Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – December 2014

Leave a comment

Welcome to December, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We begin our journey with anniversary tributes.

One of the finest actors, Deven Varma, passed away on 2nd December, 2014

Tribute to Great Actor Deven Verma and Tribute to Deven Verma are the clips from the TV programmes .

Remembering Deven Varma, intimately describes him as “one of Hindi cinema’s finest and most atypical funny men in the 1970s and 1980s, most memorably in the work of Hrishikesh Mukherjee, Basu Chatterji and Gulzar – films where Varma provided a counterpoint to the louder comedy elsewhere in the industry.It’s telling to look at the function Deven so often performed in those films: sutradhaar, vidushak, naatak-rachita rolled into one.

In an article in (gujarati) Divya Bhaskar, Dipak Soliya remembers Deven Varma’s contribution to subtlety that he introduced to the comedy in films. Of the three Filmfare awards that he got, even as two – Chor Ke Ghar Chor and Chori Mera Kaam- were for the traditional loud roles, his third award for Angoor established his subtle style at a very high pedestal.

Among many songs that Deven Verma had enacted on the screen, we pick up Baa Adab Baa Mulahisa Hoshiyar (Aaj Aur Kal – 1963- Ravi) epitomizing his style.

Happy Birthday, Sharmila Tagore and Dharmendra!, marks the 70th birthday of the lovely Sharmila Tagore and the 79th birthday of the hunky Dharmendra, and Ten of my favourite Dharmendra songs has pre-70s film songs that the author has seen. To make this challenge a little tougher, only solos (No duets) in which Dharmendra’s character does the singing are included..

Ten of my favourite Geeta Dutt  solos and its follow up article Ten of my favourite Geeta Dutt duets have pairing articles The Unforgettable Geeta Dutt and Unforgettable Geeta Dutt – Part 2 respectively. Among very memorable songs presented in these articles, we pick up Yaaron Kisi Se Na Kehna, Chhabili (1960), Snehal Bhatkar, with Nutan as a co-singer for a special mention.

Happy Birthday, Dilip Saab remembers his 92nd birthday on 11th December.

The joker and his disguises – Raj Kapoor as innocent and masochist presents a very fine analysis of persona of Raj Kapoor. The article also chooses the occasion to present author’s favorite the “Yeh Mera Prem Patra” sequence, including a two-minute prelude before the song itself starts, as one of the finest presentation of declaration of love on the silver screen.

Jiyo Toh Aise Jiyo (Bahu Beti, 1965) has led to remembering My favourite Shailendra songs

We had also remembered some very informative articles on Shailendra’s songs in our issue of December 2013.

Now we move onto other articles.

SoY has concluded its series of articles on Best Songs of 1951.

The penultimate article seeks to choose the best duet for 1951, from among 38 duets (which include songs having both male, both female, and more than two singers) in the list of 144 memorable songs of the year in Best songs of 1951: Wrap-Up 4. The article has first shortlisted the duets which are immensely popular till today, or which can be indisputably regarded as all-time great songs, regardless of their popularity. It may be observed that the duets of 1951 would easily figure among all-time great songs. The final choice crowns Seene mein sulagate hain armaan – Tarana – Talat Mahmood /Lata Mangeshkar jointly with Dum bhar jo udhar munh phere – Awara – Mukesh and Lata Mangeshkar.

The concluding article, Best songs of 1951: Final Wrap-Up 5, has very aptly presented the analysis, with the help of analytical tools, in continuation of the summing up of views by SoY’s very knowledgeable readers. The active multifaceted, discussions make the series quite engrossing and interesting. The final choice has rested with Anil Biswas, as The Music Director for the year 1951.

Item songs leads to Special issue ‘item’ of Motherland Magazine with several articles linking film item songs to older traditions.

12 must-have Hindi songs for your travel playlist! is a motley mix of old and new that should be in every traveller’s playlist.

Ten memorable prayer songs from Hindi films is a consensus-based selection, iterated through several criteria.

Discussion, Info and Great Pics Related to the Earliest Appearances of Cuckooo (thanks to Mel!) provides the link that Mel supplied for a very comprehensive post that he wrote about Cuckoo in French…… this post is worth a look just for the pics, clips, and extremely extensive filmography.The post also pose an exploratory question as to whether the little girl in the following picture, from 1943 film Prithvi Vallabh, is Cuckoo?

Is this CuckooWhilst on Prithvi Vallabh, here is one of its iconic song – Tailap Ki Nagri Gaana Nahin Bajana Nahin.

We also have some interesting posts from some new searches or from some of the friends who have not been regularly contributing articles on the subject of our blog carnival”

Captain NarendraPhanse has, in his usual poetic style, remembered some forgotten gems by Lata Mangeshkar, with an icing on the cake with a Juthika Roy and Suraiya songs each. Since the article is in Gujarati, I have listed out these songs here:

Sapana Bin Sajan Aayen – Shokhiyan (1951) – Jamal Sen

Tum Kya Jaano Tumhari Yaad Mein Hum Kitna Roye – Shin Shina Ki Boobalaa Boo (1952) – C Ramchandra

Mai Ri main kaase Kahoon - Madan Mohan , second version Lata Mangeshkar – Dastak 1970 – Madan Mohan

Aye Dil-e-Nadaan – Razia Sultan (1983) Khayyam

Tumhare Bulane Ko Ji Chahata hai – Ladli 1949 – Anil Biswas

Unko Ye Shikayat Hai Ke Hum Koochh nahin Kahate – Adalat 1958 Madan Mohan

Man Mohana Bade Joothe – Seema (1955) Shanker Jaikishan

• And a few Non-Lata Mangeshkar gems-

Meri Veena Ro Rahi Hai – Juthika Roy – Kamal Dasgupta

Man Mor Hua Matwala,- Afsar(1950) – Suraiya – S D Burman

• Kaun Bujaye Tapat More Man Ki – First version – Padma Devi, second version K L Saigal Amar Saigal

Old Hindi Songs Collection – from 50’s to 90’s era. On a blog dedicated to golden age of hindi music industry.

Shrikant Talageri has painstakingly collected Songs not included in the film Pakeezah, or perhaps intended for a sequel? These songs seem to be in a different style from the official Pakeezah songs.

Our friend Bhagwan Thavrani writes in to send the video clip – Tum Meri Jindagi Mein Kuchh [Unreleased Version] | Bombay To Goa – this tune was originally recorded in Hement Kumar-Geeta Dutt voice for GURU DUTT’s unreleased film RAAZ, later used by RDBurman in BOMBAY TO GOA, again not included in the film. See the similarity with KUCHH NA KAHO, KUCHH BHI NA KAHO (by Kumar Sanu) of ” 1942 – A Love Story. The song has a twin too, sung by Lata Mangeshakar.

