Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music : September, 2017

Welcome to September, 2017 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

Actress Shakila, who is known for the song Babuji Dheere Chalna, passed away in Mumbai on 20th September, 2017.

Actress Shakila dies of heart attack: 5 songs that will remind you of ‘the fairy queen of Indian fantasies’  – Ankita MehtaShakila was one of the top actresses in the 50s and 60s. She acted with Guru Dutt in Aar Paar (1954), Dev Anand in C.I.D (1956), Raj Kapoor in Shriman Satyawadi (1960), Shammi Kapoor in China Town (1962) and Sunil Dutt in Post Box 999.

Shakila, the star of ‘Aar Paar’ and ‘CID’ dies at the age of 82 – She made her debut as a child actor in 1950 and made her breakthrough in Guru Dutt’s ‘Aar Paar’. Born as Badshah Begum on January 1, 1935, Shakila was introduced to cinema by her aunt, who went on to manage the acting careers of Shakila and her sisters Noor, and Nasreen. Shakila’s early appearances include Dastaan (1950), Sindbad the Sailor (1952), Rajrani Damyanti (1952), Aagosh (1953), Shahenshah (1953), Raj Mahal (1953) and Armaan (1953).

Most of the newspapers, like Indian Express, Times Of India, National Herald, Hindustan Times , Free Press Journal, The Quint, News18.com, The Hindu Business Line , Mumbai Mirror etc. also have paid rich tributes.

We will also take a retrospective look and read Shakila (Shakeela) – Interview – by Nalini Uchil in 1984. the interviewer notes that she had great fun while she worked in films. ……Now, Shakila has no use for awards or trophies. …..And nothing will make her come back into films.).

We will now take up tribute posts:

M.S. Subbulakshmi: The woman who built bridges with her music : Madurai Shanmugavadivu Subbulakshmi, who was born on 16 September 1916 and died on 11 December 2004, remains an unsurpassed phenomenon in Carnatic music

Seven Contemporary Covers of Songs Once Famously Sung By Noor Jehan… on her birthday.

Forgotten Composers Unforgettable Melodies: S Mohinder is combined tribute post to S Mohinder on his 92 birthday and Asha Bhosle on her 84th birthday on 8th September:

Kaun kahe unse ja ke ae huzoor by Asha Bhosle from Paapi (1953), lyrics Sarshar Sailani

The September 2017 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs was dedicated to (Shankar-) Jaikishan and Hasrat Jaipuri’s Songs Fading From the Memory.

Here are posts on other subjects as well:

Ten of my favourite ‘imprisoned singer’ songs – Hindi cinema has its fair share of people who are in prison, at times in really dire straits but still being able to summon up the energy to sing.

National film archive adds 162 films to its stash – According to a press release, 125 of the newly acquired films are in their original negative format. These include Mani Kaul’s Uski Roti (1969), SU Sunny’s Kohinoor (1960) starring Dilip Kumar, and Jayant Desai’s Amber (1952) starring Nargis and Raj Kapoor.

OP Nayyar’s influence on other Music Directors – Ravindra Kelkar maps representative songs for the three scenarios of the songs composed by other MDs which sound like OP:

1) Those songs which were composed in OP style willingly
2) Those songs composed in OP style due to pressure from producer/distributor
3) Those songs composed in OP style with the intention of cutting OP out

We have reviews of three books at Conversations over Chai:

  • To Her, With Love – that of ‘The Classic Biography of Meena Kumari’
  • No Holds Barred – that of Rishi Kapoor’s autobiography; Khullam Khulla
  • To the Movies Born – that of Asha Parekh’s autobiography. ‘The Hit Girl’, co-authored by Khalid Mohammed

Hindi Songs With Whistling – a list of hindi film songs, where whistling forms a significant part of the song or at times, identity of the song. Not included are the songs having whistling only for a few seconds, may be at the end or the beginning. (e.g. ‘Tum Pukar Lo’ from Khamoshi)

In photos: A Jitendra Arya exhibition captures a budding film industry and a changing nationDamini Kulkarni – acclaimed photographer Jitendra Arya’s camera was as intrepid and bohemian as its owner, capturing Indian personalities like MF Hussain, Ravi Shankar, and Dilip Kumar, as well as powerful international figures like British Nobel laureate Bertrand Russell, Clement Atlee, and Grace Kelly. Arya’s skill as a portraitist has been compared to the versatility of Yousuf Karsh, who has been widely regarded as one of the best photographers of the 20th Century.

Teesri Kasam – A Story of Love That Meandered to its Dead EndTeesri Kasam – the name given to Maare Gaye Gulfam for its cinematic version – was hailed a classic and collected reasonably well at the box-office though a little too late for its producer – the great poet Shailendra. Vijay Kumar explores the similarities and deviations between Teesri Kasam and Maare Gaye Gulfam, both written by the renowned Hindi literatteur Phanishwar Nath Renu. In this exhaustive critique, he peels the layers off five songs of Teesri Kasam, revealing the deep and profound message they express about the anguish of women in the rural hinterland.

Duet Songs with ‘Two Moods’ lists songs having two different moods, mainly Happy and Sad, in broad terms.

In our series Micro View of Best Songs 1948 @SoY of Best songs of 1948: And the winners are?, SoY has presented Best songs of 1948 songs: Wrap Up 1 wherein Mukesh is adjudged the Best Singer for the song Gaaye ja geet milan ke or Kabhi dil dil se takarata to hoga.  In continuation of the series on this blog, we continued with the  posts on Female Solo Songs with following up the first part with the second part  of the solo songs of Geeta Dutt with .

