Melodies, Movies & Memories – Nalin Shah

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Movies, Memories and Melodies - Nalin Shah

Melodies, Movies & Memories – Nalin Shah © 2016
Publisher: Saarthak Prakashan, Ahmedabad ǁ Price: Rs. 300
ISBN: 978 – 93 – 84076 – 17 – 7 ǁ Buy Online

 

 

 

“The act of writing on vintage Hindi Music is akin to documenting the Ganga without having any idea of Gangotri”, writes Urvish Kothari in the preface to a well – known writer of film history-related articles, Nalin Shah’s maiden book Melodies, Movies & Memories.

nalin shahHowever to Nalin Shah, the obsession of the vintage Hindi films and its music is rooted in his early boyhood, when he wrote articles for various Gujarati periodicals on the subject of vintage film music. Later on, his writings for Filmfare, G (a film magazine of Vaju Kotak’s Chitralekha group), Playback & Fast Forward, The Pioneer, The Times of India, Hindustan Times, The Hindu, Mid-day etc. attained the stature for their authentic content, objective point-of- view and accurate analysis. ‘Writing for press enabled (Nalin Shah) to reflect on artistes as people and their place in the wider world. As a Development Officer at Life Insurance Corporation of India, in his primary professional career, Nalin Shah also had had frequent opportunities to travel to different cities all over India. These helped him to clarify his thought-process, as well as to check (and many times cross-check and re-check) and to verify “facts”. All these experiences and interactions then were distilled into lucid and engrossing stories, covering a wide panorama of subjects. He has conducted lecture-demonstrations on the history of film music and staged audio-visual shows on KL Saigal, Naushad, Khemchand Prakash, New Theatres, Mehboob Khan, Bombay Talkies. We now get to read these stories between the two covers in the present book.

In spite of relatively active publishing of film related works, the fact remains that over the years, different communication channels of the industry, like Gramophone companies, or the public communication media or the film correspondents or journalists, as a whole has not enough to preserve or document the multiple facets of the film-making, its music and its history. The advent of internet and the evolving digital platforms have been now very imaginatively been put to use by some of the very dedicated, little-known film enthusiasts to supplement the very pioneering and path-breaking works in the print media in so far as the first two decades of the Hindi Films and its world of music. Nalin Shah’s present book is not simply a documentation of history nor is it the plain narratives of stories. While maintaining very high standards of reporting, he develops story in quite an interesting style of writing. He has also been very particular in maintaining a professional arm’s length objectivity even with people, events or songs for which he has developed a deep personal like or proximity. Here is one typical illustration, picked up from the very first chapter – In Search of Gold – of the book:

I find the music of 1940s more enchanting than anything heard before or after. The music of 1950s too was extremely melodious though more ostentatious. The decline started in 1960s….However, the relevance of term ‘Golden’ to a musical age is dependent on many factors including the time and the environment. But the academic question cannot take away the appeal of any music composed at any time if it has an inherent charm.

The book apparently does not have very specified divisions, in terms of the subjects of the contents of the stories. But a little more analytical view reveal a few discerning patterns of presentations of the subject matters.

Subjects, like travails of the artistes through the days of glittering Sunrise adulations to abject poverty or loneliness of the Sunset days or A Matter of Inspiration behind a particular song have been dealt with in fairly insightful details.

Nalin Shah’s discerning choice of songs to illustrate or emphasize the matter of the subject, on one hand imparts high clarity to the point of view being presented, and on the other hand helps the reader to rekindle memories of some of very rare gems of that era.

The book also has very judiciously enriched the memories of the era with the help of some very rare photographs of the artistes with whom Nalin Shah has maintained personal contacts. References to these rare songs and use of these photographs elevate the book to a level of a collector’s prized trophy.

Nalin Shah with Naushad at Viramgam where Naushad wanted to revive his past in Viramgam before the start of his career as music director

Nalin Shah with Naushad at Viramgam where Naushad wanted to revive his past in Viramgam before the start of his career as music director

When the author takes up the subjects of reasons and aftermath of break up music duos or the First Lady of Hindi Film Music directors (Saraswati Devi), the Rhythm in Songs, or the legendary tales of Peti- masters (as the music directors were then known), he seems to have chosen a very concise narrative format to drive his point of view home.

The articles, like The End of an era – Studios and Institutions, Vintage Music – The Saviour or Radio Ceylon: Jane Kahan Gaye Who Din, not only place some of the otherwise hazy or misattributed or misinformed records straight, but also have documented some of the pioneering and path-breaking roles played by several individuals. Some of these endeavours reached the status of the institutions that left profound impact on the industry. It would not be out of place to record at this stage, that articles of this stature, and any other representation for that matter, can go a long way in building up the right type of public opinion about the different aspects of films.

The role of lyricists also has been given its due recognition in the book. The portrayal of how different lyricists tackled the themes for a particular song or the how the use of the original literary works of the poet-lyricists have been used with or without modifications or the role of a lyricist or the music director or the star who enacted in on the screen is spread over different articles – The Writer’s Dominance, The Poet’s Lament and The Song, ShAIR and the Star.

In any historical perspective analysis, the topics like how much role the destiny played in making the preeminent position of Lata Mangeshkar in the post-partition years or how would the music scene have taken shape if Noorjehan had chosen not to migrate to Pakistan have always remained quite contentious and thorny issues of the debate among film critics, historians and fans. In ‘Daughter of Destiny – Why a Lata Can Not Be Reborn’ and ‘Noorjehan, Lata and Partition’, Nalin Shah has succeeded in balancing the facts with perceptions and opinions.

We also get the taste of Nalin Shah’s considered forthright views on the subjects of film awards in ‘A Matter of Awards’, ‘Phalke, Who ?’ or ‘An Award named ‘Lata Mangeshkar’’.

The author also opines that ‘Moral Values’ in films not necessarily reflect the times but the degeneration in the minds of the films maker. Whilst on the subject, he does not miss the opportunity to record ‘the irony that delinquent film-makers welcome the controversy that can help generate some free publicity for a product which may otherwise may not be that sale-able on its own merits.

The book also finds adequate space for other contemporary subjects of Menace of Remix or The Genesis of Piracy, which underscore the fact that no one can claim to be holier than thou. The big service can be made if the original (genuine) music is ‘made available at an affordable price to the public.

‘Melodies, Movies and Memories’ must have scratched only the tip of vast treasure of treasure of documents, photographs and memories of insightful anecdotes that Nalin Shah has very assiduously built along with his “enviable storehouse of 78-RPM records”. We fondly hope that when the book is published in a digital format of e-book, addition of the soundtracks of the songs that have been referred to in the book also (as far as possible) be added on to make this book as the most memorable and immortal gift that a person who has been witness to more than half of the life span of the Hindi Film industry can bequeath the future generations.

We join the publishers in wishing that the present book “is just a precursor to many more”.

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – January, 2016

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Welcome to January, 2016 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We will begin our present issue with a tributes that were originally published in December, 2015. However, ours being a curative post, we will need to take such topical posts into our stride as a natural hazard for such curative exercises.

Week starting on 20th December is A Very Significant Week for Birth and Death Anniversaries. This post, though, has decided to include numbers that are less likely to appear on people’s greatest hits list – Nalini Jaywant (20 December), Vasant Desai (22 December), Noor Jehan (23 December), Mohammad Rafi (24 December), Naushad (25 December).