And now over to exclusive articles on Mohammad Rafi…

Mohammed Rafi and Super Star Rajesh Khanna has critically laid up the songs under all the music directors and does make a very fascinating study by Moahammed Rafi fans.

In the telephonic interview, referred to in the article Royalty was the not main cause of Rafi-Lata Dispute: Usha Timothy, the readers share the fond experiences of singing with the top singers of India like Mohd. Rafi, Mukesh, Mahendra Kapoor (Dhol Baja Dhol Jania Film Vishwas), Kishore Kumar (Rafta Rafta Dekho Aankh Meri Larri Hai’ Film Kismat), , Shamshad Begum, Asha Bhonsle, Suman Kalyanpur, Hemlata, Krishna Kalle in a very short duration.  But Ms. Usha Timothy tells proudly that she always tried to copy like Mohd. Rafi sahib, not like Lata ji or Asha ji. Among many songs listed therein, we would take note of Usha Timothy’s maiden song (of course with Mohammaed Rafi) – Tu Raat Kharhi Thi Chhat Pe… Himalay Ki God Mein (1965) – Kalyanji Anandji.

We wish that New Year  2015 yield all the fruits of joy, happiness, usher in best of health and wealth and make happen the most memorable moments… to You and Your Family….

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – December 2014

Leave a comment

Welcome to December 2014 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We are presently exploring Continual Improvement. October 2014 edition delved into basics of Continual Improvement, and November 2014 had had a look at Continual Improvement vs. Continuous Improvement.

For the present edition, we have randomly picked up a few articles to get a flair of the concept in actual practice:

  • Continuous Improvement at Two Companies (PDF, 362 KB) Todd Schneider shares lessons learned from helping to integrate continuous improvement into the operations of two companies. Examples of improvement projects at his current employer, Serigraph, show how teams used Six Sigma to improve yield by more than 20 percent, saving $40,000 in 10 months, and improve vendor material management, saving $192,000 per year. June 2011
  • Electric Utility Deploys Powerful Approach for Continuous Improvement (PDF, 313 KB) The Information Technology and Business Integration (IT&BI) Business Unit at Southern California Edison launched a three-year plan to increase visibility, awareness, and focus on continuous improvement efforts to better meet client needs. August 2010.
  • The Challenge of Overcoming Success (PDF, 428 KB) A combination of theory of constraints, Six Sigma, and lean helped a DNA testing laboratory take a holistic approach to process improvement. Redesigning the workflow and laboratory layout and introducing new operating rules increased capacity without increasing costs. March 2010
  • Can a Fishbone Diagram Stop a Bully? (PDF, 373 KB) In Community Consolidated School District 15, elementary students use quality tools to set goals, track academic progress, and even address behavioral issues such as playground bullying. September 2009.
  • PDSA: A Road Map to Improved Writing Skills (PDF, 340 KB) Using the plan, do, study, act cycle, Winston Campus Elementary in Palatine, Illinois, boosted sixth grade student writing test scores by 36 percent. September 2009.
  • Former Baldrige Recipient Rekindles Its Quality Fire (PDF, 256 KB) Since Community Consolidated School District 15 in suburban Chicago received the Baldrige award in 2003, front-line staff members have continued the improvement effort by relying on quality tools such as the plan, do, study, act model. August 2009.
  • Quality Club Teaches Today’s Learners to Become Tomorrow’s Leaders (PDF, 186 KB) Students who participate in a quality club at Hunting Ridge School in Palatine, Illinois, learn continuous improvement methods and then conduct training sessions for their peers. August 2009.
  • Quality Engrained in Culture at Iowa Hospital (PDF, 250 KB) The plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycle, data-based decision making, and lean methodologies are part of the quality culture at Guttenberg Municipal Hospital. In 2008, the hospital received a Silver Award in the Iowa Recognition for Performance Excellence program. June 2009.
  • Rural Hospital Thrives With Continuous Improvement and Innovation (PDF, 210 KB) High patient satisfaction resulted from a culture change at Wright Medical Center. They shifted to a more open communication model and a pillar system that focuses on six areas of performance improvement. The hospital is now a destination of choice for healthcare in north central Iowa, with some of the highest patient satisfaction scores in the nation. April 2009.
  • Medical Device Manufacturer’s Continuous Improvement Approach Reduces Errors in Records (PDF, 236 KB) Using a three-tiered approach that included technology-, process-, and people-related solutions, MEDRAD reduced errors in product history records by 26 percent. February 2009.
  • Match the Change Vehicle and Method To the Job (PDF, 260 KB) Process improvement teams must understand the definitions of the methodology, tools and change vehicles available to them, because mismatches can be fatal to a quality improvement program.
  • From Continuous Improvement to Continuous Innovation (PDF, 95 KB) A close-up look at the concepts of continuous improvement, continuous innovation, discontinuous innovation, incrementalism, exploitation and exploration.
  • Continuous Improvement: Methods and Madness (PDF, 28 KB) Employee involvement, daily and evolutionary improvement, and focusing on product features are all characteristics of continuous improvement.

We turn to our regular sections now:

Bill Troy, ASQ CEO had opened up a very timely debate on ‘Is Every Quality Professional a Leader?’ that can well shape the future of the profession. “Some have made the case recently that quality professionals lack the business skills needed to connect with the C-suite. Others note that quality professionals sometimes lack the “soft skills” needed to make the case for quality outside the quality department. Leadership encompasses all of the above. Business savvy, people skills, and decisive action all are required to get results in the world.”

Julia McIntosh, ASQ communications , in her ‘November Roundup: What Does Leadership Mean to Quality?. ASQ bloggers had interestingly diverse opinions on this topic. Some called for more quality training. Others said that being leader isn’t everyone.

And then move over to ASQ TV Episodes:

Quality Goes to School. In this episode we take a look at the role of quality in the classroom, see how origami can be used to teach “lean,” and learn about the brainstorming tool, the lotus flower diagram.

Improving Healthcare With Quality : Learn about the challenges of incorporating quality tools into healthcare, look at how one hospital implemented Six Sigma to improve patient discharge times, and explore design of experiments, a quality… tool that helped the hospital with its task. Read the full case study

Our ASQ’s Influential Voice for the month is – Rajan Thiyagarajan

clip_image002Based in Chennai, India, Rajan Thiyagarajan is delivery head at Tata Consultancy Services and a senior member of ASQ. He blogs @ Quality Matters, where he shares his own thoughts and opinions, on topics focused by ASQ. For example, an article last year – Remembering the Great Leaders of Quality – as a brief snapshot, presents key contributions of 10 greatest leaders of quality.

We do not have a fresh insight this month in so far as Curious Cat Management Improvement Carnival category is concerned.

