Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – November, 2017

Welcome to November, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

Our topic for November, 2017 is Design Thinking.

We had noticed the subject in our previous episode in an article Apply Design Thinking to Quality Practices.

I have exhaustively drawn excerpts from Prem Ranganath’s article The Art of Quality, which states that Design Thinking is an opportunity to humanize quality and continuous improvement.

As may be seen in the above Visual from IDEO as a reference, traditionally quality and continuous improvement initiatives are largely driven by viability and feasibility considerations. Integrating design thinking with improvement initiatives brings the ‘human’ element into focus, by driving conversation on ‘desirability’ of the solutions being proposed for implementation.

This Visual shows the integration of a Design Thinking flow represented by the steps Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype and Test with the DMAIC approach for continuous improvement. Integration of design thinking methods adopt a humanized approach to characterizing (challenges and opportunities) current state.

Design Thinking was popularized by David M. Kelley and Tim Brown of IDEO and Roger Martin of the Rotman School. A very good, short video on the topic was recently published by the Harvard Business Review blog . For a more detailed explanation please read the paper, “Design for Action” written by Brown and Martin.

As stipulated by a paper recently published by Creativity At Work, “Design Thinking is a methodology used by designers to solve complex problems, and find desirable solutions for clients. A design mindset is not problem-focused; it is solution focused and action oriented towards creating a preferred future. Design Thinking draws upon logic, imagination, intuition, and systemic reasoning, to explore possibilities of what could be—and to create desired outcomes that benefit the end user (the customer)”.

The three major stages of Design Thinking are:

  1. Observe customer behavior; define unarticulated needs
  2. Ideate, Prototype, experiment and test
  3. Bring the new concept to life; open new markets

What differentiates Design Thinking from traditional Voice of Customer collection approaches is the emphasis placed on observation of behaviors rather than relying on customers’ input to satisfaction surveys.

Michael Sabah has curated several articles on the subject – Design Thinking: Get a Quick Overview of the History; DESIGN THINKING | methods & tools; How Design Thinking will fix Design Thinking; Prototyping in Design Thinking: How to Avoid Six Common Pitfalls

Why is Design a CEO Matter? – Tim Brown – CEO of IDEO – In order to compete today, CEOs need evolutionary skills that will ensure their survival in a fast-changing climate. Business fitness now means learning how to be agile, resilient, and creative. It means adapting to the marketplace in quick generational cycles. That requires a brave new brand of leadership, and from our vantage point, as we work alongside companies young and old from around the globe, it requires being able to think like a designer.

A few videos to better understand the concept:

Design Thinking – Tim Brown, CEO and President of IDEO

‘What Is Design Thinking?’ gives better understanding of what design thinking is all about.

How It Works: Design Thinking – For more information on IBM Design Thinking, please visit: http://www.ibm.com/design

Stages of Design Thinking

Stanford Webinar – Design Thinking = Method, Not Magic – In this webinar Bill Burnett, consulting assistant professor and master in design thinking at Stanford University, as he shares three barriers organizations face when adopting an innovative culture and how to overcome them.

ABC Nightline – IDEO Shopping Cart – In 1999, ABC’s Nightline tried to describe IDEO’s approach by commissioning us to design a better shopping cart, and filmed the entire process. 17+ years later, the video is still shown in classrooms across the globe as a lesson in design thinking and team collaboration.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up one article The 4 Dos Of Change Management @ the column Effective Management @ Management Matters Network.

  1. Build a business case – Spell out why change is needed.
  2. Communicate the changes systematically – share the right things with the right people at the right time, or there is great risk of inadvertently rev up the rumor mill
  3. Mobilize your employees from the onset – When employees feel involved, they’re more invested in and supportive of the effort—and less likely to offer resistance.
  4. Roll out in phases and celebrate small wins

The reality is that change is happening all around us all the time, leaving us with two choices: embrace it to get ahead of it and manage it proactively, or resist it and let it drag us to our fate.

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy section does not have anything of interest at present.

For the present, we continue with the practice of picking up one article form ASQ.org site: Forward Progress – Looking back at quality’s evolution over the past 50 years and seeing where the movement is headed:

We now watch one of the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

  • EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION USING QUALITY TOOLS – Sam Yankelevitch, CEO, Xpress Lingo Solutions, discusses the importance of using quality tools to improve invisible processes like communication to positively impact our physical processes.

