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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs : November 2021

Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory: 1958 to 1960

Salil Chowdhury – 10 November 1922 – 5 September 1995 – had had natural attraction towards to folk music and studied inclination towards the Western Classical music. He could also play several musical instruments. In fact, it is said that any instrument that he could lay his hands on he would be able to play it very comfortably. It was the combination of the effect of these music influences that made his compositions always melodious, even when quite complex in the structure. His orchestration was always symphonic with blend of intricate use of the different instruments.

His music never got molded into any pattern. His flair for experimentation always lent his own signature originality to his composition. He was so deeply committed to his personal, social values that he never let his music be driven by the competitive market forces. For him melody was so sacrosanct that strongly believed in composing the tune first and then would want his lyricist to pen lyrics that suit the tune – in metre as well as spirit. Since he was also a poet, he would fine tune his tune with his own (dummy) lyrics. Many a times the official lyricist would love to simply take over Salil Chowdhury’s lyrics as a base to build the lyrics for the song.

It was perhaps the unique skill of Shailendra (B: 30-8-1923/ D: 14-12-1966) to come up with lyrics that fitted the tune and the mood that so easily made Salil Chowdhury comfortable working with him. Coupled with this, it was Shailendra’s knowledge of Bengali language and the earthen-closeness and selection of easy and natural words that Shailendra required to express deep emotions that also would have weighed in building the strong bond between the two. In fact, from the films that Shailendra wrote songs beyond Shankar-Jaikishan quartet team, Salil Chowdhury- Shailendra combination share is almost one third.

To commemorate the memory of Salil Chowdhury, we have been devoting our November episode to Salil Chowdhury’s compositions receding from our memory. We had remembered Salil Chowdhury’s Hindi Film Songs in Other Languages in 2017. We then commenced a series of Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory, wherein we took up their films together in the chronological order of release for remembering the songs receding from the memory from these films.  Till now we have covered the years

1953-1955 in 2018,

1956 in 2019, and

1957 in 2020

Presently we will take up relatively less heard songs from Salil Chowdhury-Shailendra combination for the years 1958 till 1960. 1958 had only one film Madhumati, 1959 had one song from only one film – Heera Moti- and 1960 had 3 films, Honeymoon, Parakh and Usne Kaha Tha.

Madhumati (1958)

Salil Chowdhury created his own space with his maiden Hindi film Do Bigha Jameen (1953). His subsequent forays with Shailendra, Naukari (1954), Jagate Raho (1956) and Musafir (1957) were well received as far as the music of these films was concerned, but the much-respected roaring commercial success of the films that Bolywood Hindi film arena required for a music director to be in demand still eluded him. Madhumati was that proverbial deliverance of the destiny. As can be recollected from a book by Bimal Roy’s daughter, Rinki Roy Bhattacharya, Bimal Roy’s Madhumati: Untold Stories from Behind the Scenes (published by Rupa Publications India Pvt. Ltd) – an excerpt from which can be read here – till Madhumati finally happened as it was, it was not very smooth sailing for the Salil Chowdhury-Shailendra duo. In fact, had it not been Bimal Roy’s closeness with and faith in Salil Chowdhury, destiny would have taken different turn. Well, the grand success of Madhumati and its music, in the face of extremely intense competition with a huge successful music of an exceptionally large number of other films during 1957 and 1958 can be better viewed form the fact that for the year 1958, Filmfare awards for Best Music Director and Female Singer being bagged by Madhumati (Aja Re Pardesi, Main To Kab Se Khadi Is Paar), Shailendra got Best Lyrics award for Ye Mera Diwanapan Hai (Yahudi) even when Suahana Safar Ye Mausam HasiN was also nominated in the category.

I have been able to pick up only two songs for the present episode, since all other songs continue to remain hugely popular even today.

Hum Haal-e-Dil Sunayenge Suniye Ke Na Suniye, Sau Bar Muskarayenge Suniyre Ke Na Suniye – Mubarak Begum

This gem of a mujra song, in the voice of Mubarak Begum, has only sakhi-

tumhaaraa dil mere dil ke baraabar ho nahin saktaa
wo sheeshaa ho nahin saktaa ye patthar ho nahin saktaa

and the above lines of mukhada in the film, before the extremely agitated hero, Dilip Kumar opens the door of the hall where this dance was being performed and the lady on the dance floor stops, so naturally, in her steps, It is to the credit of director Bimal Roy and editor Hrishikesh Mukherjee that songs to comes to a dead stop, much against the well-established tenet of the hero’s entry to take place only after the whole song has been played out.

