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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – March 2021

Welcome to March 2021 edition of IXth Volume of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We pay our special tribute to Sahir Ludhyanvi on his birth centenary:

Sahir Ludhianvi at 100: Why the poet and film lyricist was the original ‘Angry Young Man’Akshay Manwani – With his incisive poetry and plainspokenness, Ludhianvi consistently raised uncomfortable questions and expressed bitter truths.

Remembering Sahir Ludhianvi: Privileged to have sung his lyrics, says museBella Jaisinghani – “Do you know, it was Geeta Dutt and I who originally sang ‘Kabhi Kabhi mere dil mein’ for a Chetan Anand film in 1959-60. It got shelved and I don’t even have a recording. Khayyam Sahab’s tune was nearly the same as the one that was released later’ says Sudha Malhotra.

No other poet expressed separation in the same manner as Sahirsaab: Gulzar – I remember that he was never allowed to leave the stage without reciting his famous poem on the Taj Mahal — ‘Meri mehboob kahi aur mila kar mujhse’ — it was very, very popular with the people.

Sahir Ka Khayal Aaya: Sahir’s Anti-War Poem in a Unique PlayAntara Nanda Mondal – To commemorate legendary poet-lyricist Sahir Ludhianvi’s 100th Birth Anniversary, Delhi-based theatre group Pierrot’s Troupe’s premiered its unique monologue play Sahir Ka Khayal Aaya on March 7 at LTG Auditorium, New Delhi.

Sahir at 100: The ‘pal do pal ka shayar’ who doesn’t fade even 41 years after his deathUnnati Sharma and Shreyas Sharma – his lyrics and poetry still resonate for their philosophical tinge, symbolism & social consciousness.

We now move on to other tributes and memories:

Remembering Indeevar – Part I and Part II pay the tribute to The lyricist on the occasion of his 24th death anniversary.

50 years of Anand: a tribute – Everyone who loves Hrishikesh Mukherjee’s Anand agrees that it is one of the warmest, most life-affirming of Hindi films. As it turns fifty, the dominant memory is of the terminally ill hero, played by Rajesh Khanna, spreading cheer and inspiration, determined to live a badi zindagi (big life) even if he isn’t fated for a lambi (long) one.

50 years of Anand — Hrishikesh Mukherjee’s timeless classic is an ode to lifeUnnati Sharma – If director Hrishikesh Mukherjee had had his way, his 1971 classic Anand would have looked a lot different. One of Bollywood’s first superstars Raj Kapoor would have played the title character, and Bengali star Saumitra Chatterjee would have been Dr Bhaskar Banerjee.

Remembering Ninu Mazumdar – the composer and the singer is a tribute to Ninu Mazumdar on his 21st death anniversary (9 September 1915 – 3 March 2000)

Shailendra Sharma @ Golden Era of Bollywood has posted following memorial tribute posts:

March 2021 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs takes up Ghulam Mohammed and His Singers: 1943 – 1949. In the month of his death anniversary, we commence an annual series that relives his known and less known songs.

Ghulam Mohammad – A Tribute lists popular songs of Ghulam Mohammed, as a follow-up to Ghulam Mohammad’s rarely heard songs.

On Basu Bhattacharya’s Anubhav: Middle Cinema, meet avant-garde, the first film in Bhattacharya’s ‘marriage trilogy’, the other two being Avishkaar and Griha Pravesh

We will now take up the articles on other subjects:

Amitabh Bachchan and India’s battle to preserve its film heritageSoutik Biswas – Shivendra Singh Dungarpur, an award-winning filmmaker, archivist and restorer, of the Film Heritage Foundation has been at the forefront of restoring and preserving Indian films efforts.


A still from the 1958 Bollywood drama Night Club, now preserved in the archive

The Perils of Alcohol: Hindi Films’ Moral Lessons and Tips for Women is a list of ‘drunken women songs’, with following caveats:

  • Caveat 1: The woman must be the heroine, not the vamp. That knocked Hoon abhi main jawaan out of the running.
  • Caveat 2: She must truly be drinking, not pretend drinking. (That took care of a host of ‘sharabi’ songs..)
  • Caveat 3: It has to be alcohol, no other forms of intoxication allowed. NoDum maaro dum or Ye aankhen uff yumma.
  • Caveal 4: All songs had to be from pre-80s’ films.

Pick of the list is Aaj ye meri zindagi– Yeh Raaste Hai Pyar Ke (1963) – Asha Bhosle- Ravi- Shakeel Badayuni.

Romancing with ‘Zindagi’ confines the list to the songs in which ‘Zindagi’ is the main subject

Songs that Shun Love – for example Jis Pyaar Mein Yeh Haal Ho – Phir Subah Hogi, 1958 – Md.Rafi and Mukesh – Khayyam; Sahir Ludhianvi

Once Upon A TimeYe Un Dinon ki Baat Hai is divided into three sections – Pen Portraits, Reminiscences and Perspectives.

On Shadow Craft, a book about the aesthetics of black-and-white Hindi cinema – For anyone who loves black-and-white cinema – and likes the idea of a creative work being encountered in its original form rather than disfigured to meet contemporary tastes – the computer-colourisation of old films is cause for teeth-gnashing.

Songs of the Unsure/Insecure Lover – for example – Main Tumhi Se Poochti HunBlack Cat, 1959 – Md. Rafi and Lata Mangeshkar – N.Datta – Jan Nisar Akhtar.

In continuation to our tradition of ending the post with a few songs of Mohammad Rafi, each one of which basically has a link with the topics discussed in the present post.

Beta Dar Mat….Aahein Bhar Mat… – Bahi Behan (1959) – N Dutta – Sahir Ludhyanvi

Log Kahte Hain Ke Hum Tum Se Kinara Kar Lein – Bahu Begum (1967) – Roshan – Sahir Ludhyanvi

Qaza Zaalim Sahi..Ye Daawa Aaj Duniya Bhar Se – Laila Majnu (1976) – Jaidev – Sahir Ludhyanvi

Hum Mein Hai Kya Ke Humen Koi Haseena – Nawab Saheb (1978) – C Arjun – Sahir Ludhyanvi

I look forward to your inputs to enrich the contents of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Disclaimer: This monthly series of posts is my best-effort-based compilation of posts on Hindi film songs that I normally visit regularly. As I record my sincere thanks to all the original creators of these posts, any other posts that I have nor covered herein shows my lack of awareness of existence of such posts and is by no means any disrespect to their work. The copyrights to the posts, images and video clips remain the properties of the original creators.

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – November 2020

Welcome to November 2020 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We first pay our tributes to Soumitra Chatterjee who passed away on 15-11-2020 and Sean Connery who passed away on 31-10-2020.

Phenomenon called Soumitra – In Mrinal Sen’s Akash Kusum, Soumitra Chatterjee plays an ambitious middle-class executive, who is losing everything he values because of one bad decision. The Hindi remake Manzil starred Amitabh Bachchan, but a back-to-back viewing of both these films will tell you how nuanced Chatterjee’s turn as Ajoy was.

