Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – July,2017

Welcome to July, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

While searching for the articles of general interest on the topic of quality, I came up on:

The Single Biggest Problem in Communication…… Is the illusion that it has taken place quotes Gwendolyn Galsworth while pinpointing one complaint—the one problem—that nearly every company puts at (or very near) the top of its list of challenges…We … understand that part of the power in an empowered workforce was the parity created when information is reliably and repeatedly shared. When that information is made visual by design, it becomes a tangible and indispensable part of the business model…Visuality is about meaning and understanding, not simply seeing. A visual workplace embeds meaning into the dynamic landscape of work.

Visuality, as a concept, was new to me. Si I probed further and came up with:

Simplifying complex management structures to foster better working relationships – The Mobiliteit & Openbare werken (MOW) (Mobility and Public Works) department of the Flemish government in Belgium aims to support policy makers, agencies, and civil society with their expertise. MOW was looking for a way to internally show their employees how they fit into the organization’s complex overall management structure. After a couple of initial iterations aimed at getting to the core of the narrative, what came up as the end product was this:

And then I could link the word ‘visual’ with the process of continual improvement:

How Data Visualization Benefits Your Continuous Improvement CultureHenrik KjærulffIn a continuous improvement culture we expect people to base their decisions upon data – especially when it comes to problem solving….When we give everyone on the shop floor easy access to data, we’ll support a constant focus on a data-driven approach to problem solving and make it easy for people to make decisions based on data. Visualized data is easy to interpret into information.

That gave me an opportunity to brush up the memory:

11 Rapid Continuous Improvement Tools ExplainedGreg Jacobson – Please read the article for more detailed information on each tool and dive deep into one that suits your requirements.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up the article – The Secret to Building an Opportunity-Focused Organization @ the column The Drucker Perspective @ Management Matters Network. It’s an enduring truth: A successful organization is opportunity-focused, not problem-focused…Resources, to produce results, must be allocated to opportunities rather than problems. This is one of Peter F. Drucker’s most important principles for sustained success:

“An organization will have a high spirit of performance if it is consistently directed toward opportunity rather than toward problems. It will have the thrill of excitement…Of course, problems cannot be neglected. But the problem-focused organization is an organization on the defensive. It is an organization that feels it has performed well if things do not get worse….A management that wants to create and maintain the spirit of achievement therefore stresses opportunity. But it will also demand that opportunities be converted into results.”

From Ask The Experts, I have picked up a question –“Shall Be Determined” in 9001”. The reply states that According to the Oxford Dictionary:  Determine means to “Ascertain or establish exactly be research or calculation”, Merriam Webster has a similar definition:  “to find out about or come to a conclusion about by investigation, reasoning, or calculation…There does not need to be a procedure about how things are determined.  The output, or the determination itself, will serve as evidence that you did it. .. For example, if you are a hospital, and you “determine” that surgeons do not need to wash their hands, you should be subject to a non-conformance for getting that wrong.

In our ASQ CEO, Bill Troy column this time there is a topic – As Industry 4.0 continues to evolve, what can quality professionals do to ensure they will be an integral asset throughout this industrial revolution? – that we need to take up for a more –in-depth view (in our next month’s episode)

We now watch the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

  • BenchmarkingWe learn the basics of benchmarking, review the recommended six phases of a successful benchmarking process, and finally, we get reacquainted with one vital ingredient in benchmarking: metrics
  • Quality Tools—Seven Old and Seven New: Get acquainted or reacquainted with the old and the new—quality tools, that is.

“Building From the Basics”, QP, 2009
“The Quality Toolbox, Second Edition”, Nancy R. Tague, 2005
“Beyond the Basics”, QP, 2012
The 7 Basic Quality Tools for Process Improvement
Seven New Management and Planning Tools

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of June, 2017:

  • Empowering Teams : Teams have changed how business is conducted in the workplace – Teams are constructed entities designed to achieve some desired outcome. A team that is empowered is nurtured by a supporting culture in which the organization’s vision, mission and corporate values are substantive and sustainable. An empowered team, therefore, has the necessary information, skills and authority to make decisions that ratchet up performance and drive results. Additionally, how well a team functions depends largely on how well it is structured, the interpersonal relationships and the quality of team leadership. There are five elements required for high performance.
    • Clear strategy
    • Well-understood operational goals
    • Clear and agreed upon roles and responsibilities
    • Transparent and honest business relationships
    • Protocols of decision-making are established

Creating truly empowered teams is a process that cannot be done quickly.. If your organization is not on this path, your competition is set to outpace your efforts.

  • Move Forward – It’s up to you so choose now to make progress by moving forward in order to allow positive momentum to take hold. There’s absolute certainty that it’s within your grasp to feel the wonderment of being the creative person you can be. I believe it was the late Art Linkletter, author and television personality, who said “the rest of your life could be the best of your life.” All you have to do is make the effort to move forward to make it happen.
  • This Day – Even by itself, this day is filled with huge value. But…in addition, this day also gives you the opportunity to prepare for the days, weeks, months and years which follow…Therefore, living this day with purpose, gratitude and integrity will provide you with a double reward. In addition to making this day the most fulfilling it can be in this very moment in time, you are also preparing yourself for all the time that follows.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – April, 2017

Welcome to April, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We will commence our episode with three articles on Quality, in general.

The Quest for Quality in the Modern EnterpriseMichael Heaps and Kathie Poindexter – The holy grail of quality is 360-degree visibility, measurable, real-time performance and the ability to go far beyond compliance into the realm of true, value adding and sustained improvement initiatives.