The full song is available its audio form

Aside Trivia:

The couplet (sher) used as Opening Couplet (Sakhi) in this song is picked up from a Daag Dehlvi ghazal.

Similarly, the lines of the second stanza

“Ajab Hai Aah Meri, Naam ‘Daag’ Hai Mera
Tamaam Shahar Jala DogeE Kya Jala Ke Mujhe’

Is also ‘lifted’ from the last sher of the same ghazal by Daag Dehlvi

Moreover, Shailendra has used lines Rahega Ishq Tera of the first stanza again as sakhi in the song. Aa Aabhi Ja Raat Dhalane Lagi (Teesri Kasam, 1966; singer: Lata Mangeshkar; music – Shankar Jaikishan)

(This information is courtesy a comment on the post on this song @ Atul’s Song A Day)

Kancha Le Kanchi Lai Lajo, Ban Ko Baato Laltin Lai Baalera  – Asha Bhosle, Sabita Chowdhury, Ghulam Mohammed

The sakhi and repeated use of the same in song is in Nepali language, which probably Salil Chowdhury would have heard.  This is a folksong narrating the tale of a girl who has, in all probabilities, eloped. Shailendra easily takes over from there and weaves in relevant stanzas.

Salil Chowdhury has gleefully set up several experiments in the composition.

Another noteworthy point in this song is use of Ghulam Mohammed, who was a role model of Mohammad Rafi during Rafi’s initial days. Ghulam Mohammed had fallen on bad times by 50s. This song may have been offered to him as gesture of help.

Aside Trivia:

Here is the rough translation of the lyrics of Nepali lyrics, courtesy a comment by Jeta Sankrityayana on this song @Atul’s Song A Day:

(kaanchha ) the young boy took away (kaanchhi) the young girl
(Ban ko baato) along a forest road (laltin lai baalera) after lighting up a lantern…

Heera Moti (1959)

Naach Re Dharti Ke Pyare Tere ArmanoN Ki Dunuya Saamne Hai Tere  – Hemant Kumar, Lata Mangeshkar, Chorus

This was the only song composed by Salil Choudhary in this movie, all the other songs were composed by Roshan. As noted by World of Salil Chowdhury, just before recording of the song,  Roshan, who was on a cultural mission to Russia was taken ill. He sent a telegram to the director Krishan Chopra to advise him to request Salil Chowdhury to compose the Title music and the opening song.

The song seems to be based on folk tradition.  World of Salil Chowdhury notes that It is a great pity that the song “aay re o pousali bataasey (the air of month of Posh is in the winds) “- the original Bengali version of the present song – was never released. This is one of Salil’s earlier compositions from the ’40s during the IPTA days.

Honeymoon (1960)

The film was directed by Lekhraj Bhakri, who is cousin of Manjo Kumar 9 The hero in the film) and brother of well-known lyricist of 40s, Mulkraj Bhakri. He has used Salil Chowdhury in Tongawali (1955) previously.

The film did not seem to have done well at the box office, but all the songs were extremely melodious. Except two songs – Saanj Bhayi Sun Ri Sakhi and Duniya Na Dekhe Zamana Na Jane – all other songs have Bengali version (which can be accessed at Honeymoon (1960) on World of Salil Chowdhury.

Aside Trivia:

Shri Arunkumar Deshmukh notes that this was the last film of Kuldeep Kaur, one of three leading ladies in the film. She died of a tragic death thereafter. Her life story can be read at KULDIP KAUR: A SPOILED RICH PUNJABAN ACTRESS.

Saanj Bhayi Sun Ri Sakhi Man Chhine Kisaki Bansi – Lata Mangeshkar, Usha Mangeshkar

Look at the way Salil Chowdhury has played with flute first in the mukhada and then in the form of dance beat vocals, as well as the opening notes of interlude orchestration, The song has flute as the central instrument, but used as ensemble orchestra pieces.

Aaha Re Magan Mera Chanchal Man Nis Din Gun Gun Kuchh Apni Hi Dhun Mein Gaye – Lata Mangeshkar

On the face of it this a simple stage-show dance song, a situation very frequently used in Hindi films in those days. But with Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra one can expect interesting experimentation. The song composition runs in almost one breath, with Shailendra deftly using the lyrics making that possible for the singer to sing.