Naushad’s Priceless Moment: ‘Anmol Ghadi’ (1946) – Anmol Ghadi is the only link that connects up three greats. Naushad, Rafi and Noorjehan are also linked in an incredibly eerie way –Noorjehan’s death anniversary falls on December 23 (2000), Rafi was born on 24 December (1924) and Naushad’s birth anniversary falls on December 25 (1919).

Bimal Roy: The Eastern Mystic Who Made FilmsVijay Kumar explores the deeper existential layers of thoughts, views, emotions and relationships in Bimal Roy’s iconic films.. At the point of his death, he was working on two projects: Mahabharat and Maha Kumbh. In his death, the country missed out, on celluloid, what would have been the most authentic deconstruction and interpretation of the greatest epic, namely Mahabharat, and an understanding and exposition of the largest human congregation on the face of Earth, namely Maha Kumbh..

Bimal Roy’s Madhumati – Untold Stories from Behind the Scenes By Sathya SaranRinki Roy BhattachBimal Roy’s Madhumati – Untold Stories from Behind the Scenesaya, BimBack cover of the book with a comment from Amitabh Bachchanal Roy’s daughter has written this book as almost an offering to her father’s memory. Not party to any more of the actual work on Madhumati, Rinki’s book is an account of her search for stories about the film to know how it was made and the elements that went into making it one of the masterpieces of Indian cinema.

In his comment, MN Sardana has hoped that the book may throw light on the non-inclusion of two songs, recorded for Madhumati. First is Tan Jale Man Jalta Rahe ,sung by Dwijen Mukherjee & chorus and the second being Kancha Le Kanchi Lai Lajo Rut Matwali, Naye Paise Ko Leke Aaya Hai Naya Saal sung by Ghulam Mohammad , Asha Bhonsle, Sabita Banerjee & Chorus.

Last Month, Sadhana drew curtains to her life. She was well remembered in the offerings of rich Sadhna in 'Abana'obituaries. One of the most telling obit came in from (I think that was from) Sanjay Leela Bhanshali – she was queen of mellow drama and not the melodrama.

Sadhana was learning acting in “Filmalay acting school” and she got an opportunity to debut as heroine in “Love in Simla”. Sadhana had earlier played the second lead in a Sindhi film “Abana” that had released in 1958. Sheila Ramani played the lead in this Sindhi film.

Going back in time with Sadhana – “I want my fans to remember me as the Sadhana of Love In Simla, Mere Mehboob, Woh Kaun Thi and Arzoo.” – first published on Rediff.com in December 2012.

Abhi Na Jao Chhodkar… notes that it ought to be most appropriate to remember ‘one of my favourite actresses’ is to remember her ‘- frozen on screen, in all her beauty and grace, for all time’.  We have picked up one of the less heard song –Ab aur na kuch bhi yaad raha – Prem Patra (1962) – Lata Mangeshkar – Salil Choudhary – Rajinder Krishan

My contribution to such songs is Aaye Re Din Sawan Ke – Gaban (1966) – Lata Mangeshakar – Shanker Jaikishan.

Peeyush Sharma in his tribute – Adieu Sadhana – recollects some of the most enchanting, lilting, melodious, memorable songs that are associated intrinsically with the gorgeous style icon Sadhana.

In Tribute: Sadhana (1941-2015) Madulika Liddle looks back to “The schemer? The victim? The innocent soul? The glamour girl? The girl next door? Each of those. And more” roles of Sadhana. We have picked up Meri nazrein haseen hai ki tum ho haseen (Ek Musafir Ek Haseena, 1962, Asha Bhosle, O P Nayyar ) from My Favourite Songs of Sadhana

In Sadhana: What movies! What songs!, Dinesh Raheja remembers Sadhana’s memorable movies and songs.

Subir Sen passed away in Kolkata on December 29(,2015) at a private hospital. In one of the very fitting tributes, Aah Dil Mein Hai Nayan Mein Neer Hai, skapur01 recollects that ‘in all, he sang for less than 25 (plus one unreleased) Hindi films, and the number of songs is less than 30. He also composed music for a Hindi film that apparently was released only in England, in 1970 or thereabout. The film had songs sung by Mohammed Rafi, Geeta Dutt, Asha Bhosle, besides himself. Presently, the post has presented a very rare solo song, composed by S N Tripathi, from an unreleased film, ‘Rani Chandrawati’ from the 1960s’ – Aah Dil Mein Hai Nayan Mein Neer Hai .

We also recall an earlier post form Songs of Yore – Subir Sen: The involuntary Hemant Kumar clone.

We have picked up a couple of less heard songs from, Best songs of the most unloved singer Mahendra Kapoor, a tribute to Mahendra Kapoor on his what would have been 82nd birth anniversary (9 January 1934 – 27 December 2008)

The interview in Beete Hue Din contains some interesting information about the Metro-Murphy Competition and Mahendra Kapoor’s career.

In Ye duniya rahe na rahe kyaa pataa, Sadanand Kamath fondly recollects some of the events in the life of O P Nayyar on his 90th birthday on 16th January, 2016. ….. One of his box office hit films – ‘Phagun’ (1958) had 11 songs. When Ustad Ameer Khan asked him as to why he had composed almost all the songs in Raag Piloo, O P Nayyar told him that he did not have the knowledge of classical raagas. It was just a coincidence that his compositions matched with Raag Piloo. In the later years, Ustad Ameer Khan told him that in “akeli hoon main piyaa aa” from ‘Sambandh’ (1969), he had used about 16 different raagas…….The blogpost also further recounts a few examples of songs where he had nicely blended the playing of the musical instruments with that of the mood of the songs.

Posts that remember Suchitra Sen : Forever Suchitra Sen – A Silhouette tribute – By Amitava NagThis article has been edited from Uttam Kumar and ‘Mrs Sen’: The Magical and Hypnotic Uttam-Suchitra Years ǁ Rahe Na Rahe Hum: ‘Mahanayika’ Suchitra Sen’s Aura Lingers On… ǁ Romance In Cinema – Uttam Kumar And Suchitra Sen – A Case Study

“Phir Wohi Dil Laya Hoon” – Joy Mukerjee – As a hero, Joy Mukerjee appeared only in 32 films. In his last two outings – “Kahaani Phoolwati ki” and “Insaf Main Karoonga”, Joy took up the role of the villain.

Joy Mukherjee, in second lead, and Helen, in a rare break away from her ‘cabaret dancer’ roles, in Hum Hindustani (1960)

Joy Mukherjee, in second lead, and Helen, in a rare break away from her ‘cabaret dancer’ roles, in Hum Hindustani (1960)

In a tribute to Raj Kapoor, we have picked up a rare photograph of the sons with the father, from Rediff archives:

Shashi Kapoor, Raj Kapoor, Prithviraj Kapoor, Shammi Kapoor. Photograph: Rediff Archives

Shashi Kapoor, Raj Kapoor, Prithviraj Kapoor, Shammi Kapoor. Photograph: Rediff Archives

We now move over to other regular posts.

26 Rare Photos of Madhubala to Remind You Why She Was Such a Goddess – Vandita Kapoor has presented photos from a 1951 shoot for Life magazine by photographer James Burke may just help her keep this title forever. By turns sultry and sweet, serious and childlike, enigmatic and completely accessible — in these photos  Madhubala is thoroughly magnificent.

