safety and well-being of employees – Listen to ideas and concerns and take appropriate action
  8. Let employees enjoy the rewards of their hard work
  9. Help people to understand all the ways the change will be good for the organisation and also for them
  10. Promote collaboration and cross-functional problem solving
  11. Provide stability and consistency
  12. Promote creativity, innovation & learning – Within boundaries remove obstacles and encourage rule breaking
  13. Create personal responsibility for results
  14. Provide employees with feedback
  15. Create a sense of identity, ownership and pride of work
  16. Provide development opportunities, new skills and fresh knowledge
  17. Provide career opportunities
  18. Provide challenges and challenging opportunities
  19. Impose real-time consequences that matter
  20. Be connected to your community

Continuously improve your chances for project success: Whitepaper 3 || ||

Effective management of major projects relies on three key concepts:

  1. early planning and organization
  2. stakeholder communication and project controls integration, and
  • Continuous improvement.

This third instalment of a three-part series, outlines the third key component in managing a major project, continuous improvement……A collaborative culture – where information is exchanged informally and through multiple channels – is preferable for inspiring continuous improvement.

From lean to lasting: Making operational improvements stick

The broader challenge underlying such problems is integrating the better-known “hard” operational tools and approaches—such as just-in-time production—with the “soft” side, including the development of leaders who can help teams to continuously identify and make efficiency improvements, link and align the boardroom with the shop floor, and build the technical and interpersonal skills that make efficiency benefits real.

Why do continuous improvement initiatives fail to sustain? By Thomas Liesener – The four most commonly occurring hot spots are: lack of will, support, commitment and leadership from (senior) management; not right metrics selected, monitored and reviewed (for CI and change); lack in professional human development / trainings and career pathing; not right and enough resources allocated or available for implementation and projects.

Sustaining the continual improvement will find as many variants as required by the as differing needs of differing circumstances, varying by the degree in which the people involved vary with as many differing backgrounds. Obviously, we cannot cover all such variants in a single episode of our blog carnival. The ultimate message is that continuous improvement sustains in thrives in the culture of people who feel involved, who keep evolving and openly share their views and feelings.

The journey of the continuous improvement never ends.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

Bill Troy, ASQ CEO presents four guest posts:

A Day With the Future of QualityEdwin Garro presents a very intimate documentation of his visit to a junior high school class at the San Rafael de Poás Technical High School, Alajuela, Costa Rica. The Quality and Productivity Technical program was conceived as long term answer to shortage of skilled quality technicians. The visits talks about aspirations of the students of the program.

Big Data and Quality Professionals – by Ponmurugarajan Thiyagarajan Big data is in play when data size is huge (Volume), moves in high speeds (Velocity), comes in variety of forms (Variety) and in varied quality (Veracity) which conventional database systems cannot efficiently process.

Analytics built over big data enable organizations to process structured and unstructured data to derive useful intelligence and provide actionable insights for end-users.

This has interesting implications for quality professionals who may become involved with big data efforts. Assurance of quality is key in such projects: data clean-up must happen in an automated fashion and reconciliation reports to be produced in real-time to track quality parameters. Thus, relevant tools need to be built for quality assurance. It will be interesting to see how quality tools such as Plan-Do-Check-Act, the 7 quality tools (Fishbone diagram, Check sheets, Control charts, Histogram, Pareto Charts, Scatter Diagrams, Flow Charts) etc., can be customized for a big data project.

Facing Cultural Barriers by Leaders to Strengthen a Culture of Quality by Luciana Paulise company culture is modeled upon top management behavior. So, in effect, leaders need to change their behavior first if they want to change the entire company culture—and they have to do it through a systemic model considering four types of intelligence, viz. spiritual, intellectual, physical and emotional.

Talking To the C-Suite About Qualityby Dr. Suresh Gettalaemphasizes the following five rudimentsTalking to C-suite about quality culture that are indispensable when talking about quality to the top management:

  1. The long term – short term continuum
  2. The Language of Metrics
  3. Economic case for Quality
  4. Success Anecdotes
  5. Big Q” Approach

The current month episode of ASQ TV is: Quality in Pop Culture . Celebrate World Quality Month by watching examples of quality appearing in pop culture. Quality touches nearly all aspects of society. And it’s not surprising to see it in mainstream entertainment—whether it’s being satirized for its seemingly complicated tools and methods, or indirectly referenced for how it improves our lives.

For the present month, our ASQ’s Influential Voice is Bill Troy, the CEO of ASQ.

Bill TroyWe have been regular visitor to his View From the Q.