The other article – 4 Quality Management System Trends to Watch Out For In 2016  –  in fact, relates to QMS trends in 2016. However following takeaways seem relevant even for 2017:

  • Long and complex supply chains, along with an ever-changing regulatory landscape, present big compliance challenges.
  • The cloud has moved into mainstream business adoption as the value of subscription-based models and minimal on-premises infrastructure become clearly understood.
  • Business leaders are finally getting to grips with data analytics, and quality managers should be prepared to respond to this with meaningful uses of big data in their field.
  • The Internet of Things can play a transformational role in eliminating the human errors that can creep in with suboptimal systems and processes.

Jenny Brown in Top 7 Organizational Trends in Quality Management takes a quick look at the key trends that are offering the much needed competitive edge to organizations and impacting all quality initiatives to make them gain further momentum in future:

  1. Supplier-Specific Quality Standards of the Highest Levels
  2. Change Management for Higher Consistency in Work Processes
  3. Consistent and Continuous Evolutions in Quality Management
  4. ‘Six Sigma’ for Continuous Business Growth
  5. Quality Departments are Opting for Strategic Quality Planning by integrating many quality-related initiatives such as Lean, Kaizen, ISO registration, Six Sigma, and others in their strategy planning processes.
  6. Value to Supply—Quality Management is everywhere
  7. Social Equity and Environmental Sustainability

Quality management is being positively impacted by many latest organizational trends and is well set to dominate the future economy too. It’s expected that all industry sectors will be governed by this combination of project management and quality principles in the years to come.

We add one more column to our regular columns on our Blog Carnival for the current month. This is from Drucker Perspective column @ Management Matters Network. For the present we have –

Are You Asking the Right Questions? The most serious mistakes are not the result of wrong answers. The truly dangerous thing is asking the wrong questions….A wrong answer to the right question can, as a rule, be repaired and salvaged….But if you ask the wrong question and get the right answer, chances are it will take a lot longer to discover and it inevitably leads to even more costly errors.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

I have picked up the question with regard to clauses 8.4.1 and particularly 8.4.2 of ISO 9001:2015, should the other internal entities of the company (.i.e HR, IT, Sales …) absolutely necessary but outside of the perimeter be considered exactly like external providers. The answer being in affirmative, adds three comments: One, being captive, not all controls that would be applied to an outside body would be applicable. Two, use process approach (clause 4.4) to determine how these departments interact and interface with core QMS processes. And, three, exploit the concept of context of the organization (clause 4.1) to further explore these relationships.

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy has presented the Guest Post: How to Choose Continuous Improvement Software by Chris Moustakas, President & CEO of DevonWay. The best-performing organizations choose Continuous Improvement (CI) as the framework for achieving that agility of dealing with a barrage of regulatory hurdles, performance gaps, and inefficiencies, and have to move quickly to stay competitive. Most of the software models available in the market have their own challenges. ERP and QMS and BPM system software models do have elements what good CI software ought to incorporate, but it needs to be remembered that Continuous Improvement happens when you apply Quality principles to Operational needs.

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episode:

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of March, 2017:

Defining Variability – Special cause variation generally comes as a surprise to the systemIn the early 1920s, Dr. Walter A. Shewhart of Western Electric Company developed a theory that there are two components to variation: an inherent component from random variation he called chance-cause variation and an intermittent variation due to special cause which he referred to as assignable cause variation…..Dr. Shewhart’s improvement approach was that assignable causes could be removed with an effective diagnostic program. At the same time, he became convinced that random (chance-cause) variation could not be removed without making basic process or product changes….It is important, therefore, to understand the implications of the two alternatives before making a decision as to actions, or inactions, to be taken….‘Special cause variation generally comes as a surprise because it acts as a signal to the system that something’s gone astray.’

Whilst on the subject, it would be interesting to learn what Dr. Edward Deming has to say on the subject of variability –

Lynda M. Finn in the third of a 4-part series on Deming’s system of management, SoPK has listed 6 common mistakes that businesses make – and why they make them

Mistake #1: Failure to plot data over time

Mistake #2: Neglecting to normalize

Mistake #3: Neglecting to stratify

Mistake #4: Treating a continuous metric as discrete

Mistake #5: Not identifying key metrics

Mistake #6: Acting inappropriately in the face of common cause variation

For other three parts of the series, read:

Part I: Systems Thinking and the Three Musketeers

Part II: The Trouble with Motivation

Part IV: How Do We Know What We Know?

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – November, 2016

Welcome to November, 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We have already taken up the following topics for the familiarisation of different elements of new version of ISO 9001-

For the present episode we will take an overview of Auditing.

training-internal-audit

Transition to ISO 9001:2015. What will the auditor ask? – Generally, when something changes, that will be what the auditor is going to focus on; the vindictive auditor will try and catch you out, to show they know more than you, and make themselves look good. The professional auditor will focus on the continual improvement approach and appreciate that management systems change and improve over time.

What Is Auditing?  – An audit can apply to an entire organization or might be specific to a function, process, or production step. Find more information in the video, The How and Why of Auditing wherein auditing expert and ASQ fellow Dennis Arter shares tips and advice for auditors and auditees.

The Positives and Pitfalls of Auditing Checklists  – Every auditing course you go on, every book you read about auditing, and every standard that’s been written essentially all say the same thing ­– if you audit you should use a checklist! Now that’s all good and fine, but there are some things to be aware of. The article goes on to explain the good and some of the pitfalls of checklists and then recommends some ways to address them.

Audits that See Below the Surface Evaluate Internal Controls Peter Chatel draws up a very speaking line that can enable to evaluate the effectiveness of the internal controls in place, that include among other things:
• Defined responsibilities, accountabilities, authority and authorization
• Separation of Duties
• Policies, Programs and Procedures
• Personnel Experience and Development
• Protective Measures
• Internal Verification
Documentation

Explaining E-Audits: A Method for Remotely Conducting Audits – Auditing expert Shauna Wilson explains how organizations can use e-auditing to remotely audit. Learn how this approach can lead to more efficient audits and what factors organizations must consider when implementing e-audits.

