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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs: October 2022

Shankar (Jaikishan) and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory: 1956 (Part II)

Shankar (Singh Raghuvanshi) – B: 25 October 1922 | D:  26 April 1987) of Shankar Jaikishan music director duo and Shailendra (a.k.a. Shankardas Kesarilal, B:  30 August 1923 – D: 14 December 1966) of their Shailendra-Hasrat seamless pair of lyricists formed two adjacent sides of the SJ-Shailendra-Hasrat quartet.

The typical model of the films in 50s had an average of 5 to 8 songs. Where as most of the  then successful music directors were able to give two to three hit songs in each film, Shankar Jaikishan had that very unique knack which created almost all songs of each film a great hit. As a result, whereas other music directors generally handled one or two films a year, S-J started getting three to five films a year, even when they went on jacking up their fees. In the beginning, as can be expected, Shankar and Jaikishan used to devote a good time together for the conception of the music composition for each film.

Several historians have recorded that with the mounting pressure of ever increasing workload, Shankar and Jaikishan had to compose the tunes for the songs that each one had pre-selected for a given film independently. That division of labor also lead to each partner working more with a lyricist with whom each one was naturally more comfortable with.  As is very widely believed, and accepted, Shailendra mostly worked with Shankar and Hasrat Jaipuri with Jaikishan. After his marriage, it is said that Jaikishan had started composing music more from his home whereas Shankar used to work from their music studio.

The film historians also do take note of the fact that all through the 50s, even after their clear division of work there still was that great camaraderie between the two, each one improvising the other’s tune or orchestration. There have been notable instances when it is said that two had worked even with other than their normal lyricist partner.

It has been so much of personal pleasure for me to commemorate the birth anniversary of Shankar Singh Raghuvanshi, of this great S-J team, through the present series of Shankar (Jaikishan) and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory from October 2018. That pleasure gets multiplied several times while recalling their more famous numbers and listening to their less familiar songs from the films released in chronological order of year.

Till now, we have covered the years

1949 – 1953 in 2018

1953 (Continued) in 2019.

1954 in 2020

1955 and 1956 (Part I) in 2021

After an avalanche of as many as 6 Hindi films in 1953 and 5 in 1954, there was some lull during 1955, But the year 1956 had 7 films under the belt of S-J pair. Of these seven, we have covered Halaku, Kismat Ka Khel and Basant Bahar in the Part 1 of the SJ songs of 1956 in 2021. Presently, we will take up three more films of SJ duo in the year 1956, viz. Chori  Chori, New Delhi and Rajhath,

Chori Chori (1956)

As may be observed from the poster of the film, Chori Chori was romantic film (with the then most coveted lead pair of Raj Kapoor and Nargis) fairly mixed with comedy (with two big guns – Johnny Walker and Bhagwan – playing comically grey roles).

Chori Chori had nine songs, of which Hasrat Jaipuri penned 5 and Shailendra penned four, of which Yeh Raat Bheegi Bheegi (Manna Dey, Lata Mangeshkar) remains one of the most iconoic romantic songs of Hindi cinema and another sweet duet Jahan Mein Jaati Hoon (Manna Dey, Lata Mangeshkar) is my one the most favorite one.

Tum AraboN Ka Her Pher Karanewale Ramji, Sava Lakh Ki Lattery Bhejo Apne Bhi Naam Jii – Mohammad Rafi, Lata Mangeshkar

Essentially a mandatory comedy song always assigned to Bhagwan Dada in any film, stands out because very effective lyrics and equally pleasing composition by Shankar (Jaikishan).  Just note how tastefully orchestration for both interludes has been composed.

https://youtu.be/0S8YH8gPbwE

Manbhavan Ke Ghar Jaaye Gori Ghunghat Mein Sharmaye Gori Bandhi Rahe Ye Pyar Ki Dori Hamein Na Bhulana – Lata Mangeshkar, Asha Bhosle

The opportunity of entertainment stage show as part of the marriage ceremony has been converted by the music director and lyricist to weave in a traditional farewell song for the brides. Shailendra comes up with lyrics that has mix of pleasure of the friend getting married and sorrow of being away once she settles at the in-laws’ place. However Shankar(Jaikishan) uses the dance sequence to present their signature dance composition style – multiple rhythm instruments backed up multi-instruments interlude and counter-melody orchestration.