We had taken our first look at View from Q in September 2013, when it was under the guidance of the then ASQ CEO, Paul Borawski.

Presently, we seem to have reached the end of the present list of ASQ Influential Voices. We will take a different approach to visiting the views of ASQ Influential Voices, beginning January 2016.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our Improvement journey …………

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – September, 2015


Welcome to September, 2015 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

The search for “Improving measures of measurement of process” took us to the first building block -‘performance measures and metrics’, followed by the search for resources relating to the ‘structuring for the process of improvement’. Then we took one more step forward, so as to look at some basics for “Deploying the Improvement Process”. We then went over to explore different ideas and approaches in “Implementing the Improvement Process”.

We now take a look at Measuring the Improvement Process.

How to Improve Manufacturing Productivityby Tara Duggan, Demand Media

Improving manufacturing productivity involves collecting and analyzing data and making effective decisions. Ensuring the success of these operational excellence initiatives often depends on divisions working together to share data and interpret it appropriately

Step 1 – Identify the work flow associated with manufacturing your product. This includes the people, processes and technology required for production as well as the resources, communication and procedures needed throughout the company.

Step 2 – Track reports to analyze financial and customer satisfaction data. Share the same comprehensive data with all project managers so they can develop manufacturing process improvement plans, assign resources to complete the tasks, manage the budgets and determine if the projects met their goals. Establish criteria for standardizing project processes to ensure that all project managers systematically evaluate performance consistently and interpret changes appropriately.

Step 3 – Create a balanced scorecard based on data from a secure repository. Identify financial measures for the scorecard such as monthly sales, customer measures such as the number of product support calls, process measures such as number of products manufactured each month and employee measures such as staff retention. As you implement process improvement changes, note any changes in these operational measures to validate that your interventions were successful.

Step 4 – Monitor information generated from process improvement projects to implement improvements throughout all of your manufacturing operations. Analyze costs and benefits.

LEAN SIX SIGMA METRICS: HOW TO MEASURE IMPROVEMENTS WITHIN A PROCESS – Different Time, Cost, Process Complexity, Organizational Perspective metrics frequently used in Lean Six Sigma projects to measure the outcomes of a process, identify opportunities for improvement and monitor changes over time.

Using ROI to Measure the Results of BPI Initiatives Process improvement initiatives are becoming a focal point for organizations – regardless of their size or industry – and Executives want to see the positive monetary impact from these initiatives. Here is where Business Impact and ROI analysis comes into play to measure the effectiveness of an organization’s process improvement initiatives.

Measuring improvement

  • If you do not gather strong baseline data, you will never know exactly how much you have achieved.
  • For the..project, your measures should focus on the critical stakeholder experience and staff experience, as this is the focus of the overall programme. Ultimately, these factors will show whether you have met your aim.
  • Data
  • Measure little and often: measurement for improvement does not require large datasets. It is better to start with one measure, and add more, than to be ambitious about the number of measures to be collected and feel defeated by the scale of it.
  • for improvement is different from data for research. It is messier and less accurate, but highly relevant to the daily work of clinicians. Sampling is often appropriate – for example, asking 10 patients per month, as opposed to all patients. In measuring for improvement, it is rapid, small-scale feedback (through PDSA cycles) that will help you assess the impact of your changes.
  • Monitor your progress through a dashboard. This must include the main types of measure (process, outcomes and balancing measures). It should also make clear what the goal is (how much to achieve and by when), how progress will be calculated, and where the data will come from. All these are essential questions to answer when developing your measures. (See PFCC sample measurement dashboard).
  • Make sure your measures relate directly to the factors that you are changing.
  • Driver diagrams play a useful role in this activity as these help pin down what is important.. and measures that relate to these drivers.
  • Make sure you are clear about what you plan to accomplish, how you will know that this change will improve patients’ experience or outcomes, and precisely what activities you will put in place to effect this change.
  • Use the expertise in quality improvement within your organization to support you. Techniques such as ‘run charts’ (see PFCC further reading), which can track progress over time can be very useful in providing a persuasive picture of your progress. Above all, remember that the purpose of measurement for improvement is to support you to achieve your aims. The data must therefore be of value to you – not for reporting elsewhere.

How Do You Measure Process Improvement?

Maturity Levels in the Staged Representation

Maturity Levels in the Staged Representation

Measurement of Process Improvement is a paper of Practical Software and Systems Measurement (PSM) community. The paper includes areas of measurement of process improvement, measuring the value of process, improvement, measuring readiness for process improvement, measuring the process improvement progress.

