Devdutt Pattanaik’s Business Sutra |1.1 | Is there an Indian way of doing Business

business-sutra-1Business Sutra |1| Corporations

Devdutt Pattanaik opens the discussion in his TV serial Business Sutra by taking up the subject of:

What is the purpose of a corporation? Why does it exist? And is there a difference between corporations in India and those in the West? Wherefrom come these differences?

He goes on to explore the ideas of Happiness as well Strategic versus Tactical thinking. All this discussion leads one to wonder if professionalism is a good thing.

Typically, Devdutt Pattanaik gives no prescription.  He has provided the frameworks; the leader has to take the call.

In our present post, we will have a detailed look at the first of the three parts of this episode.

Business Sutra |1.1 | Is there an Indian way of doing Business

Apparently, since the core of any business activities remains more or less same, the way of doing business must also be the same anywhere. However, as is said in a 2010 HBR article – The India Way of Leading Business – these similarities are “different’ as well. In the same article, K V Kamath is quoted – “Time and again it has been proved that the Western model of doing business would not be a success here.” We “think in English and act in Indian,” is how R. Gopalakrishnan, the executive director of Tata Sons, puts it. “For the Indian manager,” he explained, “his intellectual tradition, his y-axis, is Anglo-American, and his action vector, his x-axis, is in the Indian ethos.”

The authors of this HBR article – Peter Cappelli, Harbir Singh, Jitendra Singh, and Michael Useem – in their book – The India Way: How India’s Top Business Leaders Are Revolutionizing Management – what Indian managers do differently, including: looking beyond stockholders’ interests to public mission and national purpose, drawing on improvisation, adaptation, and resilience to overcome endless hurdles, identifying products and services of compelling value to customers, investing in talent and building a stirring culture. Here are the interviews with Michael Useem and Peter Cappeli on this subject.

In an article – The Indian way of management –  published in Business Today in 2010, Sumant Sinha  notes that it’s a mix of organizational capabilities, management practices, and company culture that sets Indian enterprises apart from firms in other countries.

In an event at the American Enterprise Institute in 2014, Bill Gates speaks on what India does right

Here is one more video clip of Vodafone’s CEO Marten Pieters in a refreshingly honest conversation with ET NOW’s Sonali Krishna about the telecom industry, the plan ahead for Vodafone and why Vodafone doesn’t want to be the number one player in the country just yet, in the context of Indian business model.

This would be true for a business operating in any other country, may be some factor more dominant at one time and the other factor playing up in somewhat differently at other time.

Devdutt Pattanaik traces the roots of these differences in the (known or unknown) influence of the Indian mythology on the Indian psyche in Segment 1: On the Indian versus Western Context.

Here are the key points from his present discourse:

It was East India Company that brought to India the concept of a modern corporation a charter company issuing stock paying dividends and multinational in presence

Indians and Chinese have learned a lot from the West but they don’t have to copy. They cannot create a Chinese or Indian version for Western model.

To understand this, we need to visit the story of Alexander, The Great, when he met a naked ascetic at the bank of Indus. Though the ascetic was apparently doing nothing he did seem to be wise in every respect. Alexander asked the gymnosophist what he was doing nothing sitting over there staring at the Stars. The gymnosophist replied that I am experiencing things. He then asked Alexander as to what he was doing. Alexander said that he was conquering the world. Both laughed at each other. Alexander laughed because he thought the gymnosophist was a fool for doing nothing. The gymnosophist laughed because he thought it’s waste of life to do anything.

If we understand these differences in each other’s point of view, then we can understand the difference between the Indian mindset and the Western mindset

The Indian Way of doing business was not about doing business but using the act of doing business to figure out why you are doing what you’re doing. In the answer to that question there is growth, intellectual growth and emotional growth.

One really needs to understand the purpose of business.

It was this very point that in a 1994 Harvard Business Review article, Peter Drucker argued, “the root cause of nearly every [business] crises is not that things are being done poorly. It is not even that the wrong things are being done. Indeed, in most cases, the right things are being done—but fruitlessly.”

We will take up discussion of Purpose of Business, as presented in the Segment 2 of the first episode of Devdutt Paatanaik’s TV serial Business Sutra  in our next episode.

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – January, 2017

Welcome to January, 2017 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We will commence our current episode with the posts on the anniversaries or eulogies.

Which Was the True Voice of Pancham? – It will be 23 years since Pancham (R D Burman) on this day in 1994 left us music lovers with an awful feeling of loss just when we were about to celebrate his huge comeback. Peeyush Sharma recalls the many voices that he sang to us in, trying to really understand which his true voice was. All songs picked in this list had music by R D Burman himself. The voice had become known as a distinct and melodious one which had that ‘ras’ that was so typical of him. Mone poRe Ruby Roy (later reused as Meri bheegi bheegi si in Anamika) and Jete jete pathe holo deri (which had a Hindi reincarnation as the iconic Tere bina zindagi se koi shikwa to nahin in Aandhi) became chart-toppers in the Bengali non-film songs category.

