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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – May 2021

Welcome to May 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We recapitulate that the 2021 theme for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs is Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

We base our discussion on the subject for the present episode on A TED talk, Back to the future (1994), from the playlist The history of the future. In the talk, Danny Hillis outlines an intriguing theory of how and why technological change seems to be accelerating, by linking it to the very evolution of life itself. The presentation techniques he uses may look dated, but the ideas are as relevant as ever…. In essence, the talk has this to state on its key theme of accelerating changes –

The humanity has started abstracting out. We’re going through the same levels that multi-cellular organisms have gone through — abstracting out our methods of recording, presenting, processing information….In the process, we have speeded up time scales. The process is feeding on itself and becoming autocatalytic. The more it changes, the faster it changes.

There is an equally strong school of thought that thinks otherwise.

‘If the pace of change really were unprecedented, then conventional wisdom holds we’d better darn well slow it down, so no one gets hurt.  Either way, the commentators warn, “buckle up.” Here is one, by Alvin Toffler in 1970.:

‘ “It has become a cliché to say that what we are now living through is a “second industrial revolution.” This phrase is supposed to impress us with the speed and profundity of the change around us. But in addition to being platitudinous, it is misleading. For what is occurring now is, in all likelihood, bigger, deeper, and more important than the industrial revolution. Indeed, a growing body of reputable opinion asserts that the present movement represents nothing less than the second great divide in human history, comparable in magnitude only with that first great break in historic continuity, the shift from barbarism to civilization”.

‘Why have people long believed that their eras were unprecedented when it came to the rate of change? There are two reasons. First, at least today, it is hard to get attention if you say that “there’s nothing new here, at least in terms of the pace of change.” Second, it’s simply human nature. Most of us overestimate change in a few things around our lives and ignore most of the rest that changes very slowly, if at all.

‘None of this is to say that technology-driven change isn’t happening. Of course it is—and it’s making our lives much better. But the pace of change appears to be no faster than in prior eras, and just as economies did fine despite Luddite impulses then, ours will do fine now. So, let’s all take a deep breath and say together: “Technological change is not accelerating, but it would sure be nice if it would.” ‘[1]

Scott Brinker has formulated Martec’s Law, which states, Technology changes exponentially, organizations change logarithmically…..there have been hundreds of best-selling books written on the difficulties of personal and organizational change. Empirically, the limit of change for humans is less than linear. In other words, it’s not feasible for an organization to change faster than that. But it’s certainly possible for an organization to change more slowly — or not at all. In fact, in the absence of good leadership, stagnation seems like the default outcome. But even with great leadership, an organization can’t win by outracing technology. It needs a more nuanced strategy….In A.G. Lafley’s book, Playing to Win: How Strategy Really Works, he drives home the point that strategy is choice. It’s decisively choosing to do certain things and to not do others….That is the crux of technology management. We can’t adopt all technological changes, but we can consciously choose some. Great technology management is choosing which changes to absorb — ideally those that are best aligned with the organization’s overall strategy….In the graph, it’s intentionally deciding what’s in (the red shaded area) and what’s out (the blue shaded area)….. To succeed, technology management must explicitly address how those technologies will be absorbed into the operations and the culture of the organization.

A successful tech-enabled transformation requires organizations to make progress on several paths simultaneously. … Only by following a structured, comprehensive playbook can companies translate their transformation priorities from strategy to action. A two-step methodology supported by several enablers can provide companies with the direction, priorities, and organizational capabilities to maximize the value of such investments. Indeed, companies that took a comprehensive approach to their transformation generated more than twice as much value as organizations focused solely on technology improvements. [2]

Charlie Feld, in his article, Change Management: Leading Through Technology Changes, states: There are three major competencies that great IT leaders need in order to get the lay of the changing landscape: pattern recognition, technical savvy and street smarts.

One may tend to conclude that one should consciously map the change and act in accordance with the organization’s long-term strategy of maintain its competitive advantage.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about–

The Quality Professional’s Changing Workplace – This episode investigates how the global pandemic and digital transformation are changing the quality professional’s workplace.

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month:

Commit to Improvement – Most continuous improvement programs are treated as the latest management fad; therefore, people look at it as just another “program of the month” being pushed by management. …This is not the way the organization conducts its other business. In fact, the continuous improvement effort is often at odds with the existing processes and metrics, so it is destined to limp along on its way to mediocrity and eventual failure…. Continuous improvement is more about rigor and discipline than it is about technique.

From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand, we have

Rules: Good or Bad? – English actor and author Alan Bennett once said, “We started off trying to set up a small anarchist community, but people wouldn’t obey the rules.” … We equate rules with the difference between order and chaos. We often, quite negatively, associate rules as being an obstacle to success. …Depending on your perspective, those seen breaking the rules are either bad people or trailblazers and pioneers…These quotes express more accurately captures the essence— “Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist” (Pablo Picasso ) or “Know the rules well, so you can break them effectively.” (the Dalai Lama)…. Although much has changed in the last year and the near future can look a little daunting, understanding the rules of before, what is happening now, and how it may affect us moving forward is always good practice.

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.


[1] Technology Feels Like It’s Accelerating—Because You’ve Been Watching Too Many TED TalksRobert D. Atkinson

[2] Accelerating the impact from a tech-enabled transformation By Venkat Atluri, Aamer Baig, and Satya Rao

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – April 2021

Welcome to April 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We recapitulate that the 2021 theme for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs is Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

I have picked up two articles relating to Future of Industry. Here too I have avoided going into details that relate to impact of digital technologies but have chosen to focus on the issues that should concern the management in general.