Three Ways For Measuring Continuous Improvement Success – Mark Ruby emphasizes the critical role of measurement in the success of Continual Improvement in terms of three dimensional measurement perspectives:

#1 Measure based on Financial results

# 2 Measure based on an assessment tool

# 3 Measure based on view of the stakeholder

How to Measure Continuous ImprovementBy Emile Heskey

  1. Find ways to quantify progress
  2. Review the data in terms of initial goals
  3. Develop a series of criteria midway through the project which can be used for measuring the improvements.
  4. Accept Setbacks.

Cultural Transformation: Measuring and improving the culture to achieve significant business results – Charles Aubrey – Culture was defined over These values: Manage with Information and Metrics, Empower Employees, Teamwork, Respect and Ethical Behavior, Improve and Innovate, Coach/Mentor and Make a Difference, and Surpass Customer Expectations.

The measurement of the improvement was built into a detailed survey.

Measuring continuous improvement: sustainability at Sibelco Benelux presents the measurement of continuous improvement of the sustainability.

Measuring Asset Performance for Continuous Improvement – In this 7-minute, 9-second video, Mike Poland of Life Cycle Engineering explains the measure phase of a simple implementation model for a risk-based asset management system. Learn the importance of metrics, process parameters and key performance indicators (KPIs), as well as how to correctly interpret data and take the appropriate corrective actions.

Measuring Continuous Improvement In Engineering Education Programs: A Graphical Approach – The methodology, the Pitt-SW Analysis, is an adaptation of the competitive strategy principle of SWOT (strength, weakness, opportunities and threats). It consists of four steps – data collection, data summarization, display of proportions, and construction of a Strengths and Weakness (SW) table by the application of rules that reflect the desired sensitivity of the methodology. The results of the SW table can be displayed graphically using basic symbols to highlight and track changes in students’ perceptions.

These are at best a few samples on the subject. Measurement of the continual improvement will find as many variants as required by the as differing needs of differing circumstances, performed by the people with as many differing backgrounds. Obviously, we cannot cover all such variants in a single episode of our blog carnival. So, we would continue our onward journey of the process of improvement for two more months.

We turn to our regular sections now:

Bill Troy, ASQ CEO has presented three guest articles. Each one makes a very interesting and thought-provoking material. So we will only document the titles of these articles here:

Julia McIntosh, ASQ communications in the ‘August Roundup: Creating a Performance Culture: What Not To Do’ has collected the round of views of ASQ Bloggers on ways to change company culture in a positive direction. The original referenced article of James Lawther is Creating a Performance Culture: What Not To Do.

We then move over to ASQ TV Episodes:

  • Five Whys for the Birds – Reversing the deteriorating of the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C., with the five whys technique. The story may be a bit of a myth in some quality circles, but it still contains a good example of … the ‘five whys’ technique for root cause analysis.
  • Taking a deeper dive into root cause analysis – Root cause analysis can be used to find the crux of any problem in virtually any setting. Let’s take a look at some nuances of root cause analysis and how to apply it successfully. In this episode, we’ll… cover: • Knowing how far to take one root cause analysis method • An example of the 5 WHYs technique QP article • Finding the root cause of a deteriorating building “Flip the Switch” • Incorporating the scientific method approach in root cause analysis. Watch a full interview with Matthew Barsalou.
  • Taking the Scientific Method Approach to Root Cause Analysis – You probably take it for granted that root cause analysis should be empirical-that is, verifiable by observation or experience rather than just theory. In “real life,” organizational approaches to finding… a root cause don’t always pan out this way because people are anxious for answers. However, author and expert Matthew Barsalou suggests that the scientific method may be a good approach to root cause analysis
  • Standards and Auditing – Learn how to identify, categorize and take action on risks – vital skills for organizations transitioning to ISO 9001:2015. Also learn how audits can be conducted virtually. To watch the webinar, click … here.
  • Auditing, Risk, and ATM – Dennis Arter offers tips and techniques about assessing and managing risk with the help of risk catalogues and the ATM method (Accept-Transfer-Mitigate).

Our ASQ’s Influential Voice for the month is – Prem Ranganath.

Prem RanganathPrem Ranganath is a senior director and global head of IT delivery excellence and risk assurance at Quintiles Inc. He is a senior member of ASQ and enjoys working with teams to enable quality as a necessary and valuable behavior. He is very passionate about introducing a quality mindset and practices in K-12 so that quality is ingrained into interactions and decisions early on. Prem teaches at a graduate level course on software quality and product management at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wis. He blogs at – The Art of Quality.  The blog tagline is: Ideas and experiences to inspire professionals and students to pursue the art

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our Improvement journey ………….

Older Entries