We will end the present post with two very well-known Mohammad Rafi songs featurin Shakeela on the screen.

Jitni Haseen Ho Tum Utani Hi Bewafa Ho – Mangu Dada (1970) – C Arjun – Akhtar Romani

Chheda Jo Dil Ka Fasana Hasa Jor Se Kyon Jamana Alla Jaane Walla Jaane –  Nakli Nawab (1962) – Babul – Raja Mehandi Ali Khan

We also have a Book Review: Sujata Dev’s ‘Mohammed Rafi: Golden Voice of the Silver Screen

I trust you will always feel free to proffer your suggestions for making this series of posts more lively and informative….

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Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – September, 2017

Welcome to September, 2017 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

Our topic for September 2017 is Industry 4.0. This was a concept that had been mentioned in our July, 2017 post for further discussions in the next issue. We will take a quick look at the first few articles appearing in Google search.

Industry 4.0 is a name for the current trend of automation and data exchange in manufacturing technologies. It includes cyber-physical systems, the Internet of things, cloud computing and cognitive computing…Industry 4.0 creates what has been called a “smart factory”. Within the modular structured smart factories, cyber-physical systems monitor physical processes, create a virtual copy of the physical world and make decentralized decisions.

Industry 4.0 – The future of the Factory: The fourth industrial revolution has been introduced in recent years. It’s said that Industry 4.0 is the future of the factory where both the objects, which will be equipped with RFID devices, and the machines, will intelligently to communicate with each other in a secure networked environment. In the smart factory, intelligent machines can perform complex tasks while communicating with other machines. The machines will be able to detect mechanical issues or material shortages and then send instant messages to a live person for immediate troubleshooting.

industry_40_factory

What Everyone Must Know About Industry 4.0Bernard Marr – The question, then, is not if Industry 4.0 is coming, but how quickly.

5 things you should know about Industry 4.0Jamie Hinks – First things first – this isn’t a new technology. Nor is it a business discipline. It is in fact a new approach to achieve results that weren’t possible 10 years ago thanks to advancements in technology over the past decade.

Industry 4.0: Building the digital enterprise – This PwC research shows that first movers are transforming into digital enterprises. Industrial companies need to act now to secure a leading position in tomorrow’s complex industrial ecosystems.

Manufacturing’s next actCornelius Baur and Dominik Wee – A closer look at what’s behind Industry 4.0 reveals some powerful emerging currents with strong potential to change the way factories work. It may be too much to say that it is another industrial revolution. But call it whatever you like; the fact is, Industry 4.0 is gathering force, and executives should carefully monitor the coming changes and develop strategies to take advantage of the new opportunities.

SVGZ_Manufacturing's next act_ex1

Industry 4.0: It’s all about the peopleDouglas K. Gates   : The adoption of i4.0 will have a profound impact on the manufacturing workforce. Organizations should start planning the transition today.

We back up these this broad overview with a few video clips:

Industry 4.0 – Germany’s 4th industrial revolution

Industrie 4.0 – The Fourth Industrial Revolution

Documentary | The Fourth Industrial Revolution

The next manufacturing revolution is here | Olivier Scalabre

Implementing Industrie 4.0: This is how it works!

The World In 2050 – Future Earth – BBC Documentary 2017

We will now turn to our regular sections:

For the present episode we have picked up one article The 3 Reports Every Manager Should Use To Identify High-Performers @ the column Measuring Performance (People & Enterprise) @ Management Matters Network. The article is an excerpt originally published on Entrepreneur and is from Riaz Khadem and Linda Khadem’s book Total Alignment. The Focus Report shows an employee’s performance as it relates to the actual status of each of the process indicators assigned to them. The Feedback Report is a summary of the “good news” and the “bad news” based on the status of your employee’s indicators. It illustrates the factors that have fallen below the unacceptable range in status and those that are above the satisfactory level. Those that fall in between the two are considered in the acceptable range. And the third report is The Management Report, which gives you a quick overview of the highlights of the Feedback Reports of everyone in your pyramid of responsibility, people reporting to you directly as well as indirectly. This approach is “management by exception.”

From Ask The Experts, I have picked up a question – Special Process NCRs During Audit – that relates to a very specific set of qualifications for special processes. The answers are affirmatives Nos, as long as The organization has a process, and if it is effectively implemented that should be satisfactory evidence of conformity.

ASQ CEO, Bill Troy seems to have gone into an irregular mode. Therefore, we will take up one of the recent article post form the ASQ Home page every month now.at present.

We will begin with: Why Customer Service Teams Are Crying Out for Artificial Intelligence. The article presents certain basic advantages and needs to supplement “Why’ of the title of the article. The conclusion of the article sums to message in no uncertain terms: “There is no reason to fear AI, but neither is there any choice. If your business doesn’t utilize the technology, your competitors will. Chatbots and virtual assistants may be limited now, but they’re constantly evolving, and the potential impact they could have on your customer service team is staggering. Experts are all in agreement: AI is here to stay.”

We now watch one of the latest ASQ TV  episodes:

Supply Chain Management: Building a Stronger Supply Chain – In this episode, learn how to build a better supply chain by implementing supplier metrics and a supplier scorecard.