Note: This subject has no correlation to Industries of Future.

The future of industries: Bringing down the walls – As the boundaries between suppliers, producers and consumers and, in some cases, between whole industries shift, the separating walls are being brought down.…. It is expected that all industries will be transformed by the technology shockwave, lowering cost bases, and improving operational efficiency as well as demanding greater integration with customers and suppliers.

Five big issues for companies –

1. Have you got an outcomes’ focus or are you still stuck in a physical product mindset?

2. What are you doing to avoid commoditisation of your business?

3. Are you building a platform presence?

4. Are you leading with or being left behind by advanced technology?

5. Have you got your timing, right?

The ‘Future of Industries’ report discusses these and a number of other questions. Download it to find out more and join in the discussion with PwC.

Industry Of The Future: We Need To TalkMike Hughes – The industrial world still inhabits an environment of proprietary systems and vendor lock-in long since abandoned by the IT sector. This is throttling innovation and progress.

Credit: Getty Images

Many organizations recognize that next-generation industrial automation must be interoperable and break free from the locked-in model we currently accept. Interoperable and portable application software is a must for next-generation industries…… The factories and industries of the future, will have machines, operations and IT systems integrated and understand each other, talk and collaborate—where agility, sustainability, and productively are just a matter of choosing the best-in-class solution for your operation.

The Future of Industry | Accenture sums up succinctly the challenges as it states – The world is changing, and all industries are facing a tectonic shift. Let’s embrace the new, together…..

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about–

Shared Meanings from Top to Bottom – Charlie Barton, President, Barton Consulting LLC, discusses the importance of shared meanings of words for organizations, and the negative business implications that could occur without that common knowledge.

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month:

Organizational Culture – Workplace culture takes work but delivers value – Peter F. Drucker, the famed educator and management consultant, said, “There is nothing as useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.” …. Maybe more important for effectiveness and efficiency is workplace culture. As times change so must the culture. …We must learn to be aware of one another from a cultural background before we can learn to work together effectively. We need to realize it is not so much what we say as much as the manner in which we express ourselves that can adversely affect mutual understanding…. A lack of understanding and sensitivity can be injurious to the environment. There must be balance in the workforce just as there is in any other situation. We must learn to appreciate the differences between generations and learn to adapt. 

From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand, we have

Truth or Fallacy – Depends on how you look at it. – Sunk costs are defined as costs that have already been incurred and cannot be recovered. Proponents of the sunk cost fallacy argue that since it is a cost paid in the past and unrecoverable, it should be removed from any future decision making. But that does not stop sunk costs from being a part of our psyche…The sunk cost fallacy, in a way, is not just forgetting the time, money, and effort that went into producing something, but not allowing it to blind us to what we truly want or need. … “The sunk cost fallacy means making a choice not based on what outcome you think is going to be the best moving forward, but instead based on a desire to not see your past investment go to waste,” said Julia Galef, president of the Center for Applied Rationality.[1]

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.


[1] Julia Galef: The Sunk Costs Fallacy | Big Think

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – March, 2021

Welcome to March 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We recapitulate that the 2021 theme for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs is Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Presently, we will first take up A future direction for quality management standards, not for what it notes what is in the store for the next revisions of ISO standards. I have picked up the article for the basis of these revisions, which indicates the new way of looking at the fundamentals of the thinking in the times to come. As such, the edited excerpts show only what is relevant, in general.

The eight future concepts are:

  1. Customer experience is the sum of all perceptions, impressions and reactions that a customer has in a series of activities. It involves everything from initially discovering and researching a product or service, through shopping, purchasing and using the product or service to following up with the brand afterwards.
  2. People aspects are all the factors that impact people’s abilities to perform tasks, their interests (eg motivation and preferences), their differences and relations (individual differences and social behaviour), and how an organisation can enhance performance by getting the best from people.
  3. Change management is identified as a systematic approach to initiate, develop, implement and communicate a transition or transformation in an organisation’s identity elements. These elements include the organisation’s  vision, mission, culture, values, policy, strategy, objectives and/or processes.
  4. Integration – An integrated management system (IMS) integrates many systems and processes into one complete framework, enabling an organisation to work as a single unit with unified objectives. When an organisation integrates management systems it can achieve better alignment between its systems, strategic direction, objectives, and the context of the organisation.
  5. Knowledge management is a discipline focused on ways that organisations create and use knowledge. While this concept itself is not new, there are important aspects that now need to be considered in relation to the use of, for example, big data, machine learning, blockchain, code of ethics, copyrights and intellectual property.
  6. There are several emerging technologies that will impact an organization in the future. The extent of digitisation is constantly growing in organisations. There are many possibilities for companies to use intelligent networking and artificial intelligence (AI) for making decisions based on rapidly changing data.
  7. Ethics and integrity are critical to the organisation’s ability to achieve sustainable success. All company decisions, actions and stakeholder interactions must be aligned with its moral and professional principles of conduct. These principles should support all applicable laws and regulations and are the foundation for the organisation’s culture, values and attitudes.
  8. Organizational culture refers to the collective beliefs, values, attitudes, manners, customs and behaviours that are unique to an organisation. Leadership establishes the organisational identity through the culture it develops and promotes.