However, in such an event, we do pick up an interesting article posted recently. We take a deeper view and look at India tab to select Frugal Innovation this month. The article takes a concise look at First break all the rules. The article goes on to talk about several methods for how to profit from reducing costs which seem misguided. Frugal innovation is about thinking about meeting the needs of huge numbers of customers that can’t afford conventional solutions.

There is a great quote from Jeff Bezos that captures one reason why organizations so often fail to address frugal innovation: “There are two kinds of companies, those that work to try to charge more and those that work to charge less.”

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey to Continual Improvement in the New Year…………….with very Best Wishes

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – November 2014

Leave a comment

Welcome to November, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We begin our journey with anniversary tributes.

Manna Dey – First Death Anniversary

The post lists Manna Dey’s five most iconic songs:

§ Dil Ka Haal Sune Dilwala - Shree 420 (1955) | Shanker Jaikishan

§ Tu Pyar Ka Saagar Hai – Seema (1955) | Shanker Jaikishan

§ Kaun Aaya Mere Man Ke Dwaare – Delkh Kabira Roya (1957) | Madan Mohan

§ Ae Meri Zohara Zabeen – Waqt (1965) | Ravi

§ Zindagi Kaisi Hai Paheli Haae – Anand (1970) | Salil Chaudhary

Also lists author’s choices 10 Manna Dey songs.

Mandatory Sahir Post of the week! – on his 34th death anniversary on 25th October

We select two songs form the post here;

  • Laage Tose Nain (Chandi Ki Deewar, 1964, N.Dutta) – Talat Mahmood , Asha Bhosle

Sahir Ludhyanwi also has a range of devotional songs to his credit – Allah Tero Naam (Hum Dono), and then that brilliant Asha song from Kaajal, Tora Man Darpan Kehlaye and that fervent Rafi prayer from Naya Daur, Aana Hai Toh Aah Raah Mein

A tribute to S.D. Burman – 39th Death Anniversary on 31 October

Author writes – SDB is one of favorite music directors. O.P. Nayyar is another music director I have a special fondness for.

Remembering Rehman… An extremely talented but highly underrated actor with a powerful screen presence

We pick up these songs form the post:

Remembering Sanjeev Kumar

Our pick is:

The Unforgettable Geeta Dutt .. (so) ironical that her first super hit song was to be eventually prophetic about her short, tragic life – Mera Sundar Sapna Beet Gaya, Main Prem Mein Sab Kuch Haar Gayi, Bedard Zamaana Jeet Gaya!

Our Picjk is:

Salil Chaudhary – versatile, experimenting, melodious

Happy Birthday, Sitara Devi!

..seven scenes represent a pretty nice range…Some of these are very lively and energetic dances, because she was extremely energetic (as Saadat Hasan Manto pointed out when he called her a typhoon). …also included are a couple of slower and less frenetic scenes that highlight her individual humor and unique expressions, because these have been an important aspect of her performances, too.

The Doyenne of Vintage Era: Khursheed

….. such a prominent singer of the Vintage Era.. Endowed with a full-throated, open and powerful voice… Vintage Era refers to not only a period of time, i.e. the 1930s through 40s, but also, and more importantly, a different style of singing, which became extinct with the arrival of Lata Mangeshkar….. No singer represented this contrast better than Khursheed

Anil Biswas’s songs for Bombay Saigal: Surendra

…because of contractual difficulties inherent in the Studio Era, Anil Biswas could not compose for KL Saigal, even though their careers overlapped for over a decade, half of which was in Bombay itself where Saigal shifted from Calcutta in the early 40s. But, when Saigal was becoming a national sensation with the New Theatres in Calcutta, especially after Devdas (1935), Bombay was looking for its own Saigal, and its prayers were soon answered in Surendra – a tall, handsome young man, with a melodious voice, from Lahore.

Musical Shammi Kapoor

…When you speak of Shammi Kapoor, music cannot be far behind. All his films had that in common – melodious songs that were loud and energetic, joyous and boisterous, soft and romantic… the songs chosen (here) had him playing one instrument or another, or even multiple instruments in the same song…

We now take up visits to different sites which have several articles for our view:

Scroll .in

§ Remembering the Jewish refugee who composed the All India Radio caller tune

All India Radio’s caller tune has been heard by hundreds of millions of people since it was composed in 1936. Somewhat improbably, the melody, based on raga Shivaranjini, was composed by the Czech man.. Walter Kaufmann. He was the director of music at AIR and was one of the many Jewish refugees who found a haven in India from the Nazis.

Here’s a clip of one of his tunes, titled Meditation

§ Rediscover the virtuosity of Hindustani vocalist Amir Khan … a bandish ki thumri in raag Khamaj that he sang for the Bengali film Kshudhita Pashan. The music for this film was composed by sarod maestro Ali Akbar Khan.

§ ‘Sun Mere Bandhu Re': The double notes of S.D. Burman’s life – The thing about great stories is that there are a million way to say them and this is what makes reading Sathya Saran’s Sun Mere Bandhu Re ‒The Musical World of S. D. Burman a pleasure unlike any recent biography.

§ Before movie trailers, Indian producers used song booklets to publicise films – Ever since the release of India’s first talkie, Alam Ara, in 1931, songs have had the power of making or breaking a movie. Some releases scored big at the box-office only because of their repeat-value soundtracks. For music fans, the song booklet outlived the movie and became a record of who wrote the lyrics and who appeared in the production.

§ What’s Lata doing in a Britney Spears song? Western tunes with unlikely Bollywood samples – It’s not only Indian artists who get inspired by music from elsewhere. American music producers, with their penchant for overproduction and constant search for new, exotic sounds, have been sampling Bollywood music for years now. And it’s turned up in the most unlikely of places.

Songs, Stories, Books and More…

Before we switch over to our customary Mohammad Rafi ending of the carnival, we have a few more posts to visit –

  • My Favourites: Songs of First Love – What happens when you find that special someone? When Cupid’s arrows strike your heart, when one smile, one glance is enough to make your heart beat faster? How does it feel like to be in love? For that very first time?…..There is a special place in our poems and literature for pehla pyar. Perhaps it is the implication of innocence….the first realisation that someone else has become so important to your happiness….the hopes that he or she feels the same way about you….the dreams of living together forever…the expectation of happiness. … As always, Hindi films celebrate that first flush of love with songs. Seek, and ye shall find a cornucopia of songs that soak in this emotion…these songs that express many different shades of the same emotion.
  • Leke Pahela Pahela Pyar – Two other artists with Dev Anad and Shakeela were Sheela Vaz and Shyam Kappor, an assistant to Guru Dutt… the article narrates Shyam Kapoor’s fond memories of Gurudutt films, while updating on the present life of Shyam Kapoor.

