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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – May 2021

Welcome to May 2021 edition of IXth Volume of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We pay our tribute to Vanraj Bhatia who left for heavenly abode on 07.05.2021.

(Photo: Rajya Sabha TV/YouTube)

Vanraj Bhatia dies at 93, He was best known for the music of films such as Ankur, 36 Chowringhee Lane and TV show Tamas, has passed away at the age of 93. The veteran music composer was battling poor health and financial constraints.

‘An Indian film without songs is meaningless’ – Jyoti Punwani draws memories from her interviews with the legendary composer Vanraj Bhatia himself explained what made his music so unique…. “The first duty of music is to express the film’s texture, and the second is to be able to stand on its own feet. It must be absolutely perfect,” he said…. “When I compose, I make the music matter in the film, even if the director pushes it into the background. Like my teacher would say, you must speak the same language as everybody else, but infinitely better.”

When Vanraj Bhatia asked me to mail his opera DVD and resume to the world’s major opera housesLuis Dias – In an interview in early 2013, the great music composer professed to me his love affair with opera and shared his earnest hopes.

Night Music for Solo Flute (Rachel Woolf) by Vanraj Bhatia

Legacy Of The Enigmatic Vanraj BhatiaSunil Sampat – On the occasion of a felicitation of Bhatia at the NCPA in March 2017, Zakir Hussain said, “Vanraj Bhatia is India’s greatest ever composer. Period.” 

Young Vanraj with his family

Vanraj Bhatia’s extraordinary, multi-faceted oeuvreRanjit Hoskote – The composer’s transcultural experiments were always intense and persuasive.

I have always liked Vanraj Bhatia’s interview with Irfan, of Rajya Sabha TV – Guftagoo with Vanraj Bhatia for his candid views. The song that Vanraj Bhatia refers to @22.48 is Barse Ghan Saari Raat – Tarang (1984) – Lata Mangeshkar – Vanraj Bhatia – Raghuvir Sahay

It’s a long narrative number describing a deserted wife’s desolation. About the song, Lataji recalls, “It was one of the most difficult and complex songs of my career. [Ref: Vanraj Bhatia’s CHALLENGE for Lata MangeshkarSUBHASH K JHA]. The story that is connected with the song is also narrated by Harish Bhimani in In Search of Lata Mangeshkar’ (1955, Harper-Collins, ISBN 81-7223-183-0) – excerpted as hereunder, as a footnote on page 102 – “Composer Vanraj Bhatia rushed in excitedly….exclaiming, “(Lata) Bai stayed back yesterday to listen to my recording !”……”….The intent of this passage is that Lata Mangeshkar, who never waited to check back on her recording, was keen to know how the song was recorded.

We now move on to other tributes and memories:

The Masters: Majrooh Sultanpuri – Majrooh’s simple turns of phrase expressed the most profound emotions. With more than 6,000 songs in over 300 films to his credit, Majrooh’s poetry traversed the gamut from the soulfully romantic to philosophical, cynical and devotional.

Remembering Bulo C Rani who debuted as independent music director in Pagli Duniya (1944).

Remembering Naushad: The music director beyond compareAjay Mankotia – Naushad passed away on May 5, 2006 – 15 years ago. But old masters never die. The music lovers and connoisseurs still adore him.

India’s DeMille: Remembering Mehboob Khan on his 57th death anniversaryShaikh Ayaz   – We know him as the ambitious maker behind Bollywood’s greatest ode to Indian womanhood (1957’s Mother India) and perhaps as the founder of Mumbai’s iconic Mehboob Studio. But Mehboob Khan was more than that.

‘Teesri Kasam’ was the perfect meeting of minds between Phanishwarnath Renu and Shailendra – Phaniswarnath Renu had named his youngest daughter Waheeda Rehman, after the actor who played the lead in Teesri Kasam.

Dattaram Part 1: Under the shadow of big banyan tree with songs of Mukesh and Manna Dey – Even as several of Dattaram;s songs with Mukesh and Manna Dey have had large following, Dattaram was not limited Mukesh And Manna Dey.

Kaif Irfani – A Forgotten name – Here is his very popular, romantic song Dil Tujhe Diya Tha Rakhane KoMalhar (1951) Mukesh / Music – Roshan

Shailendra Sharma @ Golden Era of Bollywood has posted following memorial tribute posts:

Laxmikant-Pyarelal’s story is as much about friendship as it is about their tunesGanesh Vancheeswaran – The 1963 B grade film, Parasmani set the tone for an unprecedented 35-year-long run for Laxmikant-Pyarelal, in which they offered 3,000-odd songs they composed in about 500 films.

Pyarelal (left) and Laxmikant. Courtesy Rajeshwari Laxmikant.

Ban Mein Bahar Aa Gayee, Man Mein Umang Chaa Gayi – Balwant Singh was born in 1918.He got his break aas a singer, for Bomaby Talkies’ film Jeevan Prabhat (1937).. Here is his duet with Devika Rani from the film – Tum Meri Tum Mere Saajan (Music – Saraswati Devi = Lyrics: J S Kashyap).

Digging (Into) the ’60s and early ’70s Songs of Usha Uthup/Iyer – Usha Uthup has a very special voice as far as Indian film singers go, a bit lower and thicker even than many western female singers’, and it often has a certain unusually appealing hoarseness too. before she sang in Hare Rama Hare Krishna for R.D. Burman, she got a role singing as part of a Shankar-Jaikishan soundtracks in Bombay Talkie (1971) – Hari Om Tat Sat and Good Times and Bad Times..

May 2021 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs takes up Manna Dey – Chale Ja Rahein Hai…. 1954 – 1955. Till now we have covered his songs for the year(s)  

1942 – 1946 in our 2018 issue,

1947-1950 in the 2019 episode, and

1951 – 1953 in the 2020 episode.

When Rafi sang for Hanuman, Manna for Ravan… – On the legendary Manna Dey’s 102nd birth anniversary, Subhash K Jha traced an interview he had done with Mannada way back in 1997.

We now move on to songs on other subjects –

Romantic Songs with a Third Person – These are songs where apart from the couple in love, there is someone else in the frame – either obtrusively or unobtrusively

Here’s A Vintage Pic Of Raj Kapoor And Wife Krishna

From Bollywood Rewind Sampada Sharma – Indian Express’s weekly column:

  • Sharada: Of love that is beyond labels – Starring Meena Kumari and Raj Kapoor, LV Prasad’s Sharada is the kind of romance that makes you question your understanding of love, and how meaningful relationships can exist, even with the strangest labels.
  • Awara: Of nature vs nurture – Starring Raj Kapoor, Nargis and Prithviraj, Awara is set in an era where climbing out of the vicious cycle of poverty was near impossible, and strangely enough, times haven’t changed much in the last 70 years.

The Catch-22 Songs which juxtapose options and thus, present dilemmas. Some are frivolous whereas the others are weighty.

Composers sing for themselves: Ten songs are the songs where a composer actually recorded—and it was included in the film in question—a song in his/her own voice

Anand Bakshi on his legacy as a film lyricist: ‘My songs will beat just as our heart beats’ – An excerpt from a biography, Nagme, Kisse, Baatein, Yaadein – The Life & Lyrics of Anand Bakshi, Rakesh Anand Bakshi, Penguin Random House India, of the songwriter whose career in Hindi cinema spanned six decades.