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of October, 2017:

  • Dissatisfaction : It is easy to look for others to blame for our failures, discontent and dissatisfaction. Maybe that’s part of our human frailty. The alternative is to choose to embrace our failures, fully own them and be responsible for our own dissatisfaction. The result is that our willingness to own it will make it go away.
  • Quality and Lean Partnership must be linked. The purpose of quality has always been to concentrate on the process and identify sources of variation, control or eradicate them, and provide the customer, as much as is possible, product they are willing to purchase. Lean, Six Sigma, or for that matter any tool, must take this role of quality management into consideration.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – October, 2017

Welcome to October, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

Our topic for October 2017 is World Standards Day : Each year on 14th October, the members of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and International Telecommunication Union (ITU) celebrate World Standards Day, which is a means of paying tribute to the collaborative efforts of the thousands of experts worldwide who develop the voluntary technical agreements that are published as international standards.

The theme for World Standards Day, 2017 was ‘Standards make cities smarter.’ Sufficient fresh water; universal access to cleaner energy; the ability to travel efficiently from one point to another; a sense of safety and security: these are the kinds of promises modern cities must fulfil if they are to stay competitive and provide a decent quality of life to their citizens.

The winner poster of the 2017 World Standards Day by Reza Rahimian

More about the WSC and Information on previous celebrations (1998-2015) to see all previous World Standards day posters.

Setting standards is the key to building smarter cities: Eswaran Subrahmanian

What are Smart Cities? | Larissa Suzuki | TEDxUCLWomen

How we design and build a smart city and nation | Cheong Koon Hean | TEDxSingapore

Smart Cities – The Untold Story: Mischa Dohler at TEDxLondon City 2.0

Benefits of Smart Cities – #WorldStandardsDay2017 Gabriel Hernández from Mexico is winner of the video contest

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up one article(s) Be Data Literate: Understanding Why Aggregated Data Misleads, Misinforms, Misdirects: Part 1 & Part 2 @ the column Measuring Performance (People & Enterprise) @ Management Matters Network.

Not a day goes by that we are not being subjected to cheating charts, meaningless statistics, improper comparisons, and erroneous conclusions.

Worse, by failing to apply what might be called elementary statistical analysis to a variety of societal and management problems, it’s near impossible to separate a problem’s symptoms from its causes.

To arrive at the definition of the real problem and the development of alternative and effective solutions requires an approach thoroughly grounded in scientific and statistical thinking.

From this point forward, we ask you to internalize this basic truth: Overly-aggregated data misleads, misinforms, and misguides.

For any manager looking to flex their leadership acumen, he or she must not only be able to read data, but have the ability to detect the forces that skew the accuracy of its results as well.

It is called homogeneity.

Simply put, homogeneity of data refers to whether or not the total data set from which measurements were computed conceals important differences between or among what statisticians call “rational subgroups or just plain subgroups.”

To Sum It All Up:

  1. An aggregated performance measurement is of limited diagnostic value.
  2. Through the process of isolating and analyzing variation among relevant subgroups, you can locate the “root cause” of the problem.
  3. Management action is required to deal with the “root cause” of the problem. (A reminder: A decision is not an action. A decision is a good intention. Decisions must be converted into action).
  4. Faulty conclusions and/or policies inevitably flow from a dataset that is not homogeneous with respect to the performance measurement under investigation. In other words, the wrong problem is being solved.
  5. Statistical procedures detect significant variation among subgroups. If significant differences in a performance characteristic (because of thoughtful subdivision of a data set) are found to exist, the reasons for the variation must be investigated and eliminated from the process.
  6. After the “causes” of the variation are discovered and eliminated, the performance measurement under investigation improves.

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy section has one interesting article on how to Apply Design Thinking to Quality Practices.  The subject of Design Thinking calls for a full-fledged post in blog carnival series. So, we will take that up in our November, 2017 issue.

For the present, we continue with the practice of picking up one article form ASQ.org site. For our present edition we will fall back upon a 1991 interview – Statistical Quality Control in World War II Years – by Eugene L Grant [Born: 1897|Died: 1996] that translates important memories into historical documentation…….. Although Eugene L Grant is best known for Statistical Quality Control, his contributions extend beyond the boundaries of the quality profession. Industrial quality control was only one of the areas in which he specialized. He authored books in several other areas, including engineering economy, depreciation, and accounting, and one of those books outsold Statistical Quality Control.

We now watch one of the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

If we search for Likert Scales and Data Analysis on YT, we will find quite a few more informative videos on the subject.

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of September, 2017:

Fundamentally, disposition limits are focused on product, not process, control. The decisions they drive are focused on what to do with product that has already been processed through a specific process step or set of steps. The basic decision involved is whether a specific group of product should be allowed to move on for further processing and eventually become finished product worthy to be shipped….

Specifically disposition limits differ from process control limits in three areas.