Soumitra Chatterjee and Aparna Dasgupta in Akash Kusum. (Express archive photo)

Soumitra Chatterjee dies at 85Sandipan Deb – Soumitra Chatterjee was an actor who never appeared in a Bollywood film, in spite of lucrative offers. He received Dadasaheb Phalke award in 2012

My friend, Soumitra Chatterjee – Sharmila Tagore on Soumitra Chatterjee: The basis of our friendship was his persona, his values, just the inimitable way he was. There was so much to learn from him, he leaves behind a rich legacy.

Satish Acharya | The Gulf News

Satish Acharya pays tribute to veteran actor Soumitra Chatterjee, and his iconic partnership with legendary director Satyajit Ray, with who he worked in 14 films together.

Bidding Adieu to a Colossus – The man who was such a huge part of Ray’s cinema won his national honours for films he did with other directors

Soumitra Chatterjee – A Habit of Our LivesAmitava Nag attempts at an objective tribute to the magnificence of a true legend

More to read

Soumitra Chatterjee (1935-2020): A pictorial tribute to the legendary actor

Shaken. And Stirred. When Connery walked away from his character after Diamonds are Forever, and Roger Moore took over the mantle, fans were dismayed, as ‘Bond’ became less dark and dangerous, and more humorous and light-hearted. [My notes: I, too, belong to the category of “bond’ films who stopped seeing these films thereafter.]

Dusted Off also takes looks at Sean Connery beyond his James Bond image while reviewing The Hill (1965).

We pick up other tributes and memories:

It’s 100 years of the egg-headed detective who stole our hearts – Sandipan Deb  [ My notes: Agatha Christie has a very forgettable connection in the form of Gumanm (1965) , which was adapted from her And Then There Was None.]

Mughals Engulf Bollywood – D P Rangan, on 158th Remembrances Day of Bahadurshah Zafar, takes a look across influence of Mughal influence over Hindi Cinema  and songs.

Kamal Barot – a forgotten voice is a rare, tribute to one of the very talented singers of Hindi Cinema on her 82nd birthday. The post covers her solos, NFSes and of course MF and FF duets, triads and traiads+

In Hum Dono, lyricist Sahir Ludhianvi turns melodrama into a meditation on love, war & life – Starring Dev Anand in a double role, along with Sadhana and Nanda, Hum Don is film takes on the classic lookalike trope, set against the backdrop of World War 2.

The Divas: Zeenat Aman – she may not be as much of an actress as the others, but it was always a pleasure to see ‘Zeenie Baby’ on screen. She had chutzpah, and serious ‘actress’ or not, she marched to her own drummer, setting the screen on fire while doing so.

In continuation of the Hemant Kumar Centenary celebrations, Hemant Kumar’s solo songs under ‘other’ batons presents Hemant Kumar as a playback singer under direction of music directors over Hemant Kumar’s career from 1951 to 1972.

Aakrosh, Om Puri’s masterclass in the art of silence, is especially powerful after Hathras – Om Puri, Naseeruddin Shah, Amrish Puri and Smita Patil star in Govind Nihalani’s 1980 directorial debut that explores caste politics and the oppression of Adivasis.

Shailendra Sharma @ Golden Era of Bollywood has posted following memorial tribute posts:

November 2020  episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs takes up Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory: 1957. Till now we have covered the years

1953-1955 in 2018, and

1956 in 2019.

We will now take up the articles on other subjects:

How Sai Paranjpye found the ‘eccentric, lovable and unforgettable characters’ for her comedy ‘Katha’Sai Paranjpye – Edited excerpts from the renowned filmmaker’s memoir – A Patchwork Quilt – A Collage of My Creative Life, Publisher: HarperCollins India.– reveal the making of the 1982 classic

In book on early Indian cinema, a look at the romance and risk that went into filmmakingRudradeep Bhattacharjee – Debashree Mukherjee’s ‘Bombay Hustle: Making Movies in a Colonial City’ studies the transition from silent films to the talkies.

Ten of my favourite wind instrument songs expands over previous list of string instrument songs and percussion instruments to enlist the songs wherein the singer on the screen plays a wind instrument.

Female Dance Duets – Part 1 and Part 2, and Part III are now further followed by Part IV  (Public performance other than stage dance) and Part V (FF duet dance songs not placed in any foure previous parts)..

In the Micro View of Songs of 1945  we have carried forward the micro view of solo songs  of Female singers  – now in the form of Amirbai Karnataki – Part 1 and Part 2Mohantara Talpade | Rajkumari | Hamida Bano and  Zeenat Begum. SoY has concluded the review of duets in Best songs of 1945: Wrap Up 3. Aahein na bharin, shikwe na kiye kuchh bhi na zubaan se kaam liya, Badariya baras gayi us paar and  Rani khol de apne dwar, milne ka din aa gaya emerge as the joint winners for the year 1945.

In continuation to our tradition of ending the post with a few songs of Mohammad Rafi, each one of which basically has a link with the topics discussed in the present post. Presently, we remember a few Sahir Ludhianvi’s Mohammad Rafi songs –

Hum Jab Chale To Ye Jahan Jhoome – Hum Hindustani (1960) – Usha Khanna

KahiN Qaraar Na Ho Aur KahiN Khushi Na Mile – Chandi Ki Deewar (1964) – N Dutta

Sun Ae Mehzabeen Mujhe Tujhse Ishq Nahin – Dooj Ka Chand (1964) – Roshan

Kya Miliye Aise Logon Se – Izzat (1968) – Laxmikant Pyarelal

Door Reh Kar Na Karo Baat Kareeb Aa Jao – Amaanat (1975) – Ravi

I look forward to your inputs to enrich the contents of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Disclaimer: This monthly series of posts is my best-effort-based compilation of posts on Hindi film songs that I normally visit regularly. As I record my sincere thanks to all the original creators of these posts, any other posts that I have nor covered herein shows my lack of awareness of existence of such posts and is by no means any disrespect to their work. The copyrights to the posts, images and video clips remain the properties of the original creators.

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – March 2020

Welcome to March 2020 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

March was the month when India celebrated its traditional festival of Holi.

The month also celebrated International Women’s Day on March 8.. SoY has scripted Nayika Bhed in songs. The aesthetics classification of women has been an important part of aesthetics in our ancient literature and arts, such as poetry, drama, dance, music, painting and sculpture. The post has listed Hindi films songs on the basis of the eight types of Heroine, based on अवस्था – The state of her being -, are most commonly referred as Nayika Bhed, e.g. Solah singaar sajaaungi, main piya ko rijhaaungi, main waari waari jaaungi by Shanta Apte from Panihari (1946), music SN Tripathi w.r.t. वासकसज्जा (One dressed up for union).

Incidentally, this Shanta Apte song also gives an opportunity to connect to a full-fledged Shanta Apte tribute post – ‘The stormy petrel of the Indian screen’: Shanta Apte – on SoY last month.

Main Chup Nahin Rahoongi: Ten ‘Outspoken Woman’ Songs also is an article on the occasion of International Women’s Day. Lara lappa lara lappa (Ek Thi Ladki, 1949) has strongly advocated gender equality way back in 1949.

We pick up other tributes and memories:

As it happens, we have some excellent posts  covering the past epidemics in different parts of world, as captured in Hindi films-

Looking Back at My Old Review of Dr. Kotnis Ki Amar Kahani – This was a film about a doctor who goes to China to help cure a plague, which incidentally is now at the root of coronavirus pandemic.