Madhubala - a 1951 shoot for LIFE by photographer James Burke - 2Madhubala - a 1951 shoot for LIFE by photographer James Burke -1Madhubala - a 1951 shoot for LIFE by photographer James Burke - 3

Helen Remixed 3 presents a nice mix of rare Helen videos and upgrades in 1080p High Definition.

Shammi Kapoor’s connection with the ‘Silsila’ hit ‘Neela Aasman So Gaya’ – The 1960s star had composed the song, which he gifted to Amitabh Bachchan for Yash Chopra’s ‘Silsila.’

My Favourites: ‘What’s Life?’ Songs seeks some of the ‘answers’ to that deepest of existential angst.

My Favourites: Songs of Hope and Encouragement

“This new day is too dear,
with its hopes and invitations,
to waste a moment on the yesterdays.”

पन्छी : An aviary of Songs is a Bird-watch guest article by Shalan Lal in Songs of Yore.

Bollywood’s love affair with Horse – From the list of songs chosen in the guest article by D P Rangan, we have picked up one less heard song –Humkadam humsafar humnasheen humzuban by Manna Dey, Mahendra Kapur and Usha Khanna –Nishan (1965), lyrics Javed Anwar, music Usha Khanna

The Three Mumtazes in Basant (1942) – Pramila with Mumtaz Ali in Balam Dhire Bol Koi ǁ Mumtaz Ali with Mumtaz Shanti in Gori Mose Ganga ǁ   Mumtaz Shanti lip singing Parul Ghosh’s playback voice in Mere Chhote Se Man Mein. ǁ The third Mumtaz, a.k.a. Madhubala, when this toddler grows up, sings Tumko Mubarak Ho.

A dubbed film and a song : In Prema Lekhalu 1953 A. M. Rajah, in the telugu version, starts the duet. In the Hindi version, (Aah, 1953) Lata Mangeshkar starts the song Aja Re Ab Mera Dil Pukara. The Tamil version is similar to the Telugu one, both sung by A.M.Rajah and Jikki.

Music in the house: Can you hear Noor Jehan? – by Devyani Onial – On the crowded shelves of this small room at the New Gramophone House in Chandni Chowk, perhaps the only vinyl record shop in Delhi, fading record sleeves hold gems from the past. Anuj Rajpal has an enviable stock of around 2,00,000 EP and LP vinyls and 78-RPM shellac recods.

Balaji Vittal and Anirudha Bhattacharjee are Keeping Score : Was the Sixties the defining sound of Hindi film music? – for which the foundation was collectively laid by the likes of Naushad, C Ramchandra, Shanker Jaikishan, S D Burman, Salil Chaudhary.

Matinee idols – Between 2003 and 2005 – photographer Shahid Datawala received a grant from Sarai for a project on cinema and cinema-going culture in Delhi. Thus began his journey to several of the city’s decrepit single-screen theatres. –

Before the silence: Rhythm House a haven for music lovers – by Paroma Mukherjee – In the fast-changing lives of Mumbaikars, Rhythm House stood as a haven for music lovers looking to discover new genres and seek out some solitude. With its closure, the city will lose not just an institution, but also a way of life.

In our, by now a ritual, closure we revisit the recent tributes to Mohammad Rafi:

I look forward to receive your inputs for further enriching the contents of the posts…..

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – January 2016

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Welcome to January 2016 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

In the previous episode of our blog carnival, we have taken up an overview of the changes in the just published Revision of ISO 9001 (:2015). From the present episode, every month we will take up each key change individually for a closer look.

We first take up the most fundamental underlying concept – Process Approach..

The present version of the standard now “promotes the adoption of a process approach when developing, implementing and improving the effectiveness of a quality management system, to enhance customer satisfaction by meeting customer requirements. {Ref: Introduction – Clause 0.3.1} The process approach involves the systematic definition and management of processes, and their interactions, so as to achieve the intended results in accordance with the quality policy and strategic direction of the organization. Management of the processes and the system as a whole can be achieved using the PDCA cycle (see 0.3.2) with an overall focus on risk-based thinking (see 0.3.3) aimed at taking advantage of opportunities and preventing undesirable results.

Schematic representation of the elements of a single process

Schematic representation of the elements of a single process

The ISO Technical Committee 176 has published a paper The PROCESS APPROACH in ISO 9001: 2015 (ISO/TC 176/SC 2/N1289) and a detailed presentation on the PROCESS APPROACH in ISO 9001:2015

ISO’s Process Approach also lucidly presents concepts like Process Approach, Process Definition, Process Examples, Inputs and Outputs – outputs could include not only services, software, hardware, and processed materials, but also decisions, directions, instructions, plans, policies, proposals, solutions, expectations, regulations, requirements, recommendations, complaints, comments, measurements, and reports. Clearly, an output could be almost anything – Process interactions, Process-based QMS.

Three Ways ISO 9001:2015 Will Encourage a Process ApproachDan Nelson

Instead of being suited to ISO 9001, a QMS is supposed to be suited to the unique operations of an organization. A process approach demands that an organization’s real, operational; core processes are developed in accordance with the “plan” phase of the plan-do-check-act cycle (PDCA). These are the processes needed for a QMS.

Second, also in the ‘Introduction, sub-clause 0.3 -Process approach’, the standard explains that the process approach is based on the PDCA cycle, mentioning W. Edwards Deming by name.

Finally, in ISO 9001:2008 sub-clause 4.1—General Requirements, contain requirements seemingly adequate to verify whether a process approach has been applied.

Process Approach

QMS is made up of a network of value-adding processes, like Customer Oriented Processes (COPs), Support Oriented Processes (SOPs), Management Oriented Processes (MOPs), Quality Managed Processes (QOPs), Outsourced Processes (OPs) that link, combine and interact with one another to collectively provide product or service. These processes are inter-dependent and can be defined by complex interactions. In order to plan and implement QMS using the ‘Process Approach’, one must:

  • Identify the processes needed for the QMS.
  • Determine their sequence and interaction (show the sequence and interaction of COP’s). There are many ways to document this, e.g., a high level flowchart or a process map.
  • Determine the application of QMS processes throughout the organization (show how MOP’s; SOP’s and QMP’s are applied to each COP and to each other). There are many ways of documenting this. A popular way is through graphical representation, e.g. process maps.
  • Determine (plan) the criteria, methods, information, controls and resources needed for each QMS process.
  • Identify the internal/external customer-required output.
  • Describe the process activity that produces the output.
  • Identify the resources needed for the process activity.
  • Identify the inputs for the process – information, materials, supplies, etc.
  • Define the process methods, procedures, forms etc., that may be needed to produce the output.
  • Define the controls to prevent or eliminate risk of errors, omissions, or nonconformities in process activity. controls may come from the IS standards; customer; regulatory and your own organizational requirements
  • Interaction with sources that provide the inputs (internal process or external supplier), uses the output (internal process or external customer), or provide the resources (internal support process) to perform the process activity.
  • Implement QMS according to the plan.
  • Monitor, measure and improve each QMS process and its interaction with other processes. Performance indicators to monitor and measure process performance may come from the IS standard, customer, regulatory and organization’s own requirements. Performance indicators may relate to the process output as well as the process activity.
  • Performance indicators for process output must focus on meeting customer and regulatory requirements. Performance indicators for process activity should focus on measuring process effectiveness and efficiency.