  1. Disposition limits are applied to a finite group of product that has already been manufactured. Control limits, on the other hand, are applied to the manufacture of current and future operations of a process for variable amounts of time and processed product.
  2. Disposition limits are focused on product control to minimize overall producer and customer costs. Control limits are focused on process control and are ideally determined by appropriately balancing false signal rates with required levels of sensitivity.
  3. Disposition limits and process control limits differ in the amount of risk they impose on a manufacturing operation. It sounds strange but the risk associated with determining the fate of a finite lot of product outside the appropriate limits is often perceived as much less than the risk of determining the fate of the associated process. Something has to be done with the product that has already been produced outside the appropriate limits but that decision is only applied to that finite lot. However, adjusting a process will potentially impact all future product through the affected process step.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – September, 2017

Welcome to September, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

Our topic for September 2017 is Industry 4.0. This was a concept that had been mentioned in our July, 2017 post for further discussions in the next issue. We will take a quick look at the first few articles appearing in Google search.

Industry 4.0 is a name for the current trend of automation and data exchange in manufacturing technologies. It includes cyber-physical systems, the Internet of things, cloud computing and cognitive computing…Industry 4.0 creates what has been called a “smart factory”. Within the modular structured smart factories, cyber-physical systems monitor physical processes, create a virtual copy of the physical world and make decentralized decisions.

Industry 4.0 – The future of the Factory: The fourth industrial revolution has been introduced in recent years. It’s said that Industry 4.0 is the future of the factory where both the objects, which will be equipped with RFID devices, and the machines, will intelligently to communicate with each other in a secure networked environment. In the smart factory, intelligent machines can perform complex tasks while communicating with other machines. The machines will be able to detect mechanical issues or material shortages and then send instant messages to a live person for immediate troubleshooting.

industry_40_factory

What Everyone Must Know About Industry 4.0Bernard Marr – The question, then, is not if Industry 4.0 is coming, but how quickly.

5 things you should know about Industry 4.0Jamie Hinks – First things first – this isn’t a new technology. Nor is it a business discipline. It is in fact a new approach to achieve results that weren’t possible 10 years ago thanks to advancements in technology over the past decade.

Industry 4.0: Building the digital enterprise – This PwC research shows that first movers are transforming into digital enterprises. Industrial companies need to act now to secure a leading position in tomorrow’s complex industrial ecosystems.

Manufacturing’s next actCornelius Baur and Dominik Wee – A closer look at what’s behind Industry 4.0 reveals some powerful emerging currents with strong potential to change the way factories work. It may be too much to say that it is another industrial revolution. But call it whatever you like; the fact is, Industry 4.0 is gathering force, and executives should carefully monitor the coming changes and develop strategies to take advantage of the new opportunities.

SVGZ_Manufacturing's next act_ex1

Industry 4.0: It’s all about the peopleDouglas K. Gates   : The adoption of i4.0 will have a profound impact on the manufacturing workforce. Organizations should start planning the transition today.

We back up these this broad overview with a few video clips:

Industry 4.0 – Germany’s 4th industrial revolution

Industrie 4.0 – The Fourth Industrial Revolution

Documentary | The Fourth Industrial Revolution

The next manufacturing revolution is here | Olivier Scalabre

Implementing Industrie 4.0: This is how it works!

The World In 2050 – Future Earth – BBC Documentary 2017

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up one article The 3 Reports Every Manager Should Use To Identify High-Performers @ the column Measuring Performance (People & Enterprise) @ Management Matters Network. The article is an excerpt originally published on Entrepreneur and is from Riaz Khadem and Linda Khadem’s book Total Alignment. The Focus Report shows an employee’s performance as it relates to the actual status of each of the process indicators assigned to them. The Feedback Report is a summary of the “good news” and the “bad news” based on the status of your employee’s indicators. It illustrates the factors that have fallen below the unacceptable range in status and those that are above the satisfactory level. Those that fall in between the two are considered in the acceptable range. And the third report is The Management Report, which gives you a quick overview of the highlights of the Feedback Reports of everyone in your pyramid of responsibility, people reporting to you directly as well as indirectly. This approach is “management by exception.”

From Ask The Experts, I have picked up a question – Special Process NCRs During Audit – that relates to a very specific set of qualifications for special processes. The answers are affirmatives Nos, as long as The organization has a process, and if it is effectively implemented that should be satisfactory evidence of conformity.

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy seems to have gone into an irregular mode. Therefore, we will take up one of the recent article post form the ASQ Home page every month now.at present.

We will begin with: Why Customer Service Teams Are Crying Out for Artificial Intelligence. The article presents certain basic advantages and needs to supplement “Why’ of the title of the article. The conclusion of the article sums to message in no uncertain terms: “There is no reason to fear AI, but neither is there any choice. If your business doesn’t utilize the technology, your competitors will. Chatbots and virtual assistants may be limited now, but they’re constantly evolving, and the potential impact they could have on your customer service team is staggering. Experts are all in agreement: AI is here to stay.”