We have collected a few from slew of videos on the subject:

How to survive an ISO Audit

Quality Audit Preparation

What Not to Say during an ISO Audit Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

We will now take up a few ISO 9001:2015-centric articles and videos.

The Most Important Audit Questions for ISO 9001:2015By Craig Cochran, Project Manager, Georgia Manufacturing Extension Partnership (GaMEP) at Georgia TechISO 9001:2015 includes a lot of new requirements that have never been part of most audits. In order to expedite your thinking, these are what I believe to be the most important audit questions for ISO 9001:2015.

ISO 9001:2015 – The great leap forward for auditors! – It brings new challenges for auditors to apply their competencies and also brings great opportunity to accomplish their audits.

Objective Auditing Meets ISO 9001:2015 – How auditors can help organizations understand context and risk – Inderjit Arora  – Auditors must also understand how the context of an organization relates to quality management principles. If they do, then they will look for conformities in the management system to ISO 9001:2015 requirements. If during this audit they do find nonconformities based on requirements,

Auditing to ISO 9001:2015 – This presentation has spelt out what is required to be audited w.r.t. ISO 9001: 2015.

How the Auditors View ISO 9001-2015

Internal Auditing, an important type of audit, is seen to be in a different perspective, particularly in view of the structural changes in ISO 9001: 2015.

The Internal Auditing of Management Systems – Graham W Parker – Providing evidence for and confirmation of the confidence that operations are consistent, under control. Effective and efficient, is the primary role of auditing – by looking to the evidences to the contrary.

Preparing for ISO 9001: 2015 using your QMS – Part 5: Internal Audits – The subsection 9.2.2 goes on to be more detailed. Instead of “an audit program shall be planned, taking into consideration the status and importance…”, the new text includes, in part, “…the organization shall: a) plan, establish, implement and maintain an audit program(s)…which shall take into consideration the quality objectives, the importance of the processes concerned, customer feedback, changes impacting on the organization…”. The results of previous audits are also to be considered per the current requirement.

Five Main Steps in ISO 9001 Internal Audit  – If used properly, the Internal Audit, instead of being a “necessary evil,” can be one of the biggest contributors toward process improvement in the QMS.

And here are a few video clips related to internal auditing:

Understanding ISO 9001:2015: Internal audits

Meet the Internal Auditor

When I Say Internal Auditor, You Think

Internal Audit – Mastering ISO 9001:2015

7 Deadly Internal Audit Sins

Internal Auditing – A Love Story

How to Succeed as an Internal Auditor

Internal Auditing: A Career for Today, A Career for Tomorrow

Before we end our present discussion, here is one poser – Why Would you Want to be an Auditor?

For the concluding episode in this series, in December, 2016, we will take up The Road beyond ISO 9001:2015.

We will now turn to our regular sections:mr-pareto-head

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy in his ASQ’s Influential Voice has an interesting article as well: Interview With The Creator of Mr. Pareto Head, which is an absorbing interview with Mike Crossen, the creator of the Mr. Pareto Head comic strip. How a hard-core engineer finds humor in quality and how Mr. Pareto Head came to be has many other lessons for professional as well as personal lives. Meet “Mr. Pareto Head”

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episode:

  • Around the World on a Bicycle, with Quality: While some of us only dream about quitting our jobs and traveling around the world, Sunil Kaushik did it. Kaushik, a Six Sigma trainer and consultant based in India, left his job to cycle the globe and teach quality along the way.
  • Gemba Walks Improve Process, Communication, and Culture: Eileen Serrano, Business Optimization Expert, Roche, describes the process her organization went through to establish daily Gemba Walks and how its culture has changed for the better.
  • Quality Memes: In social media lingo, a “meme” is a photo, video or idea that becomes extremely popular online. What better way to promote World Quality Month this November than to share quality-themed “memes”?
  • World Quality Month: Quality is about reliability, improvement and …fun? That’s right! During World Quality Month in November, meet a quality cartoonist and a man who’s sharing quality tools while cycling around the globe. Plus, learn how you can use social media to make quality jobs, tools and concepts accessible to the community beyond quality professionals. Sunil Kaushik’s Travel Blog: www.trainntrot.com World Quality Month Website: www.worldqualitymonth.org

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of October, 2016:

  • Leadership’s Five Key Practices: All quality professionals must practice leadership skills to add value – In order to demonstrate these skills, lookJim's Gems for opportunities that surround you every day. Do not wait for someone to ‘call your name.’ Be aware of what’s happening in your organization, raise your hand, and seize those opportunities. Start small but think big. After all, you have much to gain and little to lose.
  • Make IT Happen: You have to get yourself going, sort through all the noise and complexity, roll up your sleeves, get your hands dirty, and make it happen!

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – August, 2016

Welcome to August, 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We have already taken up the following topics for the familiarization of different elements of new version of ISO 9001-

For the present episode we will look at Change Management, in general, then move over to what ISO 9001: 2015 has to state on the subject, ending the present discussion with how two other major management system standards also look at the subject.

Before we closely look at the subject of change in the ISO management system standards, let us quickly recapitulate a broader view of the subject and look at some randomly selected picks from the vast literature available on the subject on the internet.

Change Management process has 5 key phasesAdaptive HVM Ltd.’s Change Management process has 5 key phases

Torben Rick’s blog on his website Meliorate, we find a full section dealing with is posts on change management. We have picked up four among these ones here:

Top 20+ awesome quotes on change management: Here are a couple of representative ones:

The key to change …… is to let go of fear Rosanne Cash

People don’t resist change. They resist being changed! – Peter Senge

Top 12 reasons why people resist change. Again a pick at some:

Misunderstanding about the need for change/when the reason for the change is unclear

Fear of the unknown

Poor communication

Top 12 change management comic strips has quite a representative messages delivered through the medium of cartoon strips —

Top 12 change management comic strips

Organizations don’t change. People do – or they don’t

Organizations don’t change. People do – or they don’t

Change Management Iceberg

The change management iceberg suggested by Wilfried Kruger emphasizes that manager mainly consider the hard issues for change i.e. cost, quality and time. These issues represent only the tip of iceberg i.e. only about 10% of the total issues.