Rabindra Sangeet in Films: 10 Songs Sankhayan Ghosh presents a range of songs, from the obvious to the not-so-obvious to the innovative.

Regional Star, Hindi Also-Ran: Ten Actors, Ten Songs –who, for some reason or the other, never could make it big in Hindi cinema.

‘क्या भूलूँ क्या याद करूँ’ – a journey into what one wants to forget and what to remember.

In continuation to our tradition of ending the post with a few songs of Mohammad Rafi, each one of which basically has a link with the topics discussed in the present post.

Tum Hase To Gam Sharmaya – Dana Pani (1953) – with Shamshad Begum – Mohan Junior – Kaif Irfani

Aate Jaate Aankh Bachana ..Haye Re Tera Jawaab Nahin – Mehbooba (1954) – with Shamshad Begum – OP Nayyar – Majrooh Sultanpuri

Mujhe Jag Ki Bana De Malika, Phir Malik Ban Mere Man Ka – Dark Street (1961) – with Suman Kalyanpur  – Dattaram – Gulshan Bawra

Shokhiyan Nazar Mein Hain – Aasra (1966) – Laxmikant Pyarelal – Annad Bakshi

I look forward to your inputs to enrich the contents of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Disclaimer: This monthly series of posts is my best-effort-based compilation of posts on Hindi film songs that I normally visit regularly. As I record my sincere thanks to all the original creators of these posts, any other posts that I have nor covered herein shows my lack of awareness of existence of such posts and is by no means any disrespect to their work. The copyrights to the posts, images and video clips remain the properties of the original creators.

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – May 2021

Welcome to May 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We recapitulate that the 2021 theme for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs is Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

We base our discussion on the subject for the present episode on A TED talk, Back to the future (1994), from the playlist The history of the future. In the talk, Danny Hillis outlines an intriguing theory of how and why technological change seems to be accelerating, by linking it to the very evolution of life itself. The presentation techniques he uses may look dated, but the ideas are as relevant as ever…. In essence, the talk has this to state on its key theme of accelerating changes –

The humanity has started abstracting out. We’re going through the same levels that multi-cellular organisms have gone through — abstracting out our methods of recording, presenting, processing information….In the process, we have speeded up time scales. The process is feeding on itself and becoming autocatalytic. The more it changes, the faster it changes.

There is an equally strong school of thought that thinks otherwise.

‘If the pace of change really were unprecedented, then conventional wisdom holds we’d better darn well slow it down, so no one gets hurt.  Either way, the commentators warn, “buckle up.” Here is one, by Alvin Toffler in 1970.:

‘ “It has become a cliché to say that what we are now living through is a “second industrial revolution.” This phrase is supposed to impress us with the speed and profundity of the change around us. But in addition to being platitudinous, it is misleading. For what is occurring now is, in all likelihood, bigger, deeper, and more important than the industrial revolution. Indeed, a growing body of reputable opinion asserts that the present movement represents nothing less than the second great divide in human history, comparable in magnitude only with that first great break in historic continuity, the shift from barbarism to civilization”.

‘Why have people long believed that their eras were unprecedented when it came to the rate of change? There are two reasons. First, at least today, it is hard to get attention if you say that “there’s nothing new here, at least in terms of the pace of change.” Second, it’s simply human nature. Most of us overestimate change in a few things around our lives and ignore most of the rest that changes very slowly, if at all.

‘None of this is to say that technology-driven change isn’t happening. Of course it is—and it’s making our lives much better. But the pace of change appears to be no faster than in prior eras, and just as economies did fine despite Luddite impulses then, ours will do fine now. So, let’s all take a deep breath and say together: “Technological change is not accelerating, but it would sure be nice if it would.” ‘[1]

Scott Brinker has formulated Martec’s Law, which states, Technology changes exponentially, organizations change logarithmically…..there have been hundreds of best-selling books written on the difficulties of personal and organizational change. Empirically, the limit of change for humans is less than linear. In other words, it’s not feasible for an organization to change faster than that. But it’s certainly possible for an organization to change more slowly — or not at all. In fact, in the absence of good leadership, stagnation seems like the default outcome. But even with great leadership, an organization can’t win by outracing technology. It needs a more nuanced strategy….In A.G. Lafley’s book, Playing to Win: How Strategy Really Works, he drives home the point that strategy is choice. It’s decisively choosing to do certain things and to not do others….That is the crux of technology management. We can’t adopt all technological changes, but we can consciously choose some. Great technology management is choosing which changes to absorb — ideally those that are best aligned with the organization’s overall strategy….In the graph, it’s intentionally deciding what’s in (the red shaded area) and what’s out (the blue shaded area)….. To succeed, technology management must explicitly address how those technologies will be absorbed into the operations and the culture of the organization.

A successful tech-enabled transformation requires organizations to make progress on several paths simultaneously. … Only by following a structured, comprehensive playbook can companies translate their transformation priorities from strategy to action. A two-step methodology supported by several enablers can provide companies with the direction, priorities, and organizational capabilities to maximize the value of such investments. Indeed, companies that took a comprehensive approach to their transformation generated more than twice as much value as organizations focused solely on technology improvements. [2]

Charlie Feld, in his article, Change Management: Leading Through Technology Changes, states: There are three major competencies that great IT leaders need in order to get the lay of the changing landscape: pattern recognition, technical savvy and street smarts.

One may tend to conclude that one should consciously map the change and act in accordance with the organization’s long-term strategy of maintain its competitive advantage.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about–

The Quality Professional’s Changing Workplace – This episode investigates how the global pandemic and digital transformation are changing the quality professional’s workplace.

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month:

Commit to Improvement – Most continuous improvement programs are treated as the latest management fad; therefore, people look at it as just another “program of the month” being pushed by management. …This is not the way the organization conducts its other business. In fact, the continuous improvement effort is often at odds with the existing processes and metrics, so it is destined to limp along on its way to mediocrity and eventual failure…. Continuous improvement is more about rigor and discipline than it is about technique.

From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand, we have

Rules: Good or Bad? – English actor and author Alan Bennett once said, “We started off trying to set up a small anarchist community, but people wouldn’t obey the rules.” … We equate rules with the difference between order and chaos. We often, quite negatively, associate rules as being an obstacle to success. …Depending on your perspective, those seen breaking the rules are either bad people or trailblazers and pioneers…These quotes express more accurately captures the essence— “Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist” (Pablo Picasso ) or “Know the rules well, so you can break them effectively.” (the Dalai Lama)…. Although much has changed in the last year and the near future can look a little daunting, understanding the rules of before, what is happening now, and how it may affect us moving forward is always good practice.

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.


[1] Technology Feels Like It’s Accelerating—Because You’ve Been Watching Too Many TED TalksRobert D. Atkinson

[2] Accelerating the impact from a tech-enabled transformation By Venkat Atluri, Aamer Baig, and Satya Rao

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – April 2021

Welcome to April 2021 edition of IXth Volume of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We pay our tribute to Shashikala (Javalkar) who left for heavenly abode on 04.04.2021.