Our friend Bhagwan Thavrani writes in to send the video clip – Woh dekho udhar chaand – Roop Kumari (1956) – Geeta Dutt , Manna Dey , because SN Tripathi has made exact replica later in 1961 as Nigahon mein tum ho – Jadoo Nagri. – Lata Mangeshkar

And now over to exclusive articles on Mohammad Rafi…

  • Combination of LP and Rafi in the films of Dharmendra and Jeetendra in the 1960s – By Dr. Souvik Chatterji – During 60s LP composed music for 71 films, which had pivotal songs of Mohammad Rafi.
  • HEADY WINE : Rafi-Dada Burman By K.V.Ramesh – Like many of his contemporaries SD Burman started out with his scores dominated by female voices. Shamshad Begum and Geeta Roy / Dutt were the two earlier voices usually associated with Dada Burman. The trend for male voices was seemingly straight forward – to replace Saigal Rafi sang his first song for S.D.Burman in ‘Do Bhai’(1947). Raja Mahendi Ali Khan’s ‘Duniya mein meri aaj andhera hi andhera’ is very Saigal inspired in so far as singing style goes.. In a movie dominated by two Geeta Roy killers – ‘Yaad karoge’ and ‘Mera sundar sapna beet gaya’ (both sung and emoted with exquisite pain) – it was but natural that this song probably sank without a trace and it’s not present in public consciousness.
  • Rafi’s Pancham note By Anuj Sharma – The combination of Rafi and Pancham produced around 110 songs and barring 4 – 5 songs each and every song of this combination was a gem….Even before Chhote Nawab happened in 1961, RD had already chosen Rafi for his first independent assignment under Guru Dutt Productions’ Raaz in around 1957. An eighteen year old Pancham had selected Rafi, Geeta Dutt and Hemant Kumar as his first set of singers for his first film….R.D’s third film ‘Teesra Kaun’ released in 1965 carried one solo by Rafi- ‘Meri jaan tu khafa hai to kya huwa’….. Do you hear SJ tune in the song????

——————————

P.S. – Even before the post was published, Sitara Devi put the curtain down on her LIVE performances on 25-11-2014.

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – November 2014

3 Comments

Welcome to November 2014 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

We are presently exploring Continual Improvement. October 2014 edition delved into basics of Continual Improvement.

We continue our journey of Continual Improvements and look at Continual Improvement vs. Continuous Improvement in the present edition.

Continual vs. continuous

Continual : Duration that continues over a long period of time ,but can be interrupted, chiefly restricted to what recurs regularly or frequently in a prolonged and closely spaced series Examples: Reckless driving is a continual threat to our community.

Continuous : Continuing in time or space without interruption Examples : There is a continuous humming of bees outside my window.

“Continuous” versus “continual”

In English-language linguistic prescription there is a common piece of usage advice that the word “continuous” should be used for things that are continuous in a way literally or figuratively equal to the mathematical sense of the word, whereas the word “continual” should be used for things that continue in discrete jumps (that is, quantum-wise). When this distinction is enforced, it is more accurate to speak of “continual improvement” and “continual improvement processes” than of “continuous improvement” or “continuous improvement processes”.

Meanwhile, for several decades it has been common usage in the linguistic corpus of business management to use the one set term, “continuous improvement”, to cover both graph shapes in an umbrella fashion. It is merely the way the word has been conventionally used in this context, in a common understanding that existed regardless of prescriptive preferences. However, ISO has chosen the more careful usage for its standards including ISO 9000 and ISO 14000; so it may be reasonable to expect that usage among business managers will evolve in coming decades to conform to the preferred usage (and in some cases, already has).

Continuous improvement Vs Continual improvement

There is a difference. Let us start by analyzing the semantics of these words.

Continuous indicates duration without interruption.

Continual indicates duration that continues over a long period of time, but with intervals of interruption.

Continuous improvement means that organizations are in a constant state of driving process improvements. This involves a focus on linear and incremental improvement within existing processes.

Continual improvements means that organizations go through process improvements in stages and these stages are separated by a period of time. This period of time might be necessary to understand if the improvements did actually help the bottom line! In some cases, the results might take a while to come to fruition.

Continuous Improvement vs. Continual Improvement

In practical terms you can think of an alarm clock ringing and ringing without interruption as continuously ringing. Hitting the snooze button of a ringing alarm clock only to have it start ringing again later that morning and then hitting the snooze button again, would be an example of a continually ringing alarm clock. If the alarm clock did not go off at all and we could sleep in that may be ideal, just as it may be good to take a break from kaizen on some days so that ideas and energies can be refreshed. Neither continuous improvement nor continual improvement implies that we spend every waking (no sleeping) moment doing kaizen.

The Continual Improvement vs. Continuous Improvement Dilemma…

We see a substantial difference between continual and continuous.

Please bear in mind however that in the “eyes” of ISO 9000 there is no difference between continual and continuous. The concept of “continual” improvement is the term that Deming always used in reference to the general processes of improvement.

Deming’s understanding of improvement was much broader then many people seem to understand. He included people, as well as systems in his views and philosophy. Deming’s application of SPC (Statistical Process Control) was focused primarily on continuous improvement of existing (and almost exclusively manufacturing) processes. His philosophical discussions, however, included considerations much further “upstream” as applied to other less repetitive management arenas.

The concept of “continual improvement” is understood here to be the general strategy that typically consists of both “continuous process improvements,” like SPC, and “discontinuous function or systemic improvements” like organizational “reengineering” or throwing out dysfunctional methods of management and starting over instead of trying to continually improve ineffective business strategies. Also included are Deming’s 14 Points of Management.

Continual improvement is broader in scope than continuous improvement. Continuous improvement is a subset of continual improvement. Continual improvement also includes room for *discontinuous* improvements (improvements that are not like in kind to what came before – another term for this might be innovative or radical improvements such as are sought after in most reengineering efforts, or in the lean manufacturing movement). Continuous improvements are linear, incremental improvements to an existing process (Kaizen). Continual improvement includes this, as well as discontinuous/innovative improvement. In other words, continual improvement speaks to the PROCESS of improvement (always and forever (continually) ongoing, in all of its forms and in all areas) rather than the NATURE of the improvements (continuous vs discontinuous).

Thinking of continual improvement vs. continuous improvement serves to highlight the importance of developing learning disciplines on a much deeper level than most organizations seem interested in considering. If continual improvement is to be attained, the organization will be, by definition a learning organization.

Difference Between Continuous Improvement and Continual Improvement

Continuous improvement is a technique used for improving the efficiency of the process by eliminating waste and non-value adding activities. This was practiced through various Japanese concepts like Lean, Kaizen, 5S, etc. Continuous improvement is an ongoing effort used in developing products, services or processes.

Continual improvement is about identifying and making changes that would result in better outcomes which is a central concept to quality management theories.