Additional references:

Jim L. Smith’s Jim’s Gems for the month of August, 2017:

The Role of Specification Limits – Determine if a process is in a state of statistical control- jimsmith_200In the previous column Jim Smith discussed the role of specification limits in manufacturing, which led to thoughts about process control limits. When there are data points falling outside the control limits, there is an indication of a special-cause event, so the process should be discontinued until the issue’s root cause has been found and resolved which will then return the process to a state of statistical control. With that said, however, it seems that effective implementation of process control charts remains elusive to many. The control limits provide information about process behavior and have no intrinsic relationship to engineering specifications. Control charts shouldn’t be used without first performing process capability studies to determine the relationship between natural process limits and engineering specification. When capability is known the purpose of control chart limits is to permit simple detection events that are indicative of actual process change. When significant change (special cause variation) is detected the culprit must be identified and eliminated with affected data points eliminated from control chart limit calculation…..Bottom line, after the process capability study has been conducted, engineering specification limits are infrequently consulted by the manufacturing process personnel.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey in exploring the happenings across quality management blogs…………

Note: The images depicted here above are through courtesy of respective websites who have the copyrights for the respective images.

 

 

Fading Memories…. Unforgettable Songs : September, 2017

(Shankar-) Jaikishan and Hasrat Jaipuri’s Songs Fading From the Memory

Septmber happens to be the month of death anniversaries of Jaikishan [Jaikishan Dayabhai Panchal, 4 November 1929 – 12 September 1971] and Hasrat Jaipuri [Iqbal Hussain, April 15, 1922 – September 17, 1999].

Shankar Jaikishan and Shailendra- Hasrat Jaipuri are always spoken in one breath. However, it is said that Jaikishan would normally compose the song that Hasrat Jaipuri would write. There should be n-number of songs of this combination that were loved then, and are loved now too. That has germinated the idea for today’s post – let us bring back, from our Fading Memories, Hasrat Jaipuri’s songs that (Shankar) Jaikishan had composed.. I spanned 14 of SJ-composed films and some HJ-penned 67 songs, in the descending chronological order. Out of these, here are 15 (S)J-HJ songs for which I could not recollect the respective tune when I read the title of the song. Thus there is a personal, yet unintentional, bias in the selection of the songs.

Interestingly, we see a fair predominance of Lata Mangeshkar in this limited collection of 13 songs, covering the period from 1949 to 1953. That, in a way seems to reflect SJ’s marked inclination towards for Lata, among all other female playback singers of that time. It must, however, be recorded here that in comparison to total number of SJ-Lata songs in these 14 films, the numbers that appear is not of significant proportion.

The 14th song is our traditional end-of-the-post-song, a Mohammad Rafi Song. Incidentally, this was the only Rafi song of the 67 that I had ran through before hitting upon a (Shanker)Jaikishan-Hasrat- Rafi song, of course, not considering Main Zindagi Mein Hardam Rota Hi Raha Hun from Barsat.

Here are the songs for the day:

Prem Nagar Mein Basnewalon, Apni Jeet Par Hasnewalon – Barsat 1949 – Lata Mangeshkar

In the standard format of a Hindi song, technically this may not be called a song. However, creative directors like Raj Kapoor very often used the audiovisual effect of a song like recitation to tellingly convey the intent of a situation. Such a demand of the director would pose a great creative challenge to the lyricist and the music director. In this particular instance HJ and Jaikishan have lived up to the challenge. Use of silhouette shots by the cinematographer Jal Mistry adds to the surreal effect.

Khushi To Qaid Mein Hai…Rota Hai Mera Dil Kisko Pukarun Kya Karun – Badal (1951) – Lata Mangeshkar

The song starts on a high-note-prelude-couplet (Sakhi), which was to become one of the signature styles of SJ compositions. The song is filmed on a budding beuty – Madhubala.

Jiyennge Jab Tak Talak Hum Unki Yaad Aayegi…Maine Kya Kiya, Sitam  Ye Maine Kya Kiya – Kali Ghata (1951) – Lata Mangeshkar.

The song follows quite difficult composition, but the result is quite mellifluous.

Tumko Apni Zindagi Ka Aasra Samje The Ham… Dil Bequar Hai Mera Dil Bequarar Hai -Nagina (1951) – CH Atma

SJ have experimented with CH Atma’s voice as playback of Nazir Khan.

O Pyar Bhari In Aankhon Ne.. Aaja Tujhko Yaad Kiya – Parbat (1952) – Lata Mangeshkar, Geeta Roy

SJ have not used Geeta Dutt as much others in the same period. However, this Lata-Geeta duet has picked up nuances of the vocal chords of both singers. Several pieces of orchestration manifest Jaikishan’s virtuosity of using different instruments quite imaginatively.

Ab To Aa Jao Balam..Furkat Ke Maare Ro Diye –Poonam (1952) – Lata Mangeshkar

Each stanza begins on high-scales with interlude orchestration using ensemble of violins. The song is filmed on Kamini Kaushal.

Apne Bimar-e-Gam Ko Dekh Le, Ho Sake To Aa Ke Dekh Le….Aaja Re Ab Mera Dil Pukara – Aah (1953) – Mukesh, Lata Mangeshkar

Here is a song which was quite popular then, and is now. The reason we have included in this post is the tellingly innovative use of the song in the narrative of the film. The original song is the manifestation of the condition of the loving couple who are getting separated by a queer turn of the circumstances – the hero going away on a long-drawn cure of what was considered near fatal TB to a faraway sanatorium.