Kyon Muje Itani Khushi De Di – Shashikala – Beete Hue Din – Shishir Krishna Sharma – is a comprehensive life sketch of Shashikala, published seven years back.

The Greats: Shashikala remembers various roles she has played on the screen.

Ten of my favourite Shashikala songs in which Shashikala lip-syncs to the song. These could be solos or duets.

Whilst on the subject, in our Fading Memory, Unforgettable Songs episode of March 2021, we had noted a very young Shashikala in Masti Bhari Bahar Ne Masatana Kar Diya (Pugree (1948) – Shamashad Begum – Ghulam Mohammad – Shakeel Badayuni)

We now move on to other tributes and memories:

8 songs that prove Anand Bakshi was Hindi cinema’s lyricist for the common manUnnati Sharma and Shreyas Sharma – While some of his contemporaries and seniors like Sahir, Majrooh and Gulzar are considered more ‘poetic’, Anand Bakshi kept it simple and read the pulse of the masses.

A Daughter’s TributeRatnottama Sengupta – A Films Division festival ‘A Daughter’s Tribute’, screened three documentaries made by daughters as tribute to their celebrated parent. Nargis by Priya Dutt, And They Made Classics…. by Ratnottama Sengupta and The Last Adieu by Shabnam Sukhdev, were screened at Nandan in Kolkata. Ratnottama Sengupta, the curator of the festival writes about the concept and the experience of the festival.

The young Nargis – a still from the documentary Nargis

Book Review: Vinod Mehta’s ‘Meena Kumari: The Classic Biography’ – Instead of discussing Meena Kumari’s cinema (which, normally would be the main reason anyone would want to read this book), Mehta focuses on Meena Kumari’s personal life, and how that personal life affected her professional life.

‘Kohinoor’, the 1960s gem that had Bollywood’s tragedy king & queen at their comical bestUnnati Sharma – Starring Dilip Kumar and Meena Kumari, the 1960 film directed by S.U. Sunny broke the shackles of tragedy and provided audiences wholesome entertainment.

Shailendra Sharma @ Golden Era of Bollywood has posted following memorial tribute posts:

·  Bollywood Songs for Expecting Mother or Parents

·  The Songs written by Hasrat Jaipuri for Other Musi…

·  Shamshad Begum – The Highest Paid Female Playback .

April 2021 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs takes up Hasrat Jaipuri – Beyond Shankar Jaikishan: 1959, continuing the annual series of Hasrat Jaipuri’s songs with Music Directors Other Than SJ. Till now, we have covered –

The songs from 1950 to 1953 in 2017,

The songs from 1953 to 1955. In 2018

The songs from 1956 -1957 in 2019, and

The songs from 1958 in 2020

We now move on to songs on other subjects -.

Jogi, Bhogi or Dhongi  brings the gay, colourful mood Holi.

Hindi songs with Tonga (Ghoda Gadi) beats lists only one song per composer. Here is one that is a gem for ever – O Matware Sajna Chala Gaya Mera Pyar, Dil Dhadke Main Kya KarooN, Hua Ye Paheli Baar  – Faulad (1963) Asha Bhosle – G S Kohli – Faruq Kaiser

Songs with a Regional Twist lists the Hindi film songs that have a phrase or two or even an entire line which is from a different Indian language; but, the rest of the song is in Hindi.

Triad of Singers lists songs where three (or more as the case may be) playback singers sing for a single actor or actress in a single movie – for example.

Geeta Dutt (Aaja Bedardi Baalma), Lalita Deulkar (Bachpan Ki Yaad Dheere Dheere Pyar Ban Gai) & Surinder Kaur (Badnaam Na Ho Jaaye, Mohabbat Ka Fasana)  – Film – Shaheed (1948)| Actress – Kamini Kaushal| Composer – Ghulam Haider

How vicarious songs came to the aid of bashful actors in Hindi filmsAjay Mankotia @ajaymankotia – How should the budding romance between the protagonists be depicted on screen, when the script forbids them from directly doing so? Enter buskers and vicarious music to aid.

The ‘College’ Songs is a list of songs picturised in a college campus or mostly in the college building.

Best songs of 1944: And the winners are? – SoY continues with year-wise reviews of the best songs of the year.

In continuation to our tradition of ending the post with a few songs of Mohammad Rafi, each one of which basically has a link with the topics discussed in the present post.

Dil Ko Chedti Hai Tamanna Tumhi To Ho – Lachak (1951) – with Asha Bhosle – Moti Ram – Hasrat Jaipuri

Mere Dilber Mujhpar Khafa Na Ho – Dharmputra (1961) – N Dutta – Sahir Ludyanvi

Aji Aisi Nazar Ko Kya Kahiye Jo Yaar Na Apna Pahechane – Johar Mehmood In Goa (1965) – Kalyanji Anandji – Farooq Qaiser

Haye Kya Ye Shararat, Kya Ada Hai, Tauaba Re Ye Shararat Kurban Is Ada Ke – Jung Aur Aman (1968) – G S Kohli – Anjaan

I look forward to your inputs to enrich the contents of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Disclaimer: This monthly series of posts is my best-effort-based compilation of posts on Hindi film songs that I normally visit regularly. As I record my sincere thanks to all the original creators of these posts, any other posts that I have nor covered herein shows my lack of awareness of existence of such posts and is by no means any disrespect to their work. The copyrights to the posts, images and video clips remain the properties of the original creators.

Categories
Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – April 2021

Welcome to April 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We recapitulate that the 2021 theme for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs is Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

I have picked up two articles relating to Future of Industry. Here too I have avoided going into details that relate to impact of digital technologies but have chosen to focus on the issues that should concern the management in general.

Note: This subject has no correlation to Industries of Future.

The future of industries: Bringing down the walls – As the boundaries between suppliers, producers and consumers and, in some cases, between whole industries shift, the separating walls are being brought down.…. It is expected that all industries will be transformed by the technology shockwave, lowering cost bases, and improving operational efficiency as well as demanding greater integration with customers and suppliers.

Five big issues for companies –

1. Have you got an outcomes’ focus or are you still stuck in a physical product mindset?

2. What are you doing to avoid commoditisation of your business?

3. Are you building a platform presence?

4. Are you leading with or being left behind by advanced technology?

5. Have you got your timing, right?

The ‘Future of Industries’ report discusses these and a number of other questions. Download it to find out more and join in the discussion with PwC.

Industry Of The Future: We Need To TalkMike Hughes – The industrial world still inhabits an environment of proprietary systems and vendor lock-in long since abandoned by the IT sector. This is throttling innovation and progress.

Credit: Getty Images

Many organizations recognize that next-generation industrial automation must be interoperable and break free from the locked-in model we currently accept. Interoperable and portable application software is a must for next-generation industries…… The factories and industries of the future, will have machines, operations and IT systems integrated and understand each other, talk and collaborate—where agility, sustainability, and productively are just a matter of choosing the best-in-class solution for your operation.

The Future of Industry | Accenture sums up succinctly the challenges as it states – The world is changing, and all industries are facing a tectonic shift. Let’s embrace the new, together…..