We now watch one of the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

Supply Chain Management: Building a Stronger Supply Chain – In this episode, learn how to build a better supply chain by implementing supplier metrics and a supplier scorecard.

Additional references:

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of August, 2017:

The Role of Specification Limits – Determine if a process is in a state of statistical control- jimsmith_200In the previous column Jim Smith discussed the role of specification limits in manufacturing, which led to thoughts about process control limits. When there are data points falling outside the control limits, there is an indication of a special-cause event, so the process should be discontinued until the issue’s root cause has been found and resolved which will then return the process to a state of statistical control. With that said, however, it seems that effective implementation of process control charts remains elusive to many. The control limits provide information about process behavior and have no intrinsic relationship to engineering specifications. Control charts shouldn’t be used without first performing process capability studies to determine the relationship between natural process limits and engineering specification. When capability is known the purpose of control chart limits is to permit simple detection events that are indicative of actual process change. When significant change (special cause variation) is detected the culprit must be identified and eliminated with affected data points eliminated from control chart limit calculation…..Bottom line, after the process capability study has been conducted, engineering specification limits are infrequently consulted by the manufacturing process personnel.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

 

 

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – August, 2017

Welcome to August, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

Our topic for the August 2017 is Quality of Translations. The trigger for taking up this topic, in our present issue, for a brief overview, was an email from Mr. Ravi Kumar, the founder of Hindi Center  /Modlingua Learning Pvt. Ltd.. However, we will deal with that a little later.

First the basics:

Quality of translation : The term quality of translation is used to refer to the desirability of properties or characteristics of a translated text or content.

“In manufacturing quality is the concept of making products fit for a purpose and with fewest defects. Many different techniques and concepts have been tried to minimize defects in production, including Zero Defects, Six Sigma, and the House of Quality.”

Thus, in the translation process quality would be the concept of making the target text (the translated text) fit for a purpose and with the fewest errors (in terms of sense, grammar, orthography, style, omissions, etc.)

What is a “quality” translation? : The quality of translation has two constructs: In one sense, quality refers to whether the translation is acceptable. In another sense, there are different quality levels that could be needed for a given translation.

‘What is the quality of a translation?’ is the Lecture by Anthony Pym at the University of Vienna, April 13, 2015, as part of a course on academic Translation Studies.

And then a few pointers to the Quality of Translation:

10-Step Quality Assurance Process: All translation projects undergo a multi-layered process of checks and reviews in order to ensure the highest degree of quality. Presented here is a 10-Step Quality Assurance process that enables delivery of spot-on translations and the highest quality output.

10 crucial ways to ensure high quality translations has shared 10 blog posts that have given numerous tips and professional advice on how to implement and monitor processes to ensure you get high quality translations.

Ten Common Myths About Translation Quality that can actually do more harm than good.

Measuring Translation Quality: Constraints, Challenges and Solutions: Without clear goals and a repeatable, objective and accurate methodology, quality can be hard to measure, especially in the localization industry. From lack of knowledge to outside factors to subjective reviews, there are many reasons quality is hard to measure. In a webinar called “A Practical Approach to Measuring Translation Quality”, David Sommer discusses challenges with measuring quality and potential solutions.

That brings us to the core of e-mail message from Mr. Ravi Kumar:

Translation-quality standards: Like any supplier of goods or services, a translator potentially bears ethical and legal obligations toward his patron or employer. This has turned to be of enormous importance with the development of the language industry at global scale. For the protection of both parties, standards have been developed that seek to spell out their mutual duties.

In the e-mail referred to at the beginning of the article, Mr. Ravi Kumar informed me that Modlingua has recently released these videos on the subject of Translation-Quality standards:

Quality Standards and Translation:

Seven Quality Standards one must know:

As can be expected, these videos provide the strong ground work for following up the more structured approach the task of translations (services).

Moreover, Modlingua has also presented a project management perspective to the translation services:

Fundamentals of Project Management:

Project Management in Translation Business:

We can look forward to more such videos to be uploaded on language, translation and culture @ YT channel Modilingua.

Mr. Ravi Kumar, himself a language-translation entrepreneur, has presented The Translator as Entrepreneur: An Indian Perspective . –  This paper deals with Translators as entrepreneurs who are slowly getting aware of their profession and have begun coming to a common platform to share knowledge, experience and resources – a most desired step necessary for the better future of the profession. Further, this paper proposes “networking” as a possible solution to entrepreneurs who can economize their process and speed up their growth by using available resources and infrastructure without having to invest huge resources.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up two articles @ the column The Drucker Today @ Management Matters Network.