These eight future perspectives can be further viewed in the light of Gary Hamel’s seminal work ‘The Future of Management’. The book, co-authored by Bill Green, was published in 2007. His basic tenet is that most of the organizations “by a small coterie of long departed theorists and practitioners who invented the rules and conventions of “modern” management back in the early years of the 20th century. They are the poltergeists who inhabit the musty machinery of management. It is their edicts, echoing across the decades, that invisibly shape the way your company allocates resources, sets budgets, distributes power, rewards people, and makes decisions.

However, “the laws of management are neither foreordained nor eternal”.

“Whiplash change, fleeting advantages, technological disruptions, seditious competitors, fractured markets, omnipotent customers, rebellious shareholders—these 21st century challenges are testing the design limits of organizations around the world and are exposing the limitations of a management model that has failed to keep pace with the times.”

“What ultimately constrains the performance of your organization is not its business model, nor its operating model, but its management model.”

The management innovation has a unique capacity to create a long-term advantage for (the) company, and …. (the management of today) must …. first imagine, and then invent, the future of management.[1]

[Side Note: Management Innovation is defined as “..anything that substantially alters the way in which the work of management is carried out, or significantly modifies customary organizational forms, and, by so doing, advances organizational goals”. ]

In this video, Gary Hamel on the Future of Management, you can view Gary Hamel explaining the concept that he has enunciated in the book.

Additional reading:

The Future of Management Gary Hamel: The Future of Management Dr. Liano Greybe

The Future of Innovation Management: The Next 10 Years from Arthur D. Little)

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about–

Skills You Need for the Technical Era

Quality 4.0 is More Than Technology https://asq.realmagnet.land/quality-4pt0-research

Learn About Quality 4.0 https://asq.org/quality-resources/quality-4-0

Quality 4.0 Virtual Summit https://asq.org/conferences/quality-4-0

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month:

Change Perspective – In life not everything goes as planned or expected, even for the most successful people. But some people take failure very personally. It is our perspective that counts in the long run…. If you want to change your life, you need to first change your belief system. …. Anything that was learned – and our beliefs are learned – can be unlearned and relearned. Then, you will continue to act like yourself, but you will see yourself differently, so your behavior will be different. And when you change your behavior, you change the results. … Bhagwant Buddha preached : “What you think, you become. What you feel, you attract. What you imagine, you create.” In other words, change your perspective, and you change your life.

From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand, we have

Speaking the same language – George Carlin once said, “Everybody smiles in the same language.”

In fact, our facial expressions can convey a plethora of information about our emotional state.  .. What is critical is — understanding the communication, whether it is verbal or non-verbal.

March 2021 issue of QualityMag provides insight on moving communication forward in the age of Industry 4.0, in the form of Surface Tools: Speaking the language of Industry 4.0” and “Choosing Your Words Wisely: Help us clear up the confusion of NDT terminology.”

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

[1] Gary Hamel : The Future of Management

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – February, 2021

Welcome to February 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We recapitulate that the 2021 theme for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs is Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Presently, we will take up a McKinsey article, The next normal arrives: Trends that will define 2021—and beyond – By Kevin Sneader and Shubham Singhal to provide us a broad over view.

Excerpts from the article:

Quote:

There is at least a faint light at the end of the tunnel—along with the hope that another train isn’t heading our way….

Barring any unexpected catastrophes, individuals, businesses, and society can start to look forward to shaping their futures rather than just grinding through the present. The next normal is going to be different. It will not mean going back to the conditions that prevailed in 2019. Indeed, just as the terms “prewar” and “postwar” are commonly used to describe the 20th century, generations to come will likely discuss the pre-COVID-19 and post-COVID-19 eras…

The crisis has sparked a wave of innovation and launches a generation of entrepreneurs. …There’s no going back. The great acceleration in the use of technology, digitization, and new forms of working is going to be sustained.

Supply chains re-balance and shift

Think of it as “just in time plus.” The “plus” stands for “just in case,” meaning more sophisticated risk management. …When a single country or even a single factory went dark, the lack of critical components shut down production. Never again, executives vowed…. Once businesses began to study how their supply chains worked, they realized three things. First, disruptions aren’t unusual. Second, cost differences among developed and many developing countries are narrowing. In manufacturing, companies that adopt Industry 4.0 principles (meaning the application of data, analytics, human–machine interaction, advanced robotics, and 3-D printing) can offset half of the labor-cost differential between China and the United States. The gap narrows further when the cost of rigidity is factored in: end-to-end optimization is more important than the sum of individual transaction costs. And third, most businesses do not have a good idea of what is going on lower down in their supply chains, where subtiers and sub-subtiers may play small but critical roles. That is also where most disruptions originate, but two-thirds of companies say they can’t confirm the business-continuity arrangements with their non-tier-one suppliers. With the development of AI and data analytics, companies can learn more about, audit, and connect with their entire value chains.

The future of work arrives ahead of schedule

The McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) estimates that more than 20 percent of the global workforce (most of them in high-skilled jobs in sectors such as finance, insurance, and IT) could work most of its time away from the office—and be just as effective…. There are two important challenges related to the transition to working away from the office. One is to decide the role of the office itself, which is the traditional center for creating culture and a sense of belonging. Returning to the office shouldn’t be a matter of simply opening the door. Instead, it needs to be part of a systematic reconsideration of what exactly the office brings to the organization….. The other challenge has to do with adapting the workforce to the requirements of automation, digitization, and other technologies. This isn’t just the case for sectors such as banking and telecom; instead it’s a challenge across the board, even in sectors not associated with remote work…In 2018, the World Economic Forum estimated that more than half of employees would need significant reskilling or upskilling by 2022.