The second version is set to a situation where the hero wants go back and meet his beloved, as promised, probably before his life comes to an inevitable end. The version begins from the stanza with which the first version had ended. Lata Mangeshkar joins in Alaap that signals the nearing reunion,

The film track has third version too – Janaaza Dekhne Mera Nikal Aaye…..Aaja Re Ab Mera Dil Pukara. Unfortunately we do not have its separate video clip.

Humko Chhedta Hai Dil,… Kaun Jaane Kya Hua, Tumne Baat Baat Meing Kya Jaadu Kar Diya – Aas (1953) – Lata Mangeshkar

Here is a happy mood song wherein rhythm-supporting bass has been used in the subdued manner. Note a short sweet opening prelude.

Aaj Ki Raat Kabhi Khatm  Na Hone Aaye…. Wo Aayenge Khushi Bankar, Baharein Saath Laayenge, Mere Ghar Mein Muhabbat Ke Nazaren Muskarayenge – Aurat (1953) – Lata Mangeshkar

For a change, we have a fast-paced song of a bubbling, happy mood.

Taaron Ko Dil Ki Baat Sunai Tamam Raat…Main Bahron Ki Natkhat Raani, Saari Duniya Mujh Pe Hai Diwani – Boot Polish (1953) – Asha Bhosle

The song has deployed a very rich orchestra for interlude, with sweet pieces of flute thrown in for support. Boot Polish must rank as one of those rare films wherein SJ have not used Lata in any song, solely on the merits of the demands of the film’s narrative! (Absence of Lata in films like Suraj or Mera Naam Joker was on account of very specific differences.)

The song is filmed on Chand Burke.

Hum Unke Paas Aate Hain Wo Ham Se Door Jaate Hain, Tadapkar Dastaan Apni Baharon Ko Sunate Hain – Naya Ghar (1953) – Talat Mahmood

SJ have used Talat Mahmood’s voice so naturally in all the songs where they came together, while retaining their musical style. We have here so sweet gem of Talat Mahmood that my heart pains to put under the omnibus category of Fading Memory songs.

Chamke Bijuriya Garje Megh Mat Ja Re Balam Pardesava – Shikast (1953) – Asha Bhosle, chorus)

SJ have used Asha Bhosle to so sweet effect in this song.

Jaage Mera Dil Soye Zamana – Badshah (1954) – Aparesh Lahiri

It appears to be very fitting to begin the end of this post with a song that is sung by a Bengali singer whose son made a big name in Hindi films in the 90s. The knowledgeable fans of Hindi Film Songs will have correctly guessed name of that 90s Lahiri – Bappi Lahiri.

Aparesh Lahiri and his wife Bansri Lahiri, of course, were famous Bengali singers and musicians in classical music. However, it must be to credit of SJ to have experimented to use Aparesh’s voice here.

Asides:

  1. SJ had used another well-known singer, Hemant Kumar, in the film for Rula Kar Chal Diye and Aa Neel Gagan Tale Pyar Ham Kare, penned by Shailendra and Hasrat Jaipuri respectively. Both songs are immortal.
  2. ‘Badshah’ was adaptation of Victor Hugo’s very famous novel, Hunch Back of Notre Dame, written in French in 1831, on which a Hollywood film of the same name also has been made.

For our traditional end of a post with a Mohammad Rafi song, we have

Soch Na Manwa…Haye Gam Ke Maaro Ka Jamane Mein Koi Na Saath Dega – Pooja 1954

By now a well-established practice of beginning the song with short prelude-couplet comes with an innovative support orchestration of a piano piece – so typical of a Jaikishan touch.

We will continue our search for Unforgettable Songs that seem to Fading away from our Memories every second Sunday of the month……..

Disclaimer: All images are sourced from net. All copyrights of the respective image remain with the original owner of the image.

The Micro View of the Songs of 1948 @ SoY – Female Solo Songs – Geeta Roy [2]

We continue the micro-view of Solo Songs of Geeta Roy in the second leg of Solo Songs of Female Playbacksingers for 1948. I had not been to classify any song in the Part 1 of Solo Songs of Geeta Roy as “Popular Song’. Almost the same pattern seems to emerge in this part as well, with one exception.

These songs belong to film Gunsundari, which was simultaneously made in Gujarti too. And the equivalent Gujari songs of the ones that have been presented here is the cause for that exception. I had EP record of these Gujarati songs purchased in 70s, and then when the age of internet dawned, I had located their Hindi Versions.

Nandiya Maare Boli Ke Baan, Balam Main Tumse Na Bolun – Gunsundari – Avinash Vyas – Pt. Indra

Its Gujarati version – Aaj Mari Nandiya Mahenu Maaryun

Bhabhi O Bhabhi Badalo Thoda Thoda Rang

Its Gujarati version: Have Thoda Thoda Tame Thoda Thoda Thao Varnagi O Bhabhi Tame Thoda thoda Thao Varnagi

Khoye Hue Ko Dhoondhe Prabhu– Gunsundari – Bulo C Rani –Pt. Indra

And its Gujarti version – Khovaya Ne Kholawa Prabhu–  which was composed and written by Avinash Vyas

The two versions of the third song have been comopsed by two different composers as against the same composer in the case of the first two songs. That may perhaps totally different approach to the song  compostion of the two versions of the third song.