Most of the issues – soft issues – are below the surface.

Change Management Iceberg

Change affects 4 types of people in the organization:

  • Promoters – People those who support the change
  • Potential promoters – People who may support change when fully convinced
  • Opponents – People against change
  • Hidden opponents – People who appear to support change but secretly are against it.

Therefore attitudes – perceptions and beliefs, and behavior – power and politics, need to be managed.

There is additional related material too:

We also have picked up a few videos as well:

Overcoming Resistance to Change – Isn’t It Obvious? – The World with Theory of Constraints

Management of Change vs Change Management  – Life Cycle Engineering

How to Lead Change Management – DeAnne Aguirre, senior partner with Strategy&Buisness

Change Management vs. Change Leadership — What’s the Difference? – Dr. John Kotter

Kotter’s 8-Step Organizational Change Model – Steven Thomsen

How to Conduct a Management of Change (MOC) – Baker Hughes

We now move over to a closer look at how ISO Management System Standards address the subject:

5 Practices for Managing Change When ISO 9001:2015 Arrives – Terrance Holbrook, Senior Product Manager, MasterControl – While there is no single one-size-fits-all change management methodology, there are established practices that can be adopted and customized to better manage change and cultivate opportunity.

  1. Accept the changeManaging Change When ISO 9001-2015 Arrives
  2. Communicate change
  3. Engage employees
  4. Provide adequate training
  5. Introduce change gradually

ISO 9001:2015 Addressing Change : Once the organization has identified its context and interested parties and then identified the processes that support this linkage, addressing changes becomes an increasingly important component of continued success.

How change management is addressed in ISO 9001 2015 Standard? – Any change – may be it is in process, manpower, machinery, instruments, technology, raw materials, suppliers, customer requirements, legal requirements etc.…. shall be go through a defined change management process.

Change Management and ISO 9001:2015Raghu Malayanuru has described in details clauses of ISO 9001:2015 that focus on change management. For the purpose of maintaining brevity of our episode, we have listed out the clauses here:

  1. Clause 4.4.1( g);
  2. Clause 5.3 (e);
  3. Clause 6.3
  4. Clause 7.5.3.2
  5. Clause 8.1;
  6. Clause 8.2.1 (b);
  7. Clause 8.2.4
  8. Clause 8.3.6;
  9. Clause 8.5.6;
  10. Clause 9.2.2 (a)
  11. Clause 9.3.2 (b)
  12. Clause 10
  13. Clause 10.2.1(f)

The essence is captured here:

Change Management and ISO 9001_2015

ISO’s Technical Committee no.176, Sub-committee no.2 (ISO/TC 176/SC 2) has also published an explanatory paper – How Change is addressed within ISO 9001:2015

How to manage changes in an ISMS according to ISO 27001 A.12.1.2Antonio Segovia states that the requirement exists, but there are no particular instructions on how to implement the control (i.e., Change procedure is not a mandatory document), so in this article he suggests one of the ways to manage changes.

What is “Management of Change?”Thea Dunmire explains requirements related to management of change were added in section 4.3.1 of OHSAS 18001: 2007…In addition, reference to Management of Change was also included in section 4.4.6.

These new requirements cover four important concepts:

  • Identification of the hazards associated with “change”
  • Assessment of the risks associated with “change”
  • Consideration of OH&S hazards and risks prior to the introduction of the “change”
  • Implementation of the controls needed to address the hazards and risks associated with the “change”

For purposes of management of change within an OH&S management system, the changes that need to be addressed include:

  • Organizational changes (e.g. personnel or staffing changes)
  • Activity changes (e.g. changes to processes, equipment, infrastructure, software)
  • Material changes (e.g. new chemicals, packaging)
  • Changes to the OH&S management system (e.g. procedures)

Ineffective management of change is one of the major contributing factors in many of the incident investigations conducted by the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB).  To check it out, go to the CSB web site at http://www.csb.gov  and enter “management of change” as your search term at the link “Search this Site.”

Change Management in ISO 14001:2015Ivana Strgacic states that unlike the changes in ISO 9001:2015, there is no “Planning of Changes” section.  So where can we find change management in the new standard?

The change all starts with the environmental aspects,

“When determining environmental aspects, the organization shall take into account: a) change, including planned or new developments, and new or modified activities, products and services;”

Once we identify the changed aspects, then there is a cascading or domino effect on the rest of the environmental management system.

While maintaining processes, it needs to underlined that some of the triggers that will result in a change to a process are:

  • changes to aspects,
  • changes to compliance obligations,
  • changes to controls.

Management review (element 9.3) requires the specific inputs of change into the process.  Specifically changes in:

  • external and internal issues that are relevant to the environmental management system,
  • the needs and expectations of interested parties, including compliance obligations,
  • its significant environmental aspects,
  • risks and opportunities.

The resulting output includes decisions related to any need for changes to the environmental management system systems, including resources.  Without managing change, the EMS cannot remain effective.  Change, through maintenance and continual improvement of the management systems, are the core tenets of the Plan-Do-Check-Act model.

We rest our discussions on the today’s topic here.

For the September, 2016 episode, we will take Organizational Knowledge in the new versions of these management standards.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

Among several update posts by ASQ CEO, Bill Troy in his ASQ’s Influential Voice we have picked up two ‘author interviews’ for our current episode:

It should be interesting to revisit one of the HBR classics, by Francesca Gino and Bradley Staats on the subject: Why Organizations don’t learn?

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episodes that deal with ISO 9001: 2015:

  • Change Management – Change management experts discuss key steps to consider when approaching employees with change and helping them through the process. Learn about the carrot-and-stick technique—which can be used to motivate employees—and a tool that can make meetings more efficient and keep change management plans on track.