3 Questions Drucker Would Ask You And Your Management Team

  • What is our business? – The Mission
  • What will our business be? – The changing environment that we are certain about
  • What should our business be?” – The Vision

Dr. Robert Swaim also goes into more detail on the concepts discussed in this article in chapters 2 and 3 of his book The Strategic Drucker.

Notes From A Drucker Lecture: Six Questions Every Manager Must Ask To Empower Their Team

  1. The performance of your people.
  2. Taking responsibility for your relationship with others.
  3. Establishing and maintaining your relationship with others.
  4. Accountability for results.
  5. Relationship with your manager.
  6. Assignment control and staffing.

When you have completed this analysis, you may want to ask yourself one more question: When I leave this organization, what will be different because I was there?

From Ask The Experts, I have picked up a question that relates to how much (of process details / documentation) is enough so as not to jeopardize the ISO certification. The answer is demonstration of objective evidence for the process being implemented ‘under controlled condition’ (Clause 8.5.1 of ISO 9001:2015)

We do not have anything of note in the  ASQ CEO, Bill Troy at present. In the last issue we had proposed to take up the detailed view of Industry 4.0. I submit that we carry forward that proposal for the next month’s episode.

We now watch one of the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

  • Customer Journey Maps: Tool and Example – Lisa Custer, Firefly Consulting, discusses how to create a customer journey map, how it becomes more than a robust voice of the customer tool, and provides a real-world example of a customer journey map in action.

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of July, 2017:

  • The Role of Specification Limits – They are primarily for interactions with customers and management – Many people, from engineers to managers to quality professionals to technicians, possess limited understanding of product and process (manufacturing) limits. The third types of limits are: disposition limits… The specification limits are defines as – The general definition is limits within which a product would be expected to perform its stated and intended function for customer use. Specification limits, therefore, are related to product design. They should be set in the product design phase and effectively fixed for manufacture.. The specification limits may not play a direct role in process control limits within the manufacturing environment, but they do facilitate determination of useful product disposition limits. Additionally, they can even play a role in determining required sensitivity levels in setting process control limits.. Furthermore, specification limits are primarily for interactions with customers and management. Also, they are very useful in the calculation of Process Capability Index (Cpk) statistics.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – July,2017

Welcome to July, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

While searching for the articles of general interest on the topic of quality, I came up on:

The Single Biggest Problem in Communication…… Is the illusion that it has taken place quotes Gwendolyn Galsworth while pinpointing one complaint—the one problem—that nearly every company puts at (or very near) the top of its list of challenges…We … understand that part of the power in an empowered workforce was the parity created when information is reliably and repeatedly shared. When that information is made visual by design, it becomes a tangible and indispensable part of the business model…Visuality is about meaning and understanding, not simply seeing. A visual workplace embeds meaning into the dynamic landscape of work.

Visuality, as a concept, was new to me. Si I probed further and came up with:

Simplifying complex management structures to foster better working relationships – The Mobiliteit & Openbare werken (MOW) (Mobility and Public Works) department of the Flemish government in Belgium aims to support policy makers, agencies, and civil society with their expertise. MOW was looking for a way to internally show their employees how they fit into the organization’s complex overall management structure. After a couple of initial iterations aimed at getting to the core of the narrative, what came up as the end product was this:

And then I could link the word ‘visual’ with the process of continual improvement:

How Data Visualization Benefits Your Continuous Improvement CultureHenrik KjærulffIn a continuous improvement culture we expect people to base their decisions upon data – especially when it comes to problem solving….When we give everyone on the shop floor easy access to data, we’ll support a constant focus on a data-driven approach to problem solving and make it easy for people to make decisions based on data. Visualized data is easy to interpret into information.

That gave me an opportunity to brush up the memory:

11 Rapid Continuous Improvement Tools ExplainedGreg Jacobson – Please read the article for more detailed information on each tool and dive deep into one that suits your requirements.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up the article – The Secret to Building an Opportunity-Focused Organization @ the column The Drucker Perspective @ Management Matters Network. It’s an enduring truth: A successful organization is opportunity-focused, not problem-focused…Resources, to produce results, must be allocated to opportunities rather than problems. This is one of Peter F. Drucker’s most important principles for sustained success:

“An organization will have a high spirit of performance if it is consistently directed toward opportunity rather than toward problems. It will have the thrill of excitement…Of course, problems cannot be neglected. But the problem-focused organization is an organization on the defensive. It is an organization that feels it has performed well if things do not get worse….A management that wants to create and maintain the spirit of achievement therefore stresses opportunity. But it will also demand that opportunities be converted into results.”