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Dil Bujha Jaata Hai Nashad Hua Jaat Hai – Heer Ranja – Varmaji, Sharmaji – Vali Sahab

Teri Zat Hai Akbari Saravari – Heer Ranjha

[This song has does not have the singer identified in HFGK. I have gone by the identification of the YT uploader.]

Dil Yun Yun Karata Hai  Ki Dil Yun Yun Karata Hai  – Heer Ranjha

[This song, too, has does not have the singer identified in HFGK. I have gone by the identification of the YT uploader.]

Chubh Gaye Naina Baan More Dil Mein – Hip Hip Hurray – Pt Hanuman Prasad – Moti B.A.

Maine Kya Tha Kiya Jo Bujha Ke Diya Mujhe Rote Andhere Mein – Hip Hip Hurray

[This song, too, not have the singer identified in HFGK. I have gone by the identification of the YT uploader.]

O Ban Ke Azad Panchhi Bhulja Madhuban Mein – Hua Savera – Gyan Dutt – Bhagvati Prasad Bajpeyi

More Man Mein Samaya Hai Pyar Ban Jaaye Koi Pyar Ki Bahaar Mein – Hua Savera – Gyan Dutt – Bhagvati Prasad Bajpeyi

Badalee Hava Khushi Ka Jamana Badal Gaya – Hua Savera – Gyan Dutt – Bhagvati Prasad Bajpeyi

O Ho Ho Jaan Liya Maine Maine Jaan Liya Unhe Pehchan Liya – Hua Savera – Gyan Dutt – Bhagvati Prasad Bajpeyi

Raghuvir Dindayal, Tum Ko Laaj Hamari – Jay Hanuman – Bulo C Rani – Pt. Indra

Mohe Raam Naam Dhun Laagi Jug-Jug Ki Preet Jagi – Jay Hanuman – Bulo C Rani – Pt. Indra

We will conclude the Solo Songs of Geeta Roy – Part [3] – in our next episode.

Business Sutra |3.2| Relationship between Owner & Organization

Business Sutra |3| Business Ethics and Morals

In the first episode of the TV serial on CNBC 18, spread over three segments, Devdutt Pattanaik presented to us the most visible form of the business – the corporation : its meaning, its purpose and its action perspective.

In the second episode Devdutt Pattanaik discusses Leadership: Role of the leader, Context of the leader and Leadership in different business cycles.

The third episode relates to the Business Ethics and Morals. In the first part, a broad spectrum of business ethics and dilemmas of the leader has been covered. In the present, 2nd Part, a closer look at these issues has been taken up, in the perspective of relationship between owner and the organization.

Business Sutra |3.2| Relationship between Owner & Organization

Generally, business ownership can be classified as proprietorship, partnership or a limited liability company. The form, nature and complexity of working of the business have evolved ever since man learnt the barter system. The morality and ethics of a business organization and its owners also evolved in tandem. Then, as the form the State also started evolving, formal and informal legislations and regulations that governed the moral and ethical behavior of the business also entered the co-existing cycle of evolution.

Over the 19th century, scale and nature of the business started tilting more towards the large corporation with (legal) concept of limited liability. That, apparently, put the ownership and the management at an arm’s length and did get formalized under the law. However, that distance also brought the morality and ethics of both, the owners and management, severally and collectively, under my public glare. Like the excesses of East India Company, which prompted London to step in, the behaviour of Gilded Age (end of 19th century period) tycoons spurred new legislation to help modulate America being free-market economy. Today’s entrepreneurs operate in a drastically different world – one that is not only more global, but vastly more competitive, inclusive, regulated…[1]

As the more and more public debate took up the subject of corporation’s moral and ethical behaviour, and the associated role of owner as well as that of the management, more and more literature came to be published w.r.t. the moral ethics of the corporation’s owners – the shareholders – that of its management. However, there is not much of documented literature on internet in so far as moral and ethical relationship of a proprietor partnership form of ownership with the business organization that they operate.

It would be pertinent to remember here that we have not included the subject of Corporate Governance in our present discussion. Of course, that area also has evolved well in last few decades. But it views the subject of morality in ethics more from what ought to be THE corporate governance. We would like to look at the subject more from the point of view of an individual as what he or she perceives as his/her moral role as an owner of the business. I have selected two representative views, representing different points of view here:

Measuring Small Business Owners’ Differences In Moral Thought: Idealism Versus Relativism is a research study to measure small business owners’ differences in moral thought based on idealism and relativism. This is measured by determining the ethical ideological classification of individuals based on Forsyth’s ethical taxonomy. The research followed a quantitative analysis and an online survey questionnaire was used to collect the data from Small and Medium Enterprise (SME) owners in South Africa. The results found that the majority of SME owners fall in the situationist and absolutist category of Forsyth’s ethical taxonomy.

On the other hand, K.P. Kaiser in his post, Personal Morality vs Business Morality  looks at the more fundamental need of such business and their entrepreneur /owners.  Here is his question: What makes you think you know what’s better than an entire world full of people choosing where to spend their dollars?…. We have representative governments to impose moral order on the market. As a business person, you need to have a second set of morals. Your business morality should look to profit maximization above all else. Because the market doesn’t tell you the ways people imagine a fair world should work. The market tells you the way the world actually works. The beauty of the market is its amoral nature. We aren’t accountable to other people’s ideas of what we should be spending our money on.

Kaiser seems to be more concerned about the stakes – the livelihood – of the individual entrepreneur.

