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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – May 2021

Welcome to May 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We recapitulate that the 2021 theme for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs is Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

We base our discussion on the subject for the present episode on A TED talk, Back to the future (1994), from the playlist The history of the future. In the talk, Danny Hillis outlines an intriguing theory of how and why technological change seems to be accelerating, by linking it to the very evolution of life itself. The presentation techniques he uses may look dated, but the ideas are as relevant as ever…. In essence, the talk has this to state on its key theme of accelerating changes –

The humanity has started abstracting out. We’re going through the same levels that multi-cellular organisms have gone through — abstracting out our methods of recording, presenting, processing information….In the process, we have speeded up time scales. The process is feeding on itself and becoming autocatalytic. The more it changes, the faster it changes.

There is an equally strong school of thought that thinks otherwise.

‘If the pace of change really were unprecedented, then conventional wisdom holds we’d better darn well slow it down, so no one gets hurt.  Either way, the commentators warn, “buckle up.” Here is one, by Alvin Toffler in 1970.:

‘ “It has become a cliché to say that what we are now living through is a “second industrial revolution.” This phrase is supposed to impress us with the speed and profundity of the change around us. But in addition to being platitudinous, it is misleading. For what is occurring now is, in all likelihood, bigger, deeper, and more important than the industrial revolution. Indeed, a growing body of reputable opinion asserts that the present movement represents nothing less than the second great divide in human history, comparable in magnitude only with that first great break in historic continuity, the shift from barbarism to civilization”.

‘Why have people long believed that their eras were unprecedented when it came to the rate of change? There are two reasons. First, at least today, it is hard to get attention if you say that “there’s nothing new here, at least in terms of the pace of change.” Second, it’s simply human nature. Most of us overestimate change in a few things around our lives and ignore most of the rest that changes very slowly, if at all.

‘None of this is to say that technology-driven change isn’t happening. Of course it is—and it’s making our lives much better. But the pace of change appears to be no faster than in prior eras, and just as economies did fine despite Luddite impulses then, ours will do fine now. So, let’s all take a deep breath and say together: “Technological change is not accelerating, but it would sure be nice if it would.” ‘[1]

Scott Brinker has formulated Martec’s Law, which states, Technology changes exponentially, organizations change logarithmically…..there have been hundreds of best-selling books written on the difficulties of personal and organizational change. Empirically, the limit of change for humans is less than linear. In other words, it’s not feasible for an organization to change faster than that. But it’s certainly possible for an organization to change more slowly — or not at all. In fact, in the absence of good leadership, stagnation seems like the default outcome. But even with great leadership, an organization can’t win by outracing technology. It needs a more nuanced strategy….In A.G. Lafley’s book, Playing to Win: How Strategy Really Works, he drives home the point that strategy is choice. It’s decisively choosing to do certain things and to not do others….That is the crux of technology management. We can’t adopt all technological changes, but we can consciously choose some. Great technology management is choosing which changes to absorb — ideally those that are best aligned with the organization’s overall strategy….In the graph, it’s intentionally deciding what’s in (the red shaded area) and what’s out (the blue shaded area)….. To succeed, technology management must explicitly address how those technologies will be absorbed into the operations and the culture of the organization.

A successful tech-enabled transformation requires organizations to make progress on several paths simultaneously. … Only by following a structured, comprehensive playbook can companies translate their transformation priorities from strategy to action. A two-step methodology supported by several enablers can provide companies with the direction, priorities, and organizational capabilities to maximize the value of such investments. Indeed, companies that took a comprehensive approach to their transformation generated more than twice as much value as organizations focused solely on technology improvements. [2]

Charlie Feld, in his article, Change Management: Leading Through Technology Changes, states: There are three major competencies that great IT leaders need in order to get the lay of the changing landscape: pattern recognition, technical savvy and street smarts.

One may tend to conclude that one should consciously map the change and act in accordance with the organization’s long-term strategy of maintain its competitive advantage.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about–

The Quality Professional’s Changing Workplace – This episode investigates how the global pandemic and digital transformation are changing the quality professional’s workplace.

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month:

Commit to Improvement – Most continuous improvement programs are treated as the latest management fad; therefore, people look at it as just another “program of the month” being pushed by management. …This is not the way the organization conducts its other business. In fact, the continuous improvement effort is often at odds with the existing processes and metrics, so it is destined to limp along on its way to mediocrity and eventual failure…. Continuous improvement is more about rigor and discipline than it is about technique.