‘No harm in asking him, is there?’ How Rajendra Kumar got Bertrand Russell to be in a Hindi movie  – Edited excerpts from the biography ‘Jubilee Kumar’ reveal the story behind the Nobel laureate philosopher’s cameo in the 1967 movie ‘Aman’.

Dharti ke Lal – Earliest Depiction of the Great Bengal Famine – The Great Bengal Famine, a holocaust that obliterated nearly 3 million Bengalis in a span of a year or so is mostly forgotten and undiscussed. The first film to illustrate the tragedy of the famine was Dharti Ke Lal (Children of the Earth, 1946) by Khwaja Ahmad Abbas. Amitava Nag looks back at this classic.

A scene from Dharti Ke Lal

A Norwegian folk song that is cathartic, sublime and upliftingShobha Mudgal – As we seal borders and lock ourselves in fearing for the survival of the human race, this is a voice (singing about Heiemo, a girl who sings with such a perfect voice that even the water-spirit Nykkjen falls in love with her) that I find cathartic, sublime and uplifting.

In the Musical Memory of Meena Kapoor is in fact a second part of comprehensive post on Meena Kapoor on her first death anniversary 23 November 2018 by Shalan Lal.

Nutan’s understated yet powerful performance in Bandini is a masterclass in acting – Set in pre-Independence India, Bandini tells the story of Kalyani (Nutan), a young woman who has been sentenced to life in prison after she murders the wife of her lover, Bikash (Ashok Kumar).

7 Films That Prove Shashi Kapoor Was Way Ahead of His Time – Looking back at a collection of the actor’s and producer’s way-ahead-of-the-times films, when it was still possible to fly over the cuckoo’s nest – Dharmaputra (1961), Sidhdhartha (1972), Satyam Shivam Sundaram (1977), Kalyug (1980), New Delhi Times (1984), Utsav (1984), Sammy and Rosie Got Laid (1994)

Shashi Kapoor in Junoon is a masterclass in how to humanise an unlikeable man – Shyam Benegal’s historical drama based on a Ruskin Bond story, The Flight of Pigeons,  brings together the very best of Hindi cinema.

Shailendra Sharma @ Golden Era of Bollywood has posted following memorial tribute posts:

In our Manna Dey birth centenary series, after Manna Dey and his contemporary lead actors, we have taken up Manna Dey’s Comedy Songs. covers Manna Dey- In the January 2020 episode we began from the beginning of Mehmood’s acting career, till Ziddi (1964), and in February, 2020 episode, the songs composed by Roshan, Hement Kumar and Chitragupta had been covered . In the present, March 2020 episode we take up Mehmood’s Manna Dey comedy songs composed by R D Burman

March 2020  episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs takes up S N Tripathi: Unremembered music director of remembered songs: 1961 – 1968Prior to this, we have covered S N Tripathi’s unremembered songs

from 1941 to 1950 in 2017,

from 1951 to 1956 in 2018, and,

from 1957 to 1960 in 2019.

We will now take up the articles on other subjects:

Humour and fantasy in Arvind Desai and Chhoti si Baat is about two scenes from Hindi films of the 1970s, about the use of soft weapons against privilege

Mr India may have been played by Anil Kapoor but Sridevi was the best thing about it – the movie’s most iconic line, said to perfection by a wonderfully creepy Amrish Puri, reportedly wasn’t even going to make the final cut, but Javed Akhtar, who had written the film with his long-time writing partner Salim Khan before they split, insisted on it. And thank god for that, because what even is Mr India without “Mogambo…khush hua”?

Sahir Ludhianvi biopic to be adapted for the screen = The treatment will be based on Akshay Manwani’s biography ‘Sahir Ludhianvi: The People’s Poet’.

Also read:

‘I have lit fires with songs of rebellion’: Memories of Sahir Ludhianvi’s college years

Remembering Nehru, Gandhi, Ghalib: Four poems by Sahir Ludhianvi

The unspoken passion of Sahir Ludhianvi and Amrita Pritam

Sahir Ludhianvi’s hard-hitting, haunting words make ‘Phir Subah Hogi’ relevant even today – The 1958 Raj Kapoor and Mala Sinha-starrer was all about criticising the government, talking about cruel realities and helping the disadvantaged. BJP leader L.K. Advani revealed that he and Atal Bihari Vajpayee, who would go on to be prime minister, had once sought comfort in this film after an election loss in 1958.

A podcast about Gol Maal and other Hindi-film comedies – It centres on Hrishikesh Mukherjee’s Gol Maal, and such other themes of masquerade and self-discovery,  the contributions of Utpal Dutt and Rahi Masoom Raza, and the spectrum of comedy in Hrishi-da’s films (from Deven Varma’s deadpan “shabd-phenk” to the broad slapstick Biwi aur Makaan).

Rajendra ‘Jubilee’ Kumar’s lonely years: ‘I helped all those I could. Where are they today?’– In Jubilee Kumar, Seema Sonik Alimchand writes about the life of one of Bollywood’s biggest superstars and the year he almost had no films.

Nasir Husain’s Hum Kisise Kum Naheen is all about the music = R.D. Burman, Majrooh Sultanpuri, Kishore Kumar, Asha Bhosle, Mohd Rafi — this 1977 superhit was powered by its all-star music team.

We end the post with a few songs of Mohammad Rafi, each one of which basically has a link with the topics discussed in the present post, we have picked up:

Jis Pyar Mein Ye Haal Ho – Phir Subah Hogi (1958) – with Mukesh – Khayyam – Sahir Ludhyanavi

Jiyo To Aise Jiyo Jaise Sab Tumhara Hai – Bahu Beti (1965) – Ravi – Sahir Ludhyanavi

Kya Hua Tera Wada – Hum Kissi Se Kum Nahi (1977) – R D Burman – Majrooh Sultanpuri

Ishq Ne Sar Par Todi Quayamat – Junoon (1978) – Vanraj Bhatia – Jigar Morarabadi

I look forward to your inputs to enrich the contents of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Disclaimer: This monthly series of posts is my best-effort-based compilation of posts on Hindi film songs that I normally visit regularly. As I record my sincere thanks to all the original creators of these posts, any other posts that I have nor covered herein shows my lack of awareness of existence of such posts and is by no means any disrespect to their work. The copyrights to the posts, images and video clips remain the properties of the original creators.

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – January 2020

Welcome to January 2020 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

The first post is about the end of the year –

Oh, what a world – As we get close to the end of the 2010s, it’s difficult to think about the state of the world. The post ends 2019 with four songs of 1940s/50s period of Indian Cinema. About different times, of course (with one even being about ancient times – supposedly), but also – needless to say – very relevant to our own.

Songs of Yore opened the New Year with some nostalgia of Americana @ Romancing the Route 66.

And, now the major event of January 2020 –

January 14, 2020 marked the 101st birth anniversary of poet and social activist Kaifi Azmi. Google Doodles has paid tribute to the legend who was one of the pioneers to bring Urdu poetry to mainstream Hindi films.