Om Puri certainly deserved profuse eulogies in the print and net media. I have picked up the three representative ones here –

  • Om Puri – The Luminance of a Natural Actor  – Amitava Nag – Om Puri passed away on 6 January 2017 after four decades of acting. One of the pioneer faces of the Indian ‘parallel’ cinema movement of the 70s and 80s, Om Puri later on shifted to international cinema and remained a forceful actor till his last.
  • The original choice for Ahuja’s role in ‘Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro’ was… not Om Puri – Pankaj Kapoor was to play the builder Ahuja, but when he was cast in the larger role of Tarneja, Om Puri made his celebrated comic debut.
  • Everyman, comedian, sutradhaar: a tribute to Om Puri – It is a bit sad to realise that much of Puri’s best work was done between 25 and 35 years ago, that few roles in the final years did him justice…Much like the man whose hesitant voice and flashing eyes helped make them so memorable, they belong to us all. Or as JBDY’s Ahuja might slur, “Yeh films aap akayle ke nahin hain. Hum sab shareholder hain.”

Urdu Poet, Lyricist Naqsh Lyallpuri Dies at 88  – He first got break in the 1952 film Jaggu with the song Agar Teri Aakhon Se Aakhein Mila Doon (Asha Bhosale, Hansraj Behl).

From Hindi film music to raga-based symphonies, the remarkable journey of Anthony GonsalvesNaresh Fernandes pays rich tribute to the renowned musician, whose fifth death anniversary is on January 18, merged the Western classical music of his Goan heritage with Hindustani melodies.

Geeta Bali’s Personality Had the Energy of Shammi Kapoor’s Dance – Megha Mathur – This story is from The Quint’s archives and was first published on 21 January 2016. It is being republished to mark Geeta Bali’s death anniversary.

Kamal Amrohi made only four films. Fortunately for us, one of them was ‘Pakeezah’ – On the director’s birth anniversary, here is an excerpt from Vinod Mehta’s biography on Meena Kumari revisits the film’s troubled production.

The January 2017 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs was dedicated to Dilip Dholakia as singer. This was preceded by the guest article Forgotten Composers Unforgettable Melodies (11): Dilip Dholakia, which I then had reblogged on 10-1-2017. Here we have looked at back at Dilip Dholakia from the lens of a music director of Hindi films.

Here are posts on other subjects as well:

Noor Jehan with R.D. Burman & Asha Bhosle – Asha Bhosle said that “Badnaam mohabbat kaun kare [Dost, 1944, Sajjad Hussain] is her favorite song by Noor Jehan.

noor-jehan-with-r-d-burman-asha-bhosleBharat Bhushan, Meena Kumari at premiere of Baiju Bawra (1952)

bharat-bhushan-meena-kumari-at-premiere-of-baiju-bawra-1952

From left to right: Bharat Bhushan, Meena Kumari, Meena Kumari’s sister Madhuri and Surendra, who played the role of the musician Tansen in the film.

When Cinema Matched Music Beat by Beat: Nadiya Kinare in Abhimaan  – The challenge of Nadiya kinare in Abhimaan was to create a supremely classical yet rustic song. SD Burman’s music, Majrooh Sultanpuri’s lyrics, Lata Mangeshkar’s voice along with Jaya Bhaduri and Amitabh Bachchan’s performance and Hrishikesh Mukherjee’s direction were ably supported by the competent technical crew and musicians. Anand Desai and Antara Nanda Mondal explore how master craftsmen of cinema and music matched every frame to a note in this song which can well be called a textbook in song composition and picturisation!

A snowy winter is the perfect excuse to get cuddly in Hindi film songsManish Gaekwad pens this sub-genre of Hindi Film Songs.

Film Songs Based on Classical Ragas (10) – Bihag and its family – Subodh Agrawal continues from where he had left off his series, Songs based on classical ragas.

My Favourites: ‘Kaun Aaya?’ Songs – Hindi films are full of rhetorical questions to which everyone, including the people asking those questions, know the answer… One such question is ‘Kaun aaya?’ The answer is obvious, of course (and the characters on screen know who has stolen their heart, resided in their soul, made them laugh…), but they ask (sing) the questions anyway.  The post has some excellent, but not more often heard songs –

Dhoondhta Hoon Jinko Raaton Ko Khayalon Main Mein’ – Shiv Kumar (Pathak) made his debut with Poonam KI Raat (1965). Here is the link to the song in the title of the post – Dhoondhta Hoon Jinko

Flashback 50 Years By Peeyush Sharma  – There is a marked shift in the style of compositions, change in the audience taste and acceptance of new music directors. Among the films that had their music release this year, Shankar Jaikishen, O P Nayyar and Usha Khanna each had 7 films while Madan Mohan and Ravi had five each and Hemant Kumar had three. Laxmikant Pyarelal had 10 releases to their credit – a defining year for their career. RD Burman gave his life’s first massive chart buster hit Teesri Manzil.  There were several others who scored memorable music scores in a single film or two.

  • (Part I): Shankar Jaikishan Hits of 1966 – Teesari Kasam, Gaban and Amrapali were the notable films from the point of view of the quality of songs.
  • (Part II): OP Nayyar Hits of 1966 – Bahaarein Phir Bhi Aayengi, Sawan Ki Ghata, Yeh Raat Phir Na Aayegi were the notable films from the point of view of the quality of songs.
  • (Part III): Madan Mohan Hits of 1966 – Mera Saaya, Neend Hamari Khwab Tumhare, Dulhan Ek Raat Ki were the notable films from the point of view of the quality of songs.

Steam behemoth rides in Bollywood – D P Rangan takes on the nostalgic trip to the younger days of most of the readers who are in 40+ age group.

Ten of my favourite non-romantic male-female duets which do not mention romantic love in any form, not even as part of a bhajan (the Radha-Krishna trope is one that comes to mind). And that the actors should both be adults (because there are far too many songs which have a female playback singer singing for a child onscreen) as in Saanwle-salone aaye din bahaar ke (Ek Hi Raasta, 1956).