From Ask The Experts, I have picked up a question –“Shall Be Determined” in 9001”. The reply states that According to the Oxford Dictionary:  Determine means to “Ascertain or establish exactly be research or calculation”, Merriam Webster has a similar definition:  “to find out about or come to a conclusion about by investigation, reasoning, or calculation…There does not need to be a procedure about how things are determined.  The output, or the determination itself, will serve as evidence that you did it. .. For example, if you are a hospital, and you “determine” that surgeons do not need to wash their hands, you should be subject to a non-conformance for getting that wrong.

In our ASQ CEO, Bill Troy column this time there is a topic – As Industry 4.0 continues to evolve, what can quality professionals do to ensure they will be an integral asset throughout this industrial revolution? – that we need to take up for a more –in-depth view (in our next month’s episode)

We now watch the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

  • BenchmarkingWe learn the basics of benchmarking, review the recommended six phases of a successful benchmarking process, and finally, we get reacquainted with one vital ingredient in benchmarking: metrics
  • Quality Tools—Seven Old and Seven New: Get acquainted or reacquainted with the old and the new—quality tools, that is.

“Building From the Basics”, QP, 2009
“The Quality Toolbox, Second Edition”, Nancy R. Tague, 2005
“Beyond the Basics”, QP, 2012
The 7 Basic Quality Tools for Process Improvement
Seven New Management and Planning Tools

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of June, 2017:

  • Empowering Teams : Teams have changed how business is conducted in the workplace – Teams are constructed entities designed to achieve some desired outcome. A team that is empowered is nurtured by a supporting culture in which the organization’s vision, mission and corporate values are substantive and sustainable. An empowered team, therefore, has the necessary information, skills and authority to make decisions that ratchet up performance and drive results. Additionally, how well a team functions depends largely on how well it is structured, the interpersonal relationships and the quality of team leadership. There are five elements required for high performance.
    • Clear strategy
    • Well-understood operational goals
    • Clear and agreed upon roles and responsibilities
    • Transparent and honest business relationships
    • Protocols of decision-making are established

Creating truly empowered teams is a process that cannot be done quickly.. If your organization is not on this path, your competition is set to outpace your efforts.

  • Move Forward – It’s up to you so choose now to make progress by moving forward in order to allow positive momentum to take hold. There’s absolute certainty that it’s within your grasp to feel the wonderment of being the creative person you can be. I believe it was the late Art Linkletter, author and television personality, who said “the rest of your life could be the best of your life.” All you have to do is make the effort to move forward to make it happen.
  • This Day – Even by itself, this day is filled with huge value. But…in addition, this day also gives you the opportunity to prepare for the days, weeks, months and years which follow…Therefore, living this day with purpose, gratitude and integrity will provide you with a double reward. In addition to making this day the most fulfilling it can be in this very moment in time, you are also preparing yourself for all the time that follows.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – April, 2017

Welcome to April, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We will commence our episode with three articles on Quality, in general.

The Quest for Quality in the Modern EnterpriseMichael Heaps and Kathie Poindexter – The holy grail of quality is 360-degree visibility, measurable, real-time performance and the ability to go far beyond compliance into the realm of true, value adding and sustained improvement initiatives.

The other article – 4 Quality Management System Trends to Watch Out For In 2016  –  in fact, relates to QMS trends in 2016. However following takeaways seem relevant even for 2017:

  • Long and complex supply chains, along with an ever-changing regulatory landscape, present big compliance challenges.
  • The cloud has moved into mainstream business adoption as the value of subscription-based models and minimal on-premises infrastructure become clearly understood.
  • Business leaders are finally getting to grips with data analytics, and quality managers should be prepared to respond to this with meaningful uses of big data in their field.
  • The Internet of Things can play a transformational role in eliminating the human errors that can creep in with suboptimal systems and processes.

Jenny Brown in Top 7 Organizational Trends in Quality Management takes a quick look at the key trends that are offering the much needed competitive edge to organizations and impacting all quality initiatives to make them gain further momentum in future:

  1. Supplier-Specific Quality Standards of the Highest Levels
  2. Change Management for Higher Consistency in Work Processes
  3. Consistent and Continuous Evolutions in Quality Management
  4. ‘Six Sigma’ for Continuous Business Growth
  5. Quality Departments are Opting for Strategic Quality Planning by integrating many quality-related initiatives such as Lean, Kaizen, ISO registration, Six Sigma, and others in their strategy planning processes.
  6. Value to Supply—Quality Management is everywhere
  7. Social Equity and Environmental Sustainability

Quality management is being positively impacted by many latest organizational trends and is well set to dominate the future economy too. It’s expected that all industry sectors will be governed by this combination of project management and quality principles in the years to come.