Google Doodle pays tribute to famous poet and songwriter Kaifi Azmi on 101st birthday

Google Doodle celebrates Kaifi Azmi’s 101st birth anniversary: Here are some of his best Bollywood songs

दिल को गहराई तक छूने वाले हैं कैफी आजमी के ये शेर

Remembering Kaifi Azmi’s dialogue in verse for the classic Hindi film ‘Heer Raanjha’ – The Progressive writer and film lyricist left his distinctive stamp on the 1970 adaptation of the Punjabi romance. – Chetan Anand’s Heer Raanjha was set in a rugged landscape and revolves around hearty village folk. Kaifi Azmi not only wrote the dialogues of lead charchters but also those of rest of ensemble cast as well.

We pick up other tributes and memories:

Mehfil celebrates ‘C Ramchandra’ Month! with the opening post on his songs that he himself sung, in the name of Chitalkar. This is followed up by –  C Ramchandra – The 1940sC Ramchandra – The 50s (Part I) and C Ramchandra – The 50s (Part II).

Utpal Dutt Today: How would the thespian have fared in the age of Netflix and Chill?Gautam Chintamani – It’s 26 years since Utpal Dutt passed on. Would he have achieved the same glory today with online platforms, where ‘content’ and ‘actor’ surpass the ‘star’, but have a much shorter screen life?

Flawed Genius – Sahir Ludhianvi was many things all at once – a failed romantic, a bitter cynic, a master egotist, a generous mentor, a firm friend. Above all, he was a stellar poet and master lyricist. This, then, is the man on whom the book – Akshay Manwani’s Sahir Ludhianvi: The People’s Poet (Harper Collins Publishers India; ISBN: 978-93-5029-733-9; Rs.399; 320 pages) – shines a spotlight.

The World of Javed Akhtar: 124 Rare Exhibits to Celebrate the Legend’s 75th Year  –  Silhouette Magazine goes backstage to speak to the curators, Pradeep Chandra and S M M Ausaja, and bring an exclusive preview.

Shailendra Sharma @ Golden Era of Bollywood has posted following memorial tribute posts:

In our Manna Dey birth centenary series, after Manna Dey and his contemporary lead actors, we took up Manna Dey’s Comedy Songs, starting with Manna Dey’s songs for Mehmood. The January 2020 episode explores Manna Dey- Mehmood bond from the beginning of Mehmood’s acting career, till blossoming into comedy songs in 1964 with Ziddi songs.

C.I.D. — when Bollywood musical met noir in signature Dev Anand styleSamira Sood -The 1956 classic also introduced one of Hindi cinema’s most loved actors – Waheeda Rehman. Ask anyone born after 1980 and they’ll tell you — if at all they’ve heard of C.I.D. — that the one thing about the movie that has immediate recall is the song Yeh Hai Bombay Meri Jaan.

RD Didn’t Get His Due, But He’ll Never Be Forgotten: Asha BhosleKhalid Mohamed – RD Burman passed away at the age of 54, on 4th January, 1994. And it was only posthumously – or should we say belatedly? – that he has been acknowledged as a music wizard.

January 2020  episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs takes up Jaidev: Brilliant, But Underrated, Composer:  1971, in continuation of the series on Jaidev. The first two articles related to Jaidev’s songs from  1955 to 1963 and from 1964 to 1970 .

Dr. Pradeep Sheety adds: Lata’s NFL Jayate Jayate Jayate … was originally a Kannada film song by Manna Dey, Amber Kumar and Krishna Kalle from the movie KALPAVRIKSHA,1969, with Jaidev’s music. Lyrics by Ku Ra Seetaram Shastri. A lovely song. Unlike the patriotic Hindi version, it is about the role of truthfulness and honesty in life.

We will now take up the articles on other subjects:

Smita Patil’s portrayal of a flawed, messy actor in Bhumika is fascinating and powerfulSamira Sood – Based on memoir of Marathi actor Hansa Wadkar, Smita Patil’s Bhumika, a film by Shyam Benegal, is a brutal & unflinching look at the life of a female movie star in Bombay. Not only Patil’s performance, but also the sensitive writing (Shyam Benegal and Girish Karnad, with Satyadev Dubey for dialogue) shine through.

Amol Palekar interview: ‘The challenge is always to try something else’Nandini Ramnath -One of Indian cinema’s best-loved actors is back with a new play after 25 years. What will it take to make him return to the movies?

Surrogate Songs – The purpose of such songs was really to focus on the lead actors who were quietly enjoying the song and dance, wishing in their hearts they could do it themselves. We will draw upon one song to understand the theme –

Bichhade huye milenge phir kismet ne gar mila diyaPost Box 999 (1958) – – Mohammad Rafi and Asha Bhosle – Kalyanji-Virji Shah – PL Santoshi

To which I have added my own submission –

Jaane Kahan Gayi – Dil Apana Aur Preet Parayai (1960) – Mohammad Rafi – Shankar Jaikishan – Shailendar

Night Songs By Shailendra, by Swapneel Sathe, is a night tour enjoying various flavors of emotions depicted from some selected night songs from the pen Shailendra.

Shabana Azmi is what Sarat Chandra Chattopadhyay thought of when he wrote SwamiMadhavi Pothukuchi – The 1977 film is an excellent tribute to Sarat Chandra Chattopadhyay’s book, which put the woman and her desires and angst in the forefront.

“Essayed Sisyphean roles with effortless ease” is a short review – for India Today – of a new book about Dilip Kumar – Dilip Kumar: Peerless Icon Inspiring Generations (by Trinetra Bajpai and Anshula Bajpai).

Chashme Buddoor, aka Saeed Jaffrey, and the art of making a small role fill the screenSamira Sood – The 1981 rom com and buddy film starring Saeed Jaffrey shows you don’t have to be centre stage or mainstream to have an impact.

Actor Saeed Jaffrey on the sets of Chashme Buddoor with Deepti Naval and Sai Paranjape | Twitter: @FilmHistoryPic

We end the post with a few songs of Mohammad Rafi, each one of which basically has a link with the topics discussed in the present post, we have picked up:

Apni Chhaya Mein Bhagwan Bitha Le Tu Mujhe – Insaniyat (1955) – C Ramchandra – Rajinder Krishna

Tum Jahan Jaaoge – Chor Darwaza (1965) – Roy Frank –  Kaifi Azmi

Kitana Rangeen Hai Ye Sama – Picnic (1966) – With Asha Bhosle – N Dutta – Sahir Ludhyanavi

Tere Kooche Mein Tera Deewana  – Heer Raanjha (1970) –  Madan Mohan – Kaifi Azmi

Chanpa Khili Daar – Faisla (1974 /1988) – with Asha Bhosle – R D Burman – Majrooh Sultanpuri

I look forward to your inputs to enrich the contents of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Disclaimer: This monthly series of posts is my best-effort-based compilation of posts on Hindi film songs that I normally visit regularly. As I record my sincere thanks to all the original creators of these posts, any other posts that I have nor covered herein shows my lack of awareness of existence of such posts and is by no means any disrespect to their work. The copyrights to the posts, images and video clips remain the properties of the original creators.