Do actors have what it takes to stop lip-synching and start singing their own film songs? – No actor took playback singing as seriously as Premnath when he sang an Indian classical bandish Dagar Chalat Dekho in the little-known film Raja Kaka (1973). It was an enviable accomplishment that went unnoticed.

Odd(itie)s and Ends, Joys of Fusion, and Blogging Restlessness is a post that is a little more scattered and eclectic than usual, which may signal a direction for other posts to come.

Cinema classical: When Parveen Sultana trumped Kishore Kumar in ‘Hamein Tumse Pyar Kitna’Manish Gaekwad has kick started to showcase the voices of the stalwarts of Indian classical music in popular films with this song from Kudrat. Naushad introduced Parveen Sultana to Hindi moviegoers in Kaun Gali Gayo Shyam in Pakeezah (1972). The thumri was used in the background….Sultana returned to Hindi playback only in 1981 for Hamein Tumse Pyar Kitna, composed by RD Burman for the movie Kudrat. The track, in raag bhairavi, was written by Majrooh Sultanpuri. Parveen Sultana won the 1982 Filmfare trophy for her version of the song.

My Favourites: Songs of Promises – are all love songs, songs of promises between lovers. Not ‘aap ki kasam’ songs, or the breaking of promises but actual promises being asked for, or made. Promises of a future together, of hope that one will have someone with whom to share life’s struggles and happiness, of trust that one’s faith will not be betrayed. For example:

Picture the song: Guns and snogs in ‘Mile Mile Do Badan’ from ‘Black Mail’Nandini Ramnath narrates why we should trust Vijay Anand to insert a romantic song in the middle of a chase sequence and make it work…..

We end today’s episode with a INTERVIEW of Ahsan Qasim by Sanjeeb Updhyay about GREAT MOHD RAFI SAHAB – Part 1  ǁ Part 2 ǁ Part 3 ǁ Part 4

I trust you will always feel free to proffer your suggestions for making this series of posts more lively and informative….

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – January 2017

Welcome to January, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

I plan to revert back to our original model of reviewing the articles/ blog posts on the current topics related to quality and /or quality management from our present episode of the Quality Blog Carnival..

A Look at Quality’s Past – When we look back at some of Quality’s anniversaries, we can’t say what 2017 will bring to the quality community, but we do know that the quality community will continue to bring a lot to the world.

Increasingly, quality is no more considered as an essential but not so directly contributing the business activity. We have a few articles that discuss this changing perception.

Quantifying the Financial Benefits of Quality – Holly Lyke-Ho-Gland

  • Part One—How You Use Quality Matters– Once organizations get clarity on the financial impact of quality, the next step is to understand what practices and applications help improve the financial value.
  • Part Two – Quantifying the Financial Benefits of Quality — the Role of Governance and Transparency – Governance determines how the organization “operationalizes” the policy established through the design, implementation, and continuous improvement of the enterprise quality system itself….Though previous research indicates that successful quality programs rely on support and guidance by senior leadership, organizations that use a centralized committee, comprised of leaders in multiple functions, see greater financial gains. This makes sense given that a cross-functional team provides a broader perspective, strengthens buy-in, and fosters adoption of quality, its benefits, and standards throughout the organization.
  • Part Three – Bringing Suppliers into the FoldBest-in-class quality organizations use training with their suppliers to drive quality and are twice as likely to train suppliers. Supplier training ensures that all critical parties in the value chain understand the organization’s standard of quality—around quality measures and efficacy and what it wants to achieve with its product offerings.
  • Part Four – Employee training and incentives – Best-in-class organizations use training to drive a commitment to quality and help employees understand their role in quality — including their impact on the end customer and driving value.  However, organizations need to consider the purpose of their quality efforts before making decisions on incentives, the types of training, and even which employees to target for training.

Dr. Armand Feigenbaum on-

  • Managing for Quality – You have to understand that quality problems, like bananas, come in bunches. And if you try to go at them a banana at a time rather than at the stalk, you’re going to wind up with a lot of sour fruit.
  • the Cost of Quality and the Hidden Factory – By cost of quality I mean two things: the cost of getting it right and the cost of failing to get it right.

Results driven improvement process, which has the following characteristics:

  1. Organizations only introduce management and process innovations if necessary;
  2. Empirical tests show what works and what not;
  3. Frequent successes create new energy for improvement;
  4. Management creates a continuous learning process by applying lessons learnt in new phases.

Quality & Excellence: The Quality 136— Tom Peters presents Random Thoughts on Quality, Emphasizing the Elements That Are Often Missing in Conventional Quality Programs.

Quality management: caught in the tensions between quality, costs and timeWillfried Heist, Vice President Quality, Product Safety and HSE Management, T/QM, Knorr-Bremse SfN GmbH – Due to the increasing technical complexity of products an increasing number of companies from other sectors are becoming partners in our supply chain. This is confronting the quality manager of today with completely new challenges: how can new companies be optimally integrated into the supply chain? What will it require to guarantee our quality standards along the global supply chain all the way through to the n-tier companies?

Risk: A four letter word for quality management?  by Bryce Day, CEO of Catch and the driving force behind the development of the highly successful QA management tool Enterprise Tester – To me as a manager, quality is a reflection on how much risk I’m prepared to take. For example, I would want to buy a high quality car because my risk appetite for a car breaking down is low, but I’m willing to purchase a low quality $2 toy from a discount store because my risk appetite is much higher that it will break.