Portfolio restructuring accelerates

In previous downturns, the strong came out stronger, and the weak got weaker, went under, or were bought. The defining difference was resilience—the ability not only to absorb shocks but to use them to build competitive advantage…. The implication is that there is a resiliency premium on recovery. Top performers won’t sit on their strengths; instead, as in previous downturns, they will seek out ways to build them.

Green, with a touch of brown, is the color of recovery

All over the world, the costs of pollution—and the benefits of environmental sustainability—are increasingly recognized.

The COVID-19 crisis has created an imperative for companies to reconfigure their operations—and an opportunity to transform them. To the extent that they do so, greater productivity will follow.

Unquote

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about–

  • Remote Auditing – Recent health guidelines have caused companies and independent auditors to view an online audit as a viable alternative to the on-site audit. Lance Coleman, ASQ Instructor, and Principal Consultant, Full Moon Consulting, details the benefits of online audits, how to get top management buy in and how to conduct an online audit.

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month :

Fail SuccessfullyThe hallmark is that highly successful people are not afraid to try something new, set aggressive goals, and are committed to achieve success. The possibility of failure exists but they are willing to take that chance. In fact, the only real failure is not trying at all…. Failure is perceived as a negative aspect of life, but successful people believe that failure is good. Failing means that you tried something new, and the results will teach you valuable lessons that make future success possible. Another aspect of failure that falls into the beliefs of successful people is that no one cares about or remembers your failures, so do not carry them with you. Learn and move on quickly … One other thing is certain: If you do not try anything, you are guaranteed to fail.

From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand, we have

Leaders and Followers – What do you call a leader with no followers? A guy taking a walk…. In a broader sense, it begs the question of the importance of following in the footsteps of another. It is why leaders also are often referred to as trailblazers, those creating paths for others… An important part of trailblazing was—and is—documentation…Today, trailblazing and documentation take place in the form of standard operating procedures and best practices…to help their customers and others effectively and successfully use technology or follow a process…or users and practitioners to expand, innovate, and forge new paths of success.

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – January 2021

Welcome to January 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We ended the year 2020 on the subject of Future of Quality. The intention was to use that as the gateway for the 2021 theme – Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success – for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

The primary objective of each monthly episode in this ‘Future of….’ is intended to be pinned around this quote by Thomas Alva Edison – “Keep on the lookout for novel ideas that others have used successfully. Your idea has to be original only in its adaptation to the problem you’re working on.”

To put this intention into actual practice, the plan is to pick up a topic a month, relevant to the field of quality management and then explore other relevant articles and blogs related to that topic.

Presented here under is an overview of possible sources for these types of topics:

From the playlists on TED.com:

The history of the future – A look back on how we looked forward over the decades.

What direction is the future headed? – Explore what may be in store for our collective future and how we can plan for the unpredictable, together.

What does the future look like?  – Visions of the future of everything from cars to the internet to the human species.

From the themes, presented by the leading consulting or industry organizations or journals –

Is your organization prepared for the future? – McKinsey’s Organizing for the Future blog series can help organizations thrive in the years ahead.

Future of Work –  As automation changes the world of work, governments, businesses, and members of the workforce can take action and adapt.

The Future of Production | McKinsey and the World Economic Forum  – The McKinsey-WEF knowledge collaboration on the future of production and the fourth Industrial Revolutions seeks to shape advanced manufacturing through “lighthouse” factories.

The Future of Climate Risk | McKinsey and the World Economic Forum – The McKinsey-WEF knowledge collaboration on the future of climate risk focuses on natural capital and biodiversity as well as the sustainability of airlines.

Future shocks: 17 technology predictions for 2025 | World Economic …

New Nature Economy Report II: The Future Of Nature And Business …

Articles like –

The Future of the Past? Santosh Desai in City City Bang Bang, India, TOI

Or the predictions like –

Twenty for ‘20: the questions that will shape the next decade by EY Global

For the present episode, the lay the corner stone of our theme –

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about our 2021 theme –

  • The State of the Quality Profession – In this episode, a new ASQ research initiative gives us a current global state of quality: ASQ World Conference on Quality and Improvement attendees talk about the quality profession today, and what the future holds | Become reacquainted with control charts. | And, a Quality Progress character makes his first TV appearance.

To learn more about control charts and find a template, visit http://asq.org/learn-about-quality/data-collection-analysis-tools/overview/control-chart.html

  • New Roles for Quality Professionals – Peter-Elias Alouche, CEO of dqdt Inc., discusses how quality professionals can improve productivity, customer satisfaction, and profitability by expanding their skill-sets to include new professional roles.

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month, which was /is and will remain to be relevant for all quality professionals –

People, like businesses, need to be creative or stagnate – There have been numerous articles and books written on this topic. Two books pushing ‘out of box thinking’ were written by James M. Higgins. “101 Creative Problem-Solving Techniques” focuses on new ideas for businesses and “Escape from the Maze” describes Higgins’ nine steps to personal creativity. …..Aside from tools and techniques designed to stimulate creativity the following are six human conditions, which can allow creativity and ultimately innovation to flourish.