Categories
Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music, March 2019

Welcome to March 2019 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

A tribute to Shashi Kapoor on his 81st birth anniversary: The many faces of the legendary Shakespeare Wallah

Rekha speaks through her eyes, which made her my choice for Umrao Jaan: Muzaffar Ali -For every art enthusiast, Muzaffar Ali’s home is a treat to the eyes. Speaking with him about his films while laying focus on his best-known work, Umrao Jaan (1981), we got to know a bit more about him and his process of bringing poetry and art to the 70mm screen and more.

Rarely Heard Ghulam Mohammad – on 51st death anniversarythe lyrics formed an important part, then the actual tune.

Remembering Ravi through the songs that he wrote, Lata sings for Ravi and The silent giant-killer and the man of many-splendoured talents: Ravi are rich tributes to a music director who did not get credit befitting his success.

Chalo Ek Baar Phir Se Ajnabi – Gumraah – Strangers Once Again – the situation in life becomes such that you start feeling it is better to be strangers than being lovers. Music composer Ravi takes all the care to handle the delicate situation with utmost care. He uses only the piano (violin and percussion is just an accompaniment) and Mahendra Kapoor’s voice to convey Sahir’s thoughts.

The real mesmeriser Talat Mahmood: His best non-film songs capture some of the most remembered non-film songs of Talat Mahmood.

The Story Of A Sindbad – Shankarrao Biniwale, is narrated to us by Kaushal Inamdar in Marathi here. The post is English translation of that article. Shankarrao Biniwale was an accomplished violinist, who went around the world and explored the origins of violin.

Shailendra Sharma @ Golden Era of Bollywood has posted following memorial tribute posts:

Farooq Sheikh – A Man For All Seasons, who worked with directors like M S Sathyu, Satyajit Ray, Muzaffar Ali, Sai Paranjape, Hrishikesh Mukherjee, Yash Chopra, Ketan Mehta, Ayan Mukherjee.

On Kundan Shah, Paigham, and Vyjayanthimala as the comic foil recollects a lighthearted scene in the 1959 Dilip Kumar-Vyjayanthimala-starrer Paigham

Flashback series: human pain and human comedy in Boot Polish (1954) recommends seeing the film because two child actors get top billing in a 1950s Hindi film… and earn it

March, 2019 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs takes up S N Tripathi: Unremembered music director of remembered songs :1957 – 1960. This is the 3rd article in the series on S N Tripathi. First two covered his songs from 1941 to 1950 and from 1951 to 1956 respectively in 2017 and in 2018.

And, now the posts on other subjects:

Barahmasa in film songs = Literally meaning ‘twelve months’, in music it refers to folk or light classical form of north and east India, sung primarily in the rainy season. E.g.

His girl Friday: Sanjeev Kumar and the ‘computer’ in Trishul, an economical, unobtrusive little moment in a larger-than-life film. The scene is where we are introduced to the middle-aged version of the businessman RK Gupta, played by Sanjeev Kumar, and his superbly resourceful secretary Geeta (Raakhee). The office scene in Trishul isn’t subdued or quirky, but it performs a comparable function – telling us something important about a character, a situation and an environment with a few minute brush-strokes.

Songs At The Opening Credits Of The Movie – Title songs carried a gist of that particular film and the songs at the opening credits sort of served as the preamble of that particular film. Though at times both combined as one and solved both purposes. Opening credit songs might not essentially have the title of film in it. Sometimes the film might also have both, opening credits having the title as well as independent title song. We have picked up a few examples form the article:

Dhund,

Umrao Jan

Rang Birangi – serves the purpose of title songs and an opening credit song.

Somewhat Cross-dressed Women ‘Romancing’ Women in Performances: Ten Songs from which I have picked out a few, which are relatively less-known-

Few Marathi songs by prominent Hindi singers has listed Marathi songs sung by Geeta Dut, Sudha Malhotra, Mukesh, Manna Dey, Hemant Kumar and Moahammad Rafi, obviously excluding Lata Mageshkar, Asha Bhosle and Suamn Kalyanpuar. The post ends with a note on Lata Mangeshkar’s connection with Marathi cinema – a music director. Sixty-nine years back Lata Mangeshkar debuted as a Music Director in the Marathi movie Ram Ram Pavhana (1950). It is to be noted that in her first movie as a composer she used her own name. And it’s not clear why in the later four Marathi movies she gave music under the pseudonym- Anandghan. Anonymity I guess.  Her music was one of the 8 state awrds that Sadhi Manas got.

How SD Burman became as famous as the singers he worked with despite his thin, nasally voice – In edited excerpts from a reissued biography – Incomparable Sachin Dev Burman –  on SD Burman (known as Dada), H Q Chowdhury reopens the debate: was he a singer-composer or a composer-singer?

Who wrote the classic Hindi film ‘Aandhi’? And was it based on Indira Gandhi? Gulzar clears the air – In edited excerpts from an interview, by Saba Mahmood Bashir, in ‘Aandhi Insights into the Film’, Gulzar reveals how his Suchitra Sen-Sanjeev Kumar starrer got made.

Khilte Hain Gul Yahan – Sharmilee – Of Roses And Romance – One version rendered by Kishore Kumar and the other by Lata Mangeshkar. One is happy, the other is sad. The opening lines of both songs depict the sense of the opposites in the songs.

Songs with a Surprise! Share the opening lines by chance. The post has put up quite demaninding filters for the selection of these songs

    • The words should be from the opening lines of the songs
    • The songs should share at least four words.
    • The songs should not have been inspired from a well known ghazal or a bhajan,
    • The songs should be from two different films

Teri Dhoom Har Kahin – Kala Bazaar – Money Matters is a praise money situation –

Sooraj ke jaisi golaai
Chanda ki thandak bhi paayi
Thanke toh pyare duhai
Lai lai lai lai
Teri dhoom har kahin
Tujh sa yaar koi nahin
Hum ko toh pyare tu sab se pyara

In our tradition of ending our post with article on Mohammad Rafi or a topical song of his, I have picked up a few songs, each one of which basically has a link with the topics discussed in the present post.

Duniya Ki Haalat Naram Naram, Halwa Chhodo, Poodi Chhodo, Bajhiya Yeh Kha Lo Garam Garam–  Guzara-1(954) – Ghulam Muhammad – Raja Mehdi Ali Khan

Ghoda Peshauri Mera Tanaga Lahori  Mera –  Pyar Ka Bandhan (1963) – Ravi – Sahir Ludhyanavi

Beta Jamure Kah De Duniya Ko Lalakar Ke – Biradari (1966) – With Manna Dey – Chitragupta – Prem Dhawan

Kya Hua Maine Agar Ishq Ka Izahar Kiya – Yeh Dil Kis Ko Doon (1963) – with Asha Bhosle – Iqbal Quereshi – Qamar Jalalabadi

I am also not able resist temptation to recall one of my most favorite song – Ghulam mOhammad creation.

Hai Bas Ke Har Ek Unke Ek Ishare Pe Nishan Aur – Mirza Ghalib (1954)

I earnestly solicit your inputs for further broad-basing our cache for the content for our carnival of blogs on the Golden Era of Hindi film music.