Why Customer Care is the Life Blood of any QMS  – Christopher StainowHow do you go about putting your customers at the forefront of your quality management goals? Here are a few things to consider to help you go that extra mile…

Quality Management in Everyday Life and Work  – From yoga to childcare; meetings to housework… quality management strategies work in the boardroom and at home. Here are some ways that you can use these tools for everyday life situations…

We will add Ask The Experts, ASQ, as one more regular section from the current episode. We will take any topic that has been discussed on this forum, based on the relevance to the core theme of the articles for a given episode of our blog carnival. For the present episode we have chosen – Creating a Culture of Quality. The question is how to change the attitudes toward quality management at all levels of the organization. The expert reply states that since most of the management understand well what is in for them, beginning may happen by examining some of the “pain points” in your organization and showing how quality tools can help to solve them.

We will now turn to our regular sections:

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy has December Roundtable: What is the best way to ensure quality and customer integration grow together?.

customer concept with business elements
customer concept with business elements

We now watch two of the latest ASQ TV  episode:

  • The Hidden FactoryIn this episode, learn about the concept of the hidden factory and how it can affect any organization regardless of industry. And discover how it can create misleading metrics that cause productivity to outrun quality.

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of December, 2016:

  • jimsmith_200ISO 9001 is only the Foundation – If you want a manageable QMS, then better build it that way from the start. Excessive paperwork that seems to be the leading cause of disappointment is an indication that they implemented the ISO9001 requirements the wrong way.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs: January, 2017

Dilip Dholakia: A Singer

That Dilip Dholakia (Birth: 15th October, 1921 \ Death: 2nd January, 2011) was a multi-talented music personality has been universally accepted. He was a singer, a music director, a music arranger, a lyricist, all rolled into one persona.

We have looked at the music directorial side of his talent in our article on 10th January, 2017. For our present episode we will focus on the singing Dilip Dholakia.

dilip-dholakia-youngDilip Dholakia had his first exposure to singing in his early childhood when he would accompany his grandfather to Swaminarayan temple and join the singing of the temple prayers. His father used to play flute and his grandfather used to sing songs of God’s praise and hymns at the temple. Later he learnt classical singing from Pandurang Amberkar, a disciple of Khan Saheb Aman Ali Khan. He had shifted to Bombay in his. After he was selected as an artist on All India Radio, in Mumbai, he got the offer to sing a song for the film Kismatwala (1944). The composer Ratanlal, younger brother of composer Khemchand Prakash, had Dilip Dholakia sing ‘Gori Chalo Na Sina Ubharke’ and ‘Dekho Hamse Na Ankhe Ladaya Karo’. He also got chance to sing in chorus for a K L Saigal song Thukra Rahi Hai Duniya for Bhanvra (1944). In 1946, he got to sing ‘Dukh Ki Is Nagri Mein Baba Koi Na Puchhe Baat’ in ‘Laaj’ under Ramchandra Pal’s baton.

By this time Dilip Dholakia was introduced to Snehal Bhatkar at HMV studio, Bombay. Snehal Bhatkar helped him to cut his first record. Dilip Dholakia recorded two solos, penned by Gujarat’s well-known poet and lyricist, Venubahi Purohit. These songs were[i]:

Bhint Phadi Ne Piplo Re Ugyo, Jiran Eni Kaya Re, Kankari Chuno Roj Khare Ne Dhruje Vajar Kaya Re

Aadha Tel Aur Adha Paani, Em Gujarati Jaaye Javani, Em Gujarati Aa Jindagani

Another the then emerging Gujarati music director, Avinash Vyas gave him a couple of duets with the prominent playback singer Amirbai Karnataki in Gujarati film , Sati Sone (1948). One of these two, Shravani Vadaladi Tu Ja…Ja Sandesho Lai, is available on YT:

He got his first major break with Divadandi’s(1950). Ajit Merchant’s solo composition in his voice Taari Aankh No Afini Tara Bol No Bandhani was an instant hit. It has acquired a cult status among Gujarati songs and has had have covers and versions till now. Dilip Dholakia sings the first line of the song, without any accompanying instrument, to enjoy in his bare voice:

We will listen to another duet from this film. Dilip Dholakia sings his lines in lower scales –

Vagda Vachche Talavadi Ne Talavadi Ne Kor – with Rohini Roy – Lyricist: Balmukund Dave

Apparently, Dilip Dholakia could make out that he would not be able to carve out his space in the field of playback singing. So he switched over to playing the role of assistant to S N Tripathi, when Chitragupta took to his independent career and then to even Chitragupta as well. It was during this association that he could lay his hands onto some more of playback singing assignments.

Dur Gagan Pe Chamke Sitare.. Paas Hamare Chamke Chand Hamare – Ram Hanuman Yuddha, (1957) – with Geeta Dutt – S N Tripathi – Ramesh Chandra Pandey

SN Tripathi’s one of the signature melodious tunes. Dilip Dholakia has to play with his voice in sort of an undertone to match the tonal chords of Geeta Dutt.

Aaj Agar Meri Laaj Gayi, Samaz Le Teri Laaj Gayi – Ram Hanuman Yuddha (1957) – with Lata Mangeshkar – S N Tripathi – Ramesh Chandra Pandey

Dilip Dholakia sings for a playful  king on his boat tour on a river even his queen is prayerfully demanding protection of her dutiful rights … Both the singers depict two entirely different moods, in the setting of different scales on the same tune.