Read Sunil Kaushik’s Quality Progress article regarding the carrot-and-stick method as well as additional motivational strategies.
Watch the full interview and read the Quality Progress article about the Joint Commission’s improvement initiatives.

  • Explaining Annex SL and Top Management’s New Roles – Annex SL is considered the common language and text that new ISO standards are being built around. John DiMaria, senior product manager at BSI Americas, discusses how this affects ISO 9001:2015, as well as the standard’s new roles for top management with regard to responsibility, objectives and compliance.

Here are two more which also are very interesting points of view in understanding the present scenario:

  • Quality in India – This episode takes a look at quality in India, from the perspectives of leaders at the Quality Council of India (QCI) and the National Accreditation Board for Education and Training.
  • The State of Quality in India in 2015 – What’s the state of quality in India in 2015? Dr. Himanshu Trivedi, chair of ASQ’s local member community in Ahmedabad, India, reflects.

In Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of May, 2016, we have –

Jim's GemsKey management support, or lack of support, manifests itself in many ways. One way is that mid-lower level management won’t get on board so initiatives encounter all sorts of hurdles; therefore, results don’t generally live up to expectations. .. Additionally less support for quality initiatives usually results in underfunding and cuts in resources. So what do you do.. (Please read on the article)..

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – July, 2016

Welcome to July, 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We have already taken up the following topics for the familiarization of different elements of new version of ISO 9001-

For the present episode we will see how ‘Leadership’ in the Other ISO Management Standards’ is addressed.

Leadership – Leadership may therefore be the most important lever in an (ethical) system designed to support (ethical) conduct.

In The Expanding Role of Leadership in Management System Standards Chad Kymal states that new versions of ISO 9001, ISO 14001, and ISO 45001 set clear expectations. He also has drawn a broader canvas of the expanding role of the leadership in MSS.

In a very lucid white paper – The Importance of leadership in Management System Standards – BSI concludes that “many of the leadership responsibilities are contained in the standard text of Annex SL. So the principles and requirements for the other management system standards will be very similar, but with a focus onto the respective discipline, for instance environmental management or health and safety management.”

In Top Management Commitment: What Are The Standards , Syed Mahammud Wasif has postulated 10 initiatives that set the tone for the top management commitment.

Leadership for the Many, Not the Few – Beth Zimmerman states that all members of the Evans team are supported in exercising and strengthening their leadership skills in ways that align with their personal passions and Evans’ corporate goals. We also make additional investments to ensure that those with people-management responsibilities have strong skills in, and a consistent approach to, supporting those they manage in succeeding in their respective roles. Evans applies a mix of practices to bolster leadership – Coaching, Tools for Success, Mixed-level Teams, Internal and External Opportunities for Growth, Training for People Managers,

We also have a few videos on the subject:

  • ISO revisions – All about leadership in the new standards
  • Management and Leadership overview
  • Teaching leaders “What to Stop”

Obviously, before we can expect many more articles on the actual practices, we will have to wait for some more time as more and more organizations take up the implementations of the newer versions of these management system standards.

For the August, 2016 episode, we will take Change Management in the new versions of these management standards.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy in his ASQ’s Influential Voice has a guest article by Scott Rutherford – What Do We Expect from Senior Leaders? – that also looks at our current subject of leadership. Scott Rutherford recalls a 1986 Quality Progress review  by Dr. Joseph Juran.  The quote is:

It is most important that top management be quality-minded. In the absence of sincere manifestation of interest from the top, little will happen from below.”

We now watch the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

In Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of May, 2016, we have –

  • The Magic Ingredient for Success – is attitude! Successful people have a way of looking at things, a way of seeing obstacles as opportunities, and a way of “hanging in there” to make the most of every possibility. This is an attitude of positive affirmation that almost always guarantees success….The good news about attitude is that it can be altered, and we, not anyone else, are in charge of our own attitudes. What’s your Jim's Gemsattitude? If it’s not going to bring you success, then change it!
  • Where Should Organizations Focus their Greatest Efforts?… On Process or People? – Peter Drucker, the late author and management consultant, wrote that “neither technology nor people determine the other, but each shapes the other.” …..In planning how to evaluate claim data quality, building a framework of systems-thinking proved extremely helpful. Namely, the process principles of statistical thinking formed the conceptual foundation of a quality improvement plan which included: (1) All work occurs in a system of interconnected processes; (2) Variation exists in all processes; and (3) Understanding and reducing variation are keys to success….a translation from process to a greater attention on people suggests the following principles: (1) All work is done by individuals; (2) An individual’s work is variable; (3) Key to quality improvement is reducing variation by getting the right person into the right job….a predominant focus on people can lead either to management paralysis or to process tampering, when people are primarily held accountable…..Success stems from having the right processes and the right people in place. The development of this leadership style has been shaped by envisioning processes first and then providing people the opportunity to engage those processes.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – October 2013

Welcome to October 2013 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

This month, we have a broader canvas of articles that looks at Quality from different perspectives.

Evan Mathews Sanders, in his “journey to becoming a better man every day and the lessons I learn along the way” @ The Better Man Project presents

The Finest Moment

Our finest moment

Is when we reach

For something past our present

Like a fumbling hand into the future

But with a vision

That hand becomes still

One that grips with purpose

And moves away from temptation

And , on somewhat different note, we have Jessica Gross @ TED Talks’s SCIENCE section presenting the views of biologist Stuart Firesten on “In praise of ignorance” in today’s TED talk. Stuart Firestein, while proposing that science is really about ignorance, states that “Science, we generally are told, is a very well-ordered mechanism for understanding the world, for gaining facts, for gaining data.”   He explains: “I mean a kind of ignorance that’s less pejorative, a kind of ignorance that comes from a communal gap in our knowledge, something that’s just not there to be known or isn’t known well enough yet or we can’t make predictions from.” the more we know, the more we realize there is yet to be discovered.