Such a composition can perhaps materialize only when melody comes first and the body of lyrics is built around it to result into a piece of beauty.

Mere KhawboN Mein KhayaloN Chhupe Meet Mere Meri Gali Chalein Aayengein – Mukesh, Lata Mangeshkar

Documented as duet, the song, in fact, is a symmetric duet. Sail Chowdhury has used as humming alaap in the interlude pieces. From Salil Chowdhury’s standard, the song is relatively easier one to sing, and as such had gained wide acceptance.

The solo version by Lata Mangeshkar does not seem to have been released on the records, but we have an audio version on YT. Interestingly, the order in which the lyrics have been used in the interludes has been interchanged here. The song was remade by Salil Chowdhury in Bengali for the film Raktaako Bangala (1972), a film produced in Bangladesh.

Duniya Na Dekhe Zamana Na Jane Chalo KahiN Dur Chalein – Dwijen Mukherjee, Lata Mangeshkar

Salil Chowdhury has his own style for the horse-beat Tonga songs. Flute, his favorite instrument, again is the key instrument in the song.

Chhuo Na Chhuo Albele Mere Saiyan Main To Nazuk Badan Chhui-Mui – Mukesh, Sabita Banerjee

In the delight mood  duet, the song opens with first line as if the heroine would be in the trot when she sings the line. This line is played in same way across the whole song.

Tum Jo Mile To Khila Hai Gulab… Piya Tum Tod Na Dena, Khwab Ye Mere Dil Ka….-  Sabita Banerjee

The heroine playfully acknowledging the bud of love germinating is also frequently used situation for a song in Hindi films. Salil Chowdhury brings out that joy in this difficult composition.

Parakh (1960)

Billed as one of the best films directed by Bimal Roy, Parakh (the test of the identity) brings out lighter and satirical side of Bimal Roy’s film-making art. Not surprisingly, Bimal Roy received the Filmfare award as the best director a hattrick with Madhumati and Sujata being the earlier two. The story of the film is written by Salil Chowdhury and the dialogues by Shailendra. The lead male actor, as paired with the heroine in the Hindi film mold is a Bengali actor Basanta Chowdhury (who also went on to become sheriff of Calcutta), but the real hero is Motilal, in the role of a ‘lame’ postman, who lays the script on the screen. He won the Best Supporting (!?) Actor Filmfare award. Parakh was the in the list of 1-core box-office revenue roll for the year 1960. The film was ahead in time in many ways.

The three solo songs, in the voice of Lata Mangeshkar  – O Sajana Barkha Bahar Aayi (Bengali version, an NFS rendered by Lata Mangeshkar), Mila Hai Kisi Ka Jhumka (Bengali version, having the same lyrics in the opening line, in Sabita Chowdhury’s voice), Ye Bansi Kyon Gaaye (Bengali version, also a Lata Mangeshkar rendition NFS, having same opening lyrics) – remain the everlasting highlights from Salil Chowdhury’s baton.

Kya Hawa Chali Re Baba Rut Badli, Shor Hai Gali Gali Sau Sau Chuhe Khake Billi Haz Ko Chali  – Manna Dey

The village postmaster, who finds his life change dramatically when he receives a cheque for Rs. 5 lakhs from a certain Sir J.C. Roy. The cheque comes with a rider – the money would go to the most honest man in the village, someone who would use the wealth for the benefit of the people.

The song represents that search. Salil Chowdhury has fallen back on Bowl folk tradition of rural Begal, but Shailendra gets a clear ground to present his core egalitarian philosophy, as can be seen here:

pahle log mar rahe the bhukh se abhaw se
ab kahiN ye mar na jaye apni khaw khaw se
are mithi bat kadwi lage galiyaN bhali

aaj to jahan ki ulti har ek bat hai … ….  …
are hum jo kahe din hai bhai log kahe rat hai ….. ….
ret me bhi khil rahi hai pyar ki kali

aam mein uge khazur neem mein fale hai aam
dakuoN ne jog liya chor bake ram nam
hosh ki dawa karo miyaN fazal ali

Mere Man Ke Diye… Yunhi Ghut Ke Jal Tu Mere Ladle – Lata Mangeshkar

Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra weave poignancy in the song, so soulfully rendered by Lata Mangeshkar and presented by Sadhana on the screen. Salil Chowdhury has so skillfully used choir chorus in the counter melody as well as in the interlude orchestration music pieces.

Kamal Bose’s catches the song as a classic in B&W cinematography.