Run Jhun Baaje Penjaniya – Sakshi Gopal (1957) – Chitragupta – Bharat Vyas

The song is set to a slow rhythm of a traditional stray DUHA style of Charan poets of the Kathiawar (a part of Gujarat’s Suarshatra region), obviously Dilip Dholakia’s ancestral heritage instincts influencing the composition of the song. .

Khanke Kangana Khan Khan Re, Chhanake Ghungharu Chhan Chhan Re  – Saugandh (1961) – with Lata Mangeshkar and Mohammad Rafi in the lead.

This appears to be the only Hindi song that Dilip Dholakia has chosen to sing under his own music direction. But when he has chosen to do so, not lonely music director, (Dilip Dholakia), but the lyricist (Prem Dhawan) also joins Lata and Rafi @ 2.21 to 2.24 in an innovative experiment in this song.

After a long hiatus, Dilip Dholakia he came back to singing and recording non-filmy songs only at the very end of his active career. I have picked up two representative songs from this crop.

Ten Puchhyo Prem No Marm Ne Hun Dai Betho Alingan

Dilip Dholakia seems to be rekindling memories of his visits to Swaminarayan temple in this bhajan –

Lagi Re Mohe Nain Najariya…

We will continue with our tradition of ending our episode with Mohammad Rafi Songs.

I have selected two so-well-composed Dilip Dholakia songs that not only stand out as a few of Rafi’s best everm, but do present Dilip Dholakia’s range as a music director.

One is a Bhaskar Vora’s song for Satyavan Savitri (1963) –

Mithadi Nazaroon Vaagi

[Sweet glance has hit me..]

and the other on is a non-film song, written by Barakat Virani ‘Befam’

Milan Na Deepak Buzai Gaya Chhe

[Lamps of our meeting have now gone off..]

We will continue our search for Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

[i]  I most sincerely thank Shri Biren Kothari for providing the soft copies of these songs.

Dilip Dholakia? D. Dilip? Diliprai? – A Singer or A Music Director or A Music Arranger?

[First published on Songs of Yore asForgotten Composers Unforgettable Melodies (11): Dilip Dholakiaon January 10, 2017]

Those who are familiar with any of the aspect of Dilip Dholakia’s world of music probably may know of him by any one of these names that he used for his different music career roles. For the records of the Hindi Film’s mundane history Dilip Dholakia [Born: 15th October, 1921 / Death: 2nd January, 2011] was probably noticed more as an assistant to Chitragupta or S N Tripathi or to the music-duo Laxmikant Pyarelal. And yet, Dilip Dholakia remained all of singer, music director, music arranger and at times even lyricist and an actor, during his active career. Probably that is the excuse lady luck took refuge for not favoring him with the worldly success !

Dilip Dholakia’s music legacy was also multi-dimensional. His father used to play flute while his grandfather would sing hymns and prayers at Swaminarayan Temple at his birth town of Junagadh (Saurashtra, Gujarat. Dilip Dholakia would join them in singing or in playing pakhwaj when he was a toddler. He migrated to Bombay after his graduation and did some odd jobs. However his association with singing did continue. He trained under Pandurang Amberkar to hone his raw musical instincts into the systematic classical mold. His introduction to Snehal Bhatkar, who then worked for HMV studios, led him to cut his first ever music record, in  with two Gujarati songs – Bhint Phadi Ne Piplo Re Ugyo and Aadha Tel Aur Aadha Pani.

It was Khemchand Prakash who gave Dilip Dholakia first formal break to sing in the chorus  in Thukra Rahi Hai Duniya Hum Hai Ke So Rahe Hai – @2.24 with K L Saigal for film Bhanwara (1944).  In the same year, Dilip Dholaki could get to sing two songs – Gori Chalo Na Sina Ubharke and Dekho Humse Na Aankh Ladaya Karo – under the music direction of Khemchand Prakash’s younger brother, Ratanlal, for ‘Kismatwala’. He got one more song under the baton of Ramchandra Pal for ‘Laaj’ in 1946 – Dukh Ki Is Nagri Mein Baba Koi Na Puchche Baat.

It was another Gujarati music director Avinash Vyas, who paired him with the then a very well-popular singer, Amirbai Karnataki, in the Gujarati film, Sati Sone (1948) – for the duet

Shravani Ni Vadaladali Tu Ja..Ja Sandesho Lai

(O cloud of monsoon go.. go take my message..)

It was a stroke of luck that got him his first major successful break. Ajit Merchant had planned to use Mukesh for a solo song of Divadandi (1950), but it was Dilip Dholakia, who was destined to enshrine this song as one of the most iconic ever Gujarati song –

Taari Aankh No Afini Taara Bol No Bandhani, Taara Roop Ni Punam No Paagal Hun Eklo

(Addict of opium-intoxication of your eyes, and your spoken words, I am the only lunatic of your full-moon beauty).

Incidentally, this tune has been used by Chtragupta in Naya Sanasar (1959) for Lata Mangeshkar’s cradle song Chanda Loriyan Sumaye Hawa Jualan Julaye Mere Lal Ko.

Apparently, Dilip Dholakia was either intrinsically more inclined to music direction or could sense that he may not make space for himself in the then competitive world of Hindi film play-back singing. So he took up assignment of assisting S N Tripathi, and later on Chitragupta, who himself was S N Tripathi’s assistant before he charted his independent course.  His foray into music direction / music arrangement was under the name of D. Dilip.