PROCESS MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS IN ISO 9001 (2015) – Lennart Brandt -By application of the definition of “process”, the number of processes concerned by the requirements in ISO/CD 9001 could be considered to be at least about 275.

ISO 9001:2015 – The Process Approach Approacheth – focuses on the new standard’s “process approach” requirements, how it differs from the current version, and the many problems companies and auditors will have interpreting it.

ISO 9001 series, Part 3: The Process Approach in ISO 9001:2015Ben Saxton, Business Development Manager and Alastair Atcheson, Digital Marketing Executive @ Qualsys – Auditors should be looking at the effectiveness of processes over exact compliance to procedure. This is in line with PDCA, which forms a basis for the process approach to begin with. A process approach is the best way to manage a QMS, not just in terms of the audit process, but as a business strategy in general. Auditors and organisations alike should remember that the process approach is being emphasised because fundamentally, it makes sense.

The Joy of ProcessSusannah Clarke says a process approach can inspire innovation and creativity – In Morecambe & Wise Make Breakfast, watch the brilliant example of how a process approach inspires innovation and creativity:

We will now turn to our regular sections:

Future of Quality - Report - 2015Since 1996, ASQ has published seven issues of the Future of Quality Report. The latest edition explores 11 topic areas—already impacting consumers, businesses, and society—that will have a profound effect on the future of quality. These thought-provoking, personal, and detailed essays are written by distinguished experts from around the world. The “2015 ASQ Future of Quality Report: Quality Throughout” challenges, enlightens, and sparks action. ASQ CEO, Bill Troy ASQ’s Influential Voice in Top 11 Insights From ASQ’s Future of Quality Study has compiled the “key” insights from each of the 11 essays in the Future of Quality research.

We now watch the latest ASQ TV episodes:

Strategic Thinking – Business Skills – In this ASQ® TV episode, the concept of strategic thinking is examined. Learn how strategic thinking varies in theory and practice and be introduced to the analytic hierarchy process—a method that breaks down decision making into a series of comparisons. Watch now:

Strategy and Leadership: In this episode, learn a four-step method for setting organization-wide strategy that fosters employee engagement and empowerment, and get ideas for structuring your organization and communicating strategy … to employees to help achieve success. Read: Peter Merrill’s QP article on self-managed teams.

Making Strategy Visual – It is essential your staff connect goals, metrics and projects to get them engaged in the organization’s strategy. Hear how North Bay Regional Health Center in Ontario achieves this important goal by making strategy visual to employees and customers.

We would add Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems as our regular feature from this month.

Thought PowerJim's Gems: Choose to think the best about yourself, your world, and those people who are there to support you.

Dealing with Challenges:  Learning to overcome our challenges is what builds character and resilience.

Embrace efforts: Decide to embrace and enjoy the effort, and you’ll reap wonderful benefits from it.

20 Most Popular Posts on the Curious Cat Management Blog in 2015

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – December 2015

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Welcome to December, 2015 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We will begin our present issue with a post that could well have been included in our last episode –

Four Aces and A Queen – Geeta Dutt’s songs with 4 ace music directors that may be missed because of the dominance of SD Burman, Hemant Kumar, OP Nayyar in her list of hit songs. On the birth anniversary of Geeta Dutt, the Queen of Bhaav Gayaki, Parag Sankla explores her lesser heard gems from the repertoire of four music directors Hansraj Behl, Chitragupt, Bulo C Rani and Avinash Vyas.

And since we are on that very site, we certainly get more to read on Geeta Dutt:

Geeta Dutt’s list of her best songs in 1957 – For some reason, may be because C.H. Atma sang it first (?), she did not include Preetam Aan Milo

Raj Kapoor – Musically – Raj Kapoor with different instrument in each of the song is remembered here. We have picked up the less heard song from the ones presented here.

Remembering Raj Kapoor- The Showman And His 7 Iconic Heroines – Nargis, Nimmi, Simi Garewal, Zeenat Aman, Dimple Kapadia, Mandakini, Padmini Kolhapure – on his 91st birthday.

C Ramchandra as Chitalkar – continuing the series on the Year of Naushad (with C Ramchandra in tandem), SoY presents the songs of CR as a singer. C Ramchandra has also sung for other music directors, such as Mir Saheb (Lal Haveli, 1944), Anil Biswas (Jwar Bhata, 1944; Veena, 1948), Husnlal-Bhagatram (Apni Chhaya, 1950), Hemant Kumar (Samrat, 1954; Lagan, 1955), Roshan (Baraati, 1954), Usha Khanna (Faisla, 1965), Laxmikant-Pyarelal (Chhaila, 1967. We have picked up some of the less heard songs:

Naushad’s gems before ‘Rattan’ (1944) – a very fine researched article that brings up the (real) vintage Naushad – Before Rattan, Naushad did over a dozen films, having over 120 songs…. The Internet (YouTube) has brought to us a large number of his early songs….. a large number of his early songs are of outstanding quality. One for one, these songs are no less melodious and enjoyable than Rattan’s.

Upperstall has presented profiles of Saeed Jaffrey by Shoma A Chatterji; Shyam Benegal by Karan Bali and Dharmendra also by Karan Bali.

We also have a couple of more pieces to celebrate Dharmendra’s birthday:

Just be yourself: Dharmendra in Guddi, and other reflections on his 80th birthday.

[A related piece here: the Amitabh cameos. And an earlier post about Dharmendra is here]

Happy Birthday Dharmendra and Sharmila Tagore! Here are our favourite films featuring the pair – Anupama (1966), Devar (1966), Satyakam (1969), Yakeen (1969), Mere Humdam Mere Dost (1968), Chupke Chupke (1975), Ek Mahal Ho Sapno Ka (1975), Sunny (1984). Devdas (1976), a Gulzar venture did not go beyond mahurat.

“Thoda Sa Dil Laga Ke Dekh” – Shammi Aunty (nee Nargis Rabadi) passionately looks back on her long career . We see her playing sitar in Ye Hawa Ye Raat Ye Chandani (Talat Mahmood – Sangdil -1952 – Sajjad Hussain). In our December, 2015 episode of Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs we had listened Thoda sa muskara ke dekh apana bana ke to dekh (Musafirkhana (1955) – with Shamshad Begum – O P Nayyar).

We now move over to other regular posts.

Bengal’s Music and Its Influence in Hindi Film MusicAntara Nanda Mondal and Peeyush Sharma take us on to a journey of discovering and enjoying gold nuggets of Bengal’s music strewn in Hindi film songs – a presentation made at the Romancing the Song Meet in India Habitat Centre, New Delhi, November 14, 2015.

Bengal’s Music and Its Influence in Hindi Film Music

In our last episode we had first time landed upon a couple of posts on the Silhouette, the magazine section of Learning & Creativity. It is time to catch up with some of the several interesting posts:

We have three posts by Arun Kumar Deshmukh on Atul’s Song A Day, which also throw quite an insight into the topic that is intrinsically related to the song under discussion. Even as we will listen to the songs mentioned in these posts in our next issue of Fading Memories.. Unforgettable songs (10th January, 2016), here is the brief take on each of the posts:

Tu mera copyright main teri copyright Mohammad Rafi has given playback to Kishore Kumar more number of times than others.