Innovation vs. Continuous Improvement

Continuous improvement is a linear process pointed at creating stable processes. Innovation is a nonlinear process involving non-stable processes;

An innovation is when you change the game; you bring a different twist to what is currently established, and perceived. Continuous improvement is by tweaks of things in the old fashion way to bring efficiency. But, even a very small improvement leveraging a new way of doing thing, bringing an outside method, or view, shifting the paradigm, is innovation.

Continuous improvement takes specialty; while innovation is trans-disciplinary. Continuous improvement = technical specialists making the product/service more efficient, up-to-date to the consumer needs. Innovation happens when a non-specialist questions the rules of the game, inventing knowledge transfers and goes outside the industry to invent a radical new way to respond to the ‘job to be done’.

The broader the scope, scale and impact of the change, the more one leans towards calling such change an innovation

Innovation is “a change that adds stakeholder value”. Now if your stakeholders are internal process owners and your output stakeholders are the same, the type of innovation you have is Continuous Innovation.

Continuous Improvement or Continual Improvement: The Same Thing or Different?

..continual improvement is about making changes to make things better, but not in a continuous way. Continual improvement may involve creating a new process to address a problem. Continuous improvement is a more linear thing, where the same problem would likely be addressed incrementally through improvements to existing processes.

Continual Improvement or Continuous Improvement?

Continual Improvement is more about planning and implementing strategic programmes to change the company’s products, services, people and processes for the better.  Whilst Continuous Improvement is related to the constant, daily work practices and staff activities that are relentlessly devoted to removing wasted effort and eliminating defective products, services and processes.

Continuous Improvement through intermittent interruptions for consolidations

Continuous Improvement through intermittent interruptions for consolidations

Continuous Improvement vs. stage wise Continual Improvement

Continuous Improvement vs. stage wise Continual Improvement

Continuous Improvement vs Continuous Change

Continuous Improvement vs. Contnuous Change

The subject of Continual Improvement cannot be done enough justice if we address it in only one post in our Blog Carnival. So, we will continue in next Carnival edition as well…..

We turn to our regular sections now:

Bill Troy, ASQ CEO opens up the debate on Recruiting Members and Volunteers Amid a Changing Landscape.

A quick look at some tips developed by ASQ’s Community Development team:

  • Asking people to attend an association event is an authentic, effective, and simple way to engage potential members.
  • Current association members can refer members and colleagues.
  • Encourage committed members to step up and become association leaders—such as volunteers or chapter officers– explain what’s in it for them.

Julia McIntosh, ASQ communications , in her ‘November Roundup: Engaging Members and Volunteers presents views expressed by ASQ Bloggers on the subject, in terms of – Why join, Lessons learned and Tips for associations.

And then move over to ASQ TV Episode s: Your World, Your Quality, Your Month

November is World Quality Month. In this episode, we take a look at a cost-saving success story from Genpact, a tool to help you prepare for World Quality Month, reacquaint ourselves with the quality gurus, and two contests!

clip_image002[4]Our ASQ’s Influential Voice for the month is – Scott Rutherford

Scott Rutherford works in quality assurance at a nuclear shipyard, and specializes in performance improvement. He blogs at Square Peg Musings.

We do not have a fresh insight this month in so far as Curious Cat Management Improvement Carnival category is concerned.

However , in such an event, we do pick up an interesting article posted recently. We pick up Remembering Peter Scholtes for this month. The article contains Peter Scholte’s keynote address @ 2008 annual Deming Institute fall conference in Madison, Wisconsin, two of his seminal books – The Team Handbook and The Leader’s Handbook- and six competencies for leaders.

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey to continual improvement…………….

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – October 2014

Leave a comment

Welcome to October, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

We have a discovery to report this month. It is a discovery on two counts – first one being that fact that I landed upon this blog only this month, though ought to have done so a little earlier, and the second one is because the blog itself is Back after a long hiatus!.

So, we will devote our beginning to posts on Songs, Stories, Books and More… Random Musings. However, we would pick up posts for the normal period of this edition and would find opportunities to delve into (relatively) older posts in the future editions of our carnival.

We have two posts on one subject, wherein both the posts have approached the subject from totally different angle. The subject is Lata Mangeshkar’s birthday (on 28th September). The First one is Happy Birthday, Lata ji,… despite loving Asha Bhosle to the core, there are many Lata songs that I am very fond of…The volume and quality of work she has behind her is unmatched and unparalleled. And this is an Asha fan saying this.. And the Second Post is: The Swar-Saamraagyi and the the Sangeet-Maartand: Best of Lata Mangeshkar by Anil Biswas, as can be expected on any SoY post, doing full justice the selection of the songs from 123 songs that Anil Biswas – LataMangeshkar combination has provided from 30 films.

October sets in… oh yes, Happy Birthday Asha Parekh… has chosen to present songs from Phir Wohi Dil Laya Hoon. Lakhon Hai Nigah Main, Zindagi Ki Raah Mein obviously draws a parallel with Jawaniyan Yeh Mast Mast Bin Piye  [Tumsa Nahin Dekha]. “Both songs are favourites though (I) prefer to watch the Tumsa Nahin Dekha song and listen to Lakhon Hai Nigah Mein!”

Gungunaoonga Yehi Geet Main Tere Liye – Remembering Sachin Dev Burman and Majrooh Sultanpuri is in memory of 108th and 95th birth anniversaries respectively. “Mohd Rafi .. happens to be.. favourite singer and I remember reading somewhere that Dada Burman wanted him to sing this song. He wasn’t in favour of Talat saab because of that tremble in his voice. But luckily for us, Jaidev (his assistant then) convinced Dada Burman to give Talat saab this song. Thank god for that. However much, I adore Rafi, no one could have sung this song better than Talat saab.”

We have a pair of very interesting posts on Asha Bhosle and Geeta Dutt on “Songs…and More”.

The recent one Chali Re Chali Re Main toh Des Parayee (Saranga, 1961) presents a haunting, plaintive number from film Saranga, one of the films that did make a very special space for Sardar Malik as quite an accomplished music director. The second one is w.r.t. Asha Bhosle’s birthday – Thank you for the music and memories, Asha ji! – which has picked up quite a melodious piece of Humming in Kashmir Ki Kali (1964), among other songs.