Dilip Dholakia could get his first independent assignment of music direction for Bhakta Mahima (1960). Even as he composed no less than 16 songs for this film, none of the otherwise quite resourceful netizens have yet been able to lay hand on any the songs.

Dilip Dholakia’s next film was Teen Ustad in 1961. The six songs of the film, of which one Talat Mahmood- Suman Kalyanpur duet and one Mohammad Rafi- Suman Kalyanpur duet as well as one solo each of Lata Mangeshkar and Usha Mangeshkar, have been mentioned in several HFM-related documents, but two singers for the two songs remain unidentified. I have not been able to locate any digital version of the songs from this film.

In the same year Dilip Dholakia got to compose music for Saugandh. He composed 2 Talat Mahmood+Lata Mangeshkar duets, 1 Mohammad Rafi+Lata Mangeshkar duet in which Dilip Dholakia (music director) and Prem Dhawan (lyricist) join in an innovative chorus, 2 Lata Mangeshkar solos and 1 song for which singer is not identified.

Aaja Re Chand Mere Aaja Re, Chand Mere Chand Mere Dil Ye Tera Re – Saugandh (1961) – Talat Mahmood, Lata Mangeshkar – Lyrics: Prem Dhawan

Saugandh seems to be remake of a Telugu film. He has woven Talat Mahmood’s soft voice with a soft tune and equally soft orchestration. The song has been filmed on Jemini Ganeshan and Anjali Devi in the film.

Bagdad Ki Raatein followed in 1962. Dilip Dholakia composed 3 solos for Geeta Dutt, 3 solos for Lata Mangeshkar, 1 duet of Mohammad Rafi and Shamshad Begum and one more duet of Mohammad Rafi with Geeta Dutt. It seems that apart from the considerations of availability of the singers and the related economics, Dilip Dholakia was using the opportunity to present his music in as many variants as possible so as to hit the chords of success.

Julfowalo Se Na Bhul Ke Bhi Pyar Kijiye Ji – Baghdad Ki Raatein – Mohammad Rafi, Shamshad Begum and Chorus – Lyrics:  Prem Dhawan

Being a light-mood song, Dilip Dholakia has given enough space for Shamshad Begum and Mohammad Rafi’s harkatein for augmenting the mood of the song.

Kisi Se Pyar Ho To Dil Bekarar Ho To, Aao Jara Lete Jao Aji Dil Ki Dawa – Baghdad Ki Raatein – Geeta Dutt – Lyrics: Prem Dhawan

Orchestration has mid-eastern accent and Geeta Dutt is at her silken best in tune with the dance song.

Dilip Dholakia had one more film in 1962 – Private Secretary. The film had Ashok Kumar and Jayshree Gadkar in the lead. Dilip Dholakia also rose to the challenge. All 7 songs had perfect blend of melody, erudite composition, ease of singing for the spectators – all possible factors that can help the songs of the entire album to be commercially successful enough so as to provide the necessary escape velocity to the music director to move in to A-league films.

Ja Ja Re Chanda Ja Re Teri Chandani Bhi Mera Jiyara Jalaye – Private Secretary (1962) – Lata Mangeshkar – Lyrucs: Prem Dhawan

Here we have as good as any Lata Mangeshkar solo of that time. Dilip Dholakia has been able to touch the melody chords that have been signature aspect of Chitragupta compositions. There are three more Lata solos in the film. All of these are available on YT.

Jaa Re Beimaan Tujhe Jaan Liya – Private Secretary (1962) – Manna Dey – Lyrics: Prem Dhawan

This one is semi-classical song for a light situation in the film. The composition ought to have gone into augmenting the trend of using Manna Dey for light situation-classical song genre that was evolving at that time.

How Dilip Dholakia had peaked can be gaged from the songs he composed next year for a Gujarati film – Satyavan Savitri. This was his maiden Gujarti film as a composer. All of Rafi and Lata songs had become quite popular among Gujarati listeners at that time.

Aawi Rasili Chandani, Van Vagado Lahervati – Mohammad Rafi, Lata Mangeshkar – Lyrics ; Bhaskar Vora

(So enjoyable full-moon light has arrived, lighting up forest trees on the way)

The orchestration has very distinct Chitragupta effect.

And now was a sort of drought of music direction assignments in Hindi films. The next film – Veer Ghatotkatch  – to come up is again a mythological film, in 1970. Dilip Dholakia has composed one solo each for Mukesh and Manna Dey, two for Suman Kalyanpur and a female-female duet for Suman Kalyanpur and Reshma. Thus, he does keep trying to be as creative as possible even possibly within shoe string budgets.

Us Pratham Pratham Parichay Me Hi Maine Khoya Tha Apnapan – Veer Ghatotkach (1970) – Mukesh – Lyrics: B D Mishra

The song does present Mukesh at his usual romantic best.

1970 had one more C-grade film assignment, Dagabaaz, for Dilip Dholakia, in the name of Dilip Roy. He composed two solos for Mukesh, one for Mahendra Kapoor and Lata Mangeshkar each and a duet for Mahendra Kapoor and Asha Bhosle for the film.

Aa Meri Bahon Mein Jhool Ja  – Dagabaaz (1970) – Mahendra Kapoor, Asha Bhosle –– Lyrics:  B D Mishra

The couple goes to play their romance wandering happily in the garden is a very typical duet for Hindi film situations. The song is filmed on Chandra Sekhar and Helen, who themselves have not been able to get the A-grade lead actor roles, in spite of enough talent and looks.