The Quality and HSE professionals may draw lessons from Jeremy Anderberg’s Survival Lessons from World War Z @ The Art of Manliness. We have a “unique telling of the popular genre. What really sets it apart from those other cheap zombie thrills is that it focuses largely on how individuals, communities, and governments would react to such a scenario. It’s almost more of a fictional sociology textbook rather than a novel.

Whether in the actual apocalypse, or just a localized natural disaster (like what we experienced a couple weeks ago here in Colorado), these are lessons that anyone and everyone can start applying.

It took freak flooding in the city I live in to teach me the lesson that being prepared for disasters isn’t just for folks who are hard-core, it’s for people who are smart and want to come out the other end with their families and communities intact.

  • It’s Not If, But When – “Most people don’t believe something can happen until it already has. That’s not stupidity, that’s just human nature.” –World War Z by Max Brooks
  • Zombies Don’t Care About Your PowerPoint Skills – Ours was a post-industrial or service-based economy, so complex and highly specialized that each individual could only function within the confines of its narrow, compartmentalized structure. …We needed to get a lot of white collars dirty.”
  • Practice Self-Reliance Before You Need It – Not only will having DIY skills help you rebuild your community, they also greatly increase your self-reliance.
  • Basic Physical Fitness is Paramount – “Make no mistake, bipedal locomotion was how most people traveled in the beginning.” Traffics jams of stalled cars that are miles long will be the norm in every big city.
  • Relationships Matter, Even in the Apocalypse – Our jobs tend to have pretty defined hierarchies. This should go without saying, but treat everyone (secretaries, janitors, security guards, doormen) in your office and building just as you would a peer. Beyond being a kind gentleman, those people may very well save your life someday.
  • The Latest and Greatest Technology Isn’t Always the Greatest  – Technological advances are a fantastic thing. They provide entertainment, enjoyment, efficiency, convenience…and the list goes on. There is also a downside, however, particularly when it comes to survival scenarios. If we become too dependent on new technologies, it can hamper our survival efforts. Remember it was old Ham radio that came to communication rescue in the matter of Colardo” (or Uttaarakhand, India) flash floods.

On a similar note, Bill Wilder  @ Learning is Change, in the article – The Master’s Lessons on Learning – presents what “Leonardo da Vinci once said that “learning never exhausts the mind.”  Although we’ll never know for sure exactly what he meant, it sounds like he was saying something like this: Real learning happens when people do stimulating things that don’t wear them out.”

We now move on to some hard-core Quality issues. Incidentally, these articles come from some of the ASQ’s Influential Voices.

Nicole @ Quality And Innovation opens with a statement “Achieving quality (re: ISO 9000 para 3.1.5) is all about meeting stated and implied needs” in Expressing Your Needs and then goes on to link Steve Pavlina’s broader discussion that there is probably a vast audience of potential partners and co-creators who, at any time, are ready and willing (and happy!) to meet your needs. It’s just that you haven’t broadcast those needs and so the people who would be happy to help you meet them are still in the dark. “But our society has conditioned us not to freely express our needs to friends, family, and others; after all, if we need something, the marketing should have worked already, and we should know where we can go to willingly exchange currency for the means to satisfy that need.”  The author sums up the article with – “first step is for me to start getting comfortable with expressing my needs – and being open to the people who will show up to help meet them.”

Anshuman Tiwari @ Qualty the Unfair Advantage has passionately thrown the gauntlet for the quality professionals in Quality must make money and not just be the right thing to do.  “In a recent post on his bog, Paul Borwaski, CEO of ASQ, shared a fantastic turnaround story about Corning Glass. As usual Paul choses his subjects wisely and presents his thought crisply. See the case study here.

Here are some key insights from Corning’s revival and dominance through Quality that I could summarize for you.

  • Winning the Baldrige is not enough – New challenges emerge requiring new responses. Corning Glass’s case clearly demonstrates how quickly we can slip if we drop the ball.
  • Quality is a Board subject – With Corning Glass’s case it is reiterated that once Quality slips lower in the organizational hierarchy, poor quality results follow quickly.
  • BigQ and Performance Excellence – Small Q is a reference to product quality and Big Q refers to an all-encompassing view – quality of business processes. With dimensions such business processes and customer experience the quality field has evolved into Performance Excellence. Corning realized this and included all functions in their quality program. Rich dividends followed.
  • Don’t ignore Quality training – All change starts with knowledge. Without adequate knowledge of what to do we risk changing processes only to create more havoc. Corning realized the value of training before embarking on change and invested in Six Sigma and Lean training for over 1000 staff.
  • Choose methods and tools wisely – Corning did not just pick every method available. They studied all and developed a framework and stuck to it. The Corning Performance Excellence model addresses collaboration, innovation, and improvement.
  • Quality must make money – Finally a Quality program must help make money. Quality is free but not charity.

Dr. Lotto Lai @ Quality Alchemist, has chosen the ‘The ANQ 2013’ in the article Asiaization is the Future of Quality  – which was slated to be held from 14th to 18th October 2013 – Bangkok, THAILAND , meet  to launch a relatively new lexicon in the realm of Quality – “Asiaization (亞洲化) [which]  is an action, process, or result of doing or making Asia-like; implying Asia culture and habit will be more and more important in the world.” In his detailed and methodologically narrative he emphatically states that “Asiaization (亞洲化) will be a key force of the “Future of Quality””.

Jamie Flinchbaugh, in the article Lessons From the Road: Get the Most from Your Assessments has presented the value of Assessment, as different from Audit He states that Assessment is the part of continuous improvement that people generally don’t enjoy, and don’t get nearly the value from that they should. As the saying goes, “Anything worth doing is worth doing well.” The article has also spelt out the steps for realizing the value of the assessment.