S No. Movie Song Co-singer Music Director
1. Miss Mala (1954) Chori chori aana naa* Asha Bhosle Chitragupta
2. Bhagam Bhag (1956) Chale ho kahan Asha Bhosle O P Nayyar
3. Bhaagam Bhaag (1956) Hamen koi gham hai Asha Bhosle O P Nayyar
4. Raagini (1958) Man mora Bawra O P Nayyar
5. Shararat (1959) Ajab hai dastan teri aye zindagi (happy and sad versions ) Shanker Jaikishan
6. Sharaarat (1959) Tu mera copyright Lata Mangeshkar Shanker Jaikishan
7. Baaghi Shahzada (1964) Main is masoom chehre ko Suman Kalyanpur Babul
8. Pyar Diwana (1972) Apni aadat hai Lala Asar Sattar

Incidentally, the other singers who gave playback to Kishore Kumar are Manna Dey ( 3 times), S D Batish (1), Amanat Ali (1) and Asha Bhosle (once in film Baap Re Baap-1955).

[*The video clip shows some other actor singing this song.]

Samaa ye pyaar ka bahaar ke ye mele traces the most creative period – years 1955-60 – of SJ. The author attributes the loss melody in the din of popularity in post-1960 period to the growing differences between the partners.

Aa jaa aa jaa aa jaa nadiyaa kinaare Author Ganesh Anantharaman, in his book “Bollywood melodies”Bollywood Melodies says, “Perhaps success came too early to them from the very first film, depriving them to develop a bond which comes after struggling together for success.” Over and above the support of RK, quality lyricists and singers, the strong arrangers like Sebastian D’Souza played a major role in SJ’s great success. The post has quite succinctly presented a full range of ranking arrangers of that time.

Incidentally, I have been also able to locate a very interesting clip, on the subject of ‘Conviction and Leadership: Insights from the World of Bollywood Music’, in which Ganesh Anantharaman presents his ‘evolving thoughts on what can be learnt from the world of Bollywood music about conviction and leadership.

Three versions of a songMan Mor Machaye Shor – Ladki (1953) – Lata Mangeshkar and Geeta Dutt . The Hindi version sounds a bit different from the Tamil (by T.S. Bhagavati and M.S. Rajeshwari) and Telugu (by T.S.Bhagawati and P.Suseela) versions.

Scroll.in continues to provide a variety of posts:

Bollywood raags: Hindustani classical vocalists who made film music – Featuring Bade Ghulam Ali Khan, Amir Khan, DV Paluskar and other legends – Aneesh Pradhan :

Incidentally, I watched Ankahee (1985) a few days back. The film has a Tulsidas bhajan, composed by Jaidev, rendered by Pandit Bhimsen JoshiRaghuvir Tumko Meri Laaj

HMV studios: In Kolkata, the home of India’s melodious past struggles for relevance

Some say it was Satyajit Ray’s favourite place. Now, the dappled HMV studio complex wears a mostly deserted look. – Chandrima Pal  · Fading tune – Next year, Mumbai will lose a significant piece of its musical history when Rhythm House at Kala Ghoda shuts down for good. Some 1,652 km or more away, in the dusty neighborhood of Dum Dum north of Kolkata, another icon of the country’s musical legacy awaits the inevitable. [I was a regular visitor to Mumbai’s Rhythm House from 1974 till 1979. I had also occasion to visit Rhythm House sometime in 2009, when I was in that area in a case relating to a customs case. I had purchased a couple of film CDs then.]

Music and the monument: Songs inspired by the Taj Mahal – The seventh wonder of the world has always fired up the imagination – Nate Rabe  · sunday sounds :

The Carnatic vocalist who sings Urdu blues – Hariharan has invented a whole new genre in ghazal singing – Manish Gaekwad – Hariharan’s singing career began with a ghazal. Jaidev signed him to sing for the movie Gaman (1978). Hariharan sang Ajeeb Sanehaa Mujh Par Guzar Gaya Yaro, written by poet Shahryar. Hariharan later came to create a new genre within the ghazal called Urdu Blues. He incorporated elements of jazz and blues music in the song Yeh Aaine Se (Kaash, 2000). Guitars and drums play on a slow beat alongside the sitar and sarangi moving into a noir space.

We would conclude our Blog Carnival 2015 with a post that was originally published on 31st July, 2015, but I landed up only this month. So welcome an opportune coincidence!

Mohammed Rafi: For The Record By Gajendra Nand Khanna – During my of vinyl records purchasing years in mid 70s, I had collected a fairly large collection of Mohammad Rafi’s LP records. At least so I believed till I came across this post. This collector’s collection documented here is simply mind-blowing. In one of the responses to the article, Antara very aptly comments that this article has become a reference point for many. (What) an eclectic collection of Rafi’s versatility!!!

As we continue our pursuit of the golden period of Hindi Film Music …….

Wishing you all a most fruitfully joyous and happy 2016….

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – November 2015

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Welcome to November, 2015 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We will begin our present issue with a post that is so very topical.

My Favourites: Songs of Cool Breezes ushers in the early signs of winter in our part of the world. We will also enjoy the feel of the early chill by way of some of the rare songs from this excellent list:

And now we turn our sails to the tributes.

My Favourites: Salilda’s Malayalam Songs – on his 92nd birthday. ‘It may encourage folks to look up and listen to unknown gems’.

“Dekh Lo Ishq Ka Martaba Dekh Lo” – B.S.Thapa – B.S.Thapa ji who completed 92 on last 3 July may not be active in films now but his contribution to the Cinema as a teacher and a director can’t be denied with.

P.Susheela just turned 80A tribute with a list of some of her songs. Some of her Hindi films songs are here.

Please Go To My Post From Last Year to Celebrate the Birthday of the Great Sitara Devi – At this time last year, the author had posted ‘seven of her film scenes. Unfortunately, it is impossible to find an additional seven comparable clips on YouTube, especially if one tries to look for scenes from other films’. Here is one of her famous Kathak dance sequence – Thumak Chalat Ramchand.

S D Burman also gets a special mention on 40th Anniversary – on 31st October. Here are some notable tributes.

Ten best songs (solos) composed by SD Burman – The earlier saturation coverage has provided a good building block to choose one song per singer to pay the tribute to the master in this post.

Tere Mere Sapne Ab Ek Rang Hain – Eternal Melodies of SD Burman-Rafi By Peeyush Sharma – Had it not been the occasion of S D Burman’s anniversary, this post could have done full justice in this blog carnival’s special space of posts on Mohammad Rafi.

The Incomparable Music Of S D Burman Transcends Generations

My Favourites: Children’s Songs celebrates Jawaharlal Nehru’s 125h birthday on 14th November. These are not necessarily patriotic songs, but songs picturized on children, and are the ones that are sung by the children on the screen.

Some of the less heard songs:

We move over to other regular posts.

Watch 100 Years of Indian Cinema Come Alive in 200 Seconds of Sand ArtTanaya Singh pays due credit to Rahul Arya, a well-known sand artist for this 200-second action packed journey.

Posts on Scroll.in –

Do Chetan Anand’s best-known films stand the test of time?

Back to Boral: Looking for Satyajit Ray in the town in which he shot ‘Pather Panchali’

The brilliance of Salim-Javed lies not just in what they said, but how they said it

When Javed told Salim, ‘I was thinking that maybe we should work separately’Diptakirti Chaudhuri  · A new book speculates on why Salim Khan and Javed Akhtar split after a writing partnership that created some of the most iconic Hindi movies of the 1970s.