We add one more column to our regular columns on our Blog Carnival for the current month. This is from Drucker Perspective column @ Management Matters Network. For the present we have –

Are You Asking the Right Questions? The most serious mistakes are not the result of wrong answers. The truly dangerous thing is asking the wrong questions….A wrong answer to the right question can, as a rule, be repaired and salvaged….But if you ask the wrong question and get the right answer, chances are it will take a lot longer to discover and it inevitably leads to even more costly errors.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

I have picked up the question with regard to clauses 8.4.1 and particularly 8.4.2 of ISO 9001:2015, should the other internal entities of the company (.i.e HR, IT, Sales …) absolutely necessary but outside of the perimeter be considered exactly like external providers. The answer being in affirmative, adds three comments: One, being captive, not all controls that would be applied to an outside body would be applicable. Two, use process approach (clause 4.4) to determine how these departments interact and interface with core QMS processes. And, three, exploit the concept of context of the organization (clause 4.1) to further explore these relationships.

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy has presented the Guest Post: How to Choose Continuous Improvement Software by Chris Moustakas, President & CEO of DevonWay. The best-performing organizations choose Continuous Improvement (CI) as the framework for achieving that agility of dealing with a barrage of regulatory hurdles, performance gaps, and inefficiencies, and have to move quickly to stay competitive. Most of the software models available in the market have their own challenges. ERP and QMS and BPM system software models do have elements what good CI software ought to incorporate, but it needs to be remembered that Continuous Improvement happens when you apply Quality principles to Operational needs.

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episode:

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of March, 2017:

Defining Variability – Special cause variation generally comes as a surprise to the systemIn the early 1920s, Dr. Walter A. Shewhart of Western Electric Company developed a theory that there are two components to variation: an inherent component from random variation he called chance-cause variation and an intermittent variation due to special cause which he referred to as assignable cause variation…..Dr. Shewhart’s improvement approach was that assignable causes could be removed with an effective diagnostic program. At the same time, he became convinced that random (chance-cause) variation could not be removed without making basic process or product changes….It is important, therefore, to understand the implications of the two alternatives before making a decision as to actions, or inactions, to be taken….‘Special cause variation generally comes as a surprise because it acts as a signal to the system that something’s gone astray.’

Whilst on the subject, it would be interesting to learn what Dr. Edward Deming has to say on the subject of variability –

Lynda M. Finn in the third of a 4-part series on Deming’s system of management, SoPK has listed 6 common mistakes that businesses make – and why they make them

Mistake #1: Failure to plot data over time

Mistake #2: Neglecting to normalize

Mistake #3: Neglecting to stratify

Mistake #4: Treating a continuous metric as discrete

Mistake #5: Not identifying key metrics

Mistake #6: Acting inappropriately in the face of common cause variation

For other three parts of the series, read:

Part I: Systems Thinking and the Three Musketeers

Part II: The Trouble with Motivation

Part IV: How Do We Know What We Know?

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – November, 2016

Welcome to November, 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We have already taken up the following topics for the familiarisation of different elements of new version of ISO 9001-

For the present episode we will take an overview of Auditing.

training-internal-audit

Transition to ISO 9001:2015. What will the auditor ask? – Generally, when something changes, that will be what the auditor is going to focus on; the vindictive auditor will try and catch you out, to show they know more than you, and make themselves look good. The professional auditor will focus on the continual improvement approach and appreciate that management systems change and improve over time.

What Is Auditing?  – An audit can apply to an entire organization or might be specific to a function, process, or production step. Find more information in the video, The How and Why of Auditing wherein auditing expert and ASQ fellow Dennis Arter shares tips and advice for auditors and auditees.

The Positives and Pitfalls of Auditing Checklists  – Every auditing course you go on, every book you read about auditing, and every standard that’s been written essentially all say the same thing ­– if you audit you should use a checklist! Now that’s all good and fine, but there are some things to be aware of. The article goes on to explain the good and some of the pitfalls of checklists and then recommends some ways to address them.

Audits that See Below the Surface Evaluate Internal Controls Peter Chatel draws up a very speaking line that can enable to evaluate the effectiveness of the internal controls in place, that include among other things:
• Defined responsibilities, accountabilities, authority and authorization
• Separation of Duties
• Policies, Programs and Procedures
• Personnel Experience and Development
• Protective Measures
• Internal Verification
Documentation

Explaining E-Audits: A Method for Remotely Conducting Audits – Auditing expert Shauna Wilson explains how organizations can use e-auditing to remotely audit. Learn how this approach can lead to more efficient audits and what factors organizations must consider when implementing e-audits.