Disclaimer: This monthly series of posts is my best-effort-based compilation of posts on Hindi film songs that I normally visit regularly. As I record my sincere thanks to all the original creators of these posts, any other posts that I have nor covered herein shows my lack of awareness of existence of such posts and is by no means any disrespect to their work. The copyrights to the posts, images and video clips remain the properties of the original creators.

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – March, 2018

Welcome to March, 2018 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We begin our March, 2018 episode with two obituaries. One is in memory of Sridevi and the other one is in memory of Shammi..

  • No One Could Have Expected This Loss – RIP, Sridevi
  • Sridevi’s superior southern style – Sridevi recast her gamut of talents professionally as an actor to comply with her limited northern brief
  • The Moonlight Has Dimmed – Sridevi was the quintessential director’s actress, molding herself like clay into what her directors demanded of her. Director Shekhar Kapoor once remarked that Sridevi made love to the camera. The quiet, reserved woman who sat quietly in one corner of the sets, makeup on, waiting for her co-stars to arrive or the shot to be ready, would transform once the director called ‘Action’.

Annu Kapoor on Shammi: In spite of setbacks, she always smiled – Born as Nargis Rabadi in 1931 in a Parsi family Shammi debuted against Sheikh Mukhtar in Ustad Pedro(1949), then as one of the lead actors of Malhar (1951). The film didn’t do well commercially even though she got noticed. Soon after, she was cast along with Dilip Kumar and Madhubala in Sangdil (1952).

We recall here one of her forgotten appearance in Musafirkhana (1955)

And, now, we take up the tributes in March, 2018:

Remembering Baby Naaz, Sridevi’s voice in her early Hindi filmsSoumya Rao – Despite achieving acclaim early on as a child actress, Salma Baig spent her later years lending her voice to the cinematic dreams of others.

Chalo Ik Baar Phir Se: The Versatility of Ravi – The trademark of music director Ravi’s compositions? They are hummable, memorable and as alive in our memories as yesterday. Monica Kar looks at the phenomenon this giant, prolific, composer was and what he leaves behind.

Music Composer Ravi & The Golden Age Of Hindi Cine Music – A Suresh Sharma Film, showcasing his last composition

As a matter of mere coincidence, the choice of Romantic Songs by Sahir, in the course of celebrating Sahir Ludhyanavi’s 96th birthday (on 8th March, 2018),  happens to be duets. Here is one of the rare duets from the post: Chand Bhi Koi DeewanaPyas (1968) – Asha Bhosle & Mahendra Kapoor – N Datta

Recalling a Fine Actor and Poet – Sajjan (Lal Purohit), born in 1921 was a rare combination of actor and a poet. He wrote several geets that Talat Mahmood crooned in his soft voice:

‘The New York Times’ obituary of Madhubala notes her tragic life, compares her to Marilyn Monroe – The Madhubala tribute, published by ‘The New York Times’, is part of ‘Overlooked’, a series of obituaries of 15 trailblazing women.

Riding in Masculine Style  celebrates launching of ROXOR by Anand Mahindra from their US plant. M&M’s Jeep was one popular vehicle which actors have even been singing songs while driving it too. The post lists some cases of actors behind the wheel in a Jeep during a song, whether they themselves were lip-syncing or another actor was, or even if the song was being filmed background

Nasir Hussain-The King Of Musical Hits (16 November 1926 – 13 March 2002) had a ear for good, popular music.. He started his career as story writer in 1948. The famous films he wrote for Filmistan include Anarkali (1953), Munimji (1955), and Paying Guest (1957)

March, 2018 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs is dedicated to: S N Tripathi: Unremembered music director of remembered songs:: 1951 – 1956 in continuation with March, 2017 episode of his songs from 1941 to 1950.

And, now the posts on other subjects:

Parody songs: Part 1 and Part 2 are single parody songs and medley of songs respectively.

Songs in the praise of Nature lists the songs that mainly describe the beauty of nature, and also some may describe its connection to the character singing the song. E.g.

Mausam Hai Jawan – Tower House (1962) – Asha Bhosle – Ravi – Asad Bhopali

The Trio of DEV ANAND,DILIP KUMAR and RAJ KAPOOR in 1960s combined to formed the trilogy of the Indian cinema in the 1950’s and 60’s. All the three started their career as Hero before Independence. In the 1950s all of them were in the peak of their career. Each had their own brand value and distinct persona and loyal following. ..

Love gets spooky in ‘Lag Ja Gale’ from the suspense thriller ‘Woh Kaun Thi?’Nandini Ramnath – The song from Raj Khosla’s classic features Sadhana at peak etherealness. A remake of Raj Khosla’s Gothic-style suspense thriller Woh Kaun Thi? (1964) is on the cards. To be produced by KriArj Films, the movie will retain two of the biggest reasons behind its success: the songs Naina Barse Rimjhim Rimjhim and Lag Ja Gale.

Bollywood’s Connection with Goa – Goans played a major role in Bollywood music until the 1980s,Initially only Goans, having trained in Western music, knew how to compose music for orchestras, with a multitude of instruments playing in harmony.The biggest connection with Goa is Lata Mangeshkar and Asha Bhosle who are from Goa.

‘Devdas’ to ‘Daas Dev’: What torch songs say about Indian cinema’s favourite tragic heroArchana Nathan – There’s a song to fit every mood in every adaptation of Sarat Chandra Chattopadhyay’s classic novel.

In our tradition of ending our post with article on Mohammad Rafi or a topical song of his, I have picked up songs that basically have link with the topics discussed in the present post, i.e. two songs filmed on Shammi but wherein Mohamamd Rafi playbacks and one of the many Ravi- Sahir compositions for the year 1963. The second of the Rafi song on Shammi also is penned by Sahir Ludhyanvi ::

Thoda Sa Dil Lagaa Ke Dekh – Musafirkhana (1955) – with Shamshad Begum – O P Nayyar –  Majrooh Sultanpuri

This is an Asymmetric Duet where Rafi is in the support role.

Jahan Jahan Khayal Jata Hai, Wahan Wahan Tumhi Ko Paata Hai – Bade Sarkar (1957) – with Geeta Dutt – O P Nayyar

Itni Haseen, Itni Jawaan Raat Kya Karein – Aaj Aur Kal (1963) – Ravi – Sahir Ludhyanvi

I earnestly seek your suggestions / inputs / criticisms so as to make our Film Blog Festival more interesting and live.

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – March 2017

Welcome to March, 2017 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

This is the month when the North India in particular celebrate the fun and frlickings of aolourful Holi . We have picked up these  topical posts to commence our present episode:

We will now take up the posts on the anniversaries or eulogies:

“Phir Wohi Dil Laya Hoon” – Joy MukerjeeThe failure of “Humsaya” and the inability to release “Love in Bombay” resulted in Joy Mukerjee losing his stardom as soon as the 70’s dawned. To repay his debts, Joy was forced to act in B- and C- grade movies like “Ehsan”, “Puraskar”, “Mujrim”, “Aag aur Daag”, “Kahin Aar Kahin Par”. This ended up denting his reputation further. Joy’s sorrow and inner anguish reflected in his face and the sadness that had crept on his face was palpable….As a hero, Joy Mukerjee appeared only in 32 films.