Usne Kaha Tha (1960)

Usne Kaha That was a Bimal Roy Production banner film, directed by his one-time assistant in films like Do Bigha Zameen, Madhumati etc, Moni Bhattacharya. The film was cinematic adaption of Chandradhar Sharma Guleri’s renowned Hindi short story by same name[1]. The film adaption somewhere missed out the perfect characterization and development of story plot of the original story. It is actually the tale of love, valor and sacrifice with an underlying melancholy refrain. Set against the rural background of Amritsar and Ambala, it seems the Bengali production unit could neither catch the earthy flavor of the locale of the story nor its nuances of interwoven into the title Usne Kaha Tha.

However, Salil Chowdhury’s melodious music and Shailendra’s appropriate playful lyrics were the redeeming features of the film. Salil Chowdhury exceptionally came up with compositions with natural Punjabi touch, while maintaining his signature symphonic orchestration style.as can be seen in the popular songs, Machalti Arzoo Khadi Baahein ((Lata Mangeshkar) and  Aha Rhimjim Ke Ye Pyare Pyare Geet Liye (Talat Mahmood, Lata Mangeshkar)

Chalte Hi Jana Jahan Tak Aaj Ye Rah Chale…   – Mohammad Rafi, Manna Dey, chorus

Salil Chowdhury blends a tonga song with gay abandon of Punajbi youth. Such a song requires not only power of diction while maintaining the speed of rhythm. As such, having once chosen Mohammad Rafi and Manna Dey, Salil Chowdhury takes the full advantage of the range of their singing and each one is given lines that require rendition in base scale of the higher octave. Salil Chowdhury’s mastery over chorus orchestration also is evident when he makes the chorus also to sing in the similar fashion.

Balkhati Sharmati Aaja LehroN Si Lehrati Aaja, Balkhati Sharmati Aaja, – Mohammad Rafi, Lata Mangeshkar, chorus

Here is one song that epitomizes Salil Chowdhury’s versatility. Someone identified as the music director with penchant for Bengali- Assamese folk tunes and Western classical orchestration styles, Salil Chowdhury perfectly creates Punjabi rural atmosphere in the song.

With these songs Salil Chowdhury-Shailendra combination seems to have reached the peak of quality, and range as well as the popularity. On that note, we continue our journey of Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory….

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month next year too……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

[1] चंद्रधर शर्मा गुलेरी की कहानी उसने कहा था @ Kahani Suno

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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs: November 2020

Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory: 1957

Salil Chowdhury (10 November 1922 – 5 September 1995) was undoubtedly a versatile music personality – writer, lyricist, script writer, activist and of course one of the most respected music composers. His music was rooted as much in the folk music of Bengal and Assam as it was in the Western symphonies. His compositions and orchestrations had a very district style. Most of his compositions would be incredibly challenging to sing. And yet, the sheer melody that it offered made many of his difficult tunes are also his immensely popular songs. His lyricists for a good many films, Shailendra (B: 30-8-1923/ D: 14-12-1966), too, was a person rooted to the basic of life. Shailendra may not be considered a poet in the traditional literary parlance, but his simple lyrics had had profound impact on his listeners. His command of delivering an immensely powerful idealistic message or describing a complex feeling in the simple words was unparalleled.

Even when they had fundamentally very similar sociopolitical mindsets, the chemistry of apparently two different music personalities created very unique set of Hindi film songs. In terms of ratio of memorable songs to total songs or variety of moods represented, qualitatively quite comparable to Shailendra-Shankar Jaikishan or Shailendra -S D Burman, Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra quantitatively have composed songs only next to these two combinations.

To commemorate the memory of Salil Chowdhury, we have been devoting our November episode to Salil Chowdhury’s compositions receding from our memory. We had remembered Salil Chowdhury’s Hindi Film Songs in Other Languages in 2017. We then commenced a series of Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory, wherein we took up their films together in the chronological order of release for remembering the songs receding from the memory from these films.  Till now we have covered the years

1953-1955 in 2018, and

1956 in 2019.

Presently, we will take up Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra’s songs receding frm the memory form the three films – Ek Gaon Ki Kahani and Musafir for the year 1957. Salil Chowdhury had composed music for Apradhi Kaun and Laal Batti (with Majrooh Sultanpuri) and Zamana (with Indeevar and Prem Dhawan; the film had two songs composed by Anil Biswas, too).