New Delhi (1956)

The story of the film moves around a newly graduated north Indian young man’s search for a rented premises to settle in his new job in New Delhi, which lands him at the doors of tradition bound South Indian family – both for home as well as his love. Kishore Kumar in the male lead and Vyjaintimala in the female lead naturally provide music directors a templated platform for light mood male songs and classical dance based female songs. Zone would certainly expect dance-based songs to be Composed by Shankar, but even majority of Kishore Kumar songs also have been composed by Shailendra-Shankar composition.

One would very easily recall Arre Bhai Nikal Ke Aa Ghar Se, Nakhrewali Dekhne Mein Dekh Lo Kitani Bholi Bhali, Milte Hi Nazar Aap Mere Dil Mein Sama Gaye (all by Kishore Kumar) Tum Sang Preet Lagayi Rasiya (Lata Mangeshkar, Choru).

Zindagi Bahar Hai Mohabbat Ki Bahar Hai – Lata Mangeshkar

One more fine example of Shankar (Jaikishan)’s own signature style composition for a dance song – rhythm by traditional Indian-rhythm instruments but orchestration of interlude music scores by multiple western instruments.

The song is filmed back-to-back with Nakharewali…

Baari Barssi Khattan Gaya Te Khat Ke Le Aaya Sotti – Lata Mangeshkar, chorus

Essentially this a traditional Punjabi folk dance. But just see how Shankar has given it a very different treatment by first listening to a song from Punjabi film

then listening to the Shankar (Jaikishan) composition.

Gori Tere Sapno Ke Sajna Aye Ter Angana Kar Le Solah Singaar Hoja Jaane Ko Ab Taiyaar Leke Doli Khade Hai Kahaar  – Lata Mangeshkar, chorus

We have one more bride farewell song that will go on to demonstrate the wide range of tunes and compositions that Shankar Jaikishan could commandeer for the same theme.

Rajhath(1956)

Rajhath was Sohrab Modi’s romantic fantasy drama based on a historical plot. The story, revolving the animosity being perpetrated through the generations between two empires gave Sohrab Modi to lay the plot for a costume-drama and the two children of each state falling in love provided Shankar Jaikishan a wide freedom to compose songs that would help create one more hit album. Shailendra’s songs like Chale Sipaahi Dhool Udaate (Manna Dey, chorus) Mere Sapne Mein Aana Re (Lata Mangeshkar)  Naache Ang Ang Ang Tere Aage (Lata Mangeshkar, chorus) went on to big hits at the box-office.

Aa Ja Aa Ja Nadiya Kinare TaaroN Ki Chhaiya Tujhe Kab Se Pukare – Lata Mangeshkar, chorus
The prelude to the dance song gives faint hint of tune that Shankar Jaikishan used as a full-fledged song in (possibly) in Kanhaiya (1959), which I am not able to precisely remember at this stage..

If only all the tunes the duo had composed during teir music room had been well documented, the Hindi Film music would have been far richer than what the tunes that went on to be converted in to songs or background pieces.

Kahaan Se Milte Moti Ansoo Mein Meri Taqdeer Mein – Lata Mangeshkar

A love story in a Hindi film has to mandatorily have a phase wherein the there are roadblocks to the road of love of the two protagonists, which would provide the opportunity for a couple of pathos songs to be composed by the music director.

Pyare Babul Se Bichad Ke … Ghar Ka Angana Suna Kar Ke Gori KahaN Chali Ghunghat Mein – Lata Mangeshkar, chorus

If one needed any validation test for Shankar Jaikishan’s vast range of tunes, here is one more bridal farewell song.