Geeta Dutt’s song Rut Phire Par Din Hamare was not there Pyasa.(1957), but has found its place here on account of “Thou shalt write a long post on at least one Sahir Ludhianvi song per week” policy. Rut Phire Par din Hamare Phire Na (Pyaasa, 1957) recollects the topic of this song in Nasreen Munni Kabir’s book (Conversations with Waheeda Rehman). According tConversations with Waheeda Rehmano Waheeda, this song had been filmed with her rowing in a boat and everyone had appreciated the picturisation. However Waheeda Rehman differed with the view and she apparently pointed out that having that song slows the pace of the story and is just boring. Guru Dutt had heard her criticism and after the first screening, had agreed with her observation (seeing people walk out for a bathroom or coffee break), had taken it off. Excerpts from this bok can be glanced at Excerpt | Conversations With Waheeda Rehman. The other one is Na Main Dhan Chahun Na Ratan Chahun (Kala Bazaar, 1960), This duet, by Geeta Dutt and Sudha Malhotra is said to have ben (actually) composed by Jaidev, the then assistant to S D Burman. This seems quite logical since “Jaidev’s bhajans from Hum Dono (1961) are remembered to the day – Allah Tero Naam, and Prabhu Tero Naam.”

Guru Dutt’s 50th death anniversary brings in San San San Woh Chali Hawa – Kaagaz Ke Phool, 1959 ‘to remember Guru Dutt not as the melancholic, unhappy genius film maker but in happier times with a happy number! He was after all only 39 when he died.’

We have several other anniversary posts in the present episode of the carnival.

Happy 88th Birthday, Madam Noor Jehan! has clips of the entire ‘90s interview on BBC plus all of Noor Jehan birthday posts going back to 2009. A veritable treasure in on Noor Jehan, in one place !

On Begum Akhtar’s birth centenary, a musical tribute at her grave…..One hundred years after she was born, Begum Akhtar is being remembered and celebrated at the place where she was laid to rest.

clip_image002How Begum Akhtar changed my life: a tribute on the singer’s 100th birth anniversaryTisha Srivastav

“Now as a woman in my 40s, having lived life a little, the Begum is back in my life, as a modern-day primer to soothe me into understanding the subtext of experiences. Of love, shocks, surprises, loneliness, romancing life itself and laughing at one’s obsessions.”

The Lonely Ghazal Queen: Begum Akhtar , a legend in her lifetime, who achieved enormous fame at a very young age, and gave joy to millions of listeners of many generations, including doyens like Mehdi Hasan, Talat Mahmood, Madan Mohan, Pt. Jasraj and Pt. Ravi Shankar, Begum Akhtar’s own life seems to be full of sorrow, pain, abusive relationships, betrayal by people she loved and a deep melancholy.

Unfathomable greatnessSaleem Kidwai

The way [Begum Akhtar] would split words or combine them into musical phrases shows how comfortable she was with Urdu’s poetic idiom. This musical comfort level with the language also marked out some of her younger contemporaries like Mehdi Hasan, Iqbal Bano and Farida Khanum, and is sadly missing from most other singers.

Kishore Kumar’s duets by SD Burman : “With 115 songs, he gave Kishore Kumar more songs than any other (male) singer. Surjit Singh’s site indicates that out of this only 53 were solos, and 51 were Male –Female duets, 8 Male duets and 3 other songs. “.. and even die-hard opinionated person like me would very happily concede that quite a few of these pre-Aradhana duets did creditable justice to S D Burman’s marked preference to Kishore Kumar.

Geet Gaya Paththaron Ne – Rajakamal Studio is very passionate retrospective of films that have created a very respectable distinctive position for V. Shantaram. The post also carries link to a song each from Rajakamal Studio’s films from Shakuntala (1943) to Pinjra (1973).

My Favourites: Songs of Yearning – This ‘someone’ is a very hazy concept. We don’t usually know who, or how or when or where we will meet this particular person; we don’t even know that we will meet that special someone. And we do, perhaps – through choice, through circumstance, through fate. Or the someone we find becomes special. But in the meanwhile, we have our own hopes, dreams and expectations of finding that glorious love

Ten of my favourite string instrument songs, where it’s not an orchestra (Ted Lyons and His Cubs, anyone? Or The Monkees?), but a hero or heroine, not a professional musician, being the one ‘playing’ an instrument?

Radio Playback India has presented Raag Hansdhwani by Hariprasad Chaurasia.. I have especial fascination for Raag Hansdhwani, primarily because of Jaa To Se Nahin Bolun Kanhaiya , A Lata Mangeshakar – Manna Dey Duet from film Parivar(1956) , and then because of this song I landed upon this very famous Taranaa by Pandit Amir Khan Saheb Incidentally one of initial blog post is a compilation [Part I, Part II and Part III] of all that I could gather at that time on internet on Hansdhwani.

In our now a regular visit to Suresh Chandvankar’s articles, we have a topical article – When Bollywood maestros collaborated to put a Gandhi prayer to melody. The film musician Vasant Desai cut a disc of Gandhiji’s poem, sung by Manna Dey and Chorus. Gandhiji is credited as the lyricist .

How a goatherd and Mozart inspired the score for Bimal Roy’s ‘Madhumati’, is an excerpt, from Bimal Roy’s Madhumati: Untold Stories from Behind the Scenes by Rinki Roy Bhattacharya published by Rupa Publications India Pvt. Ltd..

Tamilnadus’ (ex)CM J. Jayalalitha was in the news recently. But we recall hereFour dance sequences from classic Jayalalithaa movies, of which one is from Hindi film Izzat (1967) – Jaagi Badan Men Jwala, Saiyan Tune Kya Kar Dala.

MANMOHAN KRISHNA SINGS FOR OP NAYYAR is one more post where we have very unique songs. Of the two non-film songs, both penned by Saroj Mohini Nayyar, the first one is Buje Diye Hua Andhera and the second one is Diya To Jala Sab Raat Re Balam. The latter song was also recorded in film Dhake Ki Malamal by C H Atma .

We round off this carnival edition with a post from Songs..Books and More – Sabhi Kuch Lutakar (Singer – Mohd Rafi, Movie Indrani, 1958) is a “wonderful romantic Hindi number was from an old Bengali film It is picturised on an unknown face. This man (a vagabond?) is strumming a guitar and singing this song. He is watched by Kumar and Sen – a just married couple – standing outside in the veranda of their house. Interspersed with Bengali dialogues, the mood of the song is indeed very romantic.”

Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs – October 2014

Leave a comment

Welcome to October 2014 edition of Carnival of Quality Management Articles and Blogs.

Having traversed the topics of Non-Compliance and subsequent CAPA in our earlier editions, we now take a look at the next logical step in the chain – Continual Improvement.

Be it a student or a practitioner of Quality Management, the subject is certainly not new. Hence, we will endeavour to present here the articles that shed some new perspective on the subject.

What is CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT?Improvement that occurs in spurts that reoccur

CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT WITHIN THE QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS sets the tone for the subject.

Continual improvement

Continual improvement should focus on enablers such as leadership, communication, resources, organisation architecture, people and processes – in other words, everything in the organisation, in all functions at all levels… Departmental improvements may merely move the constraints or problem somewhere else in the process chain.

Improvement is not about using a set of tools and techniques. Improvement is not going through the motions of organising improvement teams and training people. Improvement is a result, so it can only be claimed after there has been a beneficial change in an organisation’s performance.