We have collected a few from slew of videos on the subject:

How to survive an ISO Audit

Quality Audit Preparation

What Not to Say during an ISO Audit Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

We will now take up a few ISO 9001:2015-centric articles and videos.

The Most Important Audit Questions for ISO 9001:2015By Craig Cochran, Project Manager, Georgia Manufacturing Extension Partnership (GaMEP) at Georgia TechISO 9001:2015 includes a lot of new requirements that have never been part of most audits. In order to expedite your thinking, these are what I believe to be the most important audit questions for ISO 9001:2015.

ISO 9001:2015 – The great leap forward for auditors! – It brings new challenges for auditors to apply their competencies and also brings great opportunity to accomplish their audits.

Objective Auditing Meets ISO 9001:2015 – How auditors can help organizations understand context and risk – Inderjit Arora  – Auditors must also understand how the context of an organization relates to quality management principles. If they do, then they will look for conformities in the management system to ISO 9001:2015 requirements. If during this audit they do find nonconformities based on requirements,

Auditing to ISO 9001:2015 – This presentation has spelt out what is required to be audited w.r.t. ISO 9001: 2015.

How the Auditors View ISO 9001-2015

Internal Auditing, an important type of audit, is seen to be in a different perspective, particularly in view of the structural changes in ISO 9001: 2015.

The Internal Auditing of Management Systems – Graham W Parker – Providing evidence for and confirmation of the confidence that operations are consistent, under control. Effective and efficient, is the primary role of auditing – by looking to the evidences to the contrary.

Preparing for ISO 9001: 2015 using your QMS – Part 5: Internal Audits – The subsection 9.2.2 goes on to be more detailed. Instead of “an audit program shall be planned, taking into consideration the status and importance…”, the new text includes, in part, “…the organization shall: a) plan, establish, implement and maintain an audit program(s)…which shall take into consideration the quality objectives, the importance of the processes concerned, customer feedback, changes impacting on the organization…”. The results of previous audits are also to be considered per the current requirement.

Five Main Steps in ISO 9001 Internal Audit  – If used properly, the Internal Audit, instead of being a “necessary evil,” can be one of the biggest contributors toward process improvement in the QMS.

And here are a few video clips related to internal auditing:

Understanding ISO 9001:2015: Internal audits

Meet the Internal Auditor

When I Say Internal Auditor, You Think

Internal Audit – Mastering ISO 9001:2015

7 Deadly Internal Audit Sins

Internal Auditing – A Love Story

How to Succeed as an Internal Auditor

Internal Auditing: A Career for Today, A Career for Tomorrow

Before we end our present discussion, here is one poser – Why Would you Want to be an Auditor?

For the concluding episode in this series, in December, 2016, we will take up The Road beyond ISO 9001:2015.

We will now turn to our regular sections:mr-pareto-head

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy in his ASQ’s Influential Voice has an interesting article as well: Interview With The Creator of Mr. Pareto Head, which is an absorbing interview with Mike Crossen, the creator of the Mr. Pareto Head comic strip. How a hard-core engineer finds humor in quality and how Mr. Pareto Head came to be has many other lessons for professional as well as personal lives. Meet “Mr. Pareto Head”

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episode:

  • Around the World on a Bicycle, with Quality: While some of us only dream about quitting our jobs and traveling around the world, Sunil Kaushik did it. Kaushik, a Six Sigma trainer and consultant based in India, left his job to cycle the globe and teach quality along the way.
  • Gemba Walks Improve Process, Communication, and Culture: Eileen Serrano, Business Optimization Expert, Roche, describes the process her organization went through to establish daily Gemba Walks and how its culture has changed for the better.
  • Quality Memes: In social media lingo, a “meme” is a photo, video or idea that becomes extremely popular online. What better way to promote World Quality Month this November than to share quality-themed “memes”?
  • World Quality Month: Quality is about reliability, improvement and …fun? That’s right! During World Quality Month in November, meet a quality cartoonist and a man who’s sharing quality tools while cycling around the globe. Plus, learn how you can use social media to make quality jobs, tools and concepts accessible to the community beyond quality professionals. Sunil Kaushik’s Travel Blog: www.trainntrot.com World Quality Month Website: www.worldqualitymonth.org

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of October, 2016:

  • Leadership’s Five Key Practices: All quality professionals must practice leadership skills to add value – In order to demonstrate these skills, lookJim's Gems for opportunities that surround you every day. Do not wait for someone to ‘call your name.’ Be aware of what’s happening in your organization, raise your hand, and seize those opportunities. Start small but think big. After all, you have much to gain and little to lose.
  • Make IT Happen: You have to get yourself going, sort through all the noise and complexity, roll up your sleeves, get your hands dirty, and make it happen!

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.