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about–

Shared Meanings from Top to Bottom – Charlie Barton, President, Barton Consulting LLC, discusses the importance of shared meanings of words for organizations, and the negative business implications that could occur without that common knowledge.

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month:

Organizational Culture – Workplace culture takes work but delivers value – Peter F. Drucker, the famed educator and management consultant, said, “There is nothing as useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.” …. Maybe more important for effectiveness and efficiency is workplace culture. As times change so must the culture. …We must learn to be aware of one another from a cultural background before we can learn to work together effectively. We need to realize it is not so much what we say as much as the manner in which we express ourselves that can adversely affect mutual understanding…. A lack of understanding and sensitivity can be injurious to the environment. There must be balance in the workforce just as there is in any other situation. We must learn to appreciate the differences between generations and learn to adapt. 

From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand, we have

Truth or Fallacy – Depends on how you look at it. – Sunk costs are defined as costs that have already been incurred and cannot be recovered. Proponents of the sunk cost fallacy argue that since it is a cost paid in the past and unrecoverable, it should be removed from any future decision making. But that does not stop sunk costs from being a part of our psyche…The sunk cost fallacy, in a way, is not just forgetting the time, money, and effort that went into producing something, but not allowing it to blind us to what we truly want or need. … “The sunk cost fallacy means making a choice not based on what outcome you think is going to be the best moving forward, but instead based on a desire to not see your past investment go to waste,” said Julia Galef, president of the Center for Applied Rationality.[1]

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.


[1] Julia Galef: The Sunk Costs Fallacy | Big Think

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Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – March 2021

Welcome to March 2021 edition of IXth Volume of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We pay our special tribute to Sahir Ludhyanvi on his birth centenary:

Sahir Ludhianvi at 100: Why the poet and film lyricist was the original ‘Angry Young Man’Akshay Manwani – With his incisive poetry and plainspokenness, Ludhianvi consistently raised uncomfortable questions and expressed bitter truths.

Remembering Sahir Ludhianvi: Privileged to have sung his lyrics, says museBella Jaisinghani – “Do you know, it was Geeta Dutt and I who originally sang ‘Kabhi Kabhi mere dil mein’ for a Chetan Anand film in 1959-60. It got shelved and I don’t even have a recording. Khayyam Sahab’s tune was nearly the same as the one that was released later’ says Sudha Malhotra.

No other poet expressed separation in the same manner as Sahirsaab: Gulzar – I remember that he was never allowed to leave the stage without reciting his famous poem on the Taj Mahal — ‘Meri mehboob kahi aur mila kar mujhse’ — it was very, very popular with the people.

Sahir Ka Khayal Aaya: Sahir’s Anti-War Poem in a Unique PlayAntara Nanda Mondal – To commemorate legendary poet-lyricist Sahir Ludhianvi’s 100th Birth Anniversary, Delhi-based theatre group Pierrot’s Troupe’s premiered its unique monologue play Sahir Ka Khayal Aaya on March 7 at LTG Auditorium, New Delhi.

Sahir at 100: The ‘pal do pal ka shayar’ who doesn’t fade even 41 years after his deathUnnati Sharma and Shreyas Sharma – his lyrics and poetry still resonate for their philosophical tinge, symbolism & social consciousness.

We now move on to other tributes and memories:

Remembering Indeevar – Part I and Part II pay the tribute to The lyricist on the occasion of his 24th death anniversary.

50 years of Anand: a tribute – Everyone who loves Hrishikesh Mukherjee’s Anand agrees that it is one of the warmest, most life-affirming of Hindi films. As it turns fifty, the dominant memory is of the terminally ill hero, played by Rajesh Khanna, spreading cheer and inspiration, determined to live a badi zindagi (big life) even if he isn’t fated for a lambi (long) one.

50 years of Anand — Hrishikesh Mukherjee’s timeless classic is an ode to lifeUnnati Sharma – If director Hrishikesh Mukherjee had had his way, his 1971 classic Anand would have looked a lot different. One of Bollywood’s first superstars Raj Kapoor would have played the title character, and Bengali star Saumitra Chatterjee would have been Dr Bhaskar Banerjee.

Remembering Ninu Mazumdar – the composer and the singer is a tribute to Ninu Mazumdar on his 21st death anniversary (9 September 1915 – 3 March 2000)

Shailendra Sharma @ Golden Era of Bollywood has posted following memorial tribute posts:

March 2021 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs takes up Ghulam Mohammed and His Singers: 1943 – 1949. In the month of his death anniversary, we commence an annual series that relives his known and less known songs.

Ghulam Mohammad – A Tribute lists popular songs of Ghulam Mohammed, as a follow-up to Ghulam Mohammad’s rarely heard songs.

On Basu Bhattacharya’s Anubhav: Middle Cinema, meet avant-garde, the first film in Bhattacharya’s ‘marriage trilogy’, the other two being Avishkaar and Griha Pravesh

We will now take up the articles on other subjects:

Amitabh Bachchan and India’s battle to preserve its film heritageSoutik Biswas – Shivendra Singh Dungarpur, an award-winning filmmaker, archivist and restorer, of the Film Heritage Foundation has been at the forefront of restoring and preserving Indian films efforts.


A still from the 1958 Bollywood drama Night Club, now preserved in the archive

The Perils of Alcohol: Hindi Films’ Moral Lessons and Tips for Women is a list of ‘drunken women songs’, with following caveats:

  • Caveat 1: The woman must be the heroine, not the vamp. That knocked Hoon abhi main jawaan out of the running.
  • Caveat 2: She must truly be drinking, not pretend drinking. (That took care of a host of ‘sharabi’ songs..)
  • Caveat 3: It has to be alcohol, no other forms of intoxication allowed. NoDum maaro dum or Ye aankhen uff yumma.
  • Caveal 4: All songs had to be from pre-80s’ films.

Pick of the list is Aaj ye meri zindagi– Yeh Raaste Hai Pyar Ke (1963) – Asha Bhosle- Ravi- Shakeel Badayuni.

Romancing with ‘Zindagi’ confines the list to the songs in which ‘Zindagi’ is the main subject

Songs that Shun Love – for example Jis Pyaar Mein Yeh Haal Ho – Phir Subah Hogi, 1958 – Md.Rafi and Mukesh – Khayyam; Sahir Ludhianvi

Once Upon A TimeYe Un Dinon ki Baat Hai is divided into three sections – Pen Portraits, Reminiscences and Perspectives.

On Shadow Craft, a book about the aesthetics of black-and-white Hindi cinema – For anyone who loves black-and-white cinema – and likes the idea of a creative work being encountered in its original form rather than disfigured to meet contemporary tastes – the computer-colourisation of old films is cause for teeth-gnashing.

Songs of the Unsure/Insecure Lover – for example – Main Tumhi Se Poochti HunBlack Cat, 1959 – Md. Rafi and Lata Mangeshkar – N.Datta – Jan Nisar Akhtar.

In continuation to our tradition of ending the post with a few songs of Mohammad Rafi, each one of which basically has a link with the topics discussed in the present post.