Why Continuous Improvement May Need To Be DiscontinuedRon Askenas

As innovation thinker Vijay Govindarajan says, “The more you hardwire a company on total quality management, [the more] it is going to hurt breakthrough innovation. The mindset that is needed, the capabilities that are needed, the metrics that are needed, the whole culture that is needed for discontinuous innovation, are fundamentally different.”

It’s time to nuance our approach in the following ways:

Customize how and where continuous improvement is applied. One size of continuous improvement doesn’t fit all parts of the organization.

Question whether processes should be improved, eliminated, or disrupted. Too many continuous improvement projects focus so much on gaining efficiencies that they don’t challenge the basic assumptions of what’s being done.

Assess the impact on company culture.

When Your Past Success Becomes An ObstacleKarol Kinsey Goman

One of the greatest challenges for a leader who wants his or her team to thrive in changing times is to identify those practices and attitudes that need to be eliminated in order to more quickly adopt new behaviors. Here are five key questions that you should ask your team members to consider:

1. What do we do best? (What skills, abilities, and attitudes are we most proud of?)

2. Which of these current skills, abilities, and attitudes will continue to make us successful in the future?

3. What do we need to unlearn? (Which skills are becoming obsolete? What practices — attitudes, behaviors, work routines, etc. — that worked for us in the past may be a detriment in the future?)

4. How does our competence stop us from doing things differently? (Where are the “comfort zones” we’re most reluctant to leave?)

5. What new skills do we need to learn to stay valuable to the organization?

You Are Either Getting Better Or You Are Getting Worse — Here’s How To Get Better – Paul B Brown

You have to keep getting better…Everyone acknowledges that–in theory.  In practice it tends to fall apart, ironically, when things are good…. Waiting until have to change is never good…. Far better is trying to improve slightly every single day.

The subject of Continual Improvement cannot be done enough justice if we address it in only one post in our Blog Carnival. So, we will continue in next two Carnival editions…..

We turn to our regular sections now:

Bill Troy, ASQ CEO opens up the debate on Charting A Strategy For Quality–And Beyond

“The purpose of strategy, after all, is to answer this question: How do you get from where you are to where you want to be?  What is your path?  How are you going to get there, what steps do you need to take, and in what order?

“I’d like to offer five key questions about strategy that you may find useful as you work on your own strategic planning.

  1. What are your key facts and assumptions?
  2. What is your theory of victory?
  3. Can you actually accomplish each aspect of your strategy?
  4. Is your organization doing things that sit outside your strategy?
  5. Have you left enough planning time to test your strategy?

“One caveat: Determine how much time you have to spend on strategy and act accordingly. We all must get things done, so we must not fall to “paralysis by analysis.” We can only admire the problem for so long. A good rule of thumb many of us learned in the military is the one-third, two-thirds rule”, i.e. leave two-thirds of the time to others for absorbing, implementing and improving upon the strategy.

Julia McIntosh, ASQ communications , in her ‘September Roundup: What’s the Best Approach to Strategy?’ presents views expressed by ASQ Bloggers on the subject.

And then move over to ASQ TV Episode s:

Quality Improves Government

Around the world, government agencies are using quality tools and implementing quality methods to make noticeable and sustainable improvements. This episode of ASQ TV looks at two positive stories, addressing the importance of quality in government. Manu Vora interview Milwaukee Public Health Lab

Related additional video:

               Manu Vora and V.K. Agnihotri advocate quality in government by discussing quality’s role in the government of India now and for the future.

Soft Skills-Leadership and Management

It’s one thing to know the ins and outs of your industry and profession. But you can’t be an effective leader and drive change in your field without soft skills. This episode of ASQ TV describes what soft skills are and how mastering them will help you get ahead in your day-to-day relationships and, ultimately, your career.

Rosemarie Christopher’s Career Corner columns

Related additional video:

According to author and speaker Simon T. Bailey, it’s important for leaders to also think big-picture to truly drive change. In this segment, hear how leaders should consider the story they’re telling, how they can sustain their leadership and what quality leaders can do to take initiative in their organizations. View Bailey’s 2014 World Conference on Quality and Improvement keynote speech, available on demand

To motivate employees and develop high-performing work relationships, leaders must understand that all people have certain needs that must be met in the workplace. In this segment, learn about the desires of each person to help you connect with people for meaningful work relationships and long-term productivity.

Our ASQ’s Influential Voice for the month is – John Priebe

clip_image001John Priebe is vice president of business quality for NBCUniversal and a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt with experience in process improvement, innovation, and quality control. He blogs at JohnPriebe.com with a headline tag as Innovation | Quality | Leadership.

A majority of the posts relate to discussions on the topics at ASQ Influential Voices, with quite few of the topics interspersed I between. Here is one such post: The Emergent Culture: Be the Change You Wish to See.. The article draws up a parallel with a natural biological phenomenon known as ‘emergent behaviour, in a flock of birds. Of course, in case of human beings, it is a long road, but the journey can well be begun by “be the change you wish to see in the world”.

We do not have a fresh insight this month in so far as Curious Cat Management Improvement Carnival category is concerned.

However , in such an event, we do pick up an interesting article posted recently. We pick up Take Advantage of the Strengths Each Person Brings to Work for our present edition.

clip_image002Managers should be setting up the organization to take maximum advantage of the strengths of the people in the organization while minimizing the impact of weaknesses.

This needs a ‘refusing to fail’ attitude so as to ‘create a system that works and builds on the skills, ability and desire to do great work that your employees bring to work.’

W. Edwards Deming: “the aim of leadership is not merely to find and record failures of men, but to remove the causes of failure: to help people to do a better job with less effort.”

I look forward to your active participation in enriching the blog carnival as we pursue our journey to continual improvement…………….

Wishing Very Happy Diwali festivities to all………

Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music–September 2014

2 Comments

Welcome to September, 2014 edition of Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music.

The entire August 2014 edition of our blog carnival was dedicated to the memories of Mohammad Rafi. As result, we had not been able to visit any of the other published post in that episode. We will make good those inadvertent omissions in the present episode.

We begin out tour of our regular blogs:

Hemant Kumar’s songs by SD Burman

Besides his own compositions, Hemant Kumar freely sang under other composers. SD Burman was one of the most important for him, making him the voice of Dev Anand – one of the big three – in many films. Continuing the series on SD Burman for various singers, SoY presents songs for Hemant Kumar as a tribute to the latter on his 25th death anniversary.(b. 16 June 1920; d. 26 September 1989).