From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand, we have

Rules: Good or Bad? – English actor and author Alan Bennett once said, “We started off trying to set up a small anarchist community, but people wouldn’t obey the rules.” … We equate rules with the difference between order and chaos. We often, quite negatively, associate rules as being an obstacle to success. …Depending on your perspective, those seen breaking the rules are either bad people or trailblazers and pioneers…These quotes express more accurately captures the essence— “Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist” (Pablo Picasso ) or “Know the rules well, so you can break them effectively.” (the Dalai Lama)…. Although much has changed in the last year and the near future can look a little daunting, understanding the rules of before, what is happening now, and how it may affect us moving forward is always good practice.

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.


[1] Technology Feels Like It’s Accelerating—Because You’ve Been Watching Too Many TED TalksRobert D. Atkinson

[2] Accelerating the impact from a tech-enabled transformation By Venkat Atluri, Aamer Baig, and Satya Rao

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – April 2021

Welcome to April 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We recapitulate that the 2021 theme for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs is Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

I have picked up two articles relating to Future of Industry. Here too I have avoided going into details that relate to impact of digital technologies but have chosen to focus on the issues that should concern the management in general.

Note: This subject has no correlation to Industries of Future.

The future of industries: Bringing down the walls – As the boundaries between suppliers, producers and consumers and, in some cases, between whole industries shift, the separating walls are being brought down.…. It is expected that all industries will be transformed by the technology shockwave, lowering cost bases, and improving operational efficiency as well as demanding greater integration with customers and suppliers.

Five big issues for companies –

1. Have you got an outcomes’ focus or are you still stuck in a physical product mindset?

2. What are you doing to avoid commoditisation of your business?

3. Are you building a platform presence?

4. Are you leading with or being left behind by advanced technology?

5. Have you got your timing, right?

The ‘Future of Industries’ report discusses these and a number of other questions. Download it to find out more and join in the discussion with PwC.

Industry Of The Future: We Need To TalkMike Hughes – The industrial world still inhabits an environment of proprietary systems and vendor lock-in long since abandoned by the IT sector. This is throttling innovation and progress.

Credit: Getty Images

Many organizations recognize that next-generation industrial automation must be interoperable and break free from the locked-in model we currently accept. Interoperable and portable application software is a must for next-generation industries…… The factories and industries of the future, will have machines, operations and IT systems integrated and understand each other, talk and collaborate—where agility, sustainability, and productively are just a matter of choosing the best-in-class solution for your operation.

The Future of Industry | Accenture sums up succinctly the challenges as it states – The world is changing, and all industries are facing a tectonic shift. Let’s embrace the new, together…..

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about–

Shared Meanings from Top to Bottom – Charlie Barton, President, Barton Consulting LLC, discusses the importance of shared meanings of words for organizations, and the negative business implications that could occur without that common knowledge.

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month:

Organizational Culture – Workplace culture takes work but delivers value – Peter F. Drucker, the famed educator and management consultant, said, “There is nothing as useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.” …. Maybe more important for effectiveness and efficiency is workplace culture. As times change so must the culture. …We must learn to be aware of one another from a cultural background before we can learn to work together effectively. We need to realize it is not so much what we say as much as the manner in which we express ourselves that can adversely affect mutual understanding…. A lack of understanding and sensitivity can be injurious to the environment. There must be balance in the workforce just as there is in any other situation. We must learn to appreciate the differences between generations and learn to adapt. 

From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand, we have

Truth or Fallacy – Depends on how you look at it. – Sunk costs are defined as costs that have already been incurred and cannot be recovered. Proponents of the sunk cost fallacy argue that since it is a cost paid in the past and unrecoverable, it should be removed from any future decision making. But that does not stop sunk costs from being a part of our psyche…The sunk cost fallacy, in a way, is not just forgetting the time, money, and effort that went into producing something, but not allowing it to blind us to what we truly want or need. … “The sunk cost fallacy means making a choice not based on what outcome you think is going to be the best moving forward, but instead based on a desire to not see your past investment go to waste,” said Julia Galef, president of the Center for Applied Rationality.[1]

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.


[1] Julia Galef: The Sunk Costs Fallacy | Big Think

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – March, 2021

Welcome to March 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We recapitulate that the 2021 theme for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs is Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Presently, we will first take up A future direction for quality management standards, not for what it notes what is in the store for the next revisions of ISO standards. I have picked up the article for the basis of these revisions, which indicates the new way of looking at the fundamentals of the thinking in the times to come. As such, the edited excerpts show only what is relevant, in general.