Sai Paranjype’s ‘Katha’ is a fabulous fable about the most charming chawl in the worldBubla Basu – The renowned filmmaker’s 79th birthday is the perfect excuse to revisit one of her loveliest films, starring Naseeruddin Shah, Farooque Shaikh and Deepti Naval.

For Sahir Ludhianvi, the best kind of love was unrequitedNirupama Dutt – On the celebrated Urdu poet’s 96th birth anniversary, a reminder of his contradictory attitudes towards women and relationships.

The eyes have it in ‘Achcha Ji Main Haari’ from ‘Kalapani’Rudradeep Bhattacharjee – The song from Raj Khosla’s ‘Kalapani’ works on playful looks and sighs.

The Vanraj Bhatia interview: ‘My music was unique then and is perhaps unique even now’Greg Booth – The acclaimed 90-year-old composer looks back on the music he made and looks ahead to the opera he hopes to finish someday. Let us listen to: Sanvariya Dekh Zara from Shyam Benegal’s Sardari Begum (1996).

Films that are 50: A mad scientist, a vampire and willing victims in cross-border hit ‘Zinda Laash’Karan Bali  – The baggy adaptation of the Dracula legend proved to be a neat box office fit in Pakistan in 1967.

The March 2017 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs was dedicated to S N Tripathi: Unremembered music director of remembered songs.

Here are posts on other subjects as well:

WHEN BOLLYWOOD ACTRESSES DECIDED TO MASQUERADE AS ‘MEN’!Sharada Iyer is a mirror image of her article Bollywood’s Drag-Queen Acts, wherein she has been able to muster of 18 films where the actresses have donned the man’s role.

Unko Yeh Shikayat Hai Ke Hum Kuch Nahin Kehte – When Silence Speaks Volumes – There are some songs that rise high above the regular and become proverbial. Such is the everlasting magic of this exquisite ghazal from Adalat (1958) which says volumes more than simple words could ever convey. Anand Desai and Antara Nanda Mondal explore the finer nuances of this quietly introspective ghazal, written by Rajinder Krishan, composed by Madan Mohan and sung by Lata Mangeshkar, which connects with the listener at a personal level.

Another Mujra in a Different Kitchen –is post about performances by people who are not necessarily stars and have not had huge studios invested in them, who are happy simply to practice and exhibit an art that they love. It may also be lot of fun to see people doing classical Indian or Bollywood dances in very ordinary surroundings, in front of objects as incongruous as, say, modern kitchen appliances.

Noor Jehan in Incomplete Film Tara (1949) – If completed and released on time, Tara might have become Noor Jehan’s first film in Pakistan. However, with the continuous string of flop Urdu films during the formative period of Pakistani Film Industry, someone advised Shaukat Hussain Rizvi/Noor Jehan to produce and direct a film in Punjabi instead of Urdu. Chanway, a Punjabi film released in 1951 became Noor Jehan’s first released film in Pakistan and a very successful one.

Guest Post: Rajinder Singh Bedi – My Uncle as I remember him in which Nischint Bhatnagar‘Nishi’, who is Mr Bedi’s niece (his younger brother’s daughter)  a heart-warming little insight into the man Rajinder Singh Bedi was.

In Film songs in classical ragas (11) – The evocative duo: Mand and Shivranjani.Subodh Agarwal carries forward his monumental contribution of presenting Hindi Films based on a particular classical Raag along with the basics of the Raag  that laypersons would understand and relish.

Best songs of 1948: And the winners are? Apart for the very meticulous Film Historians, it is the crowd-funding efforts of netizens that have made the Vintage Era of Hindi Films so much accessible to us. “Best songs of year” has become a most dependable platform to bring all these works on one page in a structured way.

This curtain raiser has provided so much fodder, that absorbing so much itself will take some before we I commence my micro-review journey for the year.

As the curtain on 1948’s songs has gone up, I have picked up Mohammad Rafi’s most known song on Gandhiji  to end the present episode:

Suno suno ae duniyawalo Bapu ki ye amar kahani (NFS) -lyrics Rajendra Krishna, music Husnlal-Bhagatram

I trust you will always feel free to proffer your suggestions for making this series of posts more lively and informative….

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – March, 2015 edition

Welcome to March, 2015 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

March has a very important festival – Holi – linked mainly to onset of the spring in the North India. The celebration of the festival is deeply ingrained into the fabric of the entire social culture of the people. As a natural corollary, it is but natural that the festivities are reflected into the mainstream (Hindi) Cinema. From the mellow and richly classical Holi songs in the 50s to the fun songs in the 70s, the flirtatious songs of the 80s to the power-packed, rigorous dance sequences in the new millennium, Holi songs have seen a gradual but marked change in style of music and the manner of filming the sequences. It is natural that we devote the opening session of the current edition of our blog festival to the articles featuring Holi songs in the Hindi Films.

And here are some of the randomly selected articles published in the mainstream journalistic flavor:

We now turn to the anniversaries:

Conversations Over Chai has three articles to commemorate Talat Mahmood’s birth anniversary on 24th February (1924):

The Legends: Talat Mahmood – has a few ‘quintessential Talat’ songs, each one for a different music director. While reading the article and comments thereto, Tum To Dil Ke Taar Chhed Kar, Kho Gaye (Roop Ki Raani Choron Ka Raaja – 1961- Shanker Jaikishan) came up from my memory. This, incidentally, is a twin version song. Furthermore, looking for some other songs, I landed upon Tera Khayal Dil Ko Sataye To Kya Karen (Naqab – 1955 – Govind Ram).

My Favourites: Talat Mahmood – Lata Mangeshkar Duets

In addition to a fairly rich collection and the contents in the main article, these songs in Comments also catch our attention:

Yaad aanewale phir yaad aa rahe hain Anmol Ratan – Vinod. He gave another great duet Shikwa tera main gaaun in the film.
Mat chhed zindagi ke khamosh taar le jaRaag Rang – Roshan.
Saawan ki raaton meinPrem Patra – Salil Chaudhary
Chaahe nain churao chaahe daaman bachao pyar ho ke rahegaAas – Shanker Jaikishan

Mausam Ye Pukare Masti Mein Le Chal – Burmah Road (1962) – Chitragupt

The Legends: Talat Mahmood – Part 2 – has lined up duets with different singers.

SoY continues with Focusing on Naushad as the theme of the year while undertaking comparisons with C Ramchandra in Talat Mahmood by Naushad and C Ramchandra. Naushad used Talat Mahmood in lead only once in Babul (1950) and then as a co-singer with Mohammad Rafi in Kaisi haseen aaj baharon ki raat hai (Aadami – 1968). In the queer twist of commercial considerations, Talat Mahmood was replaced by Mahendra Kapoor in the final track, but the records were already in the market. In comparison, C Ramchandra has a fairly large share of ‘great’ songs with Talat Mahmood. Here also, Talat Mahmood was on the losing streak once – Kitna haseen hai mausam kitna haseen safar hai – which is finally rendered by Chitalkar himself.