One more aspect of Shankar Jaikishan’s unique style that should be noted here is their use of very fast rhythms where normally other music directors would have used a slow rhythm in lower octave scale.

Aa Gayee Lo Aa Gayi Main Jhoomti… Ho AkhiyoN ko AkhiyoN Se Chumati – Lata Mangeshkar
The situations seems to be the case where Madhubala has impersonated as a native tribe girl and performs their traditional song with accompaniment of a folk-instrument (if I am not mistaken, it is Sarangi) player as a company.

Shankar (Jaikishan) seem to have game fully tried to recreate the desired effect with relyin more on use multiple flutes as the main instrument accompanying sarangi , but the composition does not come out from the shadow of their signature dance composition style – a fast rhythm with multiple instrument-orchestra.

We have one more film -Patrani – for the year 1956, but that deserves a full-scale post, Hence, we will carry forward the year 1956 to  one more episode.

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month next year too……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs: October 2020

Shankar- (Jaikishan) and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory: 1954

Shankar (Singh Raghuvanshi) – B: 25 October 1922 | D:  26 April 1987 – is generally known to be less glamorous that his film music composition partner Jaikishan. However, barring some hiccups in the later part of their active association, their professional bond was so seamless that may knowledgeable musicologists of those days used find it difficult to recognize who has composed which song. It was said that Shankar would compose Shailendra’s songs and Jaikishan would compose Hasrat Jaipuri’s songs. The division of the songs was based on what would suit the situation. However, from the stage the song is being readied for recording, both would be seen working hands in gloves to ensure that the song is no less than their best.

Selection of only Shailendra’s songs in this series is, thus, the outcome of the then popular thumb rule of cross-paring of Shankar Jaikishan with Shailendra and Hasrat Jaipuri. We have commenced the present series of Shankar- (Jaikishan) and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory from October 2018 and have been covering their less familiar songs from the films released in chronological order of year.

Till now, we have covered the years

1949 – 1953 in 2018

1953 (Continued) in 2019.

Presently, we would listen to Shankar- (Jaikishan) and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory for the year 1954..

We have three films in 1954 – Badshah, Mayurpankh and Pooja. A cursory look at the list of Shankar- (Jaikishan) and Shailendra’s Songs shows that even as SJ – along with Shailendra and Hasrat Jaipuri as lyricists – had some outstanding successes under their bet, by 1954, they were still in the process of setting a wide base of banners, film subjects, even the actor-actresses for which the songs on the screen will be filmed etc. As such the songs for the year 1954 show a definitive stamp of SJ – Shailendra-Hasrat combination, we have relative larger share of songs (per album) that remained less familiar than the later years creations.

Badshaah (1954)

The film had eight songs of which Shailendra has penned two songs. Of the two Rula Kar Chal Diye Ek Din HaseN Ban Kar Jo Aaye The is enshrined as one of the all-time Hemant Kumar song.

Gul Muskara Utha, Bul Bul Ye Ga Utha, Bago Mein Aayi Bahar – Lata Mangeshkar, chorus

We have here a very rarely heard song. The song composition has primarily mid-western culture influence. Prominence of male singers in the chorus also attracts listener’s attention.

Mayur Pankh (1954)

The story and screenplay of the film revolve round the infatuation of Ranjit (Kishore Sahu) for an English novelist Joan (Odette Fergusson) and the tragic aspect of the love affair from both their points of view and that of Shanti (Sumitra Devi), Ranjit’s wife. The story moves around from jungle scenes to village melas against the backdrops of historic places, providing thereby the avenues for situations for the songs as well. Shankar Jaikishan have also accepted the challenge for providing music for such songs quite successfully.

Ye Barkha Bahar Sautaniya Ke Dwar – Lata Mangeshkar, Asha Bhosle

A signature mujra song, opening with note of Sarangi and a enticing alaap by the singers.