  1. Solitude. The sense of spending time to focus on your thoughts and ideas.
  2. Inactivity. Planned inactivity as a break in the busy routine.
  3. Daydream. Focusing on out of box thinking for the purpose of stimulating (innovating) thinking.
  4. Gullibility. The willingness to suspend your personal beliefs and accept what comes from inside without insisting on rationality or logic.
  5. Alertness and discipline. A twist to the Thomas Edison success quote could be “creativity is 10% inspiration and 90% perspiration”.
  6. Mental replay. Allowing yourself to revisit past creative efforts and resolution of past traumatic conflicts.

We add one more regular feature to our Quality Blog festival – ‘From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand

The Wave as a Metaphor – One of the most powerful images from nature has also become a powerful metaphor—the wave. Waves are relentless. The water crashes on the beach, ebbs back toward the ocean, only to be followed by another wave of crashing water. It never stops……Waves can be powerful. People caught in one are taught to relax and ride the wave to safety. The most powerful ships attempting to ride against and past a wave will—at the least—find themselves making no forward progress.

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

 

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Quality Management Articles and Blogs – December 2020

Welcome to December 2020 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

For the year 2020, we have chosen the core subject of Revisiting Basic Quality Concepts w.r.t. the sustained success of the organization As of now we have visited

  • History of Quality in January 2020
  • The Sustained Success of Organization in February 2020
  • Organizational Context in March 2020
  • Understanding Needs and Expectations of the Interested Parties in April 2020
  • Risk Based Approach in May 2020
  • Opportunity Based Approach in June 2020
  • The Organizational Knowledge for the Sustained Success in July 2020
  • Competent people for the sustained organizational success in August 2020
  • Process Management for Sustained Success in September 2020
  • Performance Measurement for Sustained Success in October 2020
  • Improvements for Sustained Success: A canvas of the improvement process to individual and collective mindsets in November, 2020.

We round up our discussion on the subject of Revisiting Basic Quality Concepts with Future of Quality –

People, naturally, see future of quality from the prism of their own context, and the context of the organization, that mostly ‘was’. or sometimes ‘is’, but hardly from ‘what it should be’.

Several magazines, management consulting companies and associations conduct the ‘future of….’ studies every year. We will anchor our focus on these studies during 2021.

For the present here are a few recent studies, for the current readings on the subject:

Quality Digest has run a series of articles by Tom Tormina on ‘The Future of Quality Management is Business Success’. All articles in this series:

The December 2020 issue of Quality Digest also has following articles –

The 12th edition of the World Quality Report 2020-21 (WQR), released by Capgemini, Sogeti, and Micro Focus, shows the steady evolution of quality assurance (QA) from a backroom discipline to an integral part of wider enterprise digital transformation. Contributing to business growth and business outcomes was the highest rated objective for testing and QA at 74% – up 6 percentage points from 2018. The full report can be accessed here.

Considering the phrase continuously improving as a synonyms of evolution, Jimena Calfa’s  2014 article, The Future of Quality: Evolutionary or Revolutionary?, become relevant again. She keeps thinking that Quality is going to keep evolving until the next revolution takes place, where is going to keep evolving from it.

Manikaran Singal in his article Here’s the formula of success you were searching for offers the formula

Future value= Present Value (1+r)n or Success= Efforts (1+results)time where,

The simple translation of the formula gives us the message that whatever the RoI, consistent efforts over a longer time frame can result the present ‘competence’, of an individual or an organization, to deliver sustained desired results.

The article, Quality 4.0: The Future of Quality? notes that ‘Quality 4.0 represents an opportunity to utilize those Industry 4.0 technologies to realign quality functions with broader organizational strategy.

On more mundane, immediate, terms, movement of people, data, and goods will be reshaped in the post-COVID world by the trends of emerging digital technologies and absorption thereof,[1]

To broadly sum up, one may state that to sustain the success in the future, where it is important to do what the successful people did, it is equally important not to do what the unsuccessful people did. But for that, you need to go deeper. In rather jargon terminology, overcome Survivorship Bias..

The detailed note on Future of Quality can be accessed by clicking on the hyperlink.

All facets of Revisiting Basic Quality Concepts that have been discussed at this blog carnival during 2020 can be read / downloaded as one file by clicking on the hyperlink.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

In the series the Organizational Culture, we have taken up Sustaining the Organizational Culture – It shall be well remembered that organizational culture is a means to an end, not an end in itself. The end is your business’s strategic agenda. Thus, sustaining the winning culture should be primarily pursued with the ultimate vision of sustaining the competitive edge, within the constantly varying context of the organization. It’s about raising sights beyond the strategic choices and daily initiatives to change how the organization works.

All month-wise published episodes of the series, published in 2020, The Organizational Culture, are collated in one file and can be read / downloaded by clicking on the hyperlink.

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about:

  • The Golden Age of QualityRalph de la Vega, former Vice Chairman at AT&T, announces today is the Golden Age of Quality; a time when companies need to build quality into the product and service and detect problems before they occur.

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month, which was /is and will remain to be relevant for all quality professionals –

  • The Moment of Truth – Whether we realize it or not, that everyone’s job, including the quality professional, comes down to one thing; helping our companies, at least those in business to remain profitable, As much as effectively robust processes, customer-need-satisfying competitive products and competent people are needed to run the business successfully, it is equally important that everyone in the organization consciously, and unconsciously, realizes that that their every, direct as well as indirect, interaction with customers (and for that matter with al the relevant interested parties) is that moment of truth that can make, or unmake, an opportunity for the business to remain profitable.

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the subjects of Basics of Quality and Organizational Culture and their role in Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.