Ek Gaon Ki Kahani (1957)

Ek Gaon Ki Kahani is a film directed by Dulal Guha, wherein Talat Mahmood has also acted as the lead actor. The films had two of Talat Mahmood’s all-time-great songs – Jhoome Re Neela Ambar Jhhome Re and Raat Ne Kya Kya Khwab Dikhaye – and a Lata Mangeshkar solo – Boley Pihoo Pihoo Pee Papihara – which as sweet and playful as is a difficult tune.

Kana Kubda Langda Loola Budha Doctor Aayega – Asha Bhosle

Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra have produced a light-mood, thoroughly enjoyable, song.

O Haay Koi Dekh Lega – Talat Mahmood, Lata Mangeshkar

The song opens with a very lilting prelude. The duet, though extremely sweet, is indeed a difficult composition.

Chale Thhumak Thhumak Taare Meethe Sapno Ke Dware – Lata Mangeshkar

This is a lullaby. Salil Chowdhury has used relatively easier composition Use of soft sounds of ensemble of violins. The main song as well as the interlude orchestration has Salil Chowdhury’s signature flute pieces

Din Holi Ka Aa Gaya Rang Dalo Hoji Ho – Manna Dey, Lata Mangeshkar. Chorus

The occasions of festivals like Holi have provided ideal situation for songs in Hindi films. Different directors have used the situation for different purposes – sometimes the song just comes in as a filler or sometimes as an important element of the story.  Lyricists compose the lyrics accordingly. Different directors also have adopted very different approaches in composing the song, even if they have stuck to the normal Holi song tunes of North India. Salil Chowdhury has provided ample improvisations in the songs to make it sound very realistic composition.

Musafir (1957)

Based on the Ritvik Ghatak story of three families’ ’traveler’ stay at a house, Musafir was the maiden directorial venture of Hrishikesh Mukherjee. In effect, it connects up three stories with a common link of a house. Every time the family leaves the house, like a traveler on the move, at least one member of the family will state that she will always remember this house. The film was awarded a  Certificate of Merit for Third Best Feature Film in Hindi for the year 1957.

Man Re Hari Gun Gaa, Un Sang Preet Lagaa – Lata Mangeshkar

Filmed on Suchitra Sen, the lead actress of the first of the three episodes, is a simple bhajan, in terms of the song genres. The song has a special important place in the narrative of the episode.

Munna Bada Pyaara, Ammi Ka Dulara, Koi Kahe Chand Koi Ankh Ka Taara – Kishore Kumar

This is a song pertaining to the second story in the film. Shailendra has weaved in wonderful dreams of the middle-class people in each stanza. Salil Chowdhury has composed a very pleasant tune, and Kishore Kumar is at his usual maverick improvisation best.

Tedhi Tedhi Humse Phire Saari Duniya… Har Koi Najar Bacha Chala Jaye Dekho…Jaane Kahe Hamse Kaatey  Saari Duniya – Manna Dey, Shamshad Begum, chorus

The song have several unique features.

First, Shailendra has made a cameo appearance of street song performer, with a harmonium strung on. This is second such on-screen performance. The first one was in the song Chali Kaun Se Desh Gujariya Tu Saj Dhaj Ke (Boot Polish, 1954).

Second, is Keshto Mukherjee’s maiden appearance on Hindi cinema. Her he comes up in the role of a autistic handicapped person, a very routine feature of such travelling street performers so as to encash some human pity into more alms catch. At the end of the song ,just watch him approaching Kishore Kumar to part with some cash, all in sign language !! What a pity that such a wonderful comedy actor remained typecast as THE drunkard in the films!

Third, of course, is use of Shamshad Begum by Salil Chowdhury. Shamshad Begum plays back to Heera Sawant, the dance performer of the troupe.

Shailendra is at his usual egalitarian best mood at every word of the song!

Laagi Nahi Choote Rama Chahe Jiya Jaye – Dilip Kumar, Lata Mangeshkar

First, of course, the most novel feature of the song – Dilip Kumar singing his own song. The songs, for a non-regular singer like him, is not that easy to sing. But, Dilip Kumar has done such a marvelous job of it.

Hrishikesh Mukherjee has filmed the Lata Mangeshkar part as a memory recall running at the back of mind of Usha Kiran. As such, the voice seems to come from deep within!

Ek Aaye Ek Jaaye Musafir  -Shyamal Mitra

The title and theme song that carries the message of the film, is filmed on Mohan Choti (a.k.a. Mohan Goraskar).