Best Songs of 1951: Wrap Up 2

This is the part Two of the Wrap Up round on Best songs of 1951: And the winners are? . Part 1 has addressed wide ranging discussions on Male Playback Singers for the Year 1951. The ‘other’ female playback singers bring immense variety and several of them had their landmark songs in the year. As a result, this year SoY has taken up a separate post for ‘other’ (than Lata Mangeshakar) Female Playback Singers. .

Aao bachcho tumhein dikhayen jhanki….ki

Jagriti (1954), has a more or less mirror image on the other side as Bedari. Actor Ratan Kumar (Nazir Rizvi) was the common link, where he played the same role of a differently-abled nice boy, who reforms the wayward boy

Multiple Version Songs (18): Hindi-Telugu exchange [Guest article by Arunkumar Deshmukh]

His first guest article in the series on Multiple Version Songs was on Hindi-Marathi, naturally.  Arunji surprised everyone by an equally erudite article on Hindi – Kannada versions. The Hindi- Telugu exchange is equally rich and interesting.

Ten of my favourite ‘male pianist’ songs’ is a veritable collection of songs picturised on men sitting at pianos, a worthy sequel to women pianists .

That also gives us cause to recall an archived article – My favorite piano-songs, from the 50s and 60s that have at least one character “playing” the piano throughout the song. Even as some songs would get repeated in these three articles, the presentations offer a varied fare that whets our appetite of different perspectives.

August being the month of festivals, it was high time a post on Festival Songs that would collate songs relating to various festivals was eagerly awaited.

My Favourites: Letters in Verse resurrects the now forgotten art and passion of writing letters.

August 27 is the death anniversary of Mukesh. ‘Made for each other: Mukesh and Kalyanji-Anandji’ pays tribute to Mukesh, by exploring one of the very special associations he had had with some of the leading music directors of his era.

Coincidentally we also have an exclusive post – Kalyanji-Anandji, the immortal duo detailing their notable films, songs, achievements and key recognitions that highlight their versatile talent. The post also discusses their distinctive composing style and more importantly, highlight their personal nature and why they are immortal.

We now stray beyond our oft-tracked path and take a look at occasional marvels that one lands up in such journeys:

First Ghalib ghazal to be used in a film was ‘Aah ko chahiye ek umr asar hone tak’ was the first Mirza Ghalib ghazal to be used in a movie (Masoom – 1941).

Whilst on Cutting The Chai, we also join the (still continuing) celebration of 100 years of Indian Cinema @ 100 Years of Indian Cinema: India Post’s 50 commemorative stamps.

This is also a diamond jubilee year of 1964 film Dosti, which is rightly commemorated @ Dukh To Apana Saathi Hai – Sushil Kumar.

And as coincidences would have, we landed upon The spirituality in Hindi Film songs, which also talks about immortal songs, of this 1964 movie, Dosti’, penned by inimitable Majrooh Sultanpuri and sung in the angelic voice of Mohammed Rafi”.

We have been a given an excellent lead for very unusual wealth of information in terms of several articles @ Scroll.in . Here is one example - A reminder for the Scots: India has a thriving bagpipe tradition too – Folk troupes in the country’s Garhwal region, especially those that play for weddings, often include a bagpiper. – by Mridula Chari.

Similarly Suresh Chandvankar, the Honorary Secretary of Society of Indian Record Collectors and the Editor of The Record News, the annual journal of the Society has contributed Marathi and English articles on the 78 rpm era to various periodicals, newspapers and websites. We take up one of the several articles for this edition, and will take up at least one article in each our subsequent editions.

Mimicry and comic songs from the dawn of the recording era in India – European recording companies scoured India looking for interesting sounds and songs, between 1902 to 1908.

We have a very interesting fare from our friend Bhagwan Thavrani :

In our regular ending of the carnival, we have “3-G: Great Lyrics, Grand Music and Golden Voice in Indian Cinema by Sri Biman Baruah , information shared by Sri Binu Nair, Founder, Rafi Foundation, Mumbai listing Mohammed Rafi solos written by Hasrat Jaipuri and filmed on different Actors:

Year Film Song Music Actor
1961 Jab Pyar Kisi Se Hota Hai Teri Zulfon Se Judaee Tu Nahin Mangi Thi Shankar Jaikishan Dev Anand
1962 Asli Naqli Chheda Mera Dil Ne Tarana Tere Pyar Ka Shankar Jaikishan Dev Anand
1963 Tere Ghar Ke Samne Dil Ka Bhanwar Kare Pukar, Pyar Ke Raag Suno Re S.D. Burman Dev Anand
1968 Duniya Falsafa Pyar Ka Tum Kya Jano, Tumne Kabhi Pyar Na Kiya Shankar Jaikishan Dev Anand
1964 Aayee Milan Ki Bela Tum Kamsin Ho, Nadaan Ho Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1965 Arzoo Aye Phoolon Ki Raani Baharoon Ki Malka Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1966 Suraj Chehere Pe Giri Zulfen Kehdo Tu Utha Do Main Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1968 Jhuk Gaya Aasman Kaun Hai Jo Sapnon Mein Aaya Shankar Jaikishan Rajendra Kumar
1961 Junglee Ehsaan Tera Hoga Mujh Par Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1962 Professor Aye Gul Badan Aye Gulbadan Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1964 Rajkumar Is Rang Badalti Duniya Mein Insaan Ki Niyaat Thik Nahin Hai Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1969 Tumse Accha Kaun Hai Janam Janam Ke Saath Nibhane Ko Shankar Jaikishan Shammi Kapoor
1966 Gaban Ehshan Mere Dil Pe Tuhmare Hain Dostoon, Yeh Dil Tuhmare Pyar Ka Shankar Jaikishan Sunil Dutt
1970 Bhai-Bhai Mere Mehbbob Tere Dam Se Bahar Aaye Shankar Jaikishan Sunil Dutt
1965 Gumnaam Ek Ladki Hai Jisne Jina Muskil Kar Diya Shankar Jaikishan Manoj Kumar
1964 Ziddi Teri Surat Se Nahin Milti Kisi Ki Surat S. D. Burman Joy Mukherjee
1966 Love In Tokyo Aaja Re Aa Jara Lehrake Aa Jara Shankar Jaikishan Joy Mukherjee
1964 April Fool Meri Mohabbat Paak Mohabbat Aur Jahan Ki Shankar Jaikishan Biswajeet
1972 Shararat Dil Ne Pyar Kiya Hai Ek Bewafa Se Ganesh Biswajeet
1968 Mere Huzoor Rukh Se Zara Naqab Utha Do Mere Huzoor Shankar Jaikishan Jeetendra
1969 Pyar Hi Pyar Main Kahin Kavi Na Ban Jaoon Shankar Jaikishan Dharmendra
1973 Naina Hum Ko Tu Jaan Se Pyaari Shankar Jaikishan Shashi  Kapoor

This is certainly not an exhaustive list. We will try to make good the misses in due course of time.

Older Entries Newer Entries