Dr. Lotto Lai also leads us to this month’s visit to an organization  engagaged in the pursuits of Quality Movement. Asian Network for Quality (ANQ), established since 2002, will take a significant role to contributing to the world economic development through improving quality.

The theme of ANQ 2013 is “Quality for the Strength of Asia”.

The keynote address @ ANQ 2012 – The First Ten Year Journey of ANQ  Presented by Dr. Noriaki Kano provides the detailed journey of growth of ANQ since 2002.

The emerging importance of the Quality Fraternity of Asia, in “45 year history of the Academy this is the first time a person – Mr Janak Mehta , Founder President ISQ and presently Chair International Relation Committee of ISQ  –  from region other than USA, Europe and Japan has been elected to this position.

We now take a look at current Roundup, which now presents a range of views by the ASQ Influential voices, in The Challenges of Sustaining Excellence wherein Scott Rutherford wraps up the bloggers’ comments nicely when he says: “Each organization has a unique culture with periods of great success as well as turbulent times. Ultimately, it is the alignment of culture, strategy, and execution that defines organizational sustainment during change of organizational leadership.”

In our regular winding up session from ASQ™ TV: Creating a Global View of Quality, we have ASQ TV Episode 9: Process Improvement.  This episode is about elements of process improvement. A Mexican automotive parts manufacturer shares its improvement story. An expert in transformational thinking gets us to look beyond standardization and problem solving. A rock band treats us to its interpretation of process improvement.

This month we visit Jimena Calfa  @ ASQ’s Influential Voices

Jimena CalfaAn Argentina native Jimena Calfa is a systems engineer specializing in quality software. She also writes about using quality tools in everyday life at Let’s Talk About Quality. She regards quality as “key of success of every organization and every person, in every aspect of life.

She understands Quality from the perspective of what Aristotle has said: “Quality is an art won by training and habituation. We are what we repeatedly do. Quality, then, is not an act but a habit”.

She has passionately put across the rationale for writing blog by quoting the Cuban writer, José Martí : “Everyone to be complete has to plant a tree, have a child and write a book”. “In this technological age, we could replace the last part of the phrase and say “… and write a Blog.”

Her blog – Let’s Talk About Quality has sections like General Concepts [where we find articles on quality, in general]  XX vs. YY [which has articles like Customer vs. ClientActuality – ASQ [documenting her association @ ASQ] Q & A OFI (Opportunities for Improvement) My Bookshelf [listing the books she would recommend].

And we finally round up our present edition with –
Management Improvement Carnival # 200

We end current edition of the festival with James Clear’s article @  Lifehacker –  A Scientific Guide to Effectively Saying No. “In fact, not being able to say no is one of the most biggest downfalls that successful entrepreneurs claim as their own key mistakes.

“I can’t” and “I don’t” are words that seem similar and we often interchange them for one another, but psychologically they can provide very different feedback and, ultimately, result in very different actions.

The ability to overcome temptation and effectively say no is critical not only to your physical health, but also for your daily productivity and mental health. To put it simply: you can either be the victim of your words or the architect of them. Which one would you prefer?
But I do continue to wait to know your reasons for saying NO to my statement at the end of every edition, seeking your constructive inputs and suggestions…. to improve content and the style of this Blog Festival… And of course your YES – to put forward your views, candidly, is what I really look forward to…………………..

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – September 2013

Welcome to September 2013 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We begin our current session by drawing upon seemingly unrelated fields.

The first is  Rick Bohan’s article –Volleyball, Chess and the Successful Lean Implementation, where we draw useful learning from the study of sports in so far as Lean and Quality are concerned. “People make use of patterns to evaluate and figure out how to respond to what they see. Make those patterns easy to discern, and they’ll do a better job of keeping processes in control.

First, it speaks to one of the primary foundations of lean, that is, the generation of easy-to-see, easy-to-learn, easy-to-respond-to patterns of work, material flow and information flow.

Second, it speaks to why there can be such strong resistance to even the simplest lean initiatives like 5S and visual factory.  Employees who have spent thousands of hours in their workplaces have formed strong patterns.  What might look like chaos to us, to them makes perfect sense.”

In another article, Standardisation and Climbing Ladders, James Lawther advocates “that without any rungs you have nothing to push against, so you won’t be able to climb any further.

Process Improvement is a lot like climbing a ladder.

But instead of having rungs to push against you have standards. If you don’t create and use operating standards then you have nothing to push against and so no way of moving forward.

Process improvement without standards is a bit like trying to swim up-hill…..futile.”

Michael Hess, MONEYWATCH, in the article Don’t let burning bridges fall on you, makes the point that “Every good businessperson knows the importance of building quality relationships. But I’m surprised at how often people don’t give the same thought to the “quality” with which those relationships end, and the possible ways in which a bad breakup can come back to haunt them.

Most business relationships don’t last forever; employees move on, customers come and go, suppliers are replaced. But what goes around does indeed come around, and paths can cross again, particularly within the same industry or in small communities.”

And here is the last of the present article from which quality professionals can learn a very useful lesson. McKinsey & Company insights, How to make a city great,  asserts that “Successful cities are built on smart growth, efficient government, and collaboration.

By 2030, 60 per cent of the world’s population will live in cities. That could mean great things for economic growth—if the cities handle their expansion wisely. Here’s how.

Mayors are only too aware that their tenure will be limited. But if longer-term plans are articulated—and gain popular support because of short-term successes—leaders can start a virtuous cycle that sustains and encourages a great urban environment.”

Quality and Customer are indeed two inseparable layers. In the present edition, we would take two articles, for two ‘new’ sources:

Jim Clemmer’s article Focus on Overall Customer Experience puts across the issue of customer service – “the operation was a success but the patient died” –  quite succinctly.