So we quickly take up what Devdutt Pattanaik has to say in Segment 2 of the episode 3 – Relationship between owner and the organization, from the Indian Mythology’s point of view.

The one predominant conflict that exists, at least in the context of business, is the relationship between the owner and the organization, management and ownership. I can find different ways of putting it, but that is the one key area of conflict. It is the one area that all the Western governance rules seem to actually try and control or mitigate. Yet, in India it is the biggest issue that we face when we talk about corporate governance, when we talk about organizational behavior or leadership traits, the whole relationship between the owner and the organization.

In the Western context, the organization is independent of the leader, while in the Indian context the organization is a manifestation of the leader. So Raja and Rajya are integral to each other. This is one fundamental thing.

Now let’s look at it in the form of a story in the Mahabharata, about this very honest person called Yudhisthira. Then we talk about a gambling episode. He gambled his kingdom. I have heard people talking about this episode, but not asking a very fundamental question – was it his?  It was Draupadi who asked the question – can he gamble the kingdom? What he and everybody is assuming that she’s asking about her. But she’s actually asking about everything. She says, on what basis has he gambled the kingdom away? Is the kingdom the King’s property?

Is it?

No.

Why does the kingdom exist, that is the fundamental question? Does it exist to mitigate my fear? Then it’s Adharma. If it is to mitigate my people’s fear, it’s Dharma. How are you mitigating fear – by gambling it away?

That is one extreme example. But if you were to look at modern-day business, the owner, or the promoter is the person who vests the most, invests the most in that business, both from a money point of view and from emotion, energy, risk everything. Why then does he not get, in some sense, stake for the rest of his life and treat this like his kingdom?

In India the relationship of the king and the kingdom was that between a cowherd and a cow.  If you see wealth as milk, where does the milk come from? It comes from a cow. What is good milk? Rich in bottom line? or Utterly Buttlerly Milk? The cow that gives that milk is a good cow. Now that cow’s milk belongs to the cowherd or does it belong to the cow?

It belongs to the cow.

There is a nice relationship between the cow and the cowherd. The cowherd takes care of the cow, and in exchange takes a portion of the milk. The king as the cowherd is the keeper of the cow, his kingdom. When a king gives a cow to another man, what has he done? He has given that person a lifetime of food and fuel with that milk and dung. This effectively means that you have given him survival; you have allowed him to live.

In other words, giving away a cow or Godaan, is job creation. I have created a job so that he can sustain himself forever. So the more cows I give, I basically create employment, so that more people can live. Why do they need to live? Otherwise they would be at the mercy of the elements. The great king distributes many cows. But does he own the cow? That relationship is one of trusteeship. He is the trustee of the cow.

This is very simple to understand when there is one king in one cow. If you were to expand it in the context of an organization, let us assume the king is the promoter or the entrepreneur, the founder. But thereafter, the king alone is not able to take care of the cows. The King needs the help of other people. and therefore the right on the milk he gets distributed amongst those other people who also help in taking care of the cow. Has it to be proportional? Should it be distributed disproportionately because it is the king actually who began the entire process of taking care of the cow, and  the others came on later? This is the question that constantly gets asked in India – can the promoter undertake actions that benefit himself as the shareholder, and by the way, benefit other shareholders as well ?Because they benefit him, the shareholder, should that be treated as fair or that is not fair? Should all his actions be taken from the other shareholders point of view?

The first thing is – what is fair is subjective. Fairness is a subjective concept. Second, it offered equality. In India you are equal at a soul level. So the soul (Atma) is equal, but the flesh is not.. There are inequalities based on our intellectual make-up, our emotional make-up and our material make-up.

So what you’re saying, then, is that the founder, the promoter, the entrepreneur rightfully deserves more based on the risks and the effort that he has undertaken.

The word right is not an Indian concept.  It is duty in Indian concept. Our entire culture is based on the concept of duty. Duties are for the other, right is for the self. So when you ‘this is my right’, you have in a way provoked the animal instinct of territoriality. It is mine. For what? So we’re celebrating the territoriality of our being. Which means we are surviving the animal which is celebrating the animal instinct – the imagination and amplification of fear.

Now the question is no law can say how much is fair. That is for you to figure it out. It is your duty to work out how much are you giving to people. Remember it goes to inner space, inner landscape.  No rule can tell me that. You should know that if you give me ten percent it is fair and if you give it twelve percent it is unfair. So the king has to decide. And that’s why the Kings were worshipped. Once upon a time they were put on a pedestal and the Abhishek – coronation, ablution – rituals were performed.

And yet they routinely gambled away their kingdoms or they lost their kingdoms in war which was the desire to expand their kingdoms. So if the relationship between the king and the kingdom was one of trust and trusteeship, we don’t have that many examples of Kings that actually upheld that principle.

This is because you see we are talking about the struggle to be perfect – the struggle to be human not even perfect, the struggle to step out of an animal desire, to dominate our animal desire to be territorial. 99% of our being is animal the struggle is to make 99 into 98. You never overcome your animal. If at you can do it, then you will be a living of god.

Can we make 99 into 98? That’s the Indian – introspective- method. Rules will domesticate animals. It will not fix your animal.

The episode seems to end, rather abruptly. In a way, that is because the 3rd part follows immediately and continues the link. However, if we look at the end as a poser to the questionCan we make 99 into 98?- , it provides us the food to ponder over our role of the owner and our relationship with organization that we run.