Aside Trivia: The song is rendered on the screen by the then famous Wajifdar sisters.

Atul’s Song A Day post on this song has addressed the details of the song at great length.

Main Chalu Paschim, Purab Chale Duniya – Lata Mangeshkar

This is a fast-paced dance song, performed on stage by Cuckoo.

Tandana….Mushkil Hai Pyar Chhupana Tandana… Preet Nayi Dard Purana – Lata Mangeshkar, Chorus

Hindi films have the knack of third-party singers sing songs that exactly reflect the feelings or thoughts of relevant protagonists! Shailendra has smartly rhymed the local phrase Tandanna, used normally to lend punch to the rhythm, with Chhupana, Purana etc.

Pooja (1954)

The film had Bharat Bhushan, along with Poornima in the lead. But this should be pre-Bharat Bhushan golden hand-shake period film. My first exposure to the songs happened during Multiple version songs series on SoY with two songs – Jo Ek Baar Keh Do (happy and sad versions). Other than these , all other songs belong to not-so-known territory.  The film had 10 songs, of which 8 are penned by Shailendra.

Mori Bipada Aan Haro, Prabhu Kahe Der Karo – Lata Mangeshkar

Shankar Jaikishan comes up with a minimal orchestration ‘bhajan’ genre song. Use of dholak as the rhythm instrument.

Holi Ayi Pyari Pyari, Bhar Pichkari Rang De Chunariya Hamari – Mohammad Rafi, Lata Mangeshkar

A holi genre song, with SJ improvising with the use of chorus as second interlude to change the song delivery in the second stanza, with song becoming a softly-higher-scale Rafi, chorus song.

Rang Khelo Rasiya Suratiya Pahechan – Mohammad Rafi, Lata Mangeshkar, chorus

This is the second part of the preceding song.

Main Muralidhar Ki Murali Lai, Murlidhar Ne Lai Meri Mala – Lata Mangeshkar

Shankar Jaikishan present this dance song with their trademark large sized orchestration support in the song composition.

Soch Na Manwa.. Teri Taqdeer Bananewala Sochega – Mohammad Rafi

The prelude opens with a stroke of violin ensemble, followed a solo violin piece supported piano expanse as Mohammad Rafi opens the first line with a higher note. Interlude pieces comprise of violin ensemble with flute support.

Room Jhoom Ke Bajao Bansuri Murari – Mohammad Rafi, Krishnarao Chonkar

We have a classical based MM duet. Shankar Jaikishan has roped in services of Krishnarao Chonkar to lend authenticity to the song.

Chal Chal Re Musafir Chal Tu Us Duniya Mein Chal – Mohammad Rafi

The orchestration id predominantly flute based, with a very subtle obbligato support. Short violin ensemble, more as counter melody support to the interlude music is perhaps the only tell-tale indicator of a Shankar Jaikishan composition, However, even this is presented in much different form than what we normally associate with SJ orchestration.

Shailendra is at his usual poetic mood when he thinks about the ‘the other’ world and links up his egalitarian view of ‘that’ world with these lyrics –

jaha pyaar kaa rasta koyi naa roke,
koyi naa kahe sambhal

… …. … .. .. …..
… …. … .. .. …..

jahan ujade naa singaar kisi kaa
phaile naa kaajal

We will continue our journey of Shankar Jaikishan’s songs in Shailendra’s lyrics in our future episodes.

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs: October 2019

Shankar- (Jaikishan) and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory: 1953

Shankar Jaikishan worked as a perfect team, in professional harmony, and as excellent friends. Their synthesis with Shailendra and Hasrat Jaipuri, their permanent lyricists, created a creative team par excellence was an added bonus. The association of composers Shankar-Jaikishan with lyricists Shailendra and Hasrat Jaipuri, went on to give massive downpour of hits, melodies and innovations, year in and year out. One cannot help marveling about how this fabulous foursome could keep their personal and professional bonds in tact over so many years in the challenging and notoriously fickle milieu of Hindi Film Music. The quartet forged a creative partnership which brooked no real parallel. The unique, prolific and successful bonding between the two Masters of Music with two wizards of words remains a golden chapter in the annals of Hindi film music.