The eighth of Hindi films for which Dilip Dholakia could get to compose music was again a C-grade myhtlological film, Mata Vaishnodevi.

Man Ke Kore Kaagz Pe Tasveer Khinch Lo Raam Ki – Mata Vaishnodevi (1970) – Manna Dey – Lyrics: B D Mishra

The song has twin version in Asha Bhosle’s voice, filmed on Jayshree Gadkar, who was quite successful on Marathi screen, but destined to the roles of mythological Hindi films heroin !

Dilip Dholakia had had a similar run in Gujarati films, where he had 11 films in his bag. He did a couple of A-grade films like (a national award winner regional film) Kanku or Mena Gurjari there. He continued to experiment and innovate here as well.

Eklaj Avya Hata, Ekla Javana – Jalim Singh Jadeja – Bhupinder – Lyrics: Barkat Virani

(Had come alone will go alone too)

Even though his association did span for a longer duration, that was probably not enough to meet his basic needs for a satisfying decent living or providing for satisfying his creative streak. So he had to resort to the next best career option – work as music directorial assistant for some more successful music director. This he did so well for Laxmikant Pyarelal, from 1972 to 1988. He recorded his last song in 1988.

He also had worked with Hridaynath Mangeshkar to record his compositions like Meera Bhajan (Part-I), Bhagavad Geeta, Gyaneshwari Geeta, an album of Urdu gazals by Ghalib. He also composed for HMV records sung by Lata Mangeshkar, Asha Bhosle, Kishori Amonkar. He composed music of Chausanthpadi written by Nishkulanand Swami.

The tradition of music runs into the fourth generation, the torch being kept alive by Dilip Dholakia’s son Rajat Dholakia.

Business Management Books to Read in 2017

On the very first day of 2017, I thought fit to collate a list of business management books to read, as observed on just the first page of Google search.

Jena McGregor recommendation on The Washington Post:

Mastering Civility: A Manifesto for the Workplace By Christine Porath, Dec. 27

Stretch By Scott Sonenshein, Feb. 7

Madame President By Helene Cooper, March 7

Eyes Wide Open By Isaac Lidsky, March 14

Radical Candor By Kim Scott, March 14

Option B By Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant, April 24

The Captain Class: The Driving Force Behind the World’s Greatest Teams By Sam Walker, May 16

The Push By Tommy Caldwell, May 16

Gorbachev: His Life and Times By William Taubman, Sept. 7

Shana Lebowitz recommends 10 books every new manager should read @ Business Insider India.

‘Drive’ by Daniel H. Pink

‘The One Thing You Need to Know’ by Marcus Buckingham

‘Thinking, Fast and Slow’ by Daniel Kahneman

‘Act Like a Leader, Think Like a Leader’ by Herminia Ibarra

‘How to Win Friends and Influence People’ by Dale Carnegie

“Mindset’ by Carol Dweck

‘Meditations’ by Marcus Aurelius and Gregory Hays

‘Things Fall Apart’ by Chinua Achebe

‘Now, Discover Your Strengths’ by Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton

‘Good to Great’ by Jim Collins

Four Business Books To Read In 2017 @ Eric Jacobson On Management And Leadership

 The Elegant Pitch: Create a Compelling Recommendation, Build BroadSupport, and Get It Approved, by Mike Figliuolo

Leading the Unleadable – How to Manage Mavericks, Cynics, Divas, andOther Difficult People, by Alan Willett

Extreme Ownership, by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team by Lencioni

Twelve Business Books to Read in 2017 by Natalie White

Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don’t By Jim Collins

The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers By Ben Horowitz

Big Science: Ernest Lawrence and the Invention That Launched the Military-Industrial Complex By Michael Hiltzik

Invisible Influence: The Hidden Forces That Shape Behavior By Jonah Berger

The 10 Laws of Trust: Building the Bonds That Make a Business Great By Professor Joel C. Peterson

Lead and Disrupt: How to Solve the Innovator’s Dilemma By Professor Charles O’Reilly and Michael Tushman

Clay Water Brick: Finding Inspiration from Entrepreneurs Who Do the Most with the Least By Jessica Jackley

Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World By Adam Grant

The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu By Dan Jurafsky

The Fissured Workplace: Why Work Became So Bad for So Many and What Can Be Done to Improve It By David Weil

Bad Science: Quacks, Hacks, and Big Pharma Flacks By Ben Goldacre

All the Devils Are Here: The Hidden History of the Financial Crisis By Bethany McLean and Joe Nocera

These may certainly not be the only ones to be the recommended books. But, indeed it makes a very good beginning for a New Year.

Wishing The Best of 2017…..

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – December, 2016

Welcome to December, 2016 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We will begin our present episode on a lighter note with You’ve never heard the demonetized version of this famous song from Guru Dutt’s ‘Pyaasa’. As a parody, ‘When it was our turn in the queue, the bank’s coffers were empty‘ is a part of sort of mini cottage industry – These Bollywood spoofs on demonetisation will tide you over the cashless blues.

December, 2016 also had another major event- passing away of Tamil Nadu CM, J Jayalalithaa.

Wadia and Nadia: How love kicked in pre-Bollywood filmdom – Nadia was a JBH discovery. But it was Homi (May 22, 1911 – December 10, 2004) who gave this memsahib with a thick Scottish accent, a voice. “Homi realised her language was her ‘body’,” says film theorist and curator Amrit Gangar. “He kept Nadia’s dialogue to a bare minimum because of her difficulty with Hindi.”