The laws of Corporate Governance are the rules that may domesticate the animal within us. But only we, with our own inner strength of our moral and ethical values, can really undertake the task of making 99 % of our animal-self into 98% animal. Be that in the capacity of proprietor or partner or the shareholder, or even that of the management.

In our next session, we will take up the further extension of the topic – Ramayana vs. Mahabharat – the two differing points of views of the Core Principles – Dharm – in the 3rd segment of the Third Episode of Devdutt Pattanaik’s TV serial Business Sutra.

Note: The images used in this post are the irrevocable property of their respective creator. They have been taken up courtesy the internet, so as to illustrate the point under discussion.

[1] SuperEconomies –  Raghav Bahl

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – August, 2017

Welcome to August, 2017 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We have three posts for our present episode that befit the season:

Beyond ‘Maa Tujhe Salaam’, the film songs that dare to step out of line when things go off-key – Rather than pop patriotism tunes, it’s the songs about dissent and debate that resonate as India turns 70 – Rineeta Naik recalls the anti-nationals in Hindi films who stepped out of line and reminded us of the times when things went off-key… The songs presented here convey a poet’s despair over social and moral decay, the agony of a man unfairly marked as a traitor, and the exuberant cynicism of city-dwellers who discovered that “sone ki chidiya” rhymes nicely with malaria.

Celebrate the monsoon with this performance of raag Mia ki Malhar by Amir Khan – Malhar raags are prescribed for the rainy season. – Aneesh Pradhan – Amir Khan’s presentation of Mia ki Malhar, a raag considered to have been created by the 16th-century vocalist and composer Mia Tansen, has always been considered by musicians and aficionados as one of the most iconic interpretations of the raag. The recording featured here was made for the All India Radio National Programme of Music in 1958, but it continues to haunt listeners to this day.

Rainy Days has captured songs picturised in the rain, let it be for a part of the song or the entire length, from drizzle to showers! The song may not be about the rain itself.

We will first take up the posts on Meena Kumari in our regular anniversaries or eulogies posts:

Meena Kumari: An enigma – DP Rangan pays a very touching and vivid tribute to Meena Kumari on her 85th birth anniversary (1 August 1932 – 31 March 1972).

Gaddeswaroop’s Blog has added two songs in Meena Kumari singing for herself in 1947

Ankhiyan Taras Rahin Un Bin – Piya Ghar Aaja (1947) – Bulo C Rani – Pt. Indra

Sawan Beet Gayo Mai Ri – Duniya Ek Sarai (1947) – Hansraj Behl – Kidar Sharma

We also take a look at the life of Meena Kumari in Meena Kumari Biography by Javed Akhtar. The Enigma Called Tragedy Queen Meena Kumari Part 1 ǁ Part 2 ǁ Part 3; Virasat – Meena Kumari Part 1 of 2 ǁ Part 2 of 2 and the 20 Rare Pictures of Meena Kumarisupplement good deal of interesting aspects on the subject

We have chosen to take a Retrospective look to revisit:

No One Quite Like Her –  The Inimitable Meena Kumari’ – “Good looks, great talent and unhappiness. Perhaps no other star combined all three in such a heady brew as Meena Kumari did.” Sathya Saran writes about how the iconic actress carved out an inimitable niche for herself, had held sway over her audiences for two decades and continues to fascinate her fans to this day….. Nothing added as much to the legend of Meena Kumari as her liviing of it. For many it seemed the natural culmination to a life of suffering. To be abandoned and exploited, and left without money after earning  sums that were beyond the reach of lesser stars, and die sick in heart and body is a tale that cannot fail to touch anyone who hears it.

The Legend That Was Meena Kumari in which Antara Nanda Mondal poignantly notes that pain and anguish was part of her life and she brought them to the fore in her performances that became iconic.

At a film premiere – Talat Mahmood with Meena Kumari, Usha Kiran, music director Madan Mohan and other guests

Meena Kumari – Interview (1952). This is an interview when Meena Kumari was on the verge completing two significant and much talked-about films, “Footpath” and “Baiju Bawra”, in which she had played the feminine lead.

Remembering singer Parul Ghosh, one of Hindi cinema’s quietest trailblazers – Wife of an illustrious husband, sister of a famous brother, Parul Ghosh made indelible contributions to music. Rudradeep Bhattacharjee pays tribute on her fortieth death anniversary.

All these years later, nobody exudes flamboyance like Shammi Kapoor – On the Hindi film star’s death anniversary, a reminder of his irresistible exuberance. Akshay Manwani states that In his book on dancing star and rebel hero, Shammi Kapoor: The Game Changer, journalist and film critic Rauf Ahmed gives readers a view of Kapoor’s ascent into stardom.

70mm Man: C Mohan, who designed the logo for ‘Sholay’ and other classics – Ramesh Sippy’s landmark film was released this week 42 years ago. Its designer was one of the leading exponents of Bollywoood Expressionism.

And Happy Birthday to Another Big Reason I Got Drawn Into Hindi Films, that of Vyjayanthimala, who just happens to be celebrating her birthday as this post was in the writing. There is one more post on Vaijayantimala’s birthday – Seven Dances for Vyjayanthimala’s Birthday  – posted seven years ago. This post has video clips of some of her lesser known dance songs,

Of the Ten of my favourite Mumtaz songs, presented in celebration of the 70th birthday on 31sy July, I have picked up O matwaare saajna chhalak gaya mera pyaar (Faulad, 1963) as my own offering to the celebration.