The song comes up once more in the film. The clip here has both versions.

We normally take up one Mohammad Rafi song to end the episode. However, in the present case, we do not have any Mohammad Rafi song in either of these films. So, we will take a small detour, and import one song from Salil Chowdhury’s 1957 films with other lyricist.

Naiya Ka Meri Tu Hi Khewaiya – Zamana (1957) = Lyrics: Indeevar

Salil Chowdhury has used chorus both as chorus accompaniment and as counter music support.

Our journey of Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra’s receding from the memory songs on this platform.

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

 

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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs: November, 2019

Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory – 1956

Salil Chowdhury (B: 19 -11-1925 / D: 5-9-1995) and Shailendra (B: 30-8-1923/ D: 14-12-1966), both very creative in their own fields had their own originality. Moreover Shailendra was easily able maintain his own style even he was given a tune first, for a given situation. Shailendra had an additional advantage of good knowledge of Bangla language. Resultantly, Shailendra could add life to the beautiful, melodious content that Salil Chowdhury conceived. It is perhaps no coincidence that Shailendra first shot to fame with Utha hai toofan zamana badal raha (set to music by Salil Chowdhury) for IPTA (Indian People’s Theatre Association), the cultural arm of the Communist Party of India.[1]

We have commenced an annual series on Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory w.e.f. November, 2018. We listened to their songs for the years 1953 to 1955 and those of film Awaz last year.. For the present episode we will cover their two more films for the year 1956. Both these films have Bengali background.

Parivaar (1956):-


The two duets from the film – Ja Tose Nahin Bolun Kanhaiya (Manna Dey, Lata Mangeshkar) and Jhir Jhir Badarwa Barse Ho Kare Kare (Hemant Kumar, Lata  Mangeshkar) – are two of the most memorable duets of the Hindi Films. The other songs from the film also present a much needed variety to the Salil Chowdhury – Shailendra combination.

Baawali Bana Ke Chhoda  – Asha Bhosle

This is one of the rarest gem of an Asha Bhosle songs.

Ek Do Teen Chaar Paanch  – Hemant Kumar, Asha Bhosle, chorus)

As noted on World of Salil Chowdhury, Salil Chowdhury shows his love and respect to one of his mentors, Beethoven in this song. Here one can hear how he used a small part from Beethoven’s “Pastoral” 6th Symphony.

Kuven Mein Dub Ke Mar Jaana Yaar Tum Shaadi Mat Karna – Kishore Kumar

Kishore Kumar has used at least five different voices and that too flawlessly. On the whole, the song has been a classic vintage Kishore Kumar gem.

Jaagte Raho (1956):-

Jaagte Raho was brilliantly transformed into a Bengali version Ek Din Ratre. Most of the songs have been used in the same situation.

Zindagi Khwab Hai (Mukesh) has been filmed as Ei Duniyay Bhai Shob Hi Hoy in Ek Din Ratre – Manna Dey – (Lyrics: Salil Chowdhury)

The song is filmed on Chhabi Biswas. The perfect synchronization of lyricisists in both version provides us ample testimony of the bonding of Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra.

Manna Dey has as well recorded a cover version of the Hindi version of the song, in line with very popular practice of those days.

Thandi Thandi Sawan Ki Phuhar – Asha Bhosle

Asha Bhosle is so natural in this song that the pathos of the song roots deeply in our mind. Sandhya Mukherjee’s portrayal of the song in the Bengali version is as melancholic too, even as both compositions are totally different.

Lo She Vai Vai  Maine Jo Li Angadai – Sandhya Mukherjee, chorus

The song has been used as it is in Ek Din Ratre.

Jago Mohan Pyaare Jago  (Lata Mangeshkar, chorus) remains the centerpiece in both versions, and the Bengali version of the song remains equally well-crafted piece.

We do not have any directly related song of Mohammad Rafi for our present episode. So I have veered slightly away, and have picked up –

Teki Mein Jhooth BoliyaN – Jagte Raho (1956) – Lyrics Prem Dhawan – Mohammad Rafi with S Balbir

Bengali version – Ek Din Ratre- has retained the song as it is..

In one of the interviews Salil Chowdhury gave all credit to Prem Dhawan for this song.

This song also helps in the beginning of the end of our episode, in continuing with our tradition of listening to Mohammad Rafi song(s) relevant to the subject.