Naushad-C Ramchandra duel for Amirbai Karnataki, is an innovative tribute to Amirbai Karnataki, on the 50th death anniversary (c.1906 – 3 March 1965). Naushad had About fifteen songs in seven films in a span of eight years whereas C Ramchandra had Eight films and about fifteen songs in a span of eight years – same as Naushad’s. ,,,, If we look at Amirbiai Karnataki’s singing career in overall perspective, Anil Biswas first catapulted her to great fame with Kismet (1943); she sang the maximum number of her songs for Gyan Dutt and maximum number of his songs were sung by her…. Vidur Sury has written an exhaustive and excellent article – Amirbai Karnataki – A Legendary Indian Singer on Amirbai Karnataki. He has also contributed to Atul’s bollywood song a day- with full lyrics Amirbai Karanataki’s Deendayaal sakal dukhbhanjan (Narsi Bhagat – 1940)……..And this in turn takes us to the categories Ameerbai Karnataki songs, which has 118 posts and Ameerbai Karnataki solo, (78 posts) on Atul’s bollywood song a day- with full lyrics

‘Bags, Books and More’ pays tribute to Ravi, through his scores to Sahir Ludhyanvi’s songs, in My favourite Sahir Ludhianvi – Ravi songs, on the third death anniversary. In terms of getting less to hear a song , we pick up Mahendra Kapoor-Asha Bhosle duet Rangeen Fiza hai (Bahu Beti, 1965) from among the ‘favorites’ .

We now turn to other posts on our regular blogs:

Tennis, Pathakji and ‘Tere sadke balam’ – There would many who have very strong association with a song….But it takes SoY to make it a memory to be shared with all as if we lived all those moments ourselves.

Film Songs Based on Classical Ragas (8) – Pilu – Guest article by Subodh Agrawal in which he discusses the best film songs based on this Raga and some fine classical pieces. Pilu is the one that truly captures the mood evoked by this earthy smell, possibly because it is the raga of the Gangetic plain, where the summers are long and severe, and the rain – when it comes – comes in torrents, as in a fragment from the film Sara Akash (1969), as it captures the traditional movement better than any other clip one could locate.

As can be easily expected, the advent of spring should have led to posting of articles on the subject. Ten of my favorite spring songs takes up the task with the rules: the synonym for spring—basant, bahaar, etc—should actually be present in the lyrics, the word (especially in the case of bahaar, which can also refer to scenery or enchanting environs) should specifically refer to spring itself and the word should be used in the literal, not the metaphorical, sense, making the reading even more interesting.

Ten of my favourite cloud songs is a thematic songs-list article, which follows these rules: firstly, the synonym for cloud must be in the first line of the song, and secondly, the reference to clouds should be literal; clouds should not be used only in the metaphorical sense. On a similar vein, there have been other posts on rain songs and wind songs.

Ijaazat (1987) very fondly traces the origin for writing up the review to Mera kuch samaan from the album You’ve Stolen My Heart: Songs from R.D. Burman’s Bollywood

Word Play: Shaam presents the Shaam songs with the self-imposed rules : the song had to begin with the chosen word. (At the most, the word could be the second one in the first line.) Preludes to songs didn’t count. And two, it has to be the word itself, not its variations., which have yielded three posts – Raat, Piya and Chand – in the past. We pick up, again on the basis of the criterion of not-getting-to listen-often:

Shaam gayi raat aayi – Shree 420 (1955) – Lata Mangeshkar – Shanker Jaikishan- a song that is recorded and then discarded from the film is classic fit for Mystery of the Missing Songs, strangely, this song was never used in any subsequent RK film either

Shaam dekho dhal rahi hai -Anjaan Hai Koi (1969) – Mohammed Rafi, Usha Khanna – Music: Usha Khanna

Gulzar’s “shaam se aankh mein nami se hai – Mukesh .The original Salilda tune has been used in another song and has also been sung by Mukesh.

The succinct review of Aah – 1953 has very judiciously provided a link to the jukebox filled with songs from the film.

Dances By Egypt’s Naima Akef -Egypt’s Golden Age of cinema happened very close in time to India’s, beginning in the 1940s and extending into the ’60s. …there also are close parallels between this cinema and Indian cinema in the song-and-dance sequences, with the main difference being that the Egyptian dances were mostly Middle Eastern…..the present selection starts with Naima Akef’s most strange and possibly most modern dance, “Mambo.” After that one, thrown in are six more, which fall all along the spectrum from modern cabaret to traditional Egyptian folk dance. Rather than going into any descriptions of those, let the dances speak for themselves (because they certainly do speak for themselves….).

Kahan Le Chale Ho Bat Do Musafir – Beena Rai – a career starting form Kali Ghata (1951) ran into some 18 films ending with Apna Ghar Apni Kahani (1968). The post has provided links to some of her very famous songs.

Whilst on Beena Rai, we may recollect Ashok Dave;s review of Vallah Kya Baat Hai (1962) (in Gujarati), and enjoy these two exceptional Roshan songs –

Enjoyable western beats has compiled a special list of 15 songs on the player, applying the criteria that You should distinctly hear the bongo, conga or drums played as a lead instrument for at least a few seconds, in some part of the song, hindi film songs from the 1950s to the 1970s (with one song from 1980).

Rhythm of CastanetsCastanets are relatively tiny instruments that fit into the palms of the two hands and were originally used in European music. They can be played quickly in continuous notes to create a roll type of sound, or they can be played with each click on the castanet being a discrete note. The representative songs are on Rhythm of Castanets.

Jinhen Naaz Hai Hind Par, from Pyaasa 1957 takes us to Madhukar Shukla’s Translation of the original poem, and in turn to original version in Roman Urdu and the modified film song version. Here is the video clip of the song, wherein @ 6.26 we have my most favoured portion:

vo ujale dareechoN meiN paayal ki chhan-chhan
thaki haarii saaNsoN pe tabale ki dhan-dhan
ye be-ruuh kamroN meiN khaaNsii kii Than-Than
jinhe naaz hai hind par vo kahaaN haiN?

And its English translation:

The jingling trinklets at casement bright,
Tambourins athrob’ mid gasping life;
Cheerless rooms with cough alive;
Where are they who praise, the pious eastern ways?

On this rather sombre note, we now turn over to articles from the random search of other blogs/ sites:

The Hindi film song & the soundtrack of our livesSantosh Desai in City City Bang Bang -..It would be far too simplistic to connect the change in Hindi film songs to the harsher angrier discourse that we see in our public conversations, but surely the inability to find little islands of gentleness into which we can periodically retreat must take its toll. With no better self to find refuge in, no song to hum with eyes closed in melancholic bliss, the world is a harsher place full of people resigned to their hardness.

The “Indian” Dances in Kali Yug (1963, Italy/France/Germany) – The four dances in the films all center around the character Amrita, an exotic-enough sounding Indian name, played by the French actress and “Bond girl” Claudine Auger.

And now over to exclusive articles on Mohammad Rafi…

clip_image002The search for songs on Holi had led to writer and journalist Vinod Viplav’s article होली से कटती मुंबइया फिल्में. A little more exploration of the blog leads us to the category Mohammad Rafi, where we come to know of publication of the second edition of his biographical book Meri Awaz Suno (ISBN – 81-904097-1-9), which in turn led to:

As we close our books for this edition, we get the news that Shashi Kapoor, who just celebrated his 77th birthday, will receive this year’s Dadasaheb Phalke Award.

We continue our pursuit of the golden period of Hindi Film Music …….