October is the month of Shankar’s birthday (25 October 1922 — 26 April 1987). Our today’s episode is dedicated to his memory. To commemorate the Shankar’s birthdays, we commenced the series on Shankar (Jaikishan) and Shailendra’s songs last year. We covered the years from 1949 to1953 last year. 1953 was the first quantitative peak for the SJ duo. They did seven films, 55 songs in that year. We had covered three of them – Aah, Aas and Boot Polish – in the last episode.

Asides:

We have also taken up (Shamker)-Jaikishan’s songs written by Hasrat Jaipuri, which essentially focus on Jaikishan’s compositions.

Aurat (1953)

As the title suggests this being a woman-oriented film, all songs are created for the female lead of the film. Apparently, the film draws inspiration from the famous Western mythical story of Samson and Delailah.

Dard-E-Jigar Thehar Zara…Dum To Mujhe Lene De – Lata Mangeshkar

This seems to be a copy book situation wherein the heroine melodiously weeps her sorrows. Soft strokes of piano, at the very opening of the prelude music, are the tell-tale SJ orchestration style. From the SJ’s standards, the composition is set to a difficult tune.

Dard-E-Ulfat Chupaon Kahan, Dil Ki Duniya BasauN KahaN – Lata Mangeshkar

The heroine dances to her joy of falling into love. Use of harmonium in small bursts adds to the magic of the composition.

Ye Duniya Banai Hai Kis Berahem Ne – Lata Mangeshkar

The song is filmed on the second leading lady of the story. For the records, we note that knowledgeable blog writers identify the singer on the screen as Purnima Razi.

Naya Ghar (1953)

The film has three Lata Mangeshkar solos written by Shailendra. We have picked one solo here, to accompany a very-well known Talat Mahmood solo song.

Jawan Hai Jahan Jhoom Uthi Har Nazar, Main Hoon Ke Hai Zindagi Zahar – Lata Mangeshkar

Unlike a SJ composition song is set to a difficult tune and has far less than usual orchestration support in the counter melody. The song changes the tempo of the rhythm subtly during the second and the last stanza.

Unhein Tu Bhool Ja Aye Dil, Tadapane Se Kya Haasil -Talat Mahmood

The song opens to a very exquisite musical prelude and build on one of the Talat Mahmood all-time classic.

Patita (1953)

Shankar Jaikishan has used Talat Mahmood for Dev Anand’s playback voice in this film. The three Talat songs – Andhe Jahan Ke Andhe Raaste, Tujhe Apne Paas Bulati Hai Teri Duniya and  Hai Sabse Madhur Woh Geet – instantly got etched into the All-Time Best of Talat Mahmood songs. Hasrat Jaipuri wrote only song, a Hemant Kumar- Lata Mangeshkar duet – Yaad Kiya Dil Ne Kaha Ho Tum – for the film, which also has been an all-time hit. The other two Lata Mangeshkar songs were thus destined to remain in the shadow of the brightly shining glory of these four songs, even though each of them remains a very special  Lata Mangeshkar songs.

Kisi Ne Apna Banake Mujhko Muskurana Shikha Diya– Lata Mangeshkar

We have a playful, fully pleasant mood song, set to a very lilting fast-paced tune., which opens with flute-dominated prelude. Interlude music is dominated by very innovative use of violins. Shailendra is also as his poetical best when he says : the dreams that could not  be seen at nights have indeed materialized  in the day.

Mitti Se Khelte Ho Baar Baar Kis Liye – Lata Mangeshkar

Shailendra has used the metaphor of broken toys for the shattered dreams of life, to which Shankar Jaikishan has provided a very heavy, and yet so unobtrusive, countermelody support of violin ensemble orchestra to create the mood of pensive pathos.