 

All monthly episodes, from January to December 2020 of the Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs -2020 can be seen / downloaded as one file by clicking on the hyper link.

[1] We asked 3 CEOs what tech trends will dominate post-COVIDAndrea Hak

Carnival of Quality Management Blogs and Articles wishes A Qualitatively Rich and Very Happy 2021.

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – November, 2020

Welcome to November 2020 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

For the year 2020, we have chosen the core subject of Revisiting Basic Quality Concepts w.r.t. the sustained success of the organization As of now we have visited

We take up Improvements for Sustained Success: A canvas of the improvement process to individual and collective mindsets as our next core concept this month–

Continuous Improvement requires a systemic dissatisfaction with the status quo, no matter how good the organization is perceived to be. Real change management is tangible, quantifiable, and critical to driving a sustainable adoption.

“Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do better” – Maya Angelou.

There are six main reasons why organizations fail to sustain performance improvements[1]:

  • Winning. can distract an organization from the need to continuously improve.
  • Change in Leadership.
  • Impatience. The organization tires of its improvement effort and moves on before it can yield optimal results.
  • Reduction in Improvement Methods. Infrastructure isn’t maintained.
  • M&A Activity. forces an initiative’s postponement or derailment.
  • Global Macroeconomic Events. that it did not foresee or grossly underestimated.

“Creating constancy of purpose towards improving work, product and service levels is the basis of continual improvement.

“It is common to for leaders to speak of change in the same sentence with changing culture. But our own experience with culture change these past 5 years in the Henry Ford Production System across all laboratories of nearly 800 workers in Henry Ford Health System has taught us repeatedly that culture is a desirable but secondary outcome to changing structure and process that enables and expects employees to work differently.”[2]

As we scan through the vast variety of literature on sustained improvements, we see many common threads, like, involvement of people, integration of improvement initiatives into the overall change process, building the culture of improvement to measures of the improvement process over a longer time frame cycles of the changes in the context of the organization. There is also consensus that the improvement initiatives over the long terms should help build sustainable competitive advantage(s) for the business.

Here is very short list of some of the readings that I liked:

The detailed note on Improvements for Sustained Success can be accessed by clicking on the hyperlink.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

In the series the Organizational Culture, we have taken up Improving the organizational culture – The means and speed of the value creation will bring massive disruption. Therefore, the only question that any organizational culture improvement initiative should address is whether your company is going to cause it or fall victim to it.[3].

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about:

  • PDCA for Improvement – The plan-do-check-act cycle, or PDCA, is a very popular tool that is used in many different sectors, in a wide variety of situations. Learn how to use-and better explain this powerful tool.

Before we take up Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month we have picked up one article, which is relevant to our subject, when viewed in the context of improvements for the sustained success –

“Good to Go” – The three most dangerous words in quality by Ian R Lazarus – As quality managers, it is not only important to understand the difference between “good enough” and great levels of quality, these must be quantified. Fortunately, we have many tools available to quantify the quality of our processes. Probably the most robust of these approaches is to establish the capability of the process. The meaning of the term “capability” is likely intuitive, but in Six Sigma vernacular it refers to a quantitative measure reflecting the probability that a process will meet customer specifications, expressed as a Sigma level. In fact, management has no right to complain about process performance without understanding capability on some level because after all, what is more important than meeting the customer’s expectations?

      • The Voice of the Process,” in other words, the range of process performance today
      • “The Voice of the Customer,” in other words, the upper and lower specification limits that define acceptable levels of performance in the eye of the customer.

Voice Of The Process (VOP)

Once the concept of capability is understood, interventions such as error-proofing can be applied.[4]

And now we take up Jim Smith’s article that also links up the subject –

Recognition Power: Recognizing Efforts Supports Excellence : It is well accepted that when people feel appreciated and get recognized, they are more engaged, motivated, and productive.. However, more often not, it is also observed that too few organizations take advantage of this opportunity. Some organizations believe that adequate annual performs reviews and competitive compensation packages should be sufficient to enable the employee engagement. Some other organizations may see employee recognition as too difficult to manage and oversee, too hard to keep from becoming an entitlement or simply too costly. Organizations need to think of employee recognition as a strategic advantage. The five important principles that need be considered for the development of strategy for employee engagement are:

  • Choose a common strategy and deploy it uniformly across the organization.
  • Secure top management sponsorship that is fully understood and embraced by the top management in spirit.
  • Link organization’s values and strategic objectives with employee engagement strategy.
  • Create a culture which encourages participation across all levels, in a fair, transparent and proactive manner.
  • Allow for flexibility, for the form, content, and style, for natural differences for those giving and receiving recognition.

It is always vital to recognize that sustainable competitive advantage is delivered, and sustained, by the people who work for the organization.

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the subjects of Basics of Quality and Organizational Culture and their role in Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

[1] Six Paths to Sustained Results—Part I – Joseph A. DeFeo

[2] Creating, Structuring and Sustaining a Culture of Continuous Improvement in Healthcare

[3] Value creation in the future

[4] Voice of Process vs. Voice of Customer

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – October, 2020

Welcome to October 2020 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

For the year 2020, we have chosen the core subject of Revisiting Basic Quality Concepts w.r.t. the sustained success of the organization As of now we have visited

We take up Performance Measurement for Sustained Success as our next core concept this month–

Beyond a simple agreement about it being linked to some kind of measurement of performance there is little consensus about how to define or use performance measures. [1]

Also, selection of inappropriate measures is also seen as a wide-spread phenomenon.