As we do not have any more directly related song of Mohammad Rafi, I have gone back in to the previous years of Salil Chowdhury’s filmography and have found two songs written by Prem Dhawan.:

Suno Ki Seeta Ki Kahani – Biraj Bahu (1954) – Lyrics: Prem Dhawan .

This a classic background song.

Tere Naino Ne Jadoo Daala – Taangewali (1955) – With Lata Mangeshkar – Lyrics: Prem Dhawan

We have a quintessential Punjabi folk tune-based song.

We will continue our journey of Salil Chowdhury and Shailendra’s Songs in our next episode of November, 2020.

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

[1] The Most Popular LyricistPartha Chatterjee

 

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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs: November, 2018

Salil Chaudhury and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory – 1

Salil Chaudhary (10 November, 1922 – 5 September, 1995)is considered to be belonging to the unorthodox style of music composition even he had manifested marked influence of folk tunes of his native Bengal, had been attracted by the western classical music through the works of Bach, Beethoven or Mozart and adapted Indian classical Ragas too very comfortably. He could play many Indian and Western instruments, and he was an acclaimed writer, playwright, choir conductor, composer and lyricist during his first innings during 40s- till early ‘50s, in Calcutta. His second innings in Mumbai, with his maiden Hindi Film, Do Bigha Zameen, brought him in contact with another genius- Shailendra.

Whether it was Shailendra’s knowledge of Bengali, his capability to write poetic lyrics, fully reflecting the situation in the film, even when presented with a tune or his own background of working as a proletariat, the simple fact remains that, after Shankar Jaikishan, Shailendra has written around 108 songs for around 19 Hindi Films under the baton of Salil Chaudhary, which works out to almost one fourth of the Hindi films for which Salil Chaudhary composed music.  Salil Chaudhary used to prefer compose tune first and would expect his lyricist to write the lyrics in that spirit. Shailendra’s songs under his composition have retained Shailendra’s poetic touch even under these constraints.

 

In our series of annual articles, we will cover Shaildendra’s songs composed by Salil Chaudhary We will take a closer look at the songs that seem to receding from the memory while we take note of the songs that remain quite popular even now. For this purpose, we will traverse their films in chronological order.

Do Bigha Jamin (1953)

This is the film for which his script is based on his own short story. As per the original design he was being called in to write the script, and fate landed music composition too in his account. He also composed music for another Bimal Roy directed in the same year – Biraj Bahu. There is not much documentation available how was Shailendra was called in as a lyricist for the film. Nor does it matter, as we have all evergreen songs form this pair’s maiden joint venture:

We will listen to Aaja Ja Ri Aa Nindiya (Lata Mangeshkar) in details here.

Meena Kumari, who was the leading lady of a 1953 Ashok Kumar’s production, and Bimal Roy directed, Parineeta, appears in a cameo role for this lullaby. This remains the only occasion wherein Meena Kumari has perfumed such a cameo role in her entire career.

Naukari 1954

A Nepali tune based happy version o Chhota Sa Ghar Hoga (Kishore, Sheila Belle )  overshadows other songs of the film Salil Chowdhury has experimented with Hemant Kumar for the sad version of this song.

Ek Chhoti Si Naukri Ka Talabdar Hun – Kishore, Shankar Dasgupta, Shyamal Mitra

Shailendra has so wonderfully laid down expectations of an educated youth, which remains universally true at all the times. Salil Chaudhary establishes his prowess to compose light tunes in an unconventional style.

Arji Hamari Ye Marji Hamari, Jo Soche Bina Thukraoge Dekho Bade Pachhataoge – Kishore Kumar

The song opens with what appears to be a simple recital of the application for the job, but soon cleverly gets transformed in an application for a space in mind of the beloved.

Jhoome Re Kali Bhanwara Ulajh Kaanton Mein – Geeta Dutt

Salil Chaudhary has opted for Geeta Dutt’s voice to convey the bubbling pleasure of formal acceptance, with the self, of the budding love relation. Shailendra’s poetic imagination matches every note of the song that expresses the subdued pleasure of the very young girl in the conservative times of a traditional society.

O Man Re Na Gham Kar, Ye Aansoo Banege Sitare, Judai Mein Dil Ke Sahare  – Lata Mangeshkar

Salil Chaudhary had so high respect for Lata Mangeshkar’s singing prowess that he would come up with difficult than normal composition for her songs. In the present song, he has used harmonica in the prelude and orchestration of violins with flute in the interludes to create the feeling of train motion. In the process, he has synchronized the director’s use of metaphor of the train movement to indicate the anticipation of much awaited momentum in hero’s life. Shailendra’s lyrics truthfully convey the pang of partition while Sheela Ramani ruefully bids him the farewell.