The August 2017 episode of Fading Memories, Unforgettable Songs was dedicated to Shailendra and “Other” Music Directors

Here are posts on other subjects as well:

The first duo Husnlal-Bhagatram (2): Their songs for ‘other’ singers’ is a follow up post to The first duo Husnlal-Bhagatram (1): Their songs for Suraiya, Lata Mangeshkar and Rafi, SoY recounts the memorable meeting with 90-year-old Nirmala Devi, wife of Pt. Husnlal.

Gulzar’s 1988 movie ‘Libaas’ to be finally released later this year -Zee Classic and Amul Mohan, the son of the producer Vikas Mohan, will release the film.

Subodh Agrwal has taken up a very difficult subject of Asymmetric Duets. He has further tightened the rules by taking up the duets in which the rhythm and the tune do diverge and yet complement each other too. SoY readers have chipped in a very large number of such interesting songs.

In our series Micro View of Best Songs 1948 @SoY of Best songs of 1948: And the winners are?, we have conclude the sub-series of Male Solo Songs with My Top Male Solo Songs and commenced the series of posts on Female Solo Songs with 21-solo-songs of Suraiya, following up with the first part and second part  of the solo songs of Geeta Dutt.

We will end the present post with a chance Mohammad Rafi song that an e-mail from my friend Samir Dholakia presented me.

De De Mori Mundari – Sat Saaliyaan (Punjabi) 1964 – S.Madan- Naqsh Lyallpuri – Mohd.Rafi

Note: In the song @4.28 a reference to other well-known songs – Akhiyan Sakhi Akhiyan Lagi and Ek Chatur Naar- is made as a parody

The song merited some more searches that led to a full-fledged parody song as well from the same film:

Bahut Shukriya Badi Meharbaani

Not to be satisfied now, I search more, and get two beautiful duets with Suman Kalyanpur:

Sohniye Tu Na Modi Munh

Kehdi Gallon Russiyan Ne

and a signature Rafi song

Sat Saaliyaan – Oye Sohna Jeha Mukhda

BTW, the music director S Madan is known to us for his far more famous and melodious duet with Asha Bhosle:

Ye Raat Ye Fizaain Phir Aain Naa Aaye – Batwara –Majrooh Sultanpuri

Batwara too had one signature Rafi song:

Yeh Kaisi Deewar Hai Duniya 

I trust you will always feel free to proffer your suggestions for making this series of posts more lively and informative….

The Micro View of the Songs of 1948 @ SoY – Female Solo Songs – Geeta Roy [1]

Personally for me, the songs that I heard here are the ones that I had heard for the first time. This simply means that most of songs that I had heard were of Geeta Dutt, and not those of Geeta Roy. And I always believed I have had many Geeta Roy/Dutt songs!

The number of Geeta Roy’s solo songs for 1948 too add up to our hypothesis that the year is an open-field for transition-vintage era singers,  as well as THE golden year singer – Lata Mangeshkar. The numbers also merit spanning our micro-analysis over two posts.

[1]

Dil Ke Geet Gayenge Mil Ke Gayenge – Anjana – D C Dutt – Vishvamitra Adil

Mujhe Kuchch Yaad Aata Hai… Meri Aankhon Mein Aansoo Hai – Anjana – D C Dutt – Bharat Vyas

Rim Zim Barase Nain Darae Biraha Ki Barsaat – Anjana – D C Dutt – Bharat Vyas

O Jadugar Kahe Tihari Gali Aaye – Chanda Ki Chandani – Gyan Dutt – D N Mdhok

Piya Piya Bagon Mein Papiha Bole – Chanda Ki Chandani – Gyan Dutt – D N Mdhok

Ulfat Ke Dard Ka Kabhi Majha Lo – Chanda Ki Chandani – Gyan Dutt – D N Mdhok

Jab Yaad Teri Aati Hai Dil Mera Bhar Bhar Aaye – Chanda Ki Chandani – Gyan Dutt – D N Mdhok

Ham Ko Bhula Diya To Kya Yaad Meri Bhulaoge to Jaane – Chanda Ki Chandani – Gyan Dutt – D N Mdhok

Jab Kaali Kaali Raaten Hogi Dil Se Dil Ki Baatein Hogi – Chanda Ki Chandani – Gyan Dutt – D N Mdhok

Aaja Re Balama Kaisi Suhaani Raat Hai – Chand Sitare – Premnath – Aziz Kashmiri

Dil Baar Baar Gabaraye Koi Ghadi Ghadi Yaad Aaye – Chand Sitare – Premnath – Aziz Kashmiri

Dil Se Tumhari Yaad Bhulaye Na Jayegi– Chand Sitare – Premnath – Aziz Kashmiri

Tere Milane Ko Ji Dhadake Kahan Gaye Patthar Ka Dil Karake – Chunariya – Hansraj Bahl – Muk Raj Bhakhari

O Motorwale Babu Babu Mialne Aa Jaa Re – Chunariya – Hansraj Bahl – Muk Raj Bhakhari

Koi Nain Mila Ke Chala Gaya Ek Aag Laga Chala Gaya – Chunariya – Hansraj Bahl – Muk Raj Bhakhari

Chupke Chupke Aana Mere Paas  – Didi – Mukund Masurekar – Indeevar

We will follow up with the second part of Geeta Roy’s solo songs of 1948 in our next episode.