Shikast (1953)

 

The film is a Dilip Kumar – Nalini Jaywant starrer, which did not do well during the first run. However, during the  later on re-runs, it always got a wide support from the fans of its songs.

Hum To Hai Kathputhli Kaath Ke Hey Ram – Hemant Kumar

Shankar Jaikishan has so effectively used Hemant Kumar’s soothing voice in this song that lays down the basic philosophy of life for the distressed-from-life ones.

Sapnon Ki Suhani Duniya Ko Aankhon Mein Basana Mushkil Hai – Talat Mahmood

When Naushad had successfully switched over to Mohammad Rafi as Dilip Kumar’s playback voice (Deedar, 1951), Shankar Jaikishan rekindles soft magic of Talat Mahmood for Dilip Kumar.

Jab Jab Phool Khile …. Dekha Akela Hamein Gher Lita Gham Ne – Talat Mahmood, Lata Mangeshkar

Shankar Jaikishan and Shailendra team up to create a Talat-Lata duet that can be as good as a Talat-Lata duet that can ever be.

Gulshan Mein Jal Raha Hai  Ulfat Ka Ashiyana  – Mohamamd Rafi

This happens to be also a snippet with which the film ends.

So too ends our episode with a Mohammad Rafi song.

As may be observed from listening to the songs that seem to recede form our memories, Shankar Jaikishan’s most outstanding work of the 1950s was not as awarded as their relatively less qualitative work of 1960s. We will keep exploring this phenomenon in our future episodes.

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

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Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs: October, 2018

Shankar- (Jaikishan) and Shailendra’s Songs Fading From the Memory 1949 – 1953

We are now running a series on Shailendra’s songs with other than Shanker Jaikishan songs, similarly the songs of Hasrat Jaipuri with other music directors too. We have also taken up Shamker-Jaikishan’s songs written by Hasrat Jaipuri, which essentially focus on Jaikishan’s compositions. So the only one person who does not seem to have received his due was Shankar (Singh Raghuvanshi) October is the month of Shanker’s birthday (25 October 1922 — 26 April 1987). So, we cannot have a better occasion to institute a series on Shanker(-Jaikishan)’s compositions that have been penned by Shailendra.

Top: Left Shanker, Right – Jaikishan;
Bottom: From L to R: Hasrat, Shailendra, Dattaram, Sebastian

Shanker-Jaikishan debuted with Raj Kapoor’s Barsaat in 1949. By the time fate would bring in Shailendra in this team, all except two songs were ready. Shailendra is said to have first written, fatefully or as his wont, meaningfully

Barsat Mein… Sajan Ham Se Mile Tum.. Barsat Mein – Lata Mangeshkar

The other one that Shailendra wrote was

Patli Kamar Hai Tirchhi Nazar Hai – Mukesh, Lata Mangeshkar

That seems to set the tone of Shanker-Jaikishan’s approach to what they will present as their unique identity in a highly completive word – innovative orchestration to essentially Indian tunes..

Even as Mohammad Rafi had his entry in the team in Barsaat itself, for the purpose of the scope of our present series, we will have to wait till 1951 to make the big picture complete.

Naiya Teri Majdhar – Awara 1951 – Mohammad Rafi, chorus

From Awara onwards, Mukesh shall be the playback voice of Raj Kapoor was a  settled affair. However, Shanker Jaikishan invariably had one Mohammad Rafi song in each of RK Films till Mera Naam Joker, except of course, Aah, and Jis Desh Mein Ganga Baheti Hai.

Pavitra Sitamai Ko Tune Diya Banwas – Awara (1951)   – Mohammad Rafi, Lata Mangeshkar, chorus)

This songs metaphorically sets the stage for the film’s narrative, by drawing from Ramayana, wherein Ram tells Sita to leave Ayodhya, knowing fully well that she in the advanced stage of pregnancy. The story of “Awara’ has one more agenda – to prove that a progeny of the upper class will always remain upper class and vive versa.