The three major reasons that seem particularly relevant in this context are:

  • The overconfidence bias  
  • The availability heuristic
  • The status quo

To determine which statistics are useful, you must ask two basic questions

  • First, what is your objective?
  • Second, what factors will help you achieve that objective?

The most useful statistics are persistent (they show that the outcome of an action at one time will be similar to the outcome of the same action at another time) and predictive (they link cause and effect, predicting the outcome being measured). [2]

The great Coca-cola turnaround strategy rested on placing equal emphasis on Performance (what an enterprise does to deliver improved financial and operational results for its stakeholders) and Health (how effectively people work together to pursue a common goal),

Beyond Performance 2.0 lays down five frames of performance and health are collectively called the “5As”:

  • Aspire. Where do we want to go?
  • Assess. How ready are we to go there?
  • Architect. What must we do to get there?
  • Act. How do we manage the journey?
  • Advance. How do we continue to improve?

The following figure shows the specific steps within each of the five frames of performance and health, as well as the relevant masterstrokes – important lessons about human irrationality and how to work with it constructively.[3]

From the vast variety of literature available on the subject, the foregoing two articles possibly neatly picks up the essence of what a performance analysis for the sustained success ought to be. Here are few more additional readings on the subject:

The detailed note on Performance Measurement for Sustained Success can be accessed by clicking on the hyperlink.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

In the series the Organizational Culture, we have taken up Organizational Culture Transformation – The whole journey of change covers both internal and external environments and the gradual sense of identity regarding who we are. “Vibrant cultures have high levels of performance because they create internal cohesion, attract talented people, and inspire employees to go the extra mile.”[4]

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we look at a relevant video from the archive:

  • Dashboards as Management Tools – Dashboards are being used as management tools that harness data from an organization to predict trends and highlight actions that should be taken as a result.

From Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month we have picked up one –

    • Choose different words to describe quality information in a different light – as initiatives, opportunities, or preventive actions.
    • Become bilingual to use terms with which other departments are more familiar.
    • Get over the myth that the greatest economic case for quality is resolving the issues of dissatisfied customers. Instead invest in attainment of customer delight, by focusing on better understanding, and fulfilling the needs of quiet customers who are not dissatisfied but merely satisfied.
    • Redefine yourself and your role as something more than an enforcer of specifications, standards, and regulations.

You might be surprised how the organization will react to the ‘new you.’ You might be amazed to discover managers approaching to ask for your input versus talking about a poor-quality issue.

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the subjects of Basics of Quality and Organizational Culture and their role in Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.


[1] Performance measurement

[2] The True Measures of Success by Michael J. Mauboussin

[3] A better way to lead large-scale changeExcerpted from  Beyond Performance 2.0

[4] Importance of a culture transformation

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – September, 2020

Welcome to September 2020 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

For the year 2020, we have chosen the core subject of Revisiting Basic Quality Concepts w.r.t. the sustained success of the organization As of now we have visited

  • History of Quality in January 2020
  • The Sustained Success of Organization in February 2020
  • Organizational Context in March 2020
  • Understanding Needs and Expectations of the Interested Parties in April 2020
  • Risk Based Approach in May 2020
  • Opportunity Based Approach in June 2020
  • The Organizational Knowledge for the Sustained Success in July 2020
  • Competent people for the sustained organizational success in August 2020

We take up Process Management for Sustained Success as our next core concept this month–

The importance of process as the fundamental block of every management systems of an organization is now universally accepted.

Unfortunately, ‘process’ is normally seen with a narrow utilitarian concept of the tool for managing the set of related activities. At best, it is considered a link in chain of different processes that makes up the management system. As result, many times its usefulness in in continually improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the organization’s performance also is underplayed.

The organizational knowledge that is inherently stored process management gets locked up in either the dusty files or on the huge database servers, behind well protected ‘security’ locks. This traditional approach to the process management falls short on fundamental process management requirements as a live vehicle to carry the organizational knowledge:[1]

These limitations help in providing the road map of a process management platform can help you prioritize process excellence and set your organization on the road to greater success.[2]

The stages of development in the ISO standard 9004 reflects the changing emphasis of importance of process management as a tool to attain sustained success. From being a set of guidelines for improved performance, it became guidelines for process improvement, and then process improvement itself became the approach to manage the sustained success, and now links it to the quality of the organization for achieving sustained success.

The Clause 8 relates process management of organization’s core and support processes behind the scenes of an organisation’s sustained success. This creates a system in which the needs and expectations of interested parties thrive in the vibrant quality of an organisation. The Quality of organization being now defined as “the degree to which the inherent characteristics of the organisation fulfill the needs and expectations of its customers and other interested parties, in order to achieve sustained success”.

The 2018 edition of the standard recognizes that by developing the leading KPIs that are linked to the organization’s dynamically changing context w.r.t. the needs and expectations of its customers and other relevant interested parties,  “Organisations deliver value through activities connected within a network of processes.”[3]

The detailed note on Process Management for Sustained Success can be accessed by clicking on the hyperlink.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

In the series the Organizational Culture, we have taken up Measuring Organizational Culture – Measurement of organizational culture acts as guide to the roadmap for improving culture and the performance through better decisions, by more engaged people and more cohesive culture leads to improved performance .