Customer CloudCustomer service improvements and measurements often focus on a narrow set of customer interactions or a few steps in the service process. What’s missing is understanding, and improving, the customer’s entire experience.

4 steps to improve the customer journey:

  1. Identify the journeys in which they need to excel
  2. Understand how they are currently performing in each
  3. Build cross-functional processes to redesign and support those journeys
  4. Institute cultural change and continuous improvement to sustain the initiatives at scale

The article concludes with this key point:

“Optimizing a single customer journey is tactical; shifting organizational processes, culture, and mind-sets to a journey orientation is strategic and transformational…engages the organization across functions and from top to bottom, generating excitement, innovation, and a focus on continuous improvement. It creates a culture that’s hard to build otherwise, and a true competitive advantage goes to companies that get it right.””
Jim Benson, @ Quality Digest article Understand Your Customers has put across a wide canvas of who constitute ‘customer’. He further states that “If you don’t know whom the work is for, you don’t know what you’re doing”
And then assuming that you do now ‘know’ your customer, he does suggest five quick actions we should take.

• Be clear about what the customer wants. Yes, this sounds obvious, but how many times have you had to rework something because of a simple initial lack of understanding?
• Be clear about what’s on your plate. No, sorry Ms. Customer, your request isn’t the only thing I must do right now. I wish it was, but life doesn’t work like that. Here’s what I can realistically do.
• Get the customer’s feedback early and often. How soon can you show the customer an interim product? How quickly can you compare expected and actual progress? Earlier feedback = earlier delivery.
• Understand minimum and optimal deliverables. Minimum and optimum deliverables give you a range of success to shoot for. If you’re always aiming for the high point, you will usually underdeliver.
• Work is a relationship. All work is a relationship between the person doing the work and the person receiving it. Communication (again as early as possible) helps both cement the relationship and ensure an appreciated delivery.

We always keenly look at the subject of Performance Management.

Bernard Marr, in the article, The 75 KPIs Every Manager Needs To Know, includes the metrics he considers the most important and informative, and they make a good starting point for the development of a performance management system.

“Before we look at the list I would like to express an important warning: Don’t just pick all 75 – You don’t need or indeed should have all 75 KPIs. Instead, by understanding these 75 KPIs you will be able to pick the vital few meaningful indicators that are relevant for your business.

Finally, the KPIs should then be used (and owned) by everyone in the business to inform decision-making (and not as mindless reporting references or as ‘carrot & stick tools’).”

We now take a look at current Roundup, which now presents a range of views by the ASQ Influential voices, in What’s the Value of Professional Training?

In our regular winding up session from ASQ™ TV: Creating a Global View of Quality,, we have two episodes:

ASQ TV Episode 7: Innovation and Quality

This episode focuses on innovation: what innovation is and the role it plays in quality. Also, learn about an organization in India that used an innovative management model to turn a failing business unit around. Discover how the innovation management cycle can jumpstart innovation at your organization, and take a self-assessment to see what your role is in the innovation process.

ASQ TV Episode 8: Lean

In this episode, learn why less is more! We cover all things lean: What it is and what makes lean projects work; how an emergency response centre used lean to increase efficiency; how to use value stream mapping, a key lean tool; and how you can use lean to better organize your home life. Read the Eurocross Assistance case study at asq.org/quality-engineering/2013/01/lean/quality-quandaries.pdf Learn more about value stream maps in the Quality Progress article: http://asq.org/quality-progress/2006/06/lean/value-stream-mapping–an-introduction.html. For more on lean and Six Sigma, visit http://asq.org/six-sigma/

This month we visit Don Brecken @ ASQ’s Influential Voices

Don BreckenDon Brecken, an ASQ Fellow, writes The Quality Advisor blog. Don is management faculty and Southwest Michigan business program advisor for Ferris State University. Don is also a practicing business improvement auditor and consultant; his background includes quality leadership, continuous improvement, operations learning and development, management consulting, quality auditing, quality system implementation, and business improvement auditing.

The Quality Advisor blog is for sharing Brecken’s quality-related posts, which are intended to be of general interest to most readers. After all… “Quality affects us all; it spans all industries, pertains equally to product and service, and should therefore matter to everyone!”

A little more detailed search of the blog, throws up an interesting take on A Practical Approach to Business Improvement Auditing

Business improvement audits, in comparison to QMS Audits as per ISO 9001(:2008) , are bound only by the contractual agreement with the audit client.

An organization’s QMS should serve as a business improvement tool. Clause 8.5.1 of ISO 9001, Continual improvement, requires the organization to continually improve the effectiveness of its QMS through the use of its quality policy, quality objectives, audit results, analysis of data, corrective and preventive actions, and management review. Because the QMS requires these components be used for improvement, the business improvement auditor should assess whether each component is effectively leveraged to improve the organization. Most, if not all of the information the business improvement auditor will need for this assessment should be evident if the auditor knows where to look.

From the present edition, we would also take a detailed visit to the sites of some the leading national or international ‘quality’ organizations. Our such visit(s) may span more than one editions of our blog festival.

This month we will visit Quality Council of India. We begin our tour of QCI site from its Mission To help India achieve and sustain total quality and reliability, in all areas of life, work, environment, products and services, at individual, organisational, community and societal levels.

This has been brilliantly discussed by the then President of India Dr.A.P.J.Abdul Kalam, in his inaugural speech at the 2nd National Quality Conclave on February 9, 2007 at New Delhi:

“My definition of nation prosperity index is equal to GDP including quality of life for all coupled with value system. It is essential to ensure that all the citizens are empowered with good quality of life encompassing nutritious foods, good habitat, clean environment, affordable health care, quality education with value system and productive employment leading to the comprehensive qualitative development of the nation……..”

And we finally round up our present edition with –
Management Improvement Carnival #199
I look forward to your constructive inputs and suggestions…. To improve content and the style of this Blog Festival …