The eight future concepts are:

  1. Customer experience is the sum of all perceptions, impressions and reactions that a customer has in a series of activities. It involves everything from initially discovering and researching a product or service, through shopping, purchasing and using the product or service to following up with the brand afterwards.
  2. People aspects are all the factors that impact people’s abilities to perform tasks, their interests (eg motivation and preferences), their differences and relations (individual differences and social behaviour), and how an organisation can enhance performance by getting the best from people.
  3. Change management is identified as a systematic approach to initiate, develop, implement and communicate a transition or transformation in an organisation’s identity elements. These elements include the organisation’s  vision, mission, culture, values, policy, strategy, objectives and/or processes.
  4. Integration – An integrated management system (IMS) integrates many systems and processes into one complete framework, enabling an organisation to work as a single unit with unified objectives. When an organisation integrates management systems it can achieve better alignment between its systems, strategic direction, objectives, and the context of the organisation.
  5. Knowledge management is a discipline focused on ways that organisations create and use knowledge. While this concept itself is not new, there are important aspects that now need to be considered in relation to the use of, for example, big data, machine learning, blockchain, code of ethics, copyrights and intellectual property.
  6. There are several emerging technologies that will impact an organization in the future. The extent of digitisation is constantly growing in organisations. There are many possibilities for companies to use intelligent networking and artificial intelligence (AI) for making decisions based on rapidly changing data.
  7. Ethics and integrity are critical to the organisation’s ability to achieve sustainable success. All company decisions, actions and stakeholder interactions must be aligned with its moral and professional principles of conduct. These principles should support all applicable laws and regulations and are the foundation for the organisation’s culture, values and attitudes.
  8. Organizational culture refers to the collective beliefs, values, attitudes, manners, customs and behaviours that are unique to an organisation. Leadership establishes the organisational identity through the culture it develops and promotes.

These eight future perspectives can be further viewed in the light of Gary Hamel’s seminal work ‘The Future of Management’. The book, co-authored by Bill Green, was published in 2007. His basic tenet is that most of the organizations “by a small coterie of long departed theorists and practitioners who invented the rules and conventions of “modern” management back in the early years of the 20th century. They are the poltergeists who inhabit the musty machinery of management. It is their edicts, echoing across the decades, that invisibly shape the way your company allocates resources, sets budgets, distributes power, rewards people, and makes decisions.

However, “the laws of management are neither foreordained nor eternal”.

“Whiplash change, fleeting advantages, technological disruptions, seditious competitors, fractured markets, omnipotent customers, rebellious shareholders—these 21st century challenges are testing the design limits of organizations around the world and are exposing the limitations of a management model that has failed to keep pace with the times.”

“What ultimately constrains the performance of your organization is not its business model, nor its operating model, but its management model.”

The management innovation has a unique capacity to create a long-term advantage for (the) company, and …. (the management of today) must …. first imagine, and then invent, the future of management.[1]

[Side Note: Management Innovation is defined as “..anything that substantially alters the way in which the work of management is carried out, or significantly modifies customary organizational forms, and, by so doing, advances organizational goals”. ]

In this video, Gary Hamel on the Future of Management, you can view Gary Hamel explaining the concept that he has enunciated in the book.

Additional reading:

The Future of Management Gary Hamel: The Future of Management Dr. Liano Greybe

The Future of Innovation Management: The Next 10 Years from Arthur D. Little)

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about–

Skills You Need for the Technical Era

Quality 4.0 is More Than Technology https://asq.realmagnet.land/quality-4pt0-research

Learn About Quality 4.0 https://asq.org/quality-resources/quality-4-0

Quality 4.0 Virtual Summit https://asq.org/conferences/quality-4-0

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month:

Change Perspective – In life not everything goes as planned or expected, even for the most successful people. But some people take failure very personally. It is our perspective that counts in the long run…. If you want to change your life, you need to first change your belief system. …. Anything that was learned – and our beliefs are learned – can be unlearned and relearned. Then, you will continue to act like yourself, but you will see yourself differently, so your behavior will be different. And when you change your behavior, you change the results. … Bhagwant Buddha preached : “What you think, you become. What you feel, you attract. What you imagine, you create.” In other words, change your perspective, and you change your life.

From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand, we have

Speaking the same language – George Carlin once said, “Everybody smiles in the same language.”

In fact, our facial expressions can convey a plethora of information about our emotional state.  .. What is critical is — understanding the communication, whether it is verbal or non-verbal.

March 2021 issue of QualityMag provides insight on moving communication forward in the age of Industry 4.0, in the form of Surface Tools: Speaking the language of Industry 4.0” and “Choosing Your Words Wisely: Help us clear up the confusion of NDT terminology.”