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we look at a relevant video from the archive:

  • What is the Baldrige Program?The Baldrige Program was established in 1987 to encourage American organizations to practice effective quality control in the provision of goods and services so they could better compete in a demanding global market.

To learn more about the Baldrige Excellence Program Click Here.

From Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month we have picked up one article

  • Advantages of Wait Time and what we do with that time. You can either keep fuming and fretting or regard this as gift of time. In the latter case, this can be gainfully utilized to perform something which was being postponed because of ‘lack of time’ – be it develop possible solutions to till now unresolved problems, plan (revise) day’s to-do-list, or just creatively relax and recharge your batteries. The possibilities are endless, in fact limited by your own determination and imagination. But there is no doubt that this is THE time to create a better life for you and the others you influence

 I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the subjects of Basics of Quality and Organizational Culture and their role in Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

[1] 5 Key Factors to Creating Successful, Sustainable Process Management Ivan Seseji

[2] 5 ways process management can drive sustainable success

[3] Achieving sustained success with ISO 9004:2018 – Hope Kiwekete

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – August, 2020

Welcome to August 2020 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

For the year 2020, we have chosen the core subject of Revisiting Basic Quality Concepts w.r.t. the sustained success of the organization As of now we have visited

We take up Competent people for the sustained organizational success as our next core concept this month–

Competence is the set of demonstrable characteristics and skills that enable, and improve the efficiency or performance of a job… To be competent a person would need to be able to interpret the situation in the context and to have a repertoire of possible actions to take and have been trained in the possible actions in the repertoire, if this is relevant. Regardless of training, competency would grow through experience and the extent of an individual’s capacity to learn and adapt.[1]

In order to fill this gap, a list of 14 organizational and people characteristics that can be grouped into five broad dimensions is compiled, which can lead to sustained performance by driving organizational and people capabilities. .

High-performance organizations are effective at translating their business strategy into a compelling people strategy. [2]

The key to creating a vibrant and sustainable company is to find ways to get all employees—from top executives to assembly line workers—personally engaged in day-to-day corporate sustainability efforts… A company can implement eight practices to help bridge the distance between an employee’s personal values and a company’s business practices, to create a competent people platform for the sustainable company. [3]

Meanwhile, persistent uncertainty, a multigenerational workforce, and a shorter shelf life for knowledge have placed a premium on reskilling and upskilling. The shift to a digital, knowledge-based economy means that a vibrant workforce is more important than ever, and have elevated the importance of the learning-and-development (L&D) function.

One of L&D’s primary responsibilities is to manage the development of people—and to do so in a way that supports other key business priorities. L&D’s strategic role spans five areas –

Over the years, nine dimensions have been identified and field-tested that contribute to a strong L&D function. These dimensions are combined to create the ACADEMIES framework, which covers all aspects of L&D functions, from setting aspirations to measuring impact.[4]

Four things standout to prioritize people in times of crisis[5]

  • First is the importance of prioritizing people, in terms of getting out, demonstrating empathy, and engaging with people to understand what their concerns are.
  • Second would be the importance of creating clarity on what matters most. From a leadership perspective, giving some sense of certainty and hope is important to navigate the crisis.
  • Third is the need to be responsive and fluid to the dynamics of an evolving crisis.
  • And the final one is the importance of gaining perspective. Early on in a crisis, it can be easy to get tunnel vision and to focus on managing what’s in front of your nose. But the earlier that you can find a means of stepping back and seeing the bigger picture, and pushing out the time horizon of that perspective, the better. That will allow you to sense what’s coming and get ready for what’s around the corner.

The punch line is that the people need to be competent enough to address the challenges of the future successfully within the context of present, rapidly changing business scenario..

Additional Reading:

The detailed note on Competent people for the sustained organizational success can by clicking on the hyperlink.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

In the series the Organizational Culture, we have taken up Understanding the Organizational Culture – As anthropologist Margaret Mead states, “What people say, what people do, and what they say they do are entirely different things.”. They have a tendency to focus on “The way we say we get things done” and don’t focus on “The way we really get things done”, what is normally known as what’s below the organizations surface.[6]

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we look at a relevant video from the archive:

From Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month we have picked up one article

  • Core DNA – Values, ethics and integrity are the three attributes to achieve cultural excellence – Core DNA values act as guideposts to appropriate business behavior. Creating value requires the courage to have fierce conversations intended to help the business progress. The focus on values includes a desire to win and envisioning the future—not whining and wallowing in the past…. As an organization evolves, so do its core values… To create sustainable business value that will endure for decades, organizations must set standards and then abide by those codes. … A common myth is that an organization cannot simultaneously increase sales, protect its interests and be ethically sound…. However, by creating a standard set of ethical guidelines, organizations are laying the groundwork to protect their interests. While gains are not always quantifiable in the short term, these organizations will be building a foundation of prosperity for years to come….To be successful, organizations must synchronize values with desired outcomes… Ethics should be at the core of what makes a business run.

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the subjects of Basics of Quality and Organizational Culture and their role in Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

[1] Competence

[2] High Performance organizations By Vikram BhallaJean-Michel CayeAndrew Dyer, Lisa Dymond, Yves Morieux, and Paul Orlander

[3] Engaging Employees to Create a Sustainable Business By Paul Polman & CB Bhattacharya

[4] The essential components of a successful L&D strategy By Jacqueline Brassey, Lisa Christensen, and Nick van Dam

[5] Prioritize people in times of crisis: An interview with Mike Henry, the CEO of BHP

[6] What have the invisible man and the organizational culture in common