Amaanat (1955)

Ho Jab Se Mili Tose Ankiyan Jiyara Dole Re (Hemant Kumar, Geeta Dutt) and Meri Wafaye Tumhari Jafaye, Aansoo Likhenge Fasaana Pyar Ka (Asha Bhosle) qualify as more known than the other songs of the film. The former duet is an Assamese folk tune based song, which reelect the feelings of the lead pair. The later Asha Bhosle solo would be immediately recalled by the fans of Asha Bhosle, even if the song has receded from the memory after the onslaught of OPN – Asha deluge in the later years. The songs is a signature Salil Chaudhary composition.

Chet Re Moorkh Chet Re Awsar Beet Jaye Re – Manna Dey, Asha Bhosle

An old saintly beggar and his young keeper singing a song that contains the deep message for the principal protagonists was a popular genre of Hindi Films in that period, and Manna Dey required lot of luck and hard work to get of this cast..

Chhal Chhal Paani Hamari Zindagani Ye Chal Ke Rukana Jaane Na – Manna Dey, Asha Bhosle, chorus

The song depicts a cheering group of young children taking out water from the wheel with the help of a bucketed water-wheel. The water flowing into the trough spurs them to the song which the sings the beauty and power of flowing water. The village belle and the working artisans also flow into the mood of the song. Shailendra, too, fully utilizes the opportunity to present the idea of a utopian world!

Baanki Adayein Dekhna Ji  Dekhna Dil Na Churaye Dekhanaji  – Geeta Dutt

Salil Chaudhary once again uses mellifluous silken charm of Geeta Dutt’s soft voice to express the feelings of Chand Usmani, on the piano, through the lips of her friend, Asha Mathur, in this party.

Jab Tumne Mohabbat Cheen Li Kya Milega Bahroon Se – Asha Bhosle

Salil Chaudhary has, inexplicably, chosen Asha Bhosle for this pathos song. In what is now emerging as his individual style, he has gone onto compose quite complex tune. Asha Bhosle rises to the challenge and does full justice to the confidence invested in her. However, the song become so difficult for an ordinary listener to sing the song on her own, that song does not attain the popularity.

Aawaz (1956)

Awaz was a Mehboob production, directed by the lyricist Zia Sarhadi. It had popular songs penned by lyricists other than Shailendra, like Dil Tere Liye Dole, Dhitang Dhitang Bole (Prem Dhawan), Dil Diwana Dil Mastana Mane Na and Aaraa Ram Taara Ram Duniya Ke Kaise Gam (both by Zia Sarhadi). Shailendra was one of the four lyricists and has penned three of the total 10 songs.

Baba Teri Sone Chiraiya, Jaaye Anajane Ki Nagariya   – Lata Mangeshkar

The song is a marriage song wherein bride’s friend try to tone down the pall of gloom that is imminently felt because of the departure of the bride from her parental home. The interlude music has very cleverly interwoven the traditional band party music played during the bridegroom procession.

The other two songs have Mohammad Rafi. Therefore, that makes a very opportune placement to traditionally our post with relevant Mohammad Rafi song(s):

Aayi Baraat Baje Gaaje Se…… Aaj Mera Dulha Kam Nahi Kisi Raje Se – Mohammad Rafi, S.Balbir, chorus

This is the song that friends of the bridegroom sing when they take him on their shoulders to the marriage podium. If the previous genre songs have an undercurrent of pathos, these types of song have loud boisterous tone.

Lo Bhor Hui Panchi Nikle …. Talash Mein Dane Dane Ki, Insan Bhi Lo Ghar Se Nikla, Dhun Roti Kamane Ki – Mohammad Rafi

The song is typically the voice of the proletariat class, which is the basic theme of the film, as evidenced by the title. Shailendra has again taken the opportunity to place his own deep-felt ideals into the poetic mound the lyrics of the song. The song has been very innovatively been placed as the title-credit song, too. Rafi’s very soft delivery of the song also is quite noteworthy.

In these four films, we have been able to look at multiple facets of Salil Chaudhary’s music composing styles and the degree of Salil Chaudhary – Shailendra tuning. The wait till the next year may appear to be too long, but if you consider these songs as the gourmet wine, then that time is indeed required to allow the songs to mature into our minds.

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

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