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Mary Ann Evans aka Fearless Nadia in a still from Carnival Queen, 1955

Happy Birthday Dharmendra: As he turns 81, we bring you his various filmi moods – He was probably the first Indian male star who appeared bare-chested in a song in Phool Aur Patthar. From Anupama (1966) to Satyakam (1969), Dharmendra tried to create a space for himself as an actor. Hrishikesh Mukherjee’s Chupke Chupke is another film which proved that the actor could balance subtle comedy just as well as slapstick elsewhere.

MS Subbulakshmi: A journey from Kunjamma to Meera – is N Venkataraman’s tribute on her birth centenary (16 September 1916 – 11 December 2004).

December is also a month of birth dates of Dilip Kumar and Raj Kapoor, two fulsome actors of the Great Triad.

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Dilip Kumar – Leaves from My Diary in an interview conducted in 1957.

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Prithivi Raj Kapoor with sons and a grand son

15 Songs of Shailendra: The Art of Simply Expressing Deepest Thoughts – On Shailendra’s death anniversary,Antara Nanda Mondal and Peeyush Sharma have compiled a brief list of 15 songs that give a glimpse of his massive range – encompassing songs of love and romance, songs of introspection and philosophies, songs of spiritual awakening and harsh social realities, songs of that celebrate liberation and songs that express the anguish of entrapment.

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We have an excellent career-sketch of Sitara Devi: The Twinkling Star profiled by Karan Bali on her second death anniversary on 25th November.  Some of her memorable films are Judgement of Allah (1935), Achhut (1940), Pagal (1940) and India Today (1940)., Roti (1942), Najman (1943) or her snake dance in Anjali (1957) or the Holi dance in Mother India (1957).

We will also take note of A Short Film Tribute to Sitara Devi   

Karan Bali has also profiled PC Barua, who is most easily remembered for K L Saigal’s songs of Devdas (1935) or Saigal’s So Ja Raajkumari So Ja (Zindagi).

The December, 2016 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs was dedicated to Mohammad Rafi’s solo song from the first film with the music director. This part of the article covered the first three years of the first-five-year-period of 1944-1948. The second part of the article, has covered songs from 1947 and 1948 @ Mohammad Rafi’s Solo Song From The FIRST Film With The Music Director ||2||.

Here are posts on other subjects as well:

Shyam Benegal’s ‘Ankur’ and the beginning of a film movement – A Book Review by Sangeeta Datta – A script written during the filmmaker’s college years became the foundation of his sparkling career as one of cinema’s greatest realists.

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Smita Patil as a child: Mischievous, adventurous, emotional and an excellent mimic – In her review Maithili Rao notes that  Smita Patil biography reveals that the acclaimed actor, whose death anniversary is on December 13, was ‘prem mayee’: a being suffused with love.

More Delicious Chutney Covers of Hindi Film Songs – After the introductory piece, we can now expect this to be a regular fare.

Southern Spice in Hindi Music highlights key aspects of South Indian music that have been absorbed in Hindi film songs, that have added what one would call as a dash of Southern spice in Hindi film music. This is not about the vocal styles from South India, but instruments from South India. LINK TO PLAYLIST FOR SOUTHERN SPICE IN HINDI FILM MUSIC takes us to 12 such songs from 1940s to’60s, with one exception.

I have been able to land upon this quite an imaginative subject – “Samne waali khidki” songs rather belatedly.

Shankar-Jaikishan’s multi-faceted genius with ‘other’ singers – have covered so far their best songs for his leading singers, Lata Mangeshkar, Mukesh, Rafi and Manna Dey. also presented his best dance songs for Lata Mangeshkar and female dance duets. presenting my final tribute to SJ with their songs for ‘other’ singers which give a glimpse of their multi-faceted talent.

My Favourites: Heroes – 1 (40s-70s)  is the pairing list of earlier  My Favourites: Heroines – 1 (40s-70s) , based on an idea of Stars and Songs, that the author, Ava Suri, particularly like featuring the actress. In the continuum, Zeenat Aman – My favorite Songs is a collection of Baker’s dozen songs that have matching visuals to the catchy lyrics with Zeenat Aman in the focus and Ashok Kumar – 10 favorite songs that the actor sang as well as performed on the screen.

‘Diya Na Bujhe Ri Aaj Hamara’ – Kumkum The first song I got as a dancer was the song “Angana Baaje Shehnai Re, Aaj Mori Jagmag Atariya” in the film Sheesha which was sung by Shamshad Begum. ‘Raat Ke Raahi’s song ‘Daayein Baayein Chhup Chhupa Ke Kahaan Chale’ was picturized on Kumkum’s younger sister Radhika and Shammi Kapoor.Radhika also stays with her family in Mumbai.

Trios, Quartets, and More: Ten of my favourite songs has presented songs such as:

Bas mujhko mohabbat ho gayi hai (Biwi aur Makaan), 1966); Mukesh, Manna Dey, Hemant, Talat Mahmood. There is one more such experiment in the same film – Nahi Hota… Aa Tha Jab Janam Liya – Mukesh, Manna Dey & Hemant Kumar

The Legends: Asha Bhosle sets the tone with the help of solos and The Legends: Asha Bhosle – Part 2 has her duets.

We end today’s episode with a short film on songs and life of Mohammad Rafi: Part 1| Part 2 | Part 3. 

I take this opportunity to wish a great 2017 to all of you and look forward to your valued suggestions to keep our content more engrossing…