Saxy Desi: Check out the sounds of the saxophone in South AsiaNate Rabe  – this most romantic of jazz instruments, often purringly referred to as the sexaphone, was invented in 1841 in the lowlands of a somewhat more prosaic Belgium by Adolphe Sax to create a sound that floated somewhere between the silken tone of the clarinet and the brash flare of the trumpet :

The Braz Gonsalves 7 – Raga Rock | Joe Gomes – O Saathi Re | Unknown – Spinboldak Saxophony | Rudresh Mahantappa – Abhogi | Sahib Shihab – Om Mani Padme Om

Hai kya kya jalwa bhara hua Ghanshyaam tumhaari aankhon meinAtul, while discussing the HFM related statistics pertaining to 1932, noted that only nine songs from movies of 1932 are available. Six of these songs are already covered in the blog. Here is the seventh song of 1932 to appear in the blog : Hai kya kya jalwa bhara hua Aankh Ka Taara (1932) – Jahanara Kajjan – Motilal Naik

My Favourites: Teasing Songs are the songs, only about situations where the heroine (or in one case, the hero) is already in love with the hero, and her friends (/his friend) – as friends will – tease her about it.

Songs of Sensuality – Inspired by Conversations Over Chai’s great post on the same topic, here’s list of classic Hindi and Bengali songs that explore sensuality, physical affection, and longing.

Top Ten Songs Sung by Actors Themselves (or by Singers Appearing Onscreen) – Guest Post by Abhik Majumdar – ‘songs actually sung by (not merely lip-synched by) actors. Not singer-cum-actors, but people who were known only for their acting. First off, only one track per artiste. Secondly, there’s no point including songs by people known equally for their singing and acting. So no Kishore Kumar, no Suraiya, no Rajkumar (the Kannada actor), no Talat Mehmood even. Thirdly, the singing must conform to certain minimum standards of excellence. (A certain Mr Bachchhan stands excluded on this count.) Fourthly, in the early days of talkies when playback singing was unknown actors, even the most atrociously off-key ones, were compelled to sing their own songs. Since such examples are a penny a dozen, no point adding them …..’

Ten of my favourite ‘Aaja’ songs i.e. Hindi film songs that begin with the word “Aaja” The post has all the songs that would immediately reverberate in our mind when we read the title. Here are some of the less heard songs, picked up from the discussions by the readers:

Sapnon ke gaaon mein taaron ki chhaaon mein – K Satish Shenoy remembers that this song used to be played invariably in the same session on Radio Ceylon with another song ‘Kahan le chale ho,…’ from Durgesh Nandini.

In photos: Bollywood cinema is life and life is a movie – Photojournalist Fawzan Husain captures the making of Hindi movies as well as their impact on the world beyond the sets.

A tailor in Kamatipura in Mumbai works under the watchful eye of Hindi cinema’s leading ladies from the black-and-white era

A tailor in Kamatipura in Mumbai works under the watchful eye of Hindi cinema’s leading ladies from the black-and-white era

Best songs of 1950: Wrap Up 4 which is about the best duets of 1950 in continuation of the Overview post, Wrap Up 1 (best male solos), Wrap Up 2 (best ‘other’ female solos) and Wrap Up 3 (best songs of Lata Mangeshkar).

Best songs of 1950: Final Wrap Up 5 lives up to the expectations of distillation post on a subject that always had a wide range of discussions.

We have moved the songs remembered by our friends to a separate, full-fledged post w.e.f. this month. These posts will be titled as “Fading Memories….Unforgettable Songs” and would be published on second Sunday every month.

We would therefore revert to posts on Mohammad Rafi to end each of the episode of our blog carnival.

Jaao Mere Siva Tum Kahan Jaaoge – Remembering Rafi through Rahul Dev Songs By Peeyush Sharma

Here are some not so known songs:

Ten Songs of Mohd. Rafi We Could Not Include in ‘Gaata Rahe Mera Dil’ – By Balaji VittalWe can read the excerpts of The book co-authored by Aniridha Bhattacharjee, published by Harper.

We continue our pursuit of the golden period of Hindi Film Music ……

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – November 2015

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Welcome to November, 2015 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

The search for “Improving measures of measurement of process” took us to the first building block -‘performance measures and metrics’, followed by the search for resources relating to the ‘structuring for the process of improvement’, “Deploying the Improvement Process” and “Implementing the Improvement Process”. While we were @ Measuring the Improvement Process, we had observed references to several techniques of measurements. Among these we had a detailed look at one of the most discussed one: The Balanced Scorecard.

In this last part of our journey of Continuous Improvement, we will take a look at some of the representative articles on “Sustaining Continuous Improvement’.

Sustainability of lean process System

How to Create and Sustain Successful Continuous Improvement Teams – Renee Bassett – Porter at Irving Oil: “Keep it fresh, keep improving the system.  Do not let it stagnate.  Your competition is making improvements every day; evolving change is now a way of life.” Click here to read how understanding human motivations can go a long way toward ensuring a successful continuous improvement program.

Sustaining Continuous Improvement Initiatives – Simon Bodie – Continuous Improvement Initiatives are often launched with a flurry of excitement .This can soon wane as executives fail to see value and question the rationale for continuing. Achieving longevity requires careful management of the program. Just completing ‘good work’ is not enough, benefits need to be understood calculated and extracted. Progress needs to be communicated effectively.

Sustaining a Continuous Improvement Culture in a World of Flux – It is not so much that we are afraid of change, or so in love with the old ways, but it is the place in between we fear….. like being in between trapezes……there is nothing to hold on to. CI should not merely be an institutional priority, but should be integrated into the strategic plan. A well-defined structure for implementing CI programs, transparent flow of information, listening to views of each stakeholder, showing the benefits to the individuals and maintaining the consistency of approach (towards CI) help build the culture that creates environment for sustaining the CI.

Visual Management Helps You Sustain Continuous Improvement – You can’t make your operations more efficient if your employees don’t know what is going on!  Communicating information throughout all departments and levels of your company is critical. Visual management is a fundamental element of process control that helps you sustain continuous improvement.

Creating and sustaining value: Building a culture of continuous improvementSaleem Chattergoon, Shelley Darling, Rob Devitt, Wolf Klassen have narrated a phased approach adopted at Toronto East General Hospital . These are: Phase 1 – Setting the stage ; Phase 2 – Team-driven performance management and Phase 3 – The daily management system and cross-appointment model. The three phased approach takes the movement beyond individual projects to the cultural transformation.

Continuous Improvement through a Productive Culture

Actions that Build a Productive Work Culture

  1. Practice good leadership at all levels
  • Create trust and respect
  • Be committed and persistence
  • Be patient and understanding
  • Be consistent
  • Allocate resources fairly & where needed
  • Explain the goals and reasons
  1. Lead by example, by “walking your talk”
  • Role model desired behaviours
  • Coach, mentor and teach
  1. Determine appropriate criteria for rewards, praise, and status
  2. Select good people and supporters – Put individuals in the right roles
  3. Practice open 2-way communication
  4. Manage by walking around
  5. Develop and communicate values, behavioural expectations and norms – Deliver common and consistent messages and behaviours at all levels
  6. Focus on the quality of relationships – respect people
  7. Ensure the physical and emotional safety and well-being of employees – Listen to ideas and concerns and take appropriate action
  8. Let employees enjoy the rewards of their hard work
  9. Help people to understand all the ways the change will be good for the organisation and also for them
  10. Promote collaboration and cross-functional problem solving
  11. Provide stability and consistency
  12. Promote creativity, innovation & learning – Within boundaries remove obstacles and encourage rule breaking
  13. Create personal responsibility for results
  14. Provide employees with feedback
  15. Create a sense of identity, ownership and pride of work
  16. Provide development opportunities, new skills and fresh knowledge
  17. Provide career opportunities
  18. Provide challenges and challenging opportunities
  19. Impose real-time consequences that matter
  20. Be connected to your community

Continuously improve your chances for project success: Whitepaper 3 || kpmg.com/nz ||

Effective management of major projects relies on three key concepts:

  1. early planning and organization
  2. stakeholder communication and project controls integration, and
  • Continuous improvement.