Anmol Pyaar Bin Mol Bike – Badal (1951) – Lata Mangeshkar

Whether by design or by the circumstances, Shanker Jaikishan’s first few films have a very high degree of skew tilting towards Lata Mangeshkar.

Illa Belle..Din Hai Pyare Pyare – Kali Ghata (1951) – Lata Mangeshkar

Shailendra deftly weaves fil title in the song, if not in the first couplet (mukhada), then in the first stanza. Interestingly Kishore Shahoo has carried the accordion to, probably, bring in a sense reality to the presentation of the song!

Dekho Aaya Yeh Kaisa Zamana – Daag (1952) – Lata Mangeshkar, chorus

Here we have a song that is set to classic Marathi folk tune.

Kya Bataoon Mohabbat Hai Kya – Parbat (1952) – Mohammad Rafi, Lata Mangeshkar, Geeta Dutt

There are not as many songs of Geeta Dutt from Shankar-Jaikishan’s stable, and then a trio of Geeta Dutt, Lata Mangeshkar and Mohammad Rafi is even rarer. The film itself is far less heard of. The soft composition of the song adds to the rarities.

O O My Dear Aao Near – Nagina (1952) – Mohammad Rafi, Shamshad Begum

To the most of Nagina was film where Nutan was not permitted entry during the premier because she was not yet an adult, that this was the first film after Nasir Khan had returned from a highly unsuccessful move to permanently migrate to Pakistan, that Shanker Jaikishan had dared experimenting the lead male song in the voice of C H Atma and had also presented their maiden haunting melody in Lata Mangeshkar’s voice. SJ also have successfully risen to the challenge of simultaneously presenting very light songs as well, the other one being Humse Koi Pyar Karo Ji. Both these light-tones songs are filmed on Gope and Mohana.

The year 1953 has as many as 9 films within the scope of our series, which in itself would be able to provide the material for one independent post. However, I have chosen to include three films here, because one song from each of the two films provides us variety – of singers and of the song situation. Third one has two great Mohammad Rafi songs that would fit into our tradition of ending each our post with Mohammad Rafi song related to the subject of the post.

Chhoti Si Yeh Zindagani Re Char Din Ki Kahani Teri – Aah (1953) – Mukesh

Mukesh also plays a caeo role of the horse cart driver in this song. The clip here is the one in which the films ends on a happy note. Originally, at the end of the song the hero passes away and is not able to meet her beloved.

This is what is supposed to be the original end.

Chahe Naina Churao Chahe Daman Bachao Pyar Ho Ke Rahega – Aas (1953)  – Talat Mahmood, Lata Mangeshkar

When the main protagonists cannot directly communicate what they want to convey to each other, the hind films would adopt a set of street players to come in and convey that thing through a song. Here is on such song.

And here are those two Mohammad Rafi songs:

Nanhe Munne Bacche Teri Mutthi Mein Kya Hai – Boot Polish (1953) – Mohammad Rafi, Asha Bhosle, chorus

Here is a song that fits like T to a traditional proverb – to get a slope when you want to run. Mohammad Rafi gets free hand in enacting an old man, Asha Bhosle gets to enact an adolescent girl, Shailendra gets to dream of future that he would like the new generation to enjoy and Shankar Jaikishan have a situation that naturally bends their inherent composition style.

Tumhare Hain Tumse Daya Maangte Hain  – Boot Polish (1953) – Mohammad Rafi, Asha Bhosle, chorus

Beggar songs has been one of the most experimented genre in Hindi Film songs. However subtle use of pieces of flute lifts the songs from an ordinary orphanage fund collection tune. Mohammad Rafi depicts subtle pathos in delivering the song’s message but when it comes to express their necessities he depicts an unmistakable spirit of not begging something but expecting to share what the haves have.

We will continue our journey of refreshing Shanker (Jaikishan)’s songs of Shailendra on once year basis article every October.

We will continue remembering Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.