Beta Dar Mat….Aahein Bhar Mat… – Bahi Behan (1959) – N Dutta – Sahir Ludhyanvi

Log Kahte Hain Ke Hum Tum Se Kinara Kar Lein – Bahu Begum (1967) – Roshan – Sahir Ludhyanvi

Qaza Zaalim Sahi..Ye Daawa Aaj Duniya Bhar Se – Laila Majnu (1976) – Jaidev – Sahir Ludhyanvi

Hum Mein Hai Kya Ke Humen Koi Haseena – Nawab Saheb (1978) – C Arjun – Sahir Ludhyanvi

I look forward to your inputs to enrich the contents of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Disclaimer: This monthly series of posts is my best-effort-based compilation of posts on Hindi film songs that I normally visit regularly. As I record my sincere thanks to all the original creators of these posts, any other posts that I have nor covered herein shows my lack of awareness of existence of such posts and is by no means any disrespect to their work. The copyrights to the posts, images and video clips remain the properties of the original creators.

Categories
Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – March, 2021

Welcome to March 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We recapitulate that the 2021 theme for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs is Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Presently, we will first take up A future direction for quality management standards, not for what it notes what is in the store for the next revisions of ISO standards. I have picked up the article for the basis of these revisions, which indicates the new way of looking at the fundamentals of the thinking in the times to come. As such, the edited excerpts show only what is relevant, in general.

The eight future concepts are:

  1. Customer experience is the sum of all perceptions, impressions and reactions that a customer has in a series of activities. It involves everything from initially discovering and researching a product or service, through shopping, purchasing and using the product or service to following up with the brand afterwards.
  2. People aspects are all the factors that impact people’s abilities to perform tasks, their interests (eg motivation and preferences), their differences and relations (individual differences and social behaviour), and how an organisation can enhance performance by getting the best from people.
  3. Change management is identified as a systematic approach to initiate, develop, implement and communicate a transition or transformation in an organisation’s identity elements. These elements include the organisation’s  vision, mission, culture, values, policy, strategy, objectives and/or processes.
  4. Integration – An integrated management system (IMS) integrates many systems and processes into one complete framework, enabling an organisation to work as a single unit with unified objectives. When an organisation integrates management systems it can achieve better alignment between its systems, strategic direction, objectives, and the context of the organisation.
  5. Knowledge management is a discipline focused on ways that organisations create and use knowledge. While this concept itself is not new, there are important aspects that now need to be considered in relation to the use of, for example, big data, machine learning, blockchain, code of ethics, copyrights and intellectual property.
  6. There are several emerging technologies that will impact an organization in the future. The extent of digitisation is constantly growing in organisations. There are many possibilities for companies to use intelligent networking and artificial intelligence (AI) for making decisions based on rapidly changing data.
  7. Ethics and integrity are critical to the organisation’s ability to achieve sustainable success. All company decisions, actions and stakeholder interactions must be aligned with its moral and professional principles of conduct. These principles should support all applicable laws and regulations and are the foundation for the organisation’s culture, values and attitudes.
  8. Organizational culture refers to the collective beliefs, values, attitudes, manners, customs and behaviours that are unique to an organisation. Leadership establishes the organisational identity through the culture it develops and promotes.

These eight future perspectives can be further viewed in the light of Gary Hamel’s seminal work ‘The Future of Management’. The book, co-authored by Bill Green, was published in 2007. His basic tenet is that most of the organizations “by a small coterie of long departed theorists and practitioners who invented the rules and conventions of “modern” management back in the early years of the 20th century. They are the poltergeists who inhabit the musty machinery of management. It is their edicts, echoing across the decades, that invisibly shape the way your company allocates resources, sets budgets, distributes power, rewards people, and makes decisions.

However, “the laws of management are neither foreordained nor eternal”.

“Whiplash change, fleeting advantages, technological disruptions, seditious competitors, fractured markets, omnipotent customers, rebellious shareholders—these 21st century challenges are testing the design limits of organizations around the world and are exposing the limitations of a management model that has failed to keep pace with the times.”

“What ultimately constrains the performance of your organization is not its business model, nor its operating model, but its management model.”

The management innovation has a unique capacity to create a long-term advantage for (the) company, and …. (the management of today) must …. first imagine, and then invent, the future of management.[1]

[Side Note: Management Innovation is defined as “..anything that substantially alters the way in which the work of management is carried out, or significantly modifies customary organizational forms, and, by so doing, advances organizational goals”. ]

In this video, Gary Hamel on the Future of Management, you can view Gary Hamel explaining the concept that he has enunciated in the book.

Additional reading:

The Future of Management Gary Hamel: The Future of Management Dr. Liano Greybe

The Future of Innovation Management: The Next 10 Years from Arthur D. Little)

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about–

Skills You Need for the Technical Era

Quality 4.0 is More Than Technology https://asq.realmagnet.land/quality-4pt0-research

Learn About Quality 4.0 https://asq.org/quality-resources/quality-4-0

Quality 4.0 Virtual Summit https://asq.org/conferences/quality-4-0

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month:

Change Perspective – In life not everything goes as planned or expected, even for the most successful people. But some people take failure very personally. It is our perspective that counts in the long run…. If you want to change your life, you need to first change your belief system. …. Anything that was learned – and our beliefs are learned – can be unlearned and relearned. Then, you will continue to act like yourself, but you will see yourself differently, so your behavior will be different. And when you change your behavior, you change the results. … Bhagwant Buddha preached : “What you think, you become. What you feel, you attract. What you imagine, you create.” In other words, change your perspective, and you change your life.

From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand, we have

Speaking the same language – George Carlin once said, “Everybody smiles in the same language.”

In fact, our facial expressions can convey a plethora of information about our emotional state.  .. What is critical is — understanding the communication, whether it is verbal or non-verbal.

March 2021 issue of QualityMag provides insight on moving communication forward in the age of Industry 4.0, in the form of Surface Tools: Speaking the language of Industry 4.0” and “Choosing Your Words Wisely: Help us clear up the confusion of NDT terminology.”

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

[1] Gary Hamel : The Future of Management

Categories
Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – February, 2021

Welcome to February 2021 edition of IXth Volume of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We pay tributes to:

Alvida, In Memory: Bollyviewer, with a very heavy heart, to Bollyviewer, who blogged at Old is Gold, and then at Masala Punch, since 2008.

Rajiv Kapoor, actor in ‘Ram Teri Ganga Maili’ and director of ‘Prem Granth’, who passed way at the age of 58. He gave up acting in 1990, to focus on directing the home production Prem Granth in 1996 and producing Aa Ab Laut Chalenin 1999.

We now move on to other tributes and memories:

Kamal Swaroop on Mani Kaul: ‘A visionary and ahead of his time’ – As ‘Ashad Ka Ek Din’ turns 50, it’s time to revisit Mani Kaul’s transcendental cinema and painterly minimalism.

Mani Kaul during the shoot of Ahmaq (Idiot) in the early 1990s. Photo by Lalita Krishna.

 

The Greats: Pran – More often than not, he was the suave villain, clad in the gentleman’s clothing, the one who schemes to get his hands on the hero’s wealth or the hero’s girlfriend, or both. The post reminisces some of his best performances.

Nutan the poet is not known to many. The soft, sensitive poet called Nutan was far more beautiful. This poet would constantly observe the world with a keen eye. She used to make an effort to capture the life experience in words. In these efforts subconsciously she used to dwell in the spiritual world.

Remembering Madhubala, Bollywood’s Very Own Marilyn Monroe – Khalid Mohamed pays tribute to Madhubala’s incandescent performances and tragic life.

Shailendra Sharma @ Golden Era of Bollywood has posted following memorial tribute posts:

February 2021 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs takes up Talat Mahmood: Duets with Geeta Dutt: A Rare Blend of Velvety Voice with Mellifluous Tone. To commemorate the memory of Talat Mahmood in the month of his birth runs the theme of his rare duets. Till now, this has been covered-

In 2017, an overview of Talat Mahmood’s duets receding from the memory.

In 2018, Talat Mahmood’s duets with rare co-singers,

In 2019, Talat Mahmood’s duets with Mubarak Begum and with Madhubala Jhaveri, and

In 2020, Talat Mahmood’s duets with Geeta Dutt, essentially from 1950 to 1952.

We will now take up the articles on other subjects:

How 22-year-old Vijay Anand dug in his heels to make his first film ‘Nau Do Gyarah’Anitaa Padhye – The film paved the way for Dev’s light comedies in the future, with songs taking the story forward. Goldie had become famous with his very first movie.The article is excerpted with permission from Goldie – The Man and His Movies, Anitaa Padhye, translated by Vikrant Pande, Amaryllis.

My Favourites: Songs About Gender Wars – Songs there are aplenty that extol the virtues of a ‘good’ woman. But here are some that fall in the category of nok-jhonk songs that run the gamut of emotions – the flirtatious, the teasing, even fighting to sell their wares – the battle is being waged for better or for verse. For example – Aji biwi ko ghar pe bithlaa ke – Minister (1959) – Asha Bhosle, Mohammed Rafi – C Ramchandra – Rajinder Krishan.

Songs of Stairs is a corollary to post on Terrace songs in two parts. An example of the typical song on the subject is Kahin Pe Nigahen Kahin Pe NishanaC.I.D (1956) – Shamshad Begum  – O.P.Nayyar- Majrooh Sultanpur. This is a song where the stairs have a completely different role to play. The post also refers to two other interesting articles – Film flashback: How the staircase played a starring role in Indian cinema (chronicling the thoughts of the legendary archivist P.K. Nair) and Stairway to Accessibility: the History and Symbolism of Stairs (by The Industrial Historian).

Songs of Raja-Rani are delightful because they are history-neutral and status-neutral.

 A Little About Tabla Master Zakir Hussain and His Kathak-Dancing Wife, Antonia Minnecola (who studied with Sitara Devi for three decades) – The post has two rare YT clips: Kathak Dance By Antonia Minnecola Ustad Zakir Hussain Peter Van Gelder (sitar) @ Basant Bahar Concert 1987 Berkeley California and Zakir Hussain – Kathak

Romancing the Stranger – Hindi films have Romancing the ‘Pardesi’ songs. However, one can be ‘ajnabi’ to someone with whom one has lived under the same roof for years. Nay, one can even be ajnabi to oneself

दो सहेलियाँ is a different subset of female duets that were picturised on two actresses, generally friends, one a lead actress and the other her friend, but those were not dance numbers. The list follows the rules – Stage performances, Street performances won’t be part of it. The lyrics should be directly addressed and not suggestive. For example, Dil Le Gaya Ji Koi Dil Le Gaya – Sanam (1950) – Suraiya & Shamshad Begum / Husnalal Bhagatram – Qamar Jalalabadi and Sharmake Zara Ae Mast AdaAladdin Aur Jadui Chirag (1952) Shamshad Begum & Asha Bhosle – S N Tripathi – Anjum Jaipuri

The lesser heard romantic duets of Manna Dey is the second and final part of the post, featuring lesser known light hearted romantic duets sung by Manna Dey with Suman Kalyanpur, Geeta Dutt, Shamshad Begum and Sudha Malhotra. The first part dwelt on Manna Dey’s romantic duets with the Mangeshkar sisters – Lata, Asha and Usha

In the Micro View of Songs of 1945  we have carried forward the micro view of duet songs in the form of Duets of Vintage Era (Male+) Singers, Part 1 and Part 2 and Female-Female Duets (+) to sum up with MY TOP duet songs.

All the episodes of Micro View of Duet Songs for 1945 @SoY can be read / downloaded from one file, by clicking on the hyper-link…

In continuation to our tradition of ending the post with a few songs of Mohammad Rafi, each one of which basically has a link with the topics discussed in the present post.

Unse Rippi Tippi Ho Gayi.. Yaane Baat Pakki Ho Gayi – Agra Road (1957) – with Geeta Dutt – Roshan – Prem Dhawan

Duniya Ki Nazar Hai Buri Zulfien Na Sawara Karo – Agra Road (1957) – with Geeta Dutt – Roshan – Prem Dhawan

Masti Mein Chhed Ke Taran Koi Pyar Ka – Haqueequat (1964) – Madan Mohan – Kaifi Azmi

O Lakshmi, O Sarsu, O Sheela – Kahin Le Chal (1968) (UR) – Shankar Jaikishan – Shailendra

Doobte Huye Dil Ko Tinke Ka Sahara Bhi Nahi – Kahin Le Chal (1968) (UR) – Shankar Jaikishan – Hasrat Jaipuri

Shokh Ankhe … Dekh Kar Surat Pe Pyar Aa Hi Gaya –  Kahin Le Chal (1968) (UR) – with Asha Bhosle – Shankar Jaikishan – Hasrat Jaipuri

I look forward to your inputs to enrich the contents of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Disclaimer: This monthly series of posts is my best-effort-based compilation of posts on Hindi film songs that I normally visit regularly. As I record my sincere thanks to all the original creators of these posts, any other posts that I have nor covered herein shows my lack of awareness of existence of such posts and is by no means any disrespect to their work. The copyrights to the posts, images and video clips remain the properties of the original creators

Categories
Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – February, 2021

Welcome to February 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We recapitulate that the 2021 theme for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs is Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Presently, we will take up a McKinsey article, The next normal arrives: Trends that will define 2021—and beyond – By Kevin Sneader and Shubham Singhal to provide us a broad over view.

Excerpts from the article:

Quote:

There is at least a faint light at the end of the tunnel—along with the hope that another train isn’t heading our way….

Barring any unexpected catastrophes, individuals, businesses, and society can start to look forward to shaping their futures rather than just grinding through the present. The next normal is going to be different. It will not mean going back to the conditions that prevailed in 2019. Indeed, just as the terms “prewar” and “postwar” are commonly used to describe the 20th century, generations to come will likely discuss the pre-COVID-19 and post-COVID-19 eras…

The crisis has sparked a wave of innovation and launches a generation of entrepreneurs. …There’s no going back. The great acceleration in the use of technology, digitization, and new forms of working is going to be sustained.