This third instalment of a three-part series, outlines the third key component in managing a major project, continuous improvement……A collaborative culture – where information is exchanged informally and through multiple channels – is preferable for inspiring continuous improvement.

From lean to lasting: Making operational improvements stick

The broader challenge underlying such problems is integrating the better-known “hard” operational tools and approaches—such as just-in-time production—with the “soft” side, including the development of leaders who can help teams to continuously identify and make efficiency improvements, link and align the boardroom with the shop floor, and build the technical and interpersonal skills that make efficiency benefits real.

Why do continuous improvement initiatives fail to sustain? By Thomas Liesener – The four most commonly occurring hot spots are: lack of will, support, commitment and leadership from (senior) management; not right metrics selected, monitored and reviewed (for CI and change); lack in professional human development / trainings and career pathing; not right and enough resources allocated or available for implementation and projects.

Sustaining the continual improvement will find as many variants as required by the as differing needs of differing circumstances, varying by the degree in which the people involved vary with as many differing backgrounds. Obviously, we cannot cover all such variants in a single episode of our blog carnival. The ultimate message is that continuous improvement sustains in thrives in the culture of people who feel involved, who keep evolving and openly share their views and feelings.

The journey of the continuous improvement never ends.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

Bill Troy, ASQ CEO presents four guest posts:

A Day With the Future of QualityEdwin Garro presents a very intimate documentation of his visit to a junior high school class at the San Rafael de Poás Technical High School, Alajuela, Costa Rica. The Quality and Productivity Technical program was conceived as long term answer to shortage of skilled quality technicians. The visits talks about aspirations of the students of the program.

Big Data and Quality Professionals – by Ponmurugarajan Thiyagarajan Big data is in play when data size is huge (Volume), moves in high speeds (Velocity), comes in variety of forms (Variety) and in varied quality (Veracity) which conventional database systems cannot efficiently process.

Analytics built over big data enable organizations to process structured and unstructured data to derive useful intelligence and provide actionable insights for end-users.

This has interesting implications for quality professionals who may become involved with big data efforts. Assurance of quality is key in such projects: data clean-up must happen in an automated fashion and reconciliation reports to be produced in real-time to track quality parameters. Thus, relevant tools need to be built for quality assurance. It will be interesting to see how quality tools such as Plan-Do-Check-Act, the 7 quality tools (Fishbone diagram, Check sheets, Control charts, Histogram, Pareto Charts, Scatter Diagrams, Flow Charts) etc., can be customized for a big data project.

Facing Cultural Barriers by Leaders to Strengthen a Culture of Quality by Luciana Paulise company culture is modeled upon top management behavior. So, in effect, leaders need to change their behavior first if they want to change the entire company culture—and they have to do it through a systemic model considering four types of intelligence, viz. spiritual, intellectual, physical and emotional.

Talking To the C-Suite About Qualityby Dr. Suresh Gettalaemphasizes the following five rudimentsTalking to C-suite about quality culture that are indispensable when talking about quality to the top management:

  1. The long term – short term continuum
  2. The Language of Metrics
  3. Economic case for Quality
  4. Success Anecdotes
  5. Big Q” Approach

The current month episode of ASQ TV is: Quality in Pop Culture . Celebrate World Quality Month by watching examples of quality appearing in pop culture. Quality touches nearly all aspects of society. And it’s not surprising to see it in mainstream entertainment—whether it’s being satirized for its seemingly complicated tools and methods, or indirectly referenced for how it improves our lives.

For the present month, our ASQ’s Influential Voice is Bill Troy, the CEO of ASQ.

Bill TroyWe have been regular visitor to his View From the Q.

We had taken our first look at View from Q in September 2013, when it was under the guidance of the then ASQ CEO, Paul Borawski.

Presently, we seem to have reached the end of the present list of ASQ Influential Voices. We will take a different approach to visiting the views of ASQ Influential Voices, beginning January 2016.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our Improvement journey …………

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – October 2015

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Welcome to October, 2015 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We have a fairly long list of anniversaries of the playback singers this month. But before we take them up, there is one a very unique tribute that must take the precedence over all those. So, we open our account of anniversaries for the current episode of blog carnival with –

First male dancer of Hindi films: Mumtaz Ali, which is the tribute to this great artiste from the vintage era with some dance-songs picturized on him.

On the other end, we open our account of posts on birthdays / anniversaries of the playback singers with –

We begin with Lata Mangeshkar’s birthday:

The Great Mughal and The Empress of playback singing – an exclusive post on Lata Mangeshkar’s best songs by Naushad, on her 86th birth anniversary (b. 28 September 1929). The previous ones, wherein other music directors have been chosen are : Chitragupta, C Ramchandra, Roshan, SD Burman and Anil Biswas.

Ten of my Favorite Lata Mangeshkar Songs from the Films of V. Shantaram is a fairly representative list.

Celebrating a legend: A century of MS Subbulakshmi through 10 songsVeejay Sai – tracks her journey from a child prodigy to a singing movie star to the Carnatic icon she became in her lifetime…. MSS specially recorded Hari Tum Haro for Gandhiji’s birthday on 1947.

Interestingly, we have several posts that were in fact sent in by our friends, primarily to remember a song of the particular singer or the music director, but each of the post inherently is also a commemoration of the anniversary. We will take up the underlying song separately along with other songs forwarded by our friends.

Tera Mera Pyaar Koi Aaj Kal Ki To Baat Nahin – by Mahesh Mamadapur on Usha Khanna’s 74th birthdayFor some reason, Usha Khanna never received the recognition and fame that she so rightfully deserves. She is not the first, but definitely is the most successful and talented of a handful of female composers in the Hindi film industry, having composed something like about 973 songs in total.

[We have separately documented Mukesh’s songs composed by Usha Khanna for easy access.]

Lo Mil Gayi Degree Pyaar Ki by skapur01 while tastefully narrating the circumstances how Mukesh got associated with this song, the post goes onto list 36 songs that Roshan composed for Mukesh.

[We have also separately documented Roshan’s songs of Mukesh.]

MukeshGitKoshN.B. – Both these compilations have been provided none other than Shri Harish Raghuvanshi, from his one of the several painstakingly researched books Mukesh Geet Kosh. Here is a video clip wherein Shri Raghuvanshi talks about this epochal work.]