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

[1] Gary Hamel : The Future of Management

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – February, 2021

Welcome to February 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We recapitulate that the 2021 theme for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs is Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Presently, we will take up a McKinsey article, The next normal arrives: Trends that will define 2021—and beyond – By Kevin Sneader and Shubham Singhal to provide us a broad over view.

Excerpts from the article:

Quote:

There is at least a faint light at the end of the tunnel—along with the hope that another train isn’t heading our way….

Barring any unexpected catastrophes, individuals, businesses, and society can start to look forward to shaping their futures rather than just grinding through the present. The next normal is going to be different. It will not mean going back to the conditions that prevailed in 2019. Indeed, just as the terms “prewar” and “postwar” are commonly used to describe the 20th century, generations to come will likely discuss the pre-COVID-19 and post-COVID-19 eras…

The crisis has sparked a wave of innovation and launches a generation of entrepreneurs. …There’s no going back. The great acceleration in the use of technology, digitization, and new forms of working is going to be sustained.

Supply chains re-balance and shift

Think of it as “just in time plus.” The “plus” stands for “just in case,” meaning more sophisticated risk management. …When a single country or even a single factory went dark, the lack of critical components shut down production. Never again, executives vowed…. Once businesses began to study how their supply chains worked, they realized three things. First, disruptions aren’t unusual. Second, cost differences among developed and many developing countries are narrowing. In manufacturing, companies that adopt Industry 4.0 principles (meaning the application of data, analytics, human–machine interaction, advanced robotics, and 3-D printing) can offset half of the labor-cost differential between China and the United States. The gap narrows further when the cost of rigidity is factored in: end-to-end optimization is more important than the sum of individual transaction costs. And third, most businesses do not have a good idea of what is going on lower down in their supply chains, where subtiers and sub-subtiers may play small but critical roles. That is also where most disruptions originate, but two-thirds of companies say they can’t confirm the business-continuity arrangements with their non-tier-one suppliers. With the development of AI and data analytics, companies can learn more about, audit, and connect with their entire value chains.

The future of work arrives ahead of schedule

The McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) estimates that more than 20 percent of the global workforce (most of them in high-skilled jobs in sectors such as finance, insurance, and IT) could work most of its time away from the office—and be just as effective…. There are two important challenges related to the transition to working away from the office. One is to decide the role of the office itself, which is the traditional center for creating culture and a sense of belonging. Returning to the office shouldn’t be a matter of simply opening the door. Instead, it needs to be part of a systematic reconsideration of what exactly the office brings to the organization….. The other challenge has to do with adapting the workforce to the requirements of automation, digitization, and other technologies. This isn’t just the case for sectors such as banking and telecom; instead it’s a challenge across the board, even in sectors not associated with remote work…In 2018, the World Economic Forum estimated that more than half of employees would need significant reskilling or upskilling by 2022.

Portfolio restructuring accelerates

In previous downturns, the strong came out stronger, and the weak got weaker, went under, or were bought. The defining difference was resilience—the ability not only to absorb shocks but to use them to build competitive advantage…. The implication is that there is a resiliency premium on recovery. Top performers won’t sit on their strengths; instead, as in previous downturns, they will seek out ways to build them.

Green, with a touch of brown, is the color of recovery

All over the world, the costs of pollution—and the benefits of environmental sustainability—are increasingly recognized.

The COVID-19 crisis has created an imperative for companies to reconfigure their operations—and an opportunity to transform them. To the extent that they do so, greater productivity will follow.

Unquote

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about–

  • Remote Auditing – Recent health guidelines have caused companies and independent auditors to view an online audit as a viable alternative to the on-site audit. Lance Coleman, ASQ Instructor, and Principal Consultant, Full Moon Consulting, details the benefits of online audits, how to get top management buy in and how to conduct an online audit.

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month :

Fail SuccessfullyThe hallmark is that highly successful people are not afraid to try something new, set aggressive goals, and are committed to achieve success. The possibility of failure exists but they are willing to take that chance. In fact, the only real failure is not trying at all…. Failure is perceived as a negative aspect of life, but successful people believe that failure is good. Failing means that you tried something new, and the results will teach you valuable lessons that make future success possible. Another aspect of failure that falls into the beliefs of successful people is that no one cares about or remembers your failures, so do not carry them with you. Learn and move on quickly … One other thing is certain: If you do not try anything, you are guaranteed to fail.

From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand, we have

Leaders and Followers – What do you call a leader with no followers? A guy taking a walk…. In a broader sense, it begs the question of the importance of following in the footsteps of another. It is why leaders also are often referred to as trailblazers, those creating paths for others… An important part of trailblazing was—and is—documentation…Today, trailblazing and documentation take place in the form of standard operating procedures and best practices…to help their customers and others effectively and successfully use technology or follow a process…or users and practitioners to expand, innovate, and forge new paths of success.

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – January 2021

Welcome to January 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We ended the year 2020 on the subject of Future of Quality. The intention was to use that as the gateway for the 2021 theme – Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success – for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

The primary objective of each monthly episode in this ‘Future of….’ is intended to be pinned around this quote by Thomas Alva Edison – “Keep on the lookout for novel ideas that others have used successfully. Your idea has to be original only in its adaptation to the problem you’re working on.”

To put this intention into actual practice, the plan is to pick up a topic a month, relevant to the field of quality management and then explore other relevant articles and blogs related to that topic.

Presented here under is an overview of possible sources for these types of topics:

From the playlists on TED.com:

The history of the future – A look back on how we looked forward over the decades.

What direction is the future headed? – Explore what may be in store for our collective future and how we can plan for the unpredictable, together.

What does the future look like?  – Visions of the future of everything from cars to the internet to the human species.

From the themes, presented by the leading consulting or industry organizations or journals –

Is your organization prepared for the future? – McKinsey’s Organizing for the Future blog series can help organizations thrive in the years ahead.

Future of Work –  As automation changes the world of work, governments, businesses, and members of the workforce can take action and adapt.

The Future of Production | McKinsey and the World Economic Forum  – The McKinsey-WEF knowledge collaboration on the future of production and the fourth Industrial Revolutions seeks to shape advanced manufacturing through “lighthouse” factories.

The Future of Climate Risk | McKinsey and the World Economic Forum – The McKinsey-WEF knowledge collaboration on the future of climate risk focuses on natural capital and biodiversity as well as the sustainability of airlines.

Future shocks: 17 technology predictions for 2025 | World Economic …

New Nature Economy Report II: The Future Of Nature And Business …

Articles like –

The Future of the Past? Santosh Desai in City City Bang Bang, India, TOI

Or the predictions like –

Twenty for ‘20: the questions that will shape the next decade by EY Global

For the present episode, the lay the corner stone of our theme –

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about our 2021 theme –

  • The State of the Quality Profession – In this episode, a new ASQ research initiative gives us a current global state of quality: ASQ World Conference on Quality and Improvement attendees talk about the quality profession today, and what the future holds | Become reacquainted with control charts. | And, a Quality Progress character makes his first TV appearance.

To learn more about control charts and find a template, visit http://asq.org/learn-about-quality/data-collection-analysis-tools/overview/control-chart.html

  • New Roles for Quality Professionals – Peter-Elias Alouche, CEO of dqdt Inc., discusses how quality professionals can improve productivity, customer satisfaction, and profitability by expanding their skill-sets to include new professional roles.

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month, which was /is and will remain to be relevant for all quality professionals –

People, like businesses, need to be creative or stagnate – There have been numerous articles and books written on this topic. Two books pushing ‘out of box thinking’ were written by James M. Higgins. “101 Creative Problem-Solving Techniques” focuses on new ideas for businesses and “Escape from the Maze” describes Higgins’ nine steps to personal creativity. …..Aside from tools and techniques designed to stimulate creativity the following are six human conditions, which can allow creativity and ultimately innovation to flourish.

  1. Solitude. The sense of spending time to focus on your thoughts and ideas.
  2. Inactivity. Planned inactivity as a break in the busy routine.
  3. Daydream. Focusing on out of box thinking for the purpose of stimulating (innovating) thinking.
  4. Gullibility. The willingness to suspend your personal beliefs and accept what comes from inside without insisting on rationality or logic.
  5. Alertness and discipline. A twist to the Thomas Edison success quote could be “creativity is 10% inspiration and 90% perspiration”.
  6. Mental replay. Allowing yourself to revisit past creative efforts and resolution of past traumatic conflicts.

We add one more regular feature to our Quality Blog festival – ‘From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand

The Wave as a Metaphor – One of the most powerful images from nature has also become a powerful metaphor—the wave. Waves are relentless. The water crashes on the beach, ebbs back toward the ocean, only to be followed by another wave of crashing water. It never stops……Waves can be powerful. People caught in one are taught to relax and ride the wave to safety. The most powerful ships attempting to ride against and past a wave will—at the least—find themselves making no forward progress.

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.