Supply chains re-balance and shift

Think of it as “just in time plus.” The “plus” stands for “just in case,” meaning more sophisticated risk management. …When a single country or even a single factory went dark, the lack of critical components shut down production. Never again, executives vowed…. Once businesses began to study how their supply chains worked, they realized three things. First, disruptions aren’t unusual. Second, cost differences among developed and many developing countries are narrowing. In manufacturing, companies that adopt Industry 4.0 principles (meaning the application of data, analytics, human–machine interaction, advanced robotics, and 3-D printing) can offset half of the labor-cost differential between China and the United States. The gap narrows further when the cost of rigidity is factored in: end-to-end optimization is more important than the sum of individual transaction costs. And third, most businesses do not have a good idea of what is going on lower down in their supply chains, where subtiers and sub-subtiers may play small but critical roles. That is also where most disruptions originate, but two-thirds of companies say they can’t confirm the business-continuity arrangements with their non-tier-one suppliers. With the development of AI and data analytics, companies can learn more about, audit, and connect with their entire value chains.

The future of work arrives ahead of schedule

The McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) estimates that more than 20 percent of the global workforce (most of them in high-skilled jobs in sectors such as finance, insurance, and IT) could work most of its time away from the office—and be just as effective…. There are two important challenges related to the transition to working away from the office. One is to decide the role of the office itself, which is the traditional center for creating culture and a sense of belonging. Returning to the office shouldn’t be a matter of simply opening the door. Instead, it needs to be part of a systematic reconsideration of what exactly the office brings to the organization….. The other challenge has to do with adapting the workforce to the requirements of automation, digitization, and other technologies. This isn’t just the case for sectors such as banking and telecom; instead it’s a challenge across the board, even in sectors not associated with remote work…In 2018, the World Economic Forum estimated that more than half of employees would need significant reskilling or upskilling by 2022.

Portfolio restructuring accelerates

In previous downturns, the strong came out stronger, and the weak got weaker, went under, or were bought. The defining difference was resilience—the ability not only to absorb shocks but to use them to build competitive advantage…. The implication is that there is a resiliency premium on recovery. Top performers won’t sit on their strengths; instead, as in previous downturns, they will seek out ways to build them.

Green, with a touch of brown, is the color of recovery

All over the world, the costs of pollution—and the benefits of environmental sustainability—are increasingly recognized.

The COVID-19 crisis has created an imperative for companies to reconfigure their operations—and an opportunity to transform them. To the extent that they do so, greater productivity will follow.

Unquote

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about–

  • Remote Auditing – Recent health guidelines have caused companies and independent auditors to view an online audit as a viable alternative to the on-site audit. Lance Coleman, ASQ Instructor, and Principal Consultant, Full Moon Consulting, details the benefits of online audits, how to get top management buy in and how to conduct an online audit.

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month :

Fail SuccessfullyThe hallmark is that highly successful people are not afraid to try something new, set aggressive goals, and are committed to achieve success. The possibility of failure exists but they are willing to take that chance. In fact, the only real failure is not trying at all…. Failure is perceived as a negative aspect of life, but successful people believe that failure is good. Failing means that you tried something new, and the results will teach you valuable lessons that make future success possible. Another aspect of failure that falls into the beliefs of successful people is that no one cares about or remembers your failures, so do not carry them with you. Learn and move on quickly … One other thing is certain: If you do not try anything, you are guaranteed to fail.

From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand, we have

Leaders and Followers – What do you call a leader with no followers? A guy taking a walk…. In a broader sense, it begs the question of the importance of following in the footsteps of another. It is why leaders also are often referred to as trailblazers, those creating paths for others… An important part of trailblazing was—and is—documentation…Today, trailblazing and documentation take place in the form of standard operating procedures and best practices…to help their customers and others effectively and successfully use technology or follow a process…or users and practitioners to expand, innovate, and forge new paths of success.

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Categories
Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – January 2021

Welcome to January 2021 edition of IXth Volume of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

The year 2021 opened on a very unusual note for Blog World of Hindi Film Music with a post Hans Akela: A song that stood tall amid the ruins on SoY. Rahul Bhagwanrao Muli presents the songs that are only the surviving link to the memory of the film. The song is then “Hans Akela“ which is still floating freely, liberated from the mortal debris of the film.

And of course, a post on 26th January – Republic Day: Reading between the lyrics of five patriotic Hindi film songs – The better and more enduring ones of this gnre, however, make room for other sentiments – celebration with caution, pride tinged with anxiety, a love for the country that is firm but not blind.

We now move on to other tributes and memories:

Boss of Bombay Talkies: How Devika Rani fought innuendo and personal tragedy to get back on her feetKishwar Desai presents Edited excerpts from a biography – The Longest Kiss: The Life and Times of Devika Rani, Westland Books – of the movie star and pioneering studio owner.

Mahendra Kapoor: The playback singer who did not need a sound systemAjay Mankotia – January 9, 2021 was the 86th birth anniversary of the singer who owned the bastion of patriotic and religious songs in Bollywood

Sajjad Husain, the ‘Unsung’ MaestroRajan NS – Sajjad Husain was a priceless asset to Hindi film music but could not get the recognition that was his due, despite his prodigious talent.

The Masters: Naushad Ali – After a few forays into working as an instrumentalist in films, Naushad got his first big break when music director Khemchand Prakash took him on as an assistant. It was 1940 before he got his first film as an independent composer – Prem Nagar, for which, Naushad says, he did a lot of research on the folk music of Kutch. Soon, other films followed, but it was with Rattan (1944) that Naushad first tasted success.

The Unlucky Genius N Datta: His songs for ‘other’ singers is a rounding-off article after Hans Jakhar ‘s articles on N Datta’s principal singers, Asha Bhosle and Rafi

The Masters: C Ramchandra – Ramchandra Narhar Chitalkar was born on January 12th 1918 and died on January 5th 1982. His debut in Hindi films, as an independent music director was in Jeevan (1942), on the strength of his bond with Master Bhagwan. While the film only did average business, the music was appreciated, and Ramchandra had his foot in the door in the Hindi film industry as well. Bhagwan and he would collaborate professionally on a further 15 films.

Rafi sings for Chitragupt – Part 1 is the solo songs whereas part II is his duets.

How Guru Dutt became the reluctant hero of his masterpiece ‘Pyaasa’Excerpted with permission from Guru Dutt – An Unfinished Story, Yasser Usman, Simon & Schuster India.

Shailendra Sharma @ Golden Era of Bollywood has posted following memorial tribute posts:

Ae Nargis e Mastana – Remembering Sadhana on her 5th anniversary on 25th December.

My favourite ‘Rafi-Suman Kalyanpur’ duets is a tribute to Suman Kalyanpur on her 84th birthday. Here is one duet that I have picked up as my choice, and the other one is at then end of this episode –

Zara Thehro Ji Abdul Gafaar – Satta Bazaar (1959) – Kalyanji Anandji – Hasrat Jaipuri

January 2021 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs takes up Jaidev: Brilliant, But Underrated, Composer:  1972-1973 that covers Jaidev’s music in films Bhavna, Maan Jaaiye (both in 1972) and Prem Parbat (1973). We have covered, the years –

  • In 2018, we listened to his songs from the most successful films phase of 1955 to 1963.
  • In 2019, we listened to his more remembered songs from his less remembered films for 1964 to 1970, and
  • in 2020, we listened to highly appreciated songs from the films that did not succeed in 1971

in the form of our commemorative annual series in the month of Jaidev’s death anniversary month.

We will now take up the articles on other subjects:

Film Songs Based on Classical Ragas (14) – The Melodious Trio: Bageshri, Rageshri and Malgunji – Subodh Agrawal – All three ragas are very sweet and pleasant – ideal for shringar rasa. Malgunji is perhaps the sweetest, while Rageshri has a touch of gravity.

Songs of Music (!) explores different facets of music or where music plays a very important role in the song and / or the movie. For example – Manbhaavan Sangeet Suhavan (Chandramukhi, 1960 – Manna Dey – S.N.Tripathi – Bharat Vyas) , a song based on Raag Basant Bahar, is a perfect tribute to music. It refers to the various gods and goddesses who espouse the cause of music,

Heroine introduces herself! follows up on Hero introduces himself!

In the Micro View of Songs of 1945  we have carried forward the micro view of solo songs of Female singers  – now in the form of Naseem (Banu) | Naseem Akhtar | Munnavar Sultana, Other female singers – Part I and Part II and the Summing up post on Female Solo songs – My TOP female solo songs. We, then, commenced the Micro View of the Duets for the year 1945 with Duets (+) of Golden Era (Male +) Singers.

In continuation to our tradition of ending the post with a few songs of Mohammad Rafi, each one of which basically has a link with the topics discussed in the present post.

Sambhal Sambhal Kar Jaiyo O Banjare.. Dilhi Door Hai – Saajan (1947) – with Lalita Deulkar, Gereta Roy – C Ramchandra – Ram Murti Chaturvedi

Tum Ho Jaao Hamare, Hum Ho Jaaye Tumhare – Roop Lekha (1949) – with Surinder Kaur – Sajjad Hussain – Khumar Barabankvi

Chhin Ke Pher Li Aankhein Jaan Gaye Ham Jaan Gaye – Chandani Raat (1949) – with Shamsahd Begum –  Naushad Ali – Shakel Badayuni

Ghata Mein Chhup Kar….Jo Dil Ki Baat Hai..Nazar Tak AAyee Jaati Hai – Baaz (1953) – with Geeta dutt – O P Nayyar – Majrooh Sultanpuri

Sambahl Ke Baitho Jhara, ChhaoN Mein BaharoN Ki,,,,Chand Hai Taare Bhi Aur Ye Tanhai Bhi – Roop Lekha (1962) – with Suman Kalyanpur – Nashad – Farooq Qaiser

I look forward to your inputs to enrich the contents of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Disclaimer: This monthly series of posts is my best-effort-based compilation of posts on Hindi film songs that I normally visit regularly. As I record my sincere thanks to all the original creators of these posts, any other posts that I have nor covered herein shows my lack of awareness of existence of such posts and is by no means any disrespect to their work. The copyrights to the posts, images and video clips remain the properties of the original creators.

Categories
Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – January 2021

Welcome to January 2021 edition of the IXth volume of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We ended the year 2020 on the subject of Future of Quality. The intention was to use that as the gateway for the 2021 theme – Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success – for the IXth volume of our Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

The primary objective of each monthly episode in this ‘Future of….’ is intended to be pinned around this quote by Thomas Alva Edison – “Keep on the lookout for novel ideas that others have used successfully. Your idea has to be original only in its adaptation to the problem you’re working on.”

To put this intention into actual practice, the plan is to pick up a topic a month, relevant to the field of quality management and then explore other relevant articles and blogs related to that topic.

Presented here under is an overview of possible sources for these types of topics:

From the playlists on TED.com:

The history of the future – A look back on how we looked forward over the decades.

What direction is the future headed? – Explore what may be in store for our collective future and how we can plan for the unpredictable, together.

What does the future look like?  – Visions of the future of everything from cars to the internet to the human species.

From the themes, presented by the leading consulting or industry organizations or journals –

Is your organization prepared for the future? – McKinsey’s Organizing for the Future blog series can help organizations thrive in the years ahead.

Future of Work –  As automation changes the world of work, governments, businesses, and members of the workforce can take action and adapt.

The Future of Production | McKinsey and the World Economic Forum  – The McKinsey-WEF knowledge collaboration on the future of production and the fourth Industrial Revolutions seeks to shape advanced manufacturing through “lighthouse” factories.

The Future of Climate Risk | McKinsey and the World Economic Forum – The McKinsey-WEF knowledge collaboration on the future of climate risk focuses on natural capital and biodiversity as well as the sustainability of airlines.

Future shocks: 17 technology predictions for 2025 | World Economic …

New Nature Economy Report II: The Future Of Nature And Business …

Articles like –

The Future of the Past? Santosh Desai in City City Bang Bang, India, TOI

Or the predictions like –

Twenty for ‘20: the questions that will shape the next decade by EY Global

For the present episode, the lay the corner stone of our theme –

We will now turn to our regular sections:

We now watch ASQ TV, wherein we refresh our viewpoints about our 2021 theme –

  • The State of the Quality Profession – In this episode, a new ASQ research initiative gives us a current global state of quality: ASQ World Conference on Quality and Improvement attendees talk about the quality profession today, and what the future holds | Become reacquainted with control charts. | And, a Quality Progress character makes his first TV appearance.

To learn more about control charts and find a template, visit http://asq.org/learn-about-quality/data-collection-analysis-tools/overview/control-chart.html

  • New Roles for Quality Professionals – Peter-Elias Alouche, CEO of dqdt Inc., discusses how quality professionals can improve productivity, customer satisfaction, and profitability by expanding their skill-sets to include new professional roles.

We have taken up one article from Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems this month, which was /is and will remain to be relevant for all quality professionals –

People, like businesses, need to be creative or stagnate – There have been numerous articles and books written on this topic. Two books pushing ‘out of box thinking’ were written by James M. Higgins. “101 Creative Problem-Solving Techniques” focuses on new ideas for businesses and “Escape from the Maze” describes Higgins’ nine steps to personal creativity. …..Aside from tools and techniques designed to stimulate creativity the following are six human conditions, which can allow creativity and ultimately innovation to flourish.

  1. Solitude. The sense of spending time to focus on your thoughts and ideas.
  2. Inactivity. Planned inactivity as a break in the busy routine.
  3. Daydream. Focusing on out of box thinking for the purpose of stimulating (innovating) thinking.
  4. Gullibility. The willingness to suspend your personal beliefs and accept what comes from inside without insisting on rationality or logic.
  5. Alertness and discipline. A twist to the Thomas Edison success quote could be “creativity is 10% inspiration and 90% perspiration”.
  6. Mental replay. Allowing yourself to revisit past creative efforts and resolution of past traumatic conflicts.

We add one more regular feature to our Quality Blog festival – ‘From the Editor (of Quality Magazine) – by Darryl Sealand

The Wave as a Metaphor – One of the most powerful images from nature has also become a powerful metaphor—the wave. Waves are relentless. The water crashes on the beach, ebbs back toward the ocean, only to be followed by another wave of crashing water. It never stops……Waves can be powerful. People caught in one are taught to relax and ride the wave to safety. The most powerful ships attempting to ride against and past a wave will—at the least—find themselves making no forward progress.

I look forward to your views / comments / inputs to further enrich the theme of Future of… as the basis for Creating and Maintaining Sustained Success.

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.