Dekha Hai Jab Se Aapka Chehra Ye Chaand Saskapur01 – Remembering Mahendra Kapoor on the anniversary of his passing away – 27th September……He got his debut break under the music direction of V Balsara in the 1953 film ‘Madmast’, with a duet with Dhan Indorewala – “Kisi Ke Zulm Ki Tasveer Hai Mazdoor Ki Basti” and a qawwaali with SD Batish – “Unhen Dekhen To Weh Munh Pher Lete Hain”. …..Next came his first solo song by Snehal Bhatkar in ‘Diwaali Ki Raat’(1956) – “Tere Dar Ki Bhikmangi Hai Daata Duniya Saari”.  In 1956 again, he recorded a duet with Sabita Bannerji for the film ‘Lalkaar’ – music director Sanmukh Babu Upadhyay – “O Bedardi Jaane Ke Na Kar Bahaane”.  The music competition and the associated assignments with major league music directors came later.

In Phir Mohabbat Ke Pyaam Aane Lagey, skapur01 remembers Hemant Kumar on the anniversary of his passing away – 26th September – by delving way back to ‘Iraada’ (1944) – the first Hindi film for which Hemant Kumar sang playback.

October 17 would have been 60th birthday of Smita Patil, who would certainly be ranked in the history as one of the most talented artist of the (what we know as) new, post-1970s cinema. We take note of some of the posts on this occasion to pay our tribute:

Smita Patil loved the camera and it loved her right backScroll Staff – Rare images from the key films of the late celebrated actress.

Songsstoriesbooksandmore has reviewed Sangtye Aika (You ask, I tell: An autobiography) by Hansa Wadkar transl. by Jasbir Jain and Shobha Shinde.

YT also has Smita Patil – Biography.

UpperStall had posted a decade back a very vivid profile of Smita Patil by Karan Bali.

If there has to be one song that can sum up the essence of Smita Patil’s acting talents, Tumhare Bine Jee Na Lage Ghar Men (Bhumika – 1977, Preeti Sagar- Vanraj Bhatia) can easily be the one.

Shammi Kapoor – In Perpetual Motion – It is not just that Shammi Kapoor didn’t know how to stand still; it is that he seemed to have an inordinate number of songs that were picturised in/on some mode of transport or the other. Last year, on this same date, the author had done a post on Shammi Kapoor and various musical instruments. Now it is time to chronicle his trysts with travel, whether in vehicles or on animals. In any case, whether they moved or not, Shammi definitely did.

We now move over to other posts from our regular blogs –

Arre kahaan chali – Arun Kumar Deshmukh – Film Jaalsaaz-59 was the first of three films with the same title. The second movie by this title came in 1969 and the third in 2000. Similarly even film Jaal was made 3 times- in 52, 67 and 86.

Unvoiced Emotions, Expressed Feelings has ten songs that fitted this category. Each song listed here has the lead characters’ ‘feel’ what they feel, and those emotions are ‘spelled’ out by others’ voices, even if the underlying mood is not similar (and in fact, is quite the opposite) in some cases. No, these are not ‘background songs’, but songs that are actually sung on screen by other characters.

Ten of my favourite ‘credits songs’ – are not necessarily ‘background songs’ as well: some of them are ‘sung’ by people onscreen. They run the gamut from songs that introduce the film’s ethos or primary theme, to—well, just another song to add to a list of romantic to philosophical to patriotic songs the film already boasts of..

All USTADJIs, who made us happy and will continue to make happy in all our coming generations.

Three Tandav dances feature Anada Bhairavi 1983 || Damini 1993 || Sivaanai Seemai 1959

‘Pyaasa’ is the Guru Dutt gift that keeps givingNasreen Munni Kabir – A new restoration of the 1950s classic provides an opportunity to appreciate all over again its many achievements.

The Namesakes: Musicians and the raags named after themAneesh Pradhan – Renditions of Mia ki Todi. by Faiyaz Khan, Amir Khan, Bhimsen Joshi and Kishori Amonkar.

‘Vaishnav Jan to Tene Kahiye’: One of Gandhi’s favourite bhajans played by classical maestrosAneesh Pradhan – Featuring duets by Bismillah Khan and VG Jog, and Rashid Khan and Shahid Parvez

Making Indian classical music relevant to the contemporary | Manasi Prasad | TEDxHyderabad – Manasi Prasad connects us to our roots by infusing the beauty of music from different times to present day creating relevance for us to understand it nuances better.

After the overview post on the Best songs of 1950, Wrap Up 1 on the best male solos, and Wrap Up 2 on the best female solos by ‘other’ singers have been the stage wise review of the readers’ views as well as SoY’s own analysis. .  Continuing the series, here is the third Wrap Up on the best songs of Lata MangeshkarBest songs of 1950: Wrap Up 3

We take of note of the review of Mem Didi (1961) for Salil Chaudhary’s songs –

Now we move over songs remembered by our friends in this month –

Bhagvan Thavrani

Ajab hai yeh duniya – Naya Aadmi (1956) – Lata Mangeshkar – Madan Mohan. Naya Aadmi, Hindi version of Santosham (1955), had 10 songs. 6 of them were composed by Madan Mohan and the rest by South Indian duo of Vishwanathan / Ramamurthy . Hemant Kumar – Lata Mangeshkar duet – laut gaya gham ka zamana – was the creation of the duo. They also created Lata solo – dile betaab thahar – while Madan Mohan created Rafi solo – gharibo ka paseena bah raha hai . The film had NT Rama Rao (NTR) had in the lead.

Samir Dholakia

Arre kahaan chali -Jaalsaaz (1959) – Kishore Kumar, Asha Bhonsle – N Datta – Majrooh Sultanpuri – The tune is based on “Lavani” songs of Maharashtra.

Sumant (Dadu) Vashi form Chicago (U S A) had sent in –

Dil Jalega To Zamane Mein Ujala Hoga – Yeh Basti Yeh Log (1965) -Lata Mangeshkar – Bhola Shreshtha

Harish Raghuvanshi

Tera Mera Pyaar Koi Aaj Kal Ki To Baat Nahin  – (Dada) (1966) – Mukesh, Usha Khanna – Usha Khanna – Asad Bhopali

Koi Kushnaseeb Na Hoga – Malkin (1953), Kishore Kumar, Mukesh, Ram Kamlani – Roshan – Rajendra Krishna

Yeh khaamoshi kyun ye madhoshi kyun – Hamaare Gham Se Mat Khelo (1967) – Jaidev – Nyay Sharma – Geeta Dutt’s only solo in Hindi films by Jaidev is the subject of Bharat Updhyay’s post.

[This film had a very well-known Talat Mahmood solo – Ansoo Chupaye Aankh Mein Khoon-e-Jigar Piya Karoon.]

Dekha Hai Jab Se Aapka Chehra Ye Chaand Sa – Husn Ka Ghulam (1966) – Mahendra Kapoor – Robin Banerjee – Anjaan

Phir Mohabbat Ke Payaam Aane Lagey Iraada (1944) – Hemant Kumar – Pt Amarnath – Aziz Kashmiri.

[There is another wonderful solo song “Aaraam Se Jo Raaten Kaaten” from this film.]

Jab tum hi chali England -Meri Asha (1950) –Agha – K Narayan Rao – a parody song posted by Atul Kumar Deshmukh

In the end, we have (our customary) very special songs of Mohammad Rafi, remembered Naresh Mankad, from Naqli Nawab (1964) [Music Director: Babul]:

There are a couple of very enjoyable Rafi – Asha Duets:

We continue our pursuit of the golden period of